MSU STRATEGIC INVESTMENT PROPOSAL FOR INSTITUTIONAL PRIORITIES
PROPOSAL OVERVIEW
TitleEnhanced Career Advising Program Request Date2012-12-01
DepartmentCareer Internship & Student Employment Services Emailcbeck@montana.edu
RequestorCarina Beck Phone406-994-4353
INSTITUTIONAL BENEFIT
Campuses Bozeman Billings Havre Great Falls FSTS Extension MAES
Cross Depts All Colleges, University Studies, Native American Student Center, Office of Student Success, Office of Financial Education,
TIMEFRAME
Proposed Dates Start: July 1 2013 End: June 30 2016
PROPOSAL SUMMARY
The goal of this proposal is to embed career advising within colleges and key departments to better connect students to internship and job possibilities improving MSU’s internship and job placement rates. A second outcome of the proposal is to provide significantly more opportunities for career advising to ensure clear career direction . Clear career direction is an important component of improving student retention (ultimately leading to improved graduation rates), since students who have “purpose” tend to be retained at much higher levels than those who do not (MSU Persister & Withdrawer Survey 2008 and 2010).
STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT
The contents of this proposal specifically addresses Objective L.3 Increase Job Placement and Further Education Rates by providing students with personalized information and support relative to career development, internship and job placement opportunities. By embedding a Career Coach within a College/Program, the coach will be able to establish relationships with faculty and staff, be a referral source for an academic advisor for career planning and develop efficiencies who know “where jobs and internships are” with employers. Further, the Career Coach will also be “attached” to the Career & Internship Services Office providing professional career counseling support, employer contacts, internship and job prospects, and oversight on efficacy in position.

This proposal also addresses Objective L.2 Increase graduation rates at MSU. We know a major determinant in student departure is not having “clear career direction.” To this end, the Career Coach will be charged with working with the Office of Student Success for their specific college, to interact with Freshmen and Sophomore students who have been identified as “at-risk” (either through predictive modeling, faculty early alerts, lack of ChampChange engagement, or BCSSE “flags”) and develop a “career map” based upon their academic plan.
COST AND REQUIREMENTS
Funding Type: One-Time Only Funding Base (3-yr Recurring) Funding
  FY13 FY14 FY15 Base ($) OTO Startup ($)   FTE;
Salaries 84608  87146  89760         
Benefits 2560  2560  2560         
Materials & Supplies 13167  1502  1577         
Travel              
Contracted Services              
Capital              
Other Operations 4500  4500  4500         
TOTAL 104835  95708  98397     
Please comment, if necessary, regarding cost and requirements.

Career Coaching Salaries

  • Salary: $14/hr x 19 hrs/wk x 9 staff x 32 weeks: $76,608
  • Salaries were increased by 3% for FY 14 and FY 15

Share of Web Developer/Programmer

  • Salary:  .2 FTE  X $40,000 = $8,000
  • Share of benefits $2,560
  • Salary was increased by 3% for FY 14 and FY 15

Technology (Laptops, IP Addresses, Email, Phone/Voicemail, etc.): $13,167

  • Laptop: $1199 x 9 staff = $10,791
  • Telephone/Voicemail: $13.25 x 9 staff X 12 months = $1431
  • IP Address & Email: $105 x 9 staff = $945
  • Note computers and IP & email costs are only applicable for FY 13d

Operations:

  • Incentives for workshop attendance, etc.: $250 x 9 staff = $2250
  • Other Operations $2250 (training, subscriptions, association fees, etc.).
  • Career Services will absorb the cost for printing, appointment scheduling, Administrative Staff, Employer Development, Networking and Workshop events.
  • Desks and additional furniture will be secured as needed from MSU Property Supply.

