Policies and Procedures Manual

Policy: MSU JJCBE Policies and Procedures

Effective Date: Fall 2014


Table of Contents

 

MISSION

The Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship (JJCBE) at Montana State University is a vibrant and exciting place where the academic and professional success of students comes first. An extraordinary faculty offers both an innovative, nationally recognized curriculum and a unique learning environment for undergraduate students. Distinguishing features of the program include small classes, exceptional faculty members in every classroom (no graduate student instructors), rigorous course work, an interactive, personalized learning environment, and high-performing students. Each student has a faculty advisor who is available to mentor the student on both academic and career choices.

The College has been fully accredited by AACSB International—the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the premium accrediting association for business programs—since 1981. AACSB has awarded its mark of distinction to only five percent of all business programs worldwide. Not only does this accreditation certify that the College meets AACSB’s rigorous standards for business education, but it also signals to local, regional, and national employers that the College’s graduates are well-prepared for careers in business. The College’s accreditation was reaffirmed in 2013.

The faculty adopted the following mission statement in February 2014.  A strategic plan to carry out this mission is currently in the works.

FULL MISSION STATEMENT
Through transformational experiences and the discovery of new knowledge, we provide a challenging, dynamic learning environment that develops innovative business professionals.

MISSION EXPLANATION

Innovative business professionals require cutting-edge business knowledge, communications skills, creativity, personal initiative, and the ability to both recognize opportunities and harness collaborative relationships and professional networks.

We cultivate these attributes in our students through a learning environment rich in transformational learning opportunities, inspiring students to deeply engage their education and take initiative for their own success in school and life.

Our faculty members develop this learning environment through the discovery and dissemination of both new business knowledge and new methods for helping students learn.

Our mission is enabled by our exceptional people, inspiring place, and core values:

PEOPLE
Our students are driven by a strong work ethic and desire to become innovative business professionals. Our academically-qualified faculty members come from some of the best academic programs and engage in innovative, impactful research. They bring current theory and knowledge into the classroom and model the intellectual curiosity we desire of our students. Our professionally-qualified faculty members, who are actively engaged in the practice of business, have extensive business experience that helps illustrate for our students the application of business theory. We are fortunate to be surrounded by alumni and members of the business community who actively support and mentor our students.

PLACE
The magnificent landscape of Montana attracts and inspires pioneering individuals who wish to make their own future. We strive to engage that entrepreneurial spirit by collaborating with the community of business professionals and entrepreneurs to teach and mentor our students. Because of the remarkable entrepreneurial and non-profit activity in our region, our students must be capable of working effectively in organizations of all types and sizes.

As Montana’s land grant university, we embrace our role in the larger community and the university’s mission of providing educational access to a wide variety of students. We leverage this diversity to strengthen the learning experience. We also hold our students to high expectations of performance while providing them the opportunities and support to succeed.

Montana State University known is regarded for very high research activity. We contribute to that strong research mission through innovative research and interdisciplinary inquiry that will positively impact the field as well as practice.


EMERGING VALUES

  • High performance expectations: We believe that our students are capable of excellent academic performance and will rise to our expectations.
  • Innovation: A strong foundation of business knowledge enhanced by creativity and initiative allows all our graduates to see opportunities and take action to seize them, whether they are employed in a new venture or an existing organization.
  • Engagement: To transform them into true professionals, our students engage with the community outside the college through formal experiential learning, student organizations, and volunteer activities.
  • Interdisciplinary work: We value the perspectives of those from other disciplines and have opportunities to learn alongside them.
  • Global and environmental consciousness: Our graduates have an awareness of and respect for diverse cultures and the challenges of conducting business in a sustainable fashion.

ESTABLISHED VALUES

  • Professionalism: Our students learn to conduct themselves as ethical professionals in all aspects, including effective and appropriate communication, interpersonal behavior, appearance, and attitude.
  • Undergraduate education: We take pride in our ability to serve our undergraduate students and effectively develop them into business professionals. Our efforts in graduate education are focused on the unique needs of our stakeholders.
  • Personalized learning environment: We provide ample opportunities for individual student and faculty interaction, facilitated through small class sizes and mentoring relationships.
  • Effective teaching: We work to improve students’ learning through the design and delivery of a current and relevant curriculum enacted through effective, action-oriented pedagogy.
  • Discovery: We engage in meaningful research that contributes to the understanding of business and enhances our academic reputation.
  • Professional practice: We put our knowledge of business into practice and use that experience to better inform our teaching and research.

STUDENT PRIDE CODE

The Student PRIDE Code of Excellence is a joint effort of students, faculty and administration.  Launched in 2007, the Code enables discussions in class and elsewhere about student responsibility and professionalism. The Code is distributed and discussed by faculty members in their classes, and is distributed to prospective students and at orientations for freshmen and students newly formally admitted to the College (typically in the junior year). The Code is also prominently displayed in Reid Hall.

 Student PRIDE
Code of Excellence

We, the students of the MSU Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship, understand that in choosing to enroll at MSU we are investing in our professional futures.  Therefore, we proudly commit to the following Code of Excellence:

 

Performance
I am accountable for and take pride in my own learning and conduct.

 Respect
I treat with respect all members of my community, including peers, staff and faculty.

 Integrity
I am ethical in all that I do.

 Diligence
I do my best work at all times.

 Engagement
I challenge myself to invest proactively in my academic, professional and personal development.

 


An electronic copy of the Code is available on pccommon$ on COB184 under the folder “PRIDE Code.”

PROGRAMS AND CENTERS

The Gary K. Bracken Center for Excellence in Undergraduate Business Education provides services to both students and faculty. Student-focused activities include study abroad, internship and career placement information, three conference rooms for student team work, and the Bracken Business Communication Clinic (Reid 418) where coaches assist students with their writing and oral presentation skills. The Bracken Center also awards a variety of scholarships to high-achieving students and for international travel. The Bracken Center offers faculty assistance with teaching, as well as instructional innovation grants and other resources for the maintenance of a contemporary curriculum.

The JJCBECenter for Entrepreneurship helps Montana businesses flourish by connecting them to Montana State University students and resources. The Center incorporates hands-on experiential education by pairing students with start-up or growth technology companies and serves as a connection to businesses and organizations throughout Montana. Dr. Scott Bryant is the Director.

Student Consulting Projects
In BMGT 463, The Entrepreneurial Experience and BMGT 475, The Management Experience, students provide pro bono consulting to businesses and not-for-profit organizations every semester. Projects for these clients include market assessments, creating promotional materials, writing employee handbooks, and assessing the feasibility of new technologies. Since 2002, when the Center was founded, 525 MSU business students have provided more than 17,500 hours of pro bono consulting to 170 clients, which resulted in more than 400 new jobs in these companies.

Minor in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
Each year approximately 50 students graduate with the Minor in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. The minor is open to students across campus.

The Entrepreneur-in-Residence program provides one-of-a-kind mentoring and face-to-face interactions with successful entrepreneurs spanning diverse fields of expertise. During the week, entrepreneurs visit a number of classes to chat with students, answer questions and give constructive criticism on projects and presentations. They also hold office hours.

Bootstrap Montana, funded by the Gianforte Family Foundation, offers no-interest micro-loans to rural Montana businesses. The program enlists entrepreneurship students in the evaluation of loan applications. Prof. Peter Rubicam directs Bootstrap MT.

The Family Business Program provides educational opportunities and resources to family-owned businesses; in addition, the program provides educational opportunities and resources to service providers of family businesses. The program is coordinated by Prof. Craig Ehlert.

The David B. Orser Executive Speakers Forum brings speakers to the MSU campus who are dedicated to excellence and have a proven record of achievement in business. The speakers typically visit several classes, hold small seminars for students, and deliver a lecture to the MSU community and the general public. Past Orser Speakers have included Ashley Jablow, OpenIDEO; Jeff Sundheim, senior account director with Google’s Rich Media & Video Solutions business; and Paul A. Stewart, Manager of Global Business Development, Eli Lilly Inc.

COLLEGE GOVERNANCE

The College is administered through a shared governance structure. In this structure the tenure-track faculty vests administrative authority for the College in the Dean, two Associate Deans (one for Administration and Finance, one for Academic Affairs) and the Director of Student Services. These offices are currently held as follows:

      Dean: Kregg Aytes
      Associate Dean for Academic Affairs: Susan Dana
      Associate Dean for Administration and Finance: Harry Benham (Interim)
      Director of Student Services: Brenda Truman

The dean is responsible for the overall strategic leadership and direction of the College including the relationships with the MSU central administration and many external stakeholders. The dean communicates a shared vision of the future direction of the College, inspires participation of the faculty and staff in moving the College forward and promotes the best interest of the College to external stakeholders including university, business, and political leaders. The JJCBE Board of Advisors provides input to the dean.

The associate dean duties are divided into two positions: administration & finance, and academic affairs. The Associate Dean for Administration and Finance is responsible for planning the activities and programs of the College, allocating resources to accomplish the College’s mission and reviewing financial outcomes to improve future College performance. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs is responsible for the professional development of the College faculty, the oversight and development of the College curriculum and the assessment of academic outcomes supporting the accomplishment of the College mission/vision.

The Director of Student Services orients all new freshmen and transfer students, admits students to upper-division business, monitors and certifies undergraduate degree completion, works with the director of the MPAc program in monitoring graduate degree completion, and provides general academic advising to all business students.

Although the College does not contain departments, each option (accounting, finance, management, marketing) has a coordinator who serves as the conduit of information from faculty to administration and vice versa. The Option Coordinators for 2014-15 are:

      Accounting: Angela Woodland
      Finance: Gary Caton
      Management: Bill Brown
      Marketing: Mike Kroff    

In addition, the non-tenure track faculty annually elect a representative who represents the interests of non-tenure track faculty members to the College administration and tenure-track faculty and serves on the Option Coordinators/Strategic Initiatives Committee. The Representative for 2014-15 is Tim Alzheimer.

Standing and ad-hoc faculty committees are also charged with administrative responsibilities.  Standing committees include:

  • Academic Programs – oversees the curriculum of the College
  • Promotion and Tenure – evaluates faculty candidates for retention, tenure and promotion
  • Option Coordinators/Strategic Initiatives – oversees planning processes and options
  • Assessment of Learning – oversees and manages assessment of learning processes
  • Scholarship – manages student scholarship processes
  • MPAc Advisory – oversees the MPAc program.
  • International – oversees all international activities in the College.

The Bracken Student Advisory Committee consists of the officers of College student clubs. The committee advises the Dean and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs on a wide range of issues to advance excellence in the College.

Jackie Sather, Development Officer at the MSU Alumni Foundation, manages major fundraising for the College in conjunction with the Dean by discovering, cultivating, soliciting and stewarding major donors to the College.

DIVISION OF DUTIES

Below describes in detail the responsibilities of the two Associate Deans and the Director of Student Services. Despite the apparently clear division of duties, however, in fact each member of the team works closely with the others to ensure that each knows what the others are doing. Therefore, no matter what your question or need, feel free to approach any one of the administrative team, who will either give you the help you need or will get the answer for you.

Associate Dean for Administration and Finance
Harry Benham (Interim), Reid 405

The Associate Dean for Administration and Finance manages college budgets, supervises ongoing operations and maintains internal relationships with MSU, the Regents, and the State of Montana. General duties include ongoing program delivery, personnel management, capital resource acquisition/allocation, technology evaluation/implementation, and budget development/oversight.