 

PROPOSAL SCOPE
Describe the Proposal

One major facet of the MSU strategic plan is to improve MSU job placement and further education rates (Objective L.3).   This proposal is submitted to bolster the goal by embedding 9 part-time Career Coaches within each academic college (and other departments key in the strategic plan).  The coaches would each work 19 hours per week providing an additional 3240 career-advising sessions per year.  The coaches would work closely with students and faculty to provide:

  • Career advising/coaching for:
    • Students uncertain of the benefits of a major/university degree (high risk for departure).
    • Students uncertain of career possibilities in their major.
    • Students uncertain of their major (high risk for departure).
    • The importance of participating in an internship to bolster student learning outcomes and employment prospects after graduation.
    • Sharing work/industry information/statistics about labor markets within specific industries, geography, emerging employment markets, employers with a growth trajectory, etc.
  • Coaching/information on how to apply for and use MyCatCareers.com (a database with over 3500 employer contacts and typically over 400 job/internships opportunities updated daily).
  • Information on Career Fairs, networking events and other events in support of improving job and internship placement rates.
  • Present GRE, GMAT and other graduate admissions tests preparation workshops.
  • Conduct resume critiques, mock interviews, and workshops on conducting an effective internship/job search.
  • Provide current internship and full-time salary information and assist with salary/benefits negotiation.
  • Information on debt-to-potential income ratios to ensure students are not burdened by loans difficult to repay upon graduation.
  • Coordinate employer information sessions (working with Career & Internship Services full-time staff).
  • Coordinate employer development meetings (working with Career & Internship Services full-time staff).
  • Coordinate the MSU Alumni Mentoring program (working with Career & Internship Services full-time staff).

 

In addition to supporting the goals of the strategic plan, the need for this program is evidenced by results generated from both the 2010 and 2008 “MSU Persister and Withdrawer” Survey.  Findings from these studies indicate students who have “clear career direction” are significantly more likely to persist (be retained beyond their first year of university) than those who do not.   We also know, from the 2010 MSU Career Destinations Survey, that while many of our graduates indicate they participated in an internship experience (56%) only 23% credited that internship experience as being relevant/helpful for finding full-time employment.  

 

Clearly it is important to increase the number of students participating in “valuable” internships leading to full-time positions after college.  The irony is there are a significant number of job and internship opportunities unfilled either because students don’t apply (lack of awareness) or are not “professionally competitive” compared to their peers at other institutions.  We can remedy this by embedding professionals within the colleges and key departments to improve student outcomes.

 

Using the results from the MSU Persister and Withdrawer Survey (2010 and 2008) and other “career counseling best practices” a holistic Career Literacy Program has been established and is centered on students developing competencies in several aspects of career fluency including but not limited to:

 

  • An understanding of self
    • Interests, values, abilities, skills, dreams and lifestyle goals.
    • Administration and interpretation of the Strong Interest Inventory (career development tool, to better understand one’s self and possible occupations).
    • This is the most important phase to developing the potential for identifying and working in a satisfying career (leading to higher internship and job-placement rates).
    • An understanding of the world of work
      • Occupation information, labor market statistics/demands, the interplay of geography and career, average salary by occupation, potential career paths, etc. (primarily from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Beige Book, NACE, and other credible sources).
      • An understanding of the ways of work
        • Participate in internships/externships.
        • Learn from trained Alumni Mentors on the realities of work place hiring practices, projects and politics; network development; and other intern/new graduate “on-boarding” issues.
        • Cultivate professional skills and apply course-work in a pragmatic setting through internship programs.
        • An understanding of the application, hiring, and on-boarding process
          • Learn important tactics for properly researching organization needs and goals and tie application materials to research efforts.
          • Employ appropriate “soft skills” including communication techniques, appropriate dress, and interview/dining etiquette.
          • Understand role of a new employee while developing mechanisms to “learn the ropes” of an organization and related culture.
          • An understanding of financial literacy
            • Student loan management, budgeting, scholarships, loan forgiveness programs, future potential career earnings, salary negotiation, etc.
            • All Career Coaches will be required to include financial literacy into their appointments/presentations to students.