Specific duties include:

  • Forecast student demand and submit new class schedules to the Registrar’s Office.
  • Draft faculty teaching assignments in close coordination with the option coordinators and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (ADAA).
  • Monitor enrollments and adjust teaching assignments, section offerings and capacity as appropriate.
  • Supervise the recruitment of new NTT faculty.
  • Submit summer scheduling requests to the Provost’s Office.
  • Hold regular admin/staff meetings.
  • Supervise classified staff performance evaluations, conflict resolution, professional development, and continuous process improvement.
  • Supervise payroll and personnel procedures including contract administration and salary raises.
  • In collaboration with the Dean and the ADAA conduct annual reviews for tenure-track faculty. 
  • Maintain a database of faculty performance indicators in teaching, research and service areas.
  • Provide liaison with various campus offices including the Registrar, Financial Aid, ITC, etc.
  • Develop, submit and monitor FY budgets and personnel reappointments.
  • Authorize expenditure of College budgets and foundation funds.
  • Purchase and deploy computers, software, copiers, furniture, and other College resources.
  • Assign faculty office space.
  • Supervise the electronic scholarship data processes and the distribution of scholarship funds.
  • Supervise computer and technology support personnel.
  • Evaluate and purchase new instructional computer/technology hardware and software.
  • Develop, submit, and deploy CFAC and EFAC proposals and awards.
  • Supervise the update and audit of the College web site.
  • Update, maintain, and analyze College data histories regarding students, faculty, etc.
  • Complete and submit annual AACSB surveys including the business school survey and the salary survey.
  • Research and write grant applications.
  • Participate in University and College committees and activities, and represent the College at public and community events and activities as required.

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Director of the Bracken Center
Susan Dana, Reid 457

The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of the Gary K. Bracken Center for Excellence in Undergraduate Business Education provides oversight and administration of student and faculty academic affairs with specific attention given to continuous improvement in teaching, learning, and scholarship within the College. Additionally, the ADAA manages the relationships and communication of the College with external constituents including corporations, alumni, and professional friends of the College, as well as continuous compliance with internal and external accreditation standards and policies. 

Specific responsibilities include:

  • Overseeing and managing continuing AACSB accreditation of the College.
  • Orienting, training, mentoring, and developing the NTT and tenure-track faculty.
  • With Dean and ADAF, assessing tenure-track faculty performance and writing first draft of annual reviews.
  • Conducting participating NTT faculty annual reviews.
  • Managing JJCBE faculty awards and nominations for MSU faculty awards, including BEST awards; summer research, teaching, professional development awards; and nominations for MSU awards (teaching, research, service, professional development).
  • Overseeing faculty committees and policies.
  • Organizing intellectual contribution and teaching seminars and presentations, including the annual spring pedagogical retreat.
  • Overseeing curriculum development and assessment.
  • With JJCBE Curriculum Committee, managing revisions to catalog.
  • Managing Bracken scholarships, including International Fellowships, Senate Finance Committee scholarship, Bracken Fellowships, Bracken Professionalism Award.
  • Handling academic grievances.
  • Handling requests for retroactive adds/drops.
  • Managing faculty/student conflicts.
  • Serving as JJCBE contact point for parents.
  • Managing relationships with alumni, exchange partners, corporations, executives, entrepreneurs, and other friends of the College.
  • Participating in University and College committees and activities, and representing the College at public and community events and activities as required. 
  • Overseeing Bracken Center facilities and activities, including:
    • supervising BBCC Director
    • supervising Assistant Director of Bracken Center, whose tasks include:
      • overseeing student internship, job and career activities.
      • managing relationships with employers.
      • overseeing student clubs and groups, including Beta Gamma Sigma.
    • Representing the JJCBE on the University Scholastic Appeals Board, and Graduation and Admissions Appeal Board (GARC).

Director of Student Services
Brenda Truman, Reid 338

The Director of Student Services provides oversight and administration of JJCBE and university policies and procedures regarding orientation, registration, formal admission to the JJCBE, and degree completion. In addition, the Director works in co-operation with the Associate Deans to advance the mission of the JJCBE, particularly in the areas of student outcome assessment, continuous improvement in curriculum development, and AACSB student-related accreditation standards. The Director represents the JJCBE on a variety of university committees and to external constituencies, including prospective students and families. 

Specific duties include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Orientation: mentoring JJCBE Student Orientation leaders, managing new freshmen orientation, conducting intake orientation, and advising for all transfer and change of curriculum students.
  • Registration:  Coordination and management of general registration for all continuing students during each academic term which includes registration for all JJCBE restricted entry courses and monitoring of pre-requisites.
  • Admission to JJCBE:  Coordination and processing of all applications for formal admission to the JJCBE, including monitoring of all provisional admissions and compliance with JJCBE performance standards for admission.
  • Degree Certificationof all major and minor degree requirements for all undergraduate business majors as well as JJCBE minor requirements.
  • Commencement: Coordinates the JJCBE annual undergraduate commencement ceremony.
  • Specific Advising and National/International Exchange Students: All JJCBE students accepted to study on National and International Student Exchange require Director pre-approval of exchange course work.  In consultation with the appropriate faculty, students’ advising agreements are approved, their progress is monitored, and assistance is provided upon return.
  • Substitutions:  Management of all JJCBE substitution policies and procedures.
  • Recruitment and Retention: Support JJCBE efforts to recruit and retain high quality students.
  • Scholarships & AwardsServes as ex-officio member of JJCBE scholarship committee; administers nomination and selection of students for Alumni/Chamber of Commerce Awards for Excellence; administers nomination and selection of students for the annual JJCBE student awards for excellence:  Dean’s awards for each undergraduate option, Al Day Award, and administers nomination and selection of students for the BGEN 194 Merit Scholarships.
  • Service (internal):  serves on JJCBE Scholarship Committee (ex-officio), Strategic Initiatives Committee and Academic Programs Committee.
  • Service (external):  represents JJCBE on a variety of university committees including Assistant Deans’ Council, University Advising Council, and University Financial Aid Committee.

CURRICULUM

The College grants two degrees:

  • Bachelor of Science in Business, with options in Accounting, Finance, Management, and Marketing; and
  • Master of Professional Accountancy. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM

Learning Objectives

Based on the College's mission, the College has established the following learning objectives for its students:

  • Knowledge of Business: Students will have strong working knowledge of fundamental concepts in accounting, finance, management, marketing, information technology, strategy and law.
  • Critical Thinking: Students will learn to effectively and persuasively assimilate and evaluate information to solve business problems.
  • Quantitative Reasoning: Students will be able to interpret, represent, and evaluate quantitative information and integrate such information into business decisions and recommendations.
  • Effective Written Communication: Students will be able to develop and organize ideas; adopt an appropriate tone; employ correct grammar, sentence structure and mechanics; use appropriate vocabulary; and correctly cite sources for facts, quotations and ideas.
  • Effective Oral Communication: Students will be able to develop and organize ideas; successfully employ technology in support of a message; speak extemporaneously with minimal hesitations and fillers; adopt an appropriate tone; use appropriate vocabulary; employ correct grammar and sentence structure; and manage presentation pacing, and timing effectively.
  • Ethical Decision Making and Social Responsibility: Students will recognize the ethical and societal implications of proposed actions; employ decision-making tools to evaluate the ethical and societal effects of a variety of options; and make sound decisions in accordance with the analysis and evaluation of options.
  • Life-Long Learning: Students will be immersed in an environment that encourages life-long learning through extensive opportunities to learn in team settings and to develop effective team skills; to develop research skills to advance learning; and to strengthen critical thinking skills.

Throughout the business curriculum, students receive significant exposure to each of these learning objectives. The level of student learning related to each objective is assessed in the senior year.

CURRICULUM

The JJCBE undergraduate curriculum is structured on a four-stage model. The four stages include the University Core, the Business Pre-Core, the Business Core, and the option courses. Courses are numbered to reflect their position within the curriculum. 100-level courses are generally taken in the freshman year, 200-level courses in the sophomore year, 300-level courses in the junior year, and 400-level courses in the senior year.

The Business Pre-Core consists of 100- and 200-level courses that are necessary to develop fundamental knowledge and skills in business, accounting, mathematics, statistics, economics, information technology, and communication. Completion of the Business Pre-Core is required for formal admission to the College. The Business Pre-Core includes:

BGEN 194US              Seminar*
BMGT 205                  Professional Communication Fundamentals
BMIS 211                    Introduction to Business Decision Support
ACTG 201                  Principles of Accounting I
ACTG 202 or              Managerial Accounting (ACTG, BMGT, BMKT students)
ACTG 223                  Principles of Acct II (ACTG and FIN students)

M 161                         Survey of Calculus
ECNS 202                   Principles of Macroeconomics
ECNS 204                   Microeconomics
STAT 216                    Introduction to Statistics
STAT 217 or                Intermediate Statistical Concepts
BMGT 240IS                Business Research Methods

*Students transferring into the College, either from another institution or from another MSU department, who have already earned credit for a University Seminar (US) course must take BGEN 204 instead of BGEN 194US.

The Business Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) courses, most of which are 300-level courses designed for juniors, establish the basis for business education in management, marketing, finance, information technology, production and operations management, law, and strategy and policy. The Business CBK courses are prerequisites for most upper-level option courses. The Business CBK courses include:

BMIS 311                    Management Information Systems
BMGT 322                  Operations Management
BMGT 335                  Management and Organization

BMKT 325                  Principles of Marketing
BFIN 322                    Business Finance

BGEN 302 or              Career Perspectives

BGEN 303                  Professional Coaching Clinic
BGEN 361                  Principles of Business Law
BGEN 499                  Senior Strategy Seminar

The option courses, most of which are 400-level courses designed for seniors, enhance the depth of understanding in one area of business: accounting, finance, management or marketing.

Senior Capstone: BGEN 499 is the capstone course to be taken in the last or next-to-last semester prior to graduation. Completion of CBK courses (BMGT 335, BMIS 311, BMGT 341, BMKT 325, BFIN 322, and BGEN 361) with C- or better and full formal admission to the JJCBE is required before enrolling in BGEN 499. No concurrent enrollment between pre-requisite courses and BGEN 499 is permitted. This course is restricted entry/no online registration available.

FORMAL ADMISSION to the Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship

All business majors must be formally admitted to the College in order to enroll in upper-division (300-400 level) option (ACTG, BGEN, BFIN, BMGT, BMIS, BMKT) courses and the senior capstone, BGEN 499.

The performance criteria for formal admission to the College are as follows:

  • Junior Standing (completion of 60 semester credits)
  • Completion of all Business Pre-Core Courses with no grade less than a C-
  • Score of at least 3 on the ACT Workkeys Written Exam
  • Minimum 3.00 cumulative MSU GPA (grade point average) for Priority Admission

Admission to the College is competitive, and the number of students admitted each term is limited by the instructional, classroom, and resource constraints of the College. To be considered for admission, students must submit a completed admission application. Students who meet all performance criteria and have a 3.00 or higher cumulative MSU GPA will be given priority admission. Applications from transfer students and students with cumulative grade point averages less than 3.00 will be considered on a case-by-case basis with preference based on academic performance. Applications from students with a cumulative grade point average less than 2.50 will not be considered.

The Montana Board of Regents has established a common policy on minimum course grades across all campuses in the Montana University System. According to the policy, a grade of C- or better is required to satisfy requirements for pre-requisite and required courses in majors, minors, and certificate programs and for all core requirements. Further, a grade of C- or better is required in all courses that will be counted toward the 42 upper-division credits required in all degrees. Courses with a passing grade of D-, D, or D+ may only be counted toward the overall 120 credit requirement.

A full description of all academic policies of the JJCBE and MSU is available in the MSU catalog at http://catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/business/.

MINORS

Minors are available to business and non-business students in Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management; International Business; Finance; and Accounting. Non-business students may also pursue a minor in Business Administration. 

For more detail on the undergraduate program, please go to the MSU catalog at http://catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/business/#undergraduatetext.

MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY CURRICULUM

The Master of Professional Accountancy (MPAc) degree is designed to prepare students for professional careers in the field of accounting. With the assistance of an advisor, students formulate a graduate program which integrates their educational background, areas of interest and career path.

MPAc MISSION

The mission of the MPAc program is to prepare students for professional careers in accounting. Candidates for the degree will build on the broad general and business education obtained at the undergraduate level to gain more advanced competencies in the practice and theory of financial accounting, auditing, taxation, law, and other business and professional areas. Students will also be introduced to research methods and resources used by accounting professionals. Goals include:

  • To produce graduates who will have long-term success in their accounting careers.
  • To prepare our graduates to meet the educational requirements recommended by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.
  • To provide our students with access to professional opportunities through career placement
  • services 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

At least 30 credits of acceptable coursework must be completed, including at least 21 credits of coursework from MSU. Elective credits are selected by the student, with approval from the MPAc director. Students are required to maintain a 3.0 semester grade point average, and a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

REQUIRED COURSES

ACTG 521

Advanced Auditing

3 credits

ACTG 525

Accounting Theory & Complex Issues in Accounting

3 credits

ACTG 526

Advanced Taxation

3 credits

ACTG 528

Legal Issues for Accountants

3 credits

ACTG 529

Research in Accounting

3 credits

ACTG 536

Advanced Accounting

3 credits

XXX

Electives

12 credits


For more information on the MPAc program please go to the MSU catalog at http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/business/.

ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING

The JJCBE has created an assurance of learning process in order to ensure that graduating students have met the College’s learning goals.  Accordingly, the College has established the following learning objectives for its undergraduate students:

  • Knowledge of Business: Students will have strong working knowledge of fundamental concepts in accounting, finance, management, marketing, information technology, strategy and law.
  • Critical Thinking: Students will learn to effectively and persuasively assimilate and evaluate information to solve business problems.
  • Quantitative Reasoning:  Students will be able to employ quantitative reasoning as a tool for solving business problems.
  • Effective Written Communication: Students will be able to develop and organize ideas; adopt an appropriate tone; employ correct grammar, sentence structure and mechanics; use appropriate vocabulary; and correctly cite sources for facts, quotations and ideas.
  • Effective Oral Communication: Students will be able to develop and organize ideas; successfully employ technology in support of a message; speak extemporaneously with minimal hesitations and fillers; adopt an appropriate tone; use appropriate vocabulary; employ correct grammar and sentence structure; and manage presentation pacing and timing effectively.
  • Ethical Decision Making and Social Responsibility: Students will recognize the ethical and societal implications of proposed actions; employ decision-making tools to evaluate the ethical and societal effects of a variety of options; and make sound decisions in accordance with the analysis and evaluation of options.
  • Life-Long Learning: Students will be immersed in an environment that encourages life-long learning through extensive opportunities to learn in team settings and to develop effective team skills; to develop research skills to advance learning; and to strengthen critical thinking skills.

The College’s Assessment of Learning (AoL) Committee manages the assessment of learning process by identifying, developing and revising assessment methodologies; administering the assessment tools; analyzing the results; and making recommendations for changes to the curriculum to the College’s Academic Programs Committee, which in turn makes recommendations to the faculty. Concurrently with the AoL Committee’s assessment of learning activities, the Strategic Initiatives Committee engages in strategic management activities, including reviewing the learning goals in the College’s mission, and the Academic Programs Committee pursues its regular review of the College’s curriculum.

The AoL Committee has created a variety of rubrics and other aids to improve student learning with respect to the College’s learning goals. These rubrics are attached in Appendix A. The rubrics and other resources are also available on pccommon$ on COB184 in the “AoL Committee” folder.

GENERAL INFORMATION "HOW TO..."

THE FIRST WEEK:

For personnel paperwork,office assignment, email address, phone number and instructions, office and building keys: Halina Rickman in Reid 412, 994-4423 (Dean’s Office).

For officesupplies, copying, equipment for your class, other administrative help: Rilla Esbjornson or Eleanor Inglis, Reid 451, 994-6796 (Faculty Services). Please see the memo from Rilla and Eleanor later in this section describing their services.

For help getting your computer going, contact Jerry Carvalho (jcarvalho@montana.edu, Reid 311, 994-6396).

To make copies: Use the copier in Reid 451, or your office key also opens Reid 314-A where there is a faculty copier. You need a code to operate either copier. If you do not have a code, or have forgotten your code, please obtain your code from Rilla or Eleanor in Faculty Services, Reid 451. 

You have a mailbox in the faculty mailroom in Faculty Services, Reid 451. 

Where to go with other questions:

Name

Room

Phone

994-xxxx

Can Provide Help With . . .

Dean’s Office

Halina Rickman, Admin Asst.

 

412

 

4423

 

Personnel/benefit paperwork and questions; keys/phones/office assignments, student scholarships/business cards

Admin/Finance

Suzanne Hepburn, Accounting Analyst

 

Alison Todd, Admin Asst.

 

428

 

 

408

 

7880

 

 

6796

 

Expense reimbursements

 

Faculty evaluations, class schedules, catalog, room reservations, grade submission & changes

Career/Extracurricular

Linda Ward, Assistant Director, Bracken Ctr

 

457

 

1995

 

Career and internship opportunities for students, Bracken Center room reservations, student club resources, study abroad

Student Services

Brenda Truman, Director

Liz Greenfield, Asst. Dir.

Lynnea Nelson, Admin. Asst.

 

338

338

338

 

4840

4683

4681

 

Degree requirements, student advising, time lines for formal admission & graduation, requests for course substitutions

Faculty Services

Rilla Esbjornson
Eleanor Inglis

 

451

451

 

6796

6796

 

Editing and Website updates

Shared Duties: assistance with word processing/copying/etc.; schedule & proctor make up tests; TV/VCR’s, laptops, etc.;

Public Relations

Audrey Capp, Dir. of Communications

Phyllis Johnson, Event Planning

 

 

441


409

 

7026

6195

 

JJCBE events and publications, publicity including news releases and brochures, Website

Event planning

Development Officer

Jackie Sather   

 

221 MSU Foundation

 

6766

 

Capital Campaign


CLASS ROLLS/CLASS COMMUNICATION

You will receive in your mailbox on or before the first day of class a roster for your class. After the first day of class, you will need to check your updated class roll online at the MyInfo web site:

https://atlas.montana.edu:9000/pls/bzagent/twbkwbis.P_GenMenu?name=homepage (click on “Enter Secure Area,” or simply consult your D2L course listing which is updated from MyInfo on a daily basis.

ATTENDANCE

Attendance in your class will be quite fluid during the first week. Some students who are enrolled will not show up, and others who have not enrolled will want to add your class. Take attendance in each class for at least the first week to try to keep track of enrollment. According to MSU policy, “[during the third day of University instruction and thereafter, those students who have registered but have not attended class may be required by the instructor to drop the course when space and/or equipment is limited and other students are wanting to add that class. Students are not automatically dropped. This requires a student-initiated drop/add form.” Please note that the “third day of University instruction” means the third weekday, not the third meeting of your class.

In some years, student firefighters who are registered for your fall semester course and who have notified MSU that they will be delayed in returning to school may be permitted not to attend class until the second or third week of the semester and may not be required to drop your course under the three day rule quoted above. If that is the case, the JJCBE’s Office of Student Services in Reid 338 will have a list of such students at the beginning of the semester.  We encourage all faculty to help such students catch up on work missed.

WAITING LISTS

You should post a waiting list for your courses on your office door. If you are a new faculty member, check with your mentor or Office of Student Services, Reid 338, to see if your course has a waiting list. In some cases you may wish to prioritize the waiting list – for example, to let into your class first those students for whom your class is a graduation requirement and who plan to graduate at the end of the semester. The Office of Student Services, Reid 338, can help you check the academic status of students wishing to add your class so you can determine which students legitimately must be in your class. 

See “Academic Policies” later in this manual for guidance on course adds and drops.

FACULTY SERVICES

Rilla Esbjornson and Eleanor Inglis, Reid 451
Hours: 7:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m., M-F
406-994-6796, rillae@montana.edu and eleanor.inglis@montana.edu
(Please cc: both Rilla and Eleanor on all email correspondence to the office)

The Faculty Services Office welcomes you to the Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship (JJCBE). Eleanor usually works in the mornings, and Rilla usually works in the afternoons during the academic year. We offer the following services:

WORK REQUESTS

Please allow 24–48 hours for completion of all projects, even though the turnaround time is often the same day. If you have a large copy/work request, it would be helpful if you would give them at least 48 hours lead-time. Work/copy request order forms are on the bookcase next to the mailboxes in Reid 451, or you may e-mail your requests to them.

They are able to assist you with:

  • Word processing for correspondence, exams, class handouts, syllabi, articles for publication, résumés, meeting minutes, brochures, surveys, etc.
  • Exam word processing is carefully handled to assure confidentiality. Completed exams are locked in the black file cabinet near Eleanor’ desk. The keys are available from Rilla or Eleanor. We have never had any problems with this procedure; however, we will honor any special procedure requests.
  • Scanning documents into PDF format, which they can e-mail to you.
  • Photocopying.
  • Binding supplemental materials.
  • Rilla provides professional editing services, updates the JJCBE’s webpages, and provides support to the Promotion and Tenure Committee.

If you are ill, need to cancel classes, change your office hours...

Please call Eleanor at 994-6796 in the morning or leave her a voice message. She is in our office at 7:30 a.m. and can post the necessary notices on classroom and office doors.

SMART PODIUMS

Reid Hall classrooms are equipped with a smart podium and computer. These computers have Internet connection and an on-board CD/DVD player. You’ll find an LCD ceiling projector, document camera, and overhead projector in the classrooms.

ACCUSCAN TEST SCORING MACHINES

Two Accuscan test-scoring machines are in Reid 314. Test forms are in the long cabinet, near Rilla’s desk. If you note that the machine(s) needs re-calibration or is (are) low on ink, please let Rilla and Eleanor know as soon as possible for efficient problem resolution.

IFAT FORMS (Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique)

These scratch-off answer keys provide students with immediate feedback when taking quizzes and RATs. Available in Reid 451.

EQUIPMENT CHECKOUT

Please reserve all equipment on the reservation calendar (white board) in Reid 451. Equipment is available on a first reserved, first served basis.

  • Portable computer lab (the "Hummer") with 36 laptops and wireless internet connection.
    • Hummer cart keys are available from Rilla or Eleanor.
    • Please reserve Hummer laptops on the equipment reservation calendar. At the time of checkout, please also indicate which laptops you are taking and the room you are taking them to on the checkout sheet on top of the Hummer cart.
  • Laptop Computers
    • 3 Dell laptops PCs are available for faculty/staff/student use. Checkout maximum is 48 hours, unless you request special arrangements with Harry.
  • Portable LCD Projectors
    • 3 Dell LCD projectors are available for faculty/staff/student use. Checkout maximum is 48 hours, unless your request special arrangements with Harry.
  • Flip Video Cameras and Tripods
    • 8 Flip video cameras and 3 tripods are available for faculty/staff/student use. Checkout maximum is 48 hours, unless you make special arrangements with our office.
  • Television/VCR/DVD on a cart.
  • Overhead projector, Portable overhead projector, and bulbs for overhead projectors: back-up equipment if those in the classrooms fail.
  • Zip-scan machines (2) and forms.
  • I-clickers (103).

OFFICE SUPPLIES

Office supplies are in the tall cabinets near the Faculty Services Office entry door, the cabinets along the wall near Rilla’s desk, the cubby shelves near the mailboxes, and at the back of the make-up testing area. Please request assistance if you do not find what you need. Supplies include:

  • Pens, pencils, mechanical pencils, erasers, dry erase and permanent markers, highlighters, legal pads, manila folders, binder clips, rubber bands, sticky notes, envelopes and mailers of various sizes and weights, various types of tape, transparencies, colored paper of various weights for printing/copying, and cleaning supplies are in the tall cabinets next Reid 451’s entry door. You will also find limited office and paper supplies in Reid 314.
  • Printer cartridges for your office printer are in the tall cabinets next to Reid 451’s entry door. Please return your used cartridge to Reid 451 for recycling.
  • White paper for printers and photocopiers (please feel free to take a few reams to your office), test scan forms, golf pencils, facial tissue, and batteries are located in the long cabinet near Rilla’s desk.
  • First-aid kit, tool kit, 3-inch computer disks, CDs and cases, index cards, glue, letterhead stationery, notebook dividers, and Fed Ex and UPS mailing supplies are in the small wood cabinet below the color printer.
  • Hanging folders, folder tabs, and a wide variety of labels are in the cubby shelves next to the mailboxes.

Requests for any supplies that are not in stock are always welcome.

PHOTOCOPIERS

Two photocopiers, located in Reid 314 and Reid 451 are available for faculty/staff use.