 

The coaches would be required to develop expertise in the Career Literacy model along with career opportunities of specific majors for each college.  Further, they will be charged working collaboratively with deans/faculty/advisors and staff from each department/college.  The proposed coaching slate includes:

 

  1. College of Ag                                                                       1 coach
  2. College of Business                                                              1 coach
  3. College of Engineering                                                          1 coach
  4. College of Letters & Science                                                  2 coaches
  5. University College/Native American Student Center                 1 coach
  6. Education, Health & Human Development                               1 coach
  7. Arts & Architecture                                                               1 coach
  8. Nursing/Gallatin College                                                        1 coach          

            Total Part-Time Staff (less than 20 hours per week)               9 coaches                  

 
Describe the broader impacts and benefits of this proposal

The outcome of this proposal impacts numerous constituents for a variety of reasons:

  • Creates efficiencies in the centralized model of student career development and the career literacy model.
  • Better connects students to existing resources with a consistent and familiar face within the college.
  • Allows the university to provide a more robust career development experience for students consistent with competitor institutions (see table below).
  • Career literacy becomes more ingrained into the campus culture without requiring “extra” work for departments and colleges.
  • Students will have a Career Coach well versed in career opportunities and internship and job prospects relative to their academic major.
  • Employers in Montana and beyond will have a better informed and more competitive applicant pool (our students should be better “groomed” to apply and interview for positions).
  • Employers will have improved student interest in internships, jobs, on-campus interviews, info-sessions, career fairs, etc.
  • Colleges will not have to “reinvent the wheel” when developing career programs and can work within a centralized, but flexible system.
  • Improved career outcomes provide better university outcomes for accreditation, student recruitment, and employer and alumni development.
  • Will improve internship and job placement rates in field of study.
  • Will improve overall graduation rates.

 

When compared to peer and aspiration institutions Career & Internship Services at MSU has significantly fewer staff.  There is great potential to improve Career Literacy for MSU students by investing in part-time Career Coaches.

 

 

FT Staff

PT

Staff

Interns/

GA’s

 

Centralized

Services?

 

Specialized Advisors by College?

Montana State*

4

6

0

Yes

No

U of Montana

11

0

0

Business; Law

No

U of Utah*

17

8

1

Yes

Yes

Utah State

14

0

3

Yes

Yes

U of Wyoming

8

2

3

Business

Yes

U of Idaho

7

4

3

Law

No

Idaho State

6

1

2

Yes

No

U of Colorado – Boulder*

25

1

4

Law; Business; Journalism

No

Colorado State*

19

0

7

Business

Yes

North Dakota State*

9

1

1

Yes

Yes

New Mexico State

10

0

1

Yes

No

University of California – Riverside*

16

0

4

Accounting

No

* Indicates Research Universities with Very High Research Activity Carnegie Classification

 

 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Implementation Plan

Last year the Career, Internship & Student Employment Office with three part-time coaches conducted 996 Career Coaching Appointments (YTD 536 – as of November 25).  Clearly we can do better.  By “embedding Career Coaching” into academic colleges and departments, the number of Career Coaching appointments should increase an additional 3,240 (9 coaches, 12 hours of coaching appointments X 30 weeks).  The additional 7 hours per week will be spent hosting workshops, teaching classes as a guest instructor, meeting with faculty and advisors, working with employers, participating in training and working with the full-time Career, Internship & Student Employment Staff.  

Implementation Schedule:

  • July 1 - 30                  Career Coach position advertised
  • August 1                     Interviews complete and offers extended
  • August 26 - 30          Career Coach Training by Career & Internship Services
  • September 2 - 6        Meet with each Academic Dean & College Department Head, developing a relationship, discussing and establishing expectations
  • September 3              Development of student satisfaction survey complete
  • September 5              Begin “Communication Plan” focusing on
    • Targeted-At-Risk Students (from data-mining project with the Office of Student Success):
      • First Generation Freshmen
      • Veteran Students
      • Students enrolled in Majors with Lower Starting Salaries and High Debt
      • September 9              Coaching Meetings commence with student clients
      • September 16            Network with faculty to begin classroom presentations regarding Fall Career Fair preparation
        • September 18            Mentee program applications due (for Alumni Mentoring Program)
        • September 25            Host Career Week workshops and other events in individual academic colleges (in addition to traditional Career Week events)
        • October 10                 Fall Career Fair
        • October 25                 Begin to collaborate with Faculty for Spring classroom visits
        • November 1               Begin January MCAT Test Preparation Workshop Series in conjunction with Pre-Health Advising Office
        • November 18             Meet with Deans & Department Heads for end of Semester Review
        • November 27             Final Coaching Appointment for Semester occurs
        • November 29             Present “Wrap-up” Report for Fall Semester to Deans/Department Heads/Director