  • Both copiers require you key in your assigned copier code before use.
  • The photocopier in Reid 314 is available for staff use after hours and on weekends. Your office key opens the Reid 314 door.
    • Our copiers get very heavy use, up to 1,500 copies per day. Please be patient if you have copier malfunctions. Rilla or Eleanor are happy to assist you with resolving copier problems.

**Please DO NOT leave copiers jammed; this can potentially cause major equipment damage.**

  • If a paper jam or other copier malfunction occurs after hours, follow the on-screen directions or see the Canon Reference Guide located near the Fax machine. If you cannot resolve the problem, please turn off the copier, put an “Out of Order” sign on the machine, and e-mail Rilla and Eleanor, letting them know there is a problem.
  • Personal copies are 10¢ each. Please put payment in the receptacle near each copier.

FAX MACHINE

Located in Reid 314

  • Instructions for use are posted on the wall above the Fax machine. It is not necessary to keep submission verifications for any JJCBE-related Faxes sent or received. We attempt to retrieve all incoming Faxes and place them in appropriate mailboxes.
  • Personal Fax use: 25¢ for local call Faxes, 50¢ for long-distance call Faxes, and $1.00 for international call Faxes. Please put payment in the receptacle next to the Fax machine.

MAKE-UP EXAMS

Although the Faculty Services Office is not a testing center, five study carrels are available for JJCBE students who are making up exams due to emergency/illness, conflict with another course, or MSU related travel. We are not a walk-in testing area—please pre-schedule all make-up exams with our office. The Faculty Services Office is not a quiet testing area; we provide earplugs for students who might be distracted by the noise associated with a busy office.

Students with special needs, who need a quiet testing area, may take their exam in MSU’s Testing Services office. Please make those testing arrangements with the Testing Services Office by calling 994-6984.

  • To schedule make-up exams with the Faculty Services Office, instructors may walk in, e-mail, or call Rilla and Eleanor, requesting the time and date for the student to make up the exam (students may not reserve a make-up exam time). We will confirm with you if the requested time is available. Exams and any directions about any extra materials you may allow the student to use can be e-mailed or hand-delivered to our office.
    • The make-up testing area is open 8:30 a.m.­–4:30 p.m. M–F.We are usually able to schedule and accommodate all reservations, but if the schedule is full, we will inform you via e-mail.
  • Make-up Exam Confidentiality and Security. We store make-up exams for your students. You must e-mail or bring us a copy of the exam prior to the student's scheduled exam time. When the student completes the test, you may retrieve it from your folder.

MAIL

  • Off-Campus and Campus mail can be placed in the “Outgoing” mailbox on top of the NTT mail shelf system in Reid 451.
  • Mail is picked up around 9:30 a.m. M-F. If you miss the 9:30 a.m. pickup time, please see the sign in our office with additional campus pick-up times and locations where you can drop off your mail if it is necessary for it to go out before the next day.
  • Postage. All outgoing JJCBE mail must have a bar code label placed above or to the right of the return address. These labels are located on the counter in Reid 451 near Rilla’s desk and in Reid 314 next to the FAX machine.
  • FedEx and UPS supplies are available in the wooden cabinet in Reid 451. When using FedEx or UPS, please give the invoice to Suzanne Hepburn, the JJCBE accountant, for accounting purposes. The FedEx drop-off box is located at Kinko’s, on College Street, near campus. We can also call for a pick-up for FedEx and UPS.

TEXTBOOKS

Textbooks are ordered through the Faculty Services Office. We provide an electronic order form for your book requests the middle of the previous semester. If you would like to receive desk copies and/or supplemental materials, please let us know, when placing your book order, and we will be happy to request these for you.

DOCUMENT RECYCLING AND SHREDDING

Please place all non-confidential related paper documents, magazines, and journals in the recycling bins that are in Reid 450, outside Reid 450 and outside Reid 314. Please remove paperclips and clamps.

A shredder is in the Faculty Services Office, which you may use for shredding confidential documents only. If you have a large number of confidential documents and need our assistance with shredding tasks, please place the documents in the box next to the shredder. In the fall, the week school starts, we contract with a professional shredding service. If you have extremely large quantities of documents to be shredded, please save these for our annual shredding event. 

MISCELLANEOUS REMINDERS

  • As required by MSU ID security policies, and FERPA, the Faculty Services Office is not a collection/distribution site for instructor assigned student homework, final papers, letters of recommendation, or other student-related materials. We make exceptions ONLY in emergencies. Please arrange for your students to turn in and receive all homework, papers, letters, etc. directly from you. 

We are unable to provide errand service for faculty and staff, so we request you plan accordingly. Thanks!

TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTERS

In your office you will find a desk-top computer which you can use to access your campus computer user account. This account gives you the use of common desk-top applications, e-mail and the internet and access to all networked campus resources. Please contact Jerry Carvalho (jcarvalho@montana.edu, Reid 310, 994-6396) with questions.

Please note that you need to reset your automatic backup every time you change your domain password. Note that the backup will not fail with an error message; it will simply cease to function. Please contact Jerry Carvalho if you need help resetting your automatic backup (jcarvalho@montana.edu, Reid 310, 994-6396).

Please also note the JJCBE Policy on Data and Identification Security elsewhere in this manual. It contains important information on how to keep your electronic data secure and in compliance with state and federal law.

A listing of the most commonly requested computer/technology instructions is provided on the College web site at http://www.montana.edu/business/computer-resources/index.html.

ELEMENTS OF THE COURSE SYLLABUS

The course syllabus is the document in which you establish your policies for your course. Students should be able to rely on the syllabus as accurate unless you make corrections during the semester.  If you do change the syllabus, be sure to give students plenty of notice. If your change is significant (e.g. a change in date for an exam or assignment), you should accommodate students for whom the change is very inconvenient. In some ways the syllabus is the contract for the course, and contracts should not lightly be changed unilaterally.

Your syllabus should contain the following elements (“required” means this section is required by MSU policy):

Basic Information about the Course (required)

Information should include

  • course title and number;
  • time and place of the course,
  • your name and contact information,
  • your scheduled office hours,
  • prerequisite(s) for the course if any,
  • required and recommended texts for the course, and
  • course web page address, if any

Description of the Course (required)

This should be a brief (1-2 paragraph) description of the purpose and content of the course, as well as any noteworthy or unique characteristics of the course. Think of this as the mission statement for the course.

Learning Objectives of the Course (required)

The learning objectives describe what students should be able to do upon successful completion of the course and should explicitly be tied to the mission of the College. You should list approximately 5-10 objectives, each concisely stated in terms of what the student will achieve, not what you as the instructor will do. Ideally, you should write the objectives in a concrete way that would allow you to assess each student’s achievement of each objective. For example, “you will understand the concept of net present value” is not a good objective because it is not observable. A better objective might be “you will be able to define and apply the concept of net present value,” because as an instructor you can assess a student’s ability to define and apply the concept, which in turn suggests the extent of the student’s understanding of the concept. Go to http://www.montana.edu/provost/documents/assessment/Developing%20Course%20Learning%20Outcomes.pdf for a helpful guide on writing learning outcomes.

If you are teaching an “R” course (Research course for Core 2.0), the Research Compliance Committee has requested that you include a component on responsible conduct of research. Please see http://www.montana.edu/research/RCC/ for information on research compliance and responsible conduct of research.

Relationship of the Course to the JJCBE’s Learning Goals (required by JJCBE)

The JJCBE has a set of learning goals derived from our mission. In order to place your course in the context of the mission, please describe the learning goals most relevant to your course (realizing that most courses will probably not address every learning goal). These learning goals are:

  • Knowledge of Business: Students will have strong working knowledge of fundamental concepts in accounting, finance, management, marketing, information technology, strategy and law.
  • Critical Thinking: Students will learn to effectively and persuasively assimilate and evaluate information to solve business problems.
  • Quantitative Reasoning:  Students will be able effectively to use sound quantitative reasoning to analyze business problems.
  • Effective Written Communication: Students will be able to develop and organize ideas; adopt an appropriate tone; employ correct grammar, sentence structure and mechanics; use appropriate vocabulary; and correctly cite sources for facts, quotations and ideas.
  • Effective Oral Communication: Students will be able to develop and organize ideas; successfully employ technology in support of a message; speak extemporaneously with minimal hesitations and fillers; adopt an appropriate tone; use appropriate vocabulary; employ correct grammar and sentence structure; and manage presentation pacing and timing effectively.
  • Ethical Decision Making and Social Responsibility: Students will recognize the ethical and societal implications of proposed actions; employ decision-making tools to evaluate the ethical and societal effects of a variety of options; and make sound decisions in accordance with the analysis and evaluation of options.
  • Life-Long Learning: Students will be immersed in an environment that encourages life-long learning through extensive opportunities to learn in team settings and to develop effective team skills; to develop research skills to advance learning; and to strengthen critical thinking skills.

Methodology (recommended)

This should be a brief statement of the methods through which you will teach the course. Will it be straight lecture? Will the course combine lecture with experiential and group activities? Will the students do research, make presentations, write papers, take exams? Will you use D2L or other online resources?

Assignments (recommended)

Briefly describe the assignments the students will complete. For example, if you will assign a series of papers, explain briefly their purpose and approximate length. If you will give exams, explain the composition of the exams – e.g. a combination of multiple choice, short answer and essay questions.

Grading (required)

Explain how you will determine a student’s final grade in the course. Please refer to the Grading Guidance later in this manual for direction on what each grade should represent.

Typically you would list all the graded assignments and other activities in the course and the points associated with each, then explain how you will calculate the final grade. For example, if you will grade 3 exams, 3 papers, 1 oral presentation and participation, you might assign 50 points to each exam, 50 points to each paper, 75 points to the oral presentation, and 25 points for attendance, for a total of 400 points.  You might then state that a student with 376-400 points will earn an A; 360-375 will earn an A-; etc.  If you will offer opportunities to earn extra credit, you should explain how you will do so.

You should also explain how you will handle assignments turned in late and, if you grade participation, how you will determine each student’s grade for participation. An example might be as follows:  “Participation will be evaluated through a combination of attendance record, peer assessments and my own assessment of your contributions to the class. In assessing your contributions to the class, I will consider primarily your active contributions to class discussions, but will also take into account your apparent engagement with class material as observed by me during class and individual discussions. For example, if you are reluctant to speak in class but frequently come to my office hours to discuss course material, I will take that into account as I assess your participation.”

If you assign papers and other written work, you may wish also to include guidance on how you grade written work. Go to pccommon$ on COB184, and look in the folder “Syllabi” for a sample grading standards document.  This folder also contains the JJCBE’s rubrics on critical thinking, writing, oral communication and ethical decision making.

Group Work (required)

In order to avoid student misunderstandings, you should explain clearly your expectations about group v. individual work. Some instructors have had problems with students handing in identical work because the students assumed that if they could discuss a project they could also turn in the same work.  Sample language depends on what you want, but might be as follows:

“Although you are always encouraged to talk with others about assignments, unless otherwise clearly stated in the assignment the work you turn in must be your own.  I will state explicitly in assignments when group work for a grade is permitted.  If you have any questions about whether group work is permitted, please ask.”

Student Conduct Code (required)

Please include the following in your syllabus:  “All students are expected to abide by the Student Conduct Code and Academic Integrity Guidelines available at http://www.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct/.

Paraphrasing or quoting another’s work without citing the source is a form of academic misconduct.  Even inadvertent or unintentional misuse or appropriation of another’s work (relying heavily on source material that is not expressly acknowledged) is considered plagiarism. If you have any questions about using and citing sources, please ask me for clarification.”

Recording and Distributing Course Materials (optional)

You may wish to consider including some language about the recording of your lectures and class discussions. Recording lectures can be a useful study aid for students but it also has the potential to undermine your intellectual property rights in your work product. And, once you’ve posted material on D2L it is susceptible to students’ misuse. So, here are some possible statements you might wish to include:

Option 1 (Simplest)

You may record lectures in this class only with my permission, and may record class discussions only with the permission of those you are recording. 

Option 2 (Allow recording with limits)

You may record class lectures in this course but may use the recording only for your personal use related to this course. You may not publish, distribute or otherwise make the recording available to anyone not currently enrolled in the course without my permission.