                       

  • January 2 - 3             Spring Career Coach Training by Career & Internship Services
  • January 5                   Begin Preparing Students for Spring Break Externship Searches and Expectations
  • February 3                 Begin classroom presentations regarding Fall Career Fair preparation
  • February 10              Host Career Week workshops and other events in individual academic colleges
  • February 20              “Almost Spring” Job & Internship Fair
  • March 1                      GRE Test Preparation Workshops Begin
  • March 10 - 15           Coaching Offices Closed (due to budget constraints)
  • March 24                   Revise and prepare materials for Summer Orientation and fall semester outreach
  • April 14                      Begin Meetings with Deans & Department Heads for end of Semester and Academic Year Review
  • April 16                      Attend Graduation Fair
    • Collect “HIRED” Survey Data
    • Promote MyCatCareers.com services for Alumni 
    • April 21                      Host Student Employment Coordinator Virtual Summer Job Fair on MyCatCareers.com
    • April 23                      Conduct Final Coaching Appointment of Semester
    • April 24-25                Assessment of predictive and descriptive statistics for 5 major objectives of the program (including overview of additional Strategic Plan Objectives)
    • April 25                      Final Assessment report presented to Director    

 

 

  • Similar calendar will occur within year II and III
 
Assessment Plan

Assessment will be conducted with at least five methods:

  1. An assessment of the number of:
    1. Student advising appointments
    2. Workshops
    3. Employer networking events (info-sessions, lunches, etc.)
    4. Number of “guest lectures” in classes
  2. Students will be randomly selected and asked to complete a survey on their satisfaction with the experience.
  3. Deans/Department Heads/Faculty and Staff from each department/college will be asked to complete a survey to measure their satisfaction and suggested areas for improvement.
  4. An analysis will be conducted to measure the number of internships (for credit and not-for credit) completed by students in each major.  Information will be benchmarked for AY comparisons.
  5. Employers will be surveyed requesting their feedback on student and graduate efficacy within their organizations.

In addition to the assessment plan above, the following metrics will be improved by the outcomes of this proposal.  As such, these metrics will be utilized as benchmarks of success:

  1. Metric L.2.1: By 2019, the bachelor’s graduation rate will increase from 51 percent to 65 percent as measured by the six-year graduation rate.
  2. Metric L.2.2: By 2019, the number of graduate degrees awarded will increase from 548 to 625 per year.  The number of doctoral degrees awarded will increase from 56 to 80 per year.
  3. Metric L.2.3: By 2019, the number of associate degrees conferred will increase from 38 to 70 per year.  Workforce certificates conferred will increase from 35 to 65 per year.
  4. Metric L.2.4: By 2019, the full-time, first-time freshmen fall-to-fall retention rate will increase from 74 percent to 82 percent.
  5. Metric L.3.1: By 2019, the percent of graduates employed full-time in their field or in positions of their choosing will increase from an average of 62 percent to 70 percent.
  6. Metric L.3.2: By 2019, the percent of graduates pursuing an advanced degree will increase from an average of 21 percent to 25 percent.
  7. Metric E.1.1: By 2013, MSU will have a campus-wide coordinating infrastructure to support and advance engagement, outreach and service.
  8. Metric E.1.2: By 2019, the number of students, faculty and staff involved in outreach activities will increase, with particular attention to underserved areas and minority populations.
  9. Metric E.3.1: By 2019, the number of opportunities for leadership development and practice will have increased.  Awareness of the opportunities will also have increased.

10. Metric E.3.2: By 2019, the percentage of MSU students, faculty and staff participating in leadership development activities will increase.

 
If assessed objectives are not met in the timeframe outlined what is the plan to sunset this proposal?

If results from above are not satisfactory the program should either be drastically redesigned or eliminated.

 
SIGNATURES
Dean/Director: Carina Beck (cbeck@montana.edu)
Executive/VP: James Rimpau (rimpau@montana.edu)