Option 3 (Comprehensive)

Common courtesy, professional ethics and the law all require that you ask the permission of a person before you record him or her. Therefore, you may not record any part of this course, including lectures and class discussions, without my permission, and, in the case of discussions, the consent of the participating students. I will give permission if the recording is reasonably necessary for your success in the class or is a necessary accommodation for a documented disability. Even when I give my permission, you may use the recording only for your personal use related to this course, and you may not publish, distribute or otherwise make the recording available to anyone not currently enrolled in the course without my written permission.

Moreover, you may not participate in the distribution, sharing, or accessing of course material (including but not limited to assignments, exams, recordings of the lectures, or other instructor‐provided materials) without my written permission, except between students who are both currently enrolled in this specific course.

Turnitin (required if you use Turnitin)

If you will use Turnitin (see more information below under Academic Policies), you should explain how students will submit their work and what you will do should submitted work appear to be plagiarized. Please make sure every student in every class in which you use Turnitin receives a copy of the following disclosure statement:

MSU has a license agreement with Turnitin, a web-based service that verifies the originality of student work by comparing a submitted paper to information available on the internet, databases of journal articles, and millions of student papers previously submitted to Turnitin.  In this course, you will be asked to submit some or all of your work to Turnitin.  All materials submitted to Turnitin will be retained by Turnitin in its database to be used solely for the purpose of verifying the originality of papers subsequently submitted to Turnitin.

If you do not wish a paper submitted to Turnitin to be identifiable as yours, please work with me to ensure that all personal information (e.g. name, GID, SSN) is removed from the paper before it is submitted to Turnitin.

Accommodations for Disabilities (required)

Please include the following statement: “If you have a documented disability for which you are or may be requesting an accommodation(s), please let me know as soon as possible. Please also contact Disabled Student Services (DSS) at 994-2824. You can find additional information about accommodations provided through DSS at www.montana.edu/wwwres.”

E-mail(required)

Please include any expectations you have about email use in your course, including how you use D2L email. MSU recently decided to use each student’s preferred email rather than their montana.edu email, so please encourage students to make sure the email listed by MSU is in fact their preferred email. They can go to My Info and enter the Secure Area to confirm or change their preferred email.  Please continue to communicate grades only through D2L.

Course Schedule (required)

Include in your syllabus a schedule for the course showing each date the class meets, the assignment(s) for that day and the topic(s) to be covered. Please include the last day to drop the course with a W so students do not inadvertently miss the deadline.

Student PRIDE Code of Excellence (recommended)

You may wish to incorporate the Student PRIDE Code of Excellence into your syllabus in some way. You may also wish to highlight it for the students, and perhaps lead a discussion of what one or more of the items means to the students and to you. An electronic copy of the Code is available on pccommon$ on COB184 in the “PRIDE Code” and the ‘Syllabi/JJCBE documents and policies for syllabus” folders.

ACADEMIC POLICIES

ADDS

Eligible students may add a course online without the instructor’s permission during the first week of classes if there is space available in the course. During the second week of classes students can add only with a form signed by the course instructor and the student’s advisor. Thereafter students can add a course only with the additional signature of Susan Dana, Assoc. Dean for Academic Affairs.

As described below, some JJCBE courses are restricted to students formally admitted to the College.  Students in the College are designated as either Pre-Business (not formally admitted to the College) or Business (formally admitted to the College). You can check a student’s status online at http://www.montana.edu/msuinfo/dx/bzn/st/. Please do not rely on a student’s word that s/he is formally admitted to the College because students often say that they are formally admitted when in fact they simply mean they have declared business as their major and they are in fact not yet formally admitted to the College.

For Business Pre-Core and Core courses, it is generally in your discretion whether to allow a student to add your course. BGEN 302 (Career Perspectives) is restricted to JJCBE students (PBUS and BUS). BGEN 499 (Senior Seminar) is restricted to seniors who have been formally admitted to the College, have completed all other Business Core courses, and have graduation paperwork in good order.

Business students may add 300- or 400-level option courses only if they have been provisionally or formally admitted to the College. Therefore, DO NOT add a student with a Pre-Business designation to a 300- or 400-level option course or to BGEN 499. If you do mistakenly add an ineligible student, the Office of Student Services will administratively drop the student from the course and you will be asked to inform the student of the reason for the drop.

Provisionally admitted students may add upper division option courses (provided they meet the prerequisites) only if they have an add/drop form that has been stamped ‘JJCBE Provisional Admission’ for the current semester. If eligible, they may obtain this form from the Office of Student Services. Please only sign add/drop forms for provisionally admitted students if it has the stamp. Online registration for upper division option courses is not available to provisionally admitted students.  The Office of Student Services is happy to check student eligibility for you if you have any concerns.

Please check with the Office of Student Services, Reid 338 for the JJCBE policy on allowing students to add restricted entry courses (BGEN 303, BMGT 463, BGEN 499). 

DROPS

Students can drop a course online during the first 3 weeks of class. After that, a student must obtain the instructor’s signature to drop a course.  No drops are allowed during the last 3 weeks of the semester except for extraordinary circumstances such as illness or a death in the family.  Students should see Susan Dana, Assoc. Dean for Academic Affairs, in Reid 457 for the appropriate form for such an extraordinary drop.

Pre-Requisite Enforcement

As of fall 2014 registration, students will not be able to register for upper-division courses or BMGT 205 if they have not previously completed or are not currently enrolled in the posted pre-requisite(s). If they try to register for these courses without the listed pre-requisite(s) they will receive an error that says “check pre-requisites.

The decision to turn on the pre-requisite checker was made in part to assist faculty in managing their class rosters. However, the system will not work if you do not enforce the pre-requisites when approached with add/drop forms. A signed add/drop form will override the pre-requisite enforcement.When students ask to add your course, it is essential that you require them to provide proof that they have taken the listed pre-requisite(s) (e.g.: transcript, DegreeWorks) before you sign the add/drop form. If you are unsure if a particular student has met the pre-requisite for your course, please contact the Office of Student Services; we are happy to check students’ credentials.

You may have students requesting an exception/for you to override a pre-requisite for a variety of reasons. Exceptions should be very rare, but may include circumstances such as:

  • The student has transfer work that satisfies the pre-requisite, but Banner isn’t recognizing it. Please see the Office of Student Services for verification; no appeal necessary.
  • Extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control that caused him/her to miss the pre-requisite course(s) and concurrent enrollment is the only way to ensure a timely graduation. In such a case, the student must appeal the enforcement of the prerequisite.

If a student would like to appeal a pre-requisite, he/she must submit an appeal in writing to the Office of Student Services. Appeals will be decided by the respective option coordinator, Associate Dean, Dr. Harry Benham, and Director of Student Services, Brenda Truman.

Student Absences

Section 310.01 of the Student Conduct Code (http://www.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct/) states the following:

A student officially representing MSU in athletic events, government, performance, or in similar official capacities, is entitled to the rescheduling of exams or important assignments due to required absences, only if a student has met the academic expectations outlined in section 310.00 of the Student Conduct Code. Students who do not meet the academic expectations, however, may not be entitled to special accommodations. Students are expected to provide course instructors with official notification of scheduled activity(ies) as early as possible, preferably at least ten (10) days in advance of the event.

Students participating in official MSU activities should not expect any special accommodation for attendance at regularly scheduled practice sessions or meetings (i.e., the routine activities required for performance, athletic pursuits, etc.).

Section 310.00 referred to in this section lists the academic expectations of students, including regular attendance in class, being prepared for class, submitting assignments on time, acting respectfully and keeping appointments with instructors.

Grading Policies and Guidelines

The full range of grades A - F is given in the College, including + and - grades.  An “A” should represent superior performance, while “F” should represent failure to complete the work required.  See Grading Guidance in next section for a description of what each grade should represent.  Pass/fail grades are not normally given except for internships.  Typically, letter grades are assigned as follows

A   = 93-100%

B- =  80-82%

D+ = 67-69%

A-  = 90-92%

C+ = 77-79%

D =   64-66%

B+ = 87-89%

C =   73-76%

D- =  60-63%

B =   83-86%

C- =  70-72%

F =   < 60%


Final Grades

Final grades must be turned in on-line AND as a signed hard-copy within 48 hours after the final exam. You will receive complete instructions and the hard copy 1-2 weeks before the end of the semester. If you are late turning in your grades, reporting of the grades of all students in your course will be delayed and the Registrar’s office will be extremely displeased with the JJCBE, so please do turn your grades in (to Alison Todd in Reid 408) on time. 

If for any reason you are not able to assign a grade to a student, please complete a form for an “incomplete” for that student. Do not hold all grades pending resolution of the grade for one student.

Grade Grievances

The following comes from Section 160.00 of the Conduct Guidelines and Grievance Procedure for Students (http://www2.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct/):

Instructors must specify in writing, as part of the syllabus, the specific grading policies for the class. Grading is the prerogative and responsibility of the instructor. Instructors are responsible for the assignment of the final course grade. The assigned grade must reflect the performance of the student in the course commensurate with the content and objectives of the course. If a student questions his or her grade, the instructor has a responsibility to discuss the matter with the student. If the instructor cannot satisfactorily resolve the matter, the student must be advised of the grievance procedures, see section 530.00 (http://www2.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct/#studentacademicgrievances).

Should a grievance be filed, the instructor will provide assistance as necessary to process the grievance. Graded examinations, papers, and other sources of evaluation are to be available to the student for inspection and discussion. If the instructor chooses ultimately to retain these materials, they must be kept for a period of one year. If graded materials become the property of the student, then uncollected materials must be kept for one semester. Adjunct and part-time instructors should arrange for storage with the department in their absence. The grade records will be retained for at least one year to provide the opportunity for review and resolution of grade disputes.

Course Evaluations

At the end of each semester, all students are asked to fill out an evaluation form, called the Knapp form, for their instructors. These forms, with instructions, will be provided to you 2-3 weeks before the end of the semester. As per the instructions, these evaluations are turned into MSU Exam Scoring by a student. A summary of the scores and a transcription of all comments will be provided to you, typically about two months later. Please note that the College does not currently use online evaluations due to a concern about low response rates.

Office Hours

You should hold regular weekly office hours for your students. As a general guideline, you should provide 2 hours per week of availability for every 3-credit course taught. Full-time faculty are required to provide 5-6 office hours per week.

Instructor Absences

If you know in advance that you will miss a scheduled class for any reason it is recommended that you make arrangements with a colleague within the College to cover the class. The scheduling of activities which are appropriately proctored by a colleague such as exams, guest speakers, videos or projects is also recommended. If you must miss a class because of illness or emergency, please call Rilla or Eleanor at 994-6796—they will post a notice on your office and classroom door for your students. Please report any sick leave taken in your monthly time report.

Common Hour Exams

Common hour exams are exams that are given to more than one section of a class at the same time in the same place. In order to be included in the Schedule of Classes, requests for common hour exams need to be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the 20th class day of the prior semester.

In fall 2012, MSU adopted a comprehensive policy on common hour exams in order to resolve conflicts with other exams, classes or MSU obligations. The policy is available at http://catalog.montana.edu/code-conduct-policies-regulations-reports/common-hour-policy/

Student Work Retention Policy

You must keep all grade records and student work not returned to students for one year after the completion of the semester in which the work was done. If you will not be employed by the College during that year, you must deliver your course materials, including grade records, to Susan Dana, Associate Dean, before your departure.

Student E-mail Policy

MSU recently decided to use each student’s preferred e-mail rather than their montana.edu email, so please encourage students to make sure the email listed by MSU is in fact their preferred email.  They can go to My Info and enter the Secure Area to confirm or change their preferred email.  Please continue to communicate grades only through D2L. The MSU Student Electronic Communications Policy is available at http://www.montana.edu/policy/student_electronic_communications/.

Academic Integrity

All students and faculty are expected to abide by the Conduct Guidelines and Grievance Procedures for Students at http://www2.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct/. If you suspect a student of violating the guidelines, please follow the procedures described in these Guidelines. In particular, please follow the procedures described in Section 440, which require an informal meeting with the student to discuss your accusation, followed by your filing with the Provost’s Office an Academic Misconduct Notification Form, available at https://publicdocs.maxient.com/reportingform.php?MontanaStateUniv&layout_id=10.

You may wish to require students to sign a pledge on each paper, project and exam turned in, such as: “I hereby certify that I have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this work.”

Turnitin

MSU has subscribed to an online anti-plagiarism service called Turnitin. As Turnitin states on its website (http://turnitin.com/), Turnitin checks the originality of a student paper against “billions of pages from both current and archived instances of the internet, millions of student papers previously submitted to Turnitin, and commercial databases of journal articles and periodicals.” Although Turnitin can be an effective deterrent to plagiarism, there are some student privacy issues that you must understand before you use Turnitin.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) prohibits the disclosure of a student’s “education record,” including a student’s paper, without the written consent of the student.  Therefore, if a student is expected to submit his/her paper to Turnitin, we must protect that student’s identity.  Importantly, a paper from which all personally identifiable information has been removed may be released because it is not considered a “disclosure” under FERPA.  Accordingly, in order to protect student privacy and comply with FERPA, you should give students a disclosure statement and follow one of two procedures for submitting student papers to Turnitin.

Disclosure Statement

Please make sure every student in every class in which you use Turnitin receives a copy of the following disclosure statement:

MSU has a license agreement with Turnitin, a web-based service that verifies the originality of student work by comparing a submitted paper to information available on the internet, databases of journal articles, and millions of student papers previously submitted to Turnitin.  In this course, you will be asked to submit some or all of your work to Turnitin.  All materials submitted to Turnitin will be retained by Turnitin in its database to be used solely for the purpose of verifying the originality of papers subsequently submitted to Turnitin.

If you do not wish a paper submitted to Turnitin to be identifiable as yours, please work with me to ensure that all personal information (e.g. name, GID, SSN) is removed from the paper before it is submitted to Turnitin.

Procedures

As the instructor, you can follow one of the following two procedures for submitting papers to Turnitin:

1.   Request students to register with Turnitin and submit their own papers. If students do not care that their paper is identifiable as their work, they are welcome to register as themselves and leave their names and other identifying information on the paper submitted. (Voluntary disclosure of one’s own educational record is permissible.) On the other hand, if a student does not wish a paper to be identifiable as his/hers, you should allow him/her to use an alias both when registering with Turnitin and on his/her paper, as long as s/he discloses the alias to you.  Because students’ email addresses often identify them by name, you may need to allow such students either to use a different email address or use your email address when registering with Turnitin.

2.   Students submit electronic copies of their papers to you, and you then submit the papers to Turnitin. If you follow this route, you MUST remove all personal identifying information (name, GID, SSN, etc.) from the paper before you submit it to Turnitin. You may wish to assign a separate identifier known only to you to each paper submitted.

Turnitin works by comparing a student paper to millions of other sources of information, including other student papers, in the Turnitin database. Therefore, it is possible that a paper submitted by a student in your class might turn up later as a paper from which another student from MSU or another university apparently plagiarized. Therefore, if you receive a request from Turnitin to allow another instructor to see your student’s paper, please talk to Susan Dana before you consent.  If the instructor is from MSU there is most likely no problem.  However, there could be a FERPA issue if the paper contains personally identifiable information and the request is to deliver a copy to an instructor from another institution.

Food

Faculty, from time to time, have provided snacks to currently enrolled students. Be advised that MSU policy requires that all food/snacks served on campus must be purchased from MSU catering.  The decision of whether or not to provide snacks for students is left up to the judgment of each faculty member. The JJCBE will not provide reimbursement or funding for food/snacks in instructional classroom settings. 

MSU Credit Hour Policy

Approved in Faculty Senate, October 9, 2013

At Montana State University, the credit hour is used as a unit of instruction to quantify student achievement. The intent of the policy is to maintain the highest standards of learning while encouraging innovative instructional approaches. Each credit hour is defined in relation to seat time, a minimum of three class-oriented work hours (50 minutes of classroom instruction and an additional two hours of out-of-class, engaged effort and work per student) each week during a 15-week (minimum) semester. One credit of instruction should approximate 45 hours of combined instruction and student work/engaged effort.

A credit hour is defined as an amount of work and engaged effort represented in learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that includes not less than:

(1)   One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for a total of 45 hours of engaged effort, or

At least an equivalent amount of work and engaged effort as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including web-enhanced, blended, hybrid, distance, on-line, or condensed coursework, as well as laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, independent study or other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

GRADING GUIDANCE

(4/30/2014)

This grading guidance is intended to reflect the consensus of the JJCBE faculty on expectations for student performance in the classroom. The guidance reflects the belief that student performance should be assessed based on both performance and professional behavior because both will be essential to success in students’ careers. Faculty should decide for themselves how much to weight course work compared to engagement/participation.

Faculty are expected to communicate their expectations around grading of the course and individual assignments to students. This document is intended to provide guidance and some sample phrases for faculty use.  It is not expected that every faculty member will use this language verbatim in every course because content and pedagogy vary course to course based both on level of offering and subject matter. Overall, however, it is expected that a student graduating in business with a particular grade average will be considered by most faculty members to have demonstrated the attributes described below for that grade.

A Grade

A student who earns an A grade has demonstrated the ability to synthesize and evaluate course material at an exceptionally high level commensurate with the level of the course.  Attributes of students performing at this level may include:

Qualitative course work:

  • Demonstrates original thought through new information and/or perspectives, exceptionally thorough research, visual impact, etc.
  • Offers exceptionally persuasive, insightful, interesting analysis, solution
  • Includes consideration of alternative approaches, methods, perspectives, etc.
  • Demonstrates ability to evaluate and create commensurate with the course level
  • Stands out as significantly more accomplished than most other students

Quantitative/Technical course work:

  • Work is accurate and complete
  • Consistently demonstrates ability to evaluate among several possible approaches to select the best or most appropriate approach for solving a particular problem
  • Is easily able to apply knowledge and/or skills to new problems
  • Is efficient at solving problems

Engagement/Participation:

  • Consistently attends and is well-prepared for class
  • Consistently and proactively adds value and original thought to class discussions and activities in a respectful and beneficial way, including by asking insightful questions
  • Makes the class an enjoyable, challenging and rewarding experience for all
  • Never gives up when challenged, takes responsibility for own learning
  • Proactively identifies and solves situational challenges

B Grade

A student who earns a B grade has demonstrated the ability to apply and analyze course material at a high level commensurate with the level of the course.  Attributes of students performing at this level may include:

Qualitative course work:

  • Closely follows instructions in assignment
  • Demonstrates ability to apply and analyze, with occasional success at evaluating and creating
  • Offers competent analysis, solution, etc.
  • Delivers work that is more accomplished than that of many other students
  • Demonstrates competency in understanding of course topics

Quantitative/Technical course work:

  • Work is reliably accurate and complete
  • Knows how to solve most problems
  • Demonstrates a general understanding of why a particular approach is appropriate for solving a particular problem
  • Is usually able to apply knowledge to new problems but often needs time to figure out how

Engagement/Participation:

  • Almost always attends class and is usually well-prepared for class
  • Participates in class when called upon, occasionally adding value through thoughtful questions and original perspectives
  • Is attentive, responsive and respectful to others in class
  • Works to understand and master course material
  • Identifies and offers ideas for solving situational challenges

C Grade

A student who earns a C grade has demonstrated the ability to remember and understand course material.  Attributes of students performing at this level may include:

Qualitative course work:

  • Generally follows instructions in assignment
  • Offers basic analysis, solution, etc.
  • Delivers work similar to that of many other students
  • Demonstrates understanding of course topics with occasional ability to apply and analyze

Quantitative/Technical course work:

  • Work contains multiple but generally not substantive errors in approach and/or execution
  • Generally understands how to solve a problem but often struggles with execution
  • Generally does not demonstrate an understanding of why an approach is the best or most appropriate for solving a particular problem
  • Struggles with applying knowledge and/or skills to new problems

Engagement/Participation:

  • Attends class regularly and is usually prepared for class
  • Participates in class when called upon, but normally adds little value through thoughtful questions and original perspectives
  • Does not interfere with or obstruct class discussions and activities
  • Does not demonstrate commitment to trying to understand and master course material
  • Tends to offer excuses for own performance and conduct and fails to solve situational challenges

D Grade

A student who earns a D grade demonstrates only rudimentary knowledge of course material.  Attributes of students performing at this level may include:

Qualitative course work:

  • Does not complete all parts of the assignment 
  • Offers incomplete analysis, solution, etc.
  • Delivers less good work than most other students
  • Remembers course material but does not demonstrate understanding or attempt to apply or analyze

Quantitative/Technical course work:

  • Work contains frequent substantive errors in approach and/or execution
  • Generally remembers how to solve a problem if a very similar problem has been presented previously
  • Does not demonstrate an understanding of why an approach is the best or most appropriate for solving a particular problem
  • Is generally unable to apply knowledge and/or skills to new problems

Engagement/Participation

  • Is often unprepared for class
  • Is often unable or unwilling to participate in class
  • Occasionally interferes with or obstructs class discussions and activities
  • Does not demonstrate commitment to trying to understand and master course material
  • Blames others for own poor performance and fails to solve situational challenges

F Grade

A student who earns an F grade has demonstrated essentially no knowledge of course material or has engaged in unacceptable conduct.

STUDENT PRIVACY POLICIES

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a federal law that protects the confidentiality of a student's education record, and Montana state statutes are very strict about protecting student information, including grades. Therefore, you may not reveal a grade to anyone other than the student (including a parent), may not leave student work in the hallway for students to pick up, and should not post student grades on your door unless they are in random order and students are identified by a partial (e.g. last 4 digits) GID #, not by name. Violations of student privacy are taken very seriously, so please ask Brenda Truman or Susan Dana if you have any questions at all about what information you may reveal.

FERPA and Montana law also specify that the university may not release information from a student's record to anyone outside of the university without the express written consent of the student. This means that MSU generally must withhold such information from parents and others who may believe their relationship with the student entitles them to have the information.  Education records covered by federal and state privacy laws include grades, housing information, financial status, results of disciplinary proceedings, class schedules and courses, etc. Health information maintained by the university, including medical and psychological records, is also protected under separate Montana statutes governing the release of health information. MSU can not release this information without the express written consent of the student.

Federal law does allow release of certain information referred to as directory information. This includes the student's full name, local address and phone number, dates of attendance and degrees, honors and certificates received, class level (e.g. freshman) and academic major(s). The student has the right to request the university not to release directory information by notifying the Registrar's Office in writing of this request. The University may also release information without the student's consent in connection with an emergency if necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals.

If you receive a call from a parent or other person asking for information about a student, please refer the caller to Susan Dana, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at (406) 994-1776.

For more information on student privacy, please go to http://www.montana.edu/policy/family_ed_privacy_act/

PRIVACY AND SECURITY DO'S AND DONT'S

Receiving and Returning Student Work

  • DO: Collect & return all student work in class or electronically through D2L
  • DO NOT: Have students submit work to Faculty Services, the Office of Student Services, or leave papers/work outside your office and/or Faculty Services or the Office of Student Services for student pick-up

Posting Student Grades

  • DO: Use D2L or return work in class; or (less secure method), post grades on your office door (single assignments only) with randomly sorted partial (never full) GIDs
  • DO NOT: Post grades with full GIDs or leave work outside your office or Faculty Services for pick-up

Discussing Student Academic Performance or Grades

  • DO: Discuss grades with students, preferably face to face 
  • DO NOT: Discuss grades/academic performance (or any protected categories of information) with non-university personnel – parents, family members, or others (even if they e-mail or contact you). Use discretion when discussing information with university personnel. When unsure, refer requests for information to Susan Dana.

Other Assorted Security & Privacy Issues

  • DO: Be sensitive to opportunities for identity theft. When in doubt shred documents which may contain identifying information rather than just tossing them in the trash.
  • DO NOT: Store confidential student information on your flash drive or home computer. If your flash drive is lost or your computer stolen, US regulations require costly MSU follow-up correspondence with all individuals whose ID has been compromised
  • DO NOT: Respond to any legal action concerning students (e.g., subpoenas) – all requests of this nature are handled through the Office of the MSU Legal Counsel (Leslie Taylor)

Please also note the JJCBE Policy on Data and Identification Security elsewhere in this Manual. It contains important information on how to keep your electronic data secure and in compliance with state and federal law.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND VIOLENCE REPORTING REQUIREMENT

The Board of Regents adopted a Title IX policy for the Montana University System in 2012. This policy requires that all employees who know of an allegation of sexual violence must promptly report the allegation to the Title IX Coordinator for their campus. The Title IX Coordinator for the MSU-Bozeman campus is Kate Grimes, Director of the Office of Institutional Equity, 994-2042, oie@montana.edu.

Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment and is prohibited by Title IX. For purposes of reporting, sexual violence means physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to drugs, alcohol, or disability. Sexual violence includes rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion. If you are unsure what constitutes sexual violence, please contact the Office of Institutional Equity, 994-2042, oie@montana.edu.

All employees--excepting only those with a legal privilege, such as medical providers, mental health counselors, and rape crisis counselors--are subject to the mandatory reporting obligation and must report allegations of sexual violence to a Title IX Coordinator. Each report made to a Title IX Coordinator will be promptly investigated to determine what occurred and the Title IX Coordinator will work with campus officials to take appropriate steps to protect the student and prevent future incidents of sexual harassment.

Confidentiality
Mandatory reporting is required even if the alleged victim requests confidentiality or asks that the complaint not be pursued. The campus is required to take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to reports of sexual violence while respecting the alleged victim's wishes to the extent possible.

For example, suppose a student came to you and wished to discuss an incident involving possible use of the date-rape drug at a party over the weekend and asked you to not tell anyone. You cannot promise confidentiality to the student because you do not have the protection of the law to do so. In fact, you should tell the student that you have a duty to report anything he or she tells you. If you don’t report what you hear about the incident, both you and the university may be held liable for not investigating. 

Reporting To Law Enforcement
Alleged victims may report crimes directly to law enforcement and campus authorities will assist any student wishing to file a report to law enforcement. However, because of student confidentiality laws, the Title IX Coordinator will disclose reports of sexual violence related to students if a health or safety emergency as defined by state and federal law warrants disclosure of information.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

The JJCBE’s website contains answers to student and faculty FAQs about the curriculum, registration, and other matters. From the JJCBE’s home page at http://www.montana.edu/business/ click on the “Advising Information” on the left, or go directly to http://www.montana.edu/business/current-students/advising-faq.html.

There is also an online resource for faculty academic advisors which contains a few additional links – see http://www.montana.edu/business/faculty-staff/advising-resources.html. You will see the following:

Advising FAQ's and Information

Academic Information

Other Resources

 

Another great resource is the Office of Student Services’ webpage, which can be found at:
http://www.montana.edu/business/current-students/studentservices/

FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS POLICIES

CRITERIA AND GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINING FACULTY QUALIFICATION

The College is accredited by ACCSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. In order to maintain its accreditation, the JJCBE must meet a variety of standards with respect to its tenure-track and non-tenure-track (NTT) faculty members, including those governing the qualifications of faculty members and whether a faculty member is considered to be “participating” or “supporting.”  Accordingly, the College adopted the following definitions, criteria and guidelines in 2012.  Please note that AACSB changed its standards in 2013 so the JJCBE will need to revisit the following policy in the near future. 

I. Academically Qualified Faculty

Academic qualification (AQ) requires a combination of original academic preparation augmented by subsequent activities that maintain or establish preparation for current teaching responsibilities.  This policy establishes the minimum qualifications required to maintain AQ status for purposes of maintaining AACSB accreditation. It does not establish the expectations of the College with respect to promotion and tenure or the intellectual contributions required for satisfactory annual performance. Those expectations are described in the College’s Promotion & Tenure document and the College’s Intellectual Contributions policy.

A. Criteria for Designation as Academically Qualified

The following is an illustrative, but not necessarily exhaustive, list of the academic preparation required for initial designation of an instructor as academically qualified. Refer to AACSB’s definitions and guidelines for more detailed information.

1. A research doctoral degree or graduate law degree in the area in which the instructor teaches. 

2. A research doctoral degree in a business field, or a graduate law degree, but primary teaching responsibility in a field that is not the area of academic preparation. The instructor must maintain active involvement in the areas of teaching responsibility through writing, participation in professional meetings, or related activities.

3. A research doctoral degree outside of business, or a graduate law degree, but primary teaching responsibilities that incorporate the area of academic preparation. 

4. A research doctoral degree outside of business, or a graduate law degree, and primary teaching responsibilities that do not incorporate the area of academic preparation. Such instructors must have completed additional coursework or personal study sufficient to provide a sound basis of knowledge in the areas of his/her teaching responsibilities.

5. Completion of all but the dissertation in a research doctoral degree program. AQ status will apply for no more than three years beyond the most recently completed graduate comprehensive examination or other milestone that puts the student into the dissertation stage. 

B. Performance Expectations for Maintaining Academically Qualified Status

To maintain classification as academically qualified, a faculty member must maintain currency in his/her field. Maintenance of currency requires significant annual activities that contribute to the faculty member’s intellectual capital by increasing his/her understanding or knowledge of his/her field and area(s) of teaching. Failure to engage in substantive maintenance activities over the course of five years may lead to the loss of AQ status.

Most tenure-track faculty members are expected to maintain their AQ status through research, publication, and academic leadership. In keeping with its mission, the College of Business values many forms of research activity. Research activities consist of contributions to discipline-based scholarship, pedagogical research, and contributions to practice. Discipline-based scholarship adds to the theory or knowledge base in the faculty member’s area of expertise. It includes not only basic research, but also applied scholarship that extends existing knowledge to practice areas such as, but not limited to, taxation, investments, leadership and advertising. Pedagogical research contributes to the academic community's understanding and application of teaching and learning theories and techniques. Contributions to practice interpret existing knowledge for a practitioner audience.

Because the College seeks to offer its students a personalized, experiential and contemporary education, on occasion a tenure-track faculty member may acquire or maintain AQ status in part through non-research activities such as consulting or acquisition of a new certification or licensure.

To maintain AQ status, a faculty member must have accumulated at least 20 points over the previous five years. These points can be accumulated as described below. A faculty member will accumulate points based on the final product in any given 5 year period. In other words, if over the course of 5 years a faculty member produces a working paper, submits the paper to a non-top tier journal and the paper is then published, she would earn 10 points (or 20 if the paper is published in a top-tier journal), not 18 points.

AQ Activities Worth 20 Points

Terminal degree earned within last five years

Publication of article in top tier blind peer reviewed journal or law review (discipline-based or pedagogical)

Publication of textbook, research monograph or scholarly book

Editor-in-Chief or managing or senior editor of scholarly journal

Principal Investigator on externally funded grant for at least three years and over $50,000

AQ Activities Worth 10 Points

Publication of blind peer reviewed journal article not in a top tier journal (discipline-based, pedagogical or practitioner-oriented)

AQ Activities Worth 10 Points, Up to a Maximum of 10 Points per 5 Year Period

Publication of chapter in scholarly journal or scholarly book (discipline-based or pedagogical)

Publication of article in editor-only reviewed journal

Principal Investigator on an externally funded grant for at least one year and over $10,000

Leadership position on board of national academic or professional organization lasting at least two years, including editor or guest editor of a refereed journal or other publication

Conference program manager or conference organizing role

Text book revision

Publication of an educational resource such as practice set, study guide, software, or instructor’s manual to accompany textbook authored by another

Conducting an active, ongoing and substantive consulting practice with a single client over at least 2 years, or conducting an active and substantive consulting practice with multiple clients, each with a documentable outcome

Acquisition of new professional certification or licensure related to faculty member’s area of teaching

Activities Worth 5 Points, Up to a Maximum of 10 Points per 5 Year Period

Publication in blind peer reviewed proceedings

Presentation of paper at academic conference (discipline-based, pedagogical or practitioner-oriented) (may not double-count with publication in proceedings)

Submission of an article to a blind peer reviewed journal or other publication not a proceedings, or submission of a chapter to a book publisher

Submission of research grant proposal for external funding over $50,000

Poster presentation at academic conference (discipline-based, pedagogical or practitioner-oriented)

Activities Worth 2 Points, Up to a Maximum of 10 Points per 5 Year Period

Working paper

Regular reviewer for scholarly or pedagogical journal (at least 3 reviews per year)

Presentation at workshop or seminar (e.g. continuing education seminar)

Attendance at academic or professional meeting without making a presentation

Other Activities – Points To be Determined


II. Professionally Qualified Faculty

A. Importance of Professionally Qualified Faculty to the Mission of the College

The College strives to deliver a learning environment that enables students to become highly competent professionals. Accordingly, the JJCBE curriculum combines the breadth of liberal arts education with the depth of business practice. The College emphasizes a rigorous curriculum, student services, job placement, and student mentoring, and encourages such professional skills as critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, effective communication, ethical decision-making and social responsibility, and life-long learning. Faculty, staff and administration initiate and cultivate interactive student mentoring relationships in support of the academic and professional development of students, and engender student commitment to learning, personal responsibility, effective problem-solving, and ethical judgment.

In order to accomplish its mission, it is critical that all faculty be qualified to teach at the College. In addition, it is necessary that a significant portion of the faculty have the professional experience to teach the “real-world” application of theory, model professional thinking, and serve as mentors in support of the students’ professional development. Accordingly, it is vital to the College’s mission to have professionally qualified in addition to academically qualified faculty members. Fortunately, the College is in a position to benefit from the significant number of highly qualified professionals who are attracted to Bozeman and who are eager to teach students based on the experience, knowledge and skills they have acquired during their business careers. These executives help the College fulfill its mission by bringing recent, “real-world” experience into the classroom.

B. Criteria for Designation as Professionally Qualified

The College strives to hire PQ instructors in order to fulfill its mission to prepare students to be professionals. In order to be PQ, an instructor must have attained a sufficient educational level and must have significant professional experience that is consistent with the instructor’s teaching responsibilities. In addition, it is preferred but not required that the instructor have successful teaching experience.

The following requirements are the minimum necessary to be designated PQ. The College’s and University’s requirements for advancement in rank by non-tenure track faculty members are contained in the College’s Role, Scope, Criteria, Standards and Procedures document.

1. Education

Normally, in order to be considered PQ, an instructor should have at least a master’s degree in a field or discipline related to his/her teaching responsibilities. Occasionally, an instructor may not have a master’s degree but his/her professional experience is of such exceptional duration and responsibility that s/he has developed the necessary intellectual capital to be able to contribute meaningfully to the mission of the College. Typically, this requires significant long-term direct experience with successful deployment and execution of business processes and substantial insight into the theoretical frameworks of the area in which s/he will be teaching.

2. Professional Experience

In addition to the requisite education described above, a PQ instructor must also have professional experience that is significant in duration and level of responsibility and is consistent with the instructor’s teaching responsibilities. Each individual case must be judged on its merits, but general guidelines are as follows.

a. Significant in Duration and Level of Responsibility

The expected number of years of professional experience and the level of responsibility vary depending on the knowledge and skills necessary to teach the assigned course(s). In all cases, the instructor’s experience must be sufficient to enable the instructor to be knowledgeable in the area of his/her teaching assignment(s).

b. Consistent with Area(s) of Teaching Responsibilities

In order to ensure that an instructor has sufficient intellectual capital effectively to be able to teach his/her course(s), the instructor’s professional experience must be related to the courses the instructor is assigned to teach. The instructor’s professional experience need not be precisely coterminous with his/her teaching assignments, but the instructor must be very familiar with the majority of the course content.

3. Teaching Experience

Finally, it is preferred but not required that a PQ instructor have previous teaching experience. This experience may be in teaching undergraduate or graduate students in a formal university setting, but may also arise from such settings as executive education programs, in-house training programs, or other knowledge-transfer activities.

C. Performance Expectations for Maintaining Professionally Qualified Status

To maintain classification as professionally qualified, a faculty member must maintain currency in his/her field. Maintenance of currency requires significant annual activities that contribute to the faculty member’s intellectual capital by increasing his/her understanding or knowledge of his/her field and area(s) of teaching. Failure to engage in substantive maintenance activities over the course of five years may lead to the loss of PQ status.

Most non-tenure track (NTT) faculty members are expected to maintain their currency and therefore PQ status through professional activities related to their fields of teaching. While the College encourages NTT faculty to engage in research, it is not expected nor required.

To maintain PQ status, a faculty member must have accumulated at least 20 points over the previous five years. These points can be accumulated as follows:

PQ Activities Worth 20 Points

Ongoing employment in the instructor’s field in a mid- or high level position

Conducting an active, sustained and high-level consulting practice with a single client over at least 2 years, or conducting an active and substantive consulting practice with multiple clients over the course of several years, each with a documentable outcome

Significant recognition by a national or international professional organization for outstanding contributions to the discipline or profession

Providing significant service to the profession, such as through a leadership position in a professional society or substantive participation in a significant activity sponsored by a professional organization

Acquisition of a new professional certification or licensure related to the faculty member’s area of teaching

Serving on the board of directors of a publicly-traded company

PQ Activities Worth 15 Points

Judging a professional (not student) competition in the instructor’s field

PQ Activities Worth 10 Points

Conducting a consulting practice that is active but sporadic, with documentable outcomes

Serving in a leadership role on a board of directors of a private firm or non-profit organization (e.g. President of Board, VP, Secretary, Treasurer)

Regular reviewer for a scholarly or practitioner publication or conference. Points are for each year in which faculty member conducts at least 3 reviews.  

Presentation at a scholarly or professional workshop or seminar (e.g. continuing education seminar)

Attendance at an academic or professional meeting (e.g. conference, workshop, continuing education seminar) related to the instructor’s area of teaching without making a presentation

Renewal of an existing professional certification or licensure requiring demonstration of knowledge or skill (i.e. not simply a mail-in renewal form)

PQ Activities Worth 5 Points

Serving on a board of directors of a private firm or non-profit organization

PQ Activities Worth 2 Points

Continuing education workshop, seminar, etc. related to area of teaching. Points per workshop/seminar attended.

Serving as reviewer for one paper for a scholarly or practitioner outlet or one textbook.  Points are for each such review.

Other PQ Activities

Academically qualified activities as described in section I.B not already listed in this table (points vary according to AQ activities table)

Other activities and points to be determined


III. Other Qualified Faculty

Occasionally a faculty member who is not academically or professionally qualified has relevant educational background and professional experience that enables the instructor to support the fulfillment of the College’s mission. The determination of whether an instructor is “other” qualified will be made on a case-by-cases basis guided by the College’s mission.

Participating and Supporting Faculty Members

AACSB distinguishes between “participating” and “supporting” faculty members. The JJCBE must show that “participating” faculty members deliver at least 75% of the JJCBE’s teaching and at least 60% of the teaching in each degree program and in each discipline. Your letter of hire specifies whether you are a “participating” or “supporting” faculty member. If you are a “participating” faculty member, you and the JJCBE need to make sure you are in fact fulfilling the requirements and expectations of a “participating” faculty member. A part of your annual review will consist of an assessment of your activities in light of your designation as a “participating” or “supporting” member of the faculty.

Participating:

The College defines participating faculty members as those who meet the following criteria:

  1. Typically teach two courses or more per year and
  2. Are actively engaged in the operation and intellectual life of the College beyond the classroom. Participating faculty members can be involved in non-class activities such as, but not limited to, mentoring of clubs or other extracurricular student activities, providing academic and career advising, providing oversight for internships, serving on committees, developing curriculum, recruiting students, and conducting research. 

Supporting:

A supporting faculty member’s appointment is normally exclusive to teaching responsibilities and is short term in nature.

ANNUAL REVIEW OF FACULTY

TENURE-TRACK FACULTY
Annual reviews are conducted of all tenure-track faculty members during the spring semester by the Dean with support from the two Associate Deans. Each tenure-track faculty member is required to submit a self-assessment of his/her performance in teaching, research, service and professional development covering the previous calendar year. Each faculty member then has a personal meeting with the Dean. The Dean and the Associate Deans review all the submitted material, rate the faculty member using the rating system prescribed by MSU, and write an evaluation of the faculty member’s performance. The faculty member reviews the written report and signs a rating card required by the SRC. Please see http://www.montana.edu/business/documents/faculty-staff/annualreview-process.doc for a more detailed explanation of the process.

NON-TENURE TRACK (NTT) FACULTY
The College instituted an annual review for participating adjunct faculty members in 2007. The Non-Tenure Track Collective Bargaining Agreement requires the following: 

Each home department shall review annually the performance of all NTT faculty who have contracted for at least 7.5 workload units (0.5 FTE) in any semester in the calendar year for which they are being reviewed and who are employed during the time of the annual review, or who are employed on a multi-year contract. All NTT faculty who are reviewed will receive a written evaluation.

All eligible NTT faculty members are asked to submit a self-report containing information about and self-evaluation of their teaching performance, currency, and activities that support their designation as participating faculty members. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs then conducts a personal interview with each eligible NTT faculty member, and, after consultation with the Associate Dean for Finance and Administration and the Dean, provides the faculty member a written assessment of his/her performance, including an assessment of the faculty member’s currency and activities as a participating faculty member.

There is no formal annual review of NTT faculty members who are not covered by the NTT union.  All faculty members, including NTT faculty members, receive student teaching evaluations, and all faculty members are encouraged to discuss their performance at any time with one of the associate deans.

Promotion and Tenure

Tenure-track faculty members are evaluated for retention, promotion and tenure on the basis of their teaching, research and service. The retention review typically occurs in a faculty member’s third year at MSU. A candidate for retention must show that s/he meets the effectiveness standard for teaching, research and service. The review for tenure and promotion to associate professor typically occurs in a faculty member’s sixth year. A candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor must show effectiveness in all three areas, and accomplishment in either teaching or research. An associate professor may seek promotion to full professor after five years as an associate professor, and must demonstrate effectiveness in all three areas and excellence in either teaching or research.  See P&T Standards and Criteria at http://www.montana.edu/business/faculty-staff/pandt.html.

FINANCIAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT EXPENSE ACCOUNTS

Tenure-track faculty and full-time non-tenure track faculty are provided an expense account for use in professional development and for instructional support. The amount of funds in each account is a function of the faculty member’s status (e.g. untenured, tenured, non-tenure track) and, in the case of tenured faculty, the faculty member’s previous annual review rating.

Expenditures that are clearly for “professional development” or “instructional support” do not require pre-approval. For example, expenditures associated with article publication, academic conference attendance, computer software to support your research, or reference books need not be pre-approved. Please consult with Faculty Services before you purchase office supplies on your P-card.  Faculty Services can often obtain such material more quickly and at a lower cost than you can obtain on your own.

There, however, are many gray areas where pre-approval is highly advised to prevent your having to reimburse the College. For example, you may wish to purchase a DVD movie.  There may be both personal entertainment and instructional value in the DVD. Please consult with Harry Benham, Associate Dean, before you make such a purchase.  If in doubt, definitely talk with Harry to get pre-approval. Do not use your professional development account for:

  • Home Internet service
  • Cell phone data plans
  • Membership in Amazon PRIME
  • Or other services where one could reasonably expect that there is personal benefit from the expense.

Harry must pre-approve any computer equipment expenditure

Requests for reimbursements must be turned in to Suzanne Hepburn.  Please submit original receipts (no photocopies or scanned copies) for all purchases. If the original receipt is an email receipt/confirmation please forward the email to Suzanne Hepburn.

Please note that anything purchased with faculty development funds is the property of Montana State University.

Computing Devices Costing in Excess of $500

For computing devices costing more than $500, state policy requires that we either purchase these devices through ITC or the MSU Bookstore, or we must submit a form prior to the purchase. If you plan on purchasing any computing device for $500 or more with state funds, please see Harry Benham before making the purchase. Harry will fill out the required paperwork before you make the purchase. 

There are a few surprising state policies, so if you have any questions, a good rule of thumb is do not make a purchase of $500 or more with state funds, without having a brief conversation with Harry Benham. He can quickly let you know if there are any unique state or campus purchasing policies.

Food

Faculty, from time to time, have provided snacks to currently enrolled students. Be advised that MSU policy requires that all food/snacks served on campus must be purchased from MSU catering.  The decision of whether or not to provide snacks for students is left up to the judgment of each faculty member. The JJCBE will not provide reimbursement or funding for food/snacks in instructional classroom settings. 

P-Card

All tenure-track faculty should hold a P-Card (MSU credit card) which must be used for all travel purchases and other purchases related to Faculty Development accounts. In addition, all faculty/staff who are traveling on MSU related business must obtain a P-Card before booking any travel. As it takes approximately one week to obtain a P-Card please keep this timeframe in mind when planning travel arrangement. Please see Harry Benham to initiate the P-Card application process.

Original itemized receipts must be submitted to Suzanne Hepburn immediately at the time of purchase!  If you are using an internet site to make a purchase, be sure to print the receipt at the time of purchase for your records and forward the email receipt to Suzanne Hepburn.

  • Conference travel
    • Transportation (including checked baggage fees) and lodging charges for MSU travel must be charged on the P-Card.
    • Conference registration should also be charged on the P-Card. 
    • Meals may not be charged on the P-Card because meals are simply compensated on a per diem basis when traveling.
    • Charges for conference travel must be supported by a Travel Authorization form which is to be completed and signed by Harry Benham prior to making the charges. Once travel is complete, all receipts must be turned in to Suzanne Hepburn and a Travel Expense Voucher must be completed if per diems and/or mileage are being requested or for items not billed to the P-card such as cash payments for metro fares etc.
  • Entertaining
    • Food can be charged to the P-card when entertaining on MSU business.
    • Alcohol can never be charged to the P-card. You may purchase alcohol with your own credit card and seek reimbursement.
    • An itemized meal receipt is required when entertaining that shows the individual meals and separates out the alcohol charges if you do use your personal card.
    • When submitting your receipt, be sure to list all individuals in attendance.

JJCBE users of the MSU purchasing card (P-card) are required to know and to follow MSU P-card policies. Repeated violations of the P-card policies will lead to withdrawal of P-card privileges. As a general rule of thumb, a third violation will trigger the withdrawal of P-card privileges, although both the frequency and severity of each violation will be relevant to the decision to withdraw privileges.

When using your P-Card for travel you have the following insurance benefits:

  • Primary auto rental insurance – this means that you should decline the car rental company’s collision damage waiver (CDW/LDW) option, or similar provision, if offered by the car rental company.
  • Worldwide automatic travel accident insurance
  • $500,000 accidental death & dismemberment coverage for air travel purchased with the card.
  • Excess lost or damaged luggage coverage. 

ACH (Direct Deposit) Payments for Expense Reimbursements

Individuals are strongly encouraged to submit an ACH Authorization form to facilitate the expense reimbursement process for faculty who do not hold P-cards and for reimbursement of expenses submitted via a Travel Expense Voucher. Submittal of the form will enable the Business Services office to direct deposit the reimbursement into your bank account and will significantly speed up the reimbursement process and reduce costs for the university. This ACH process is distinct from the payroll ACH process, thus the need for the additional form (see Suzanne Hepburn for copy of form).

Expenditures for Tenure-Track Faculty Recruiting Meals

1.   The College will pay for all reasonable meal expenses of a tenure-track faculty candidate and his/her spouse or significant other incurred while traveling to and from Bozeman and while in Bozeman for the duration of the recruiting visit.

2.   Breakfast. For each day the candidate has breakfast in Bozeman, the College will pay for breakfast expenses for one member of the relevant College search committee who accompanies the candidate to breakfast.

3.   Lunch. For each day the candidate has lunch in Bozeman, the College will pay for lunch expenses for a total of three representatives of the College. These representatives may consist of any combination of faculty, staff, administration, students and spouses as the search committee chair deems necessary to accomplish the mission of the College. If the candidate’s spouse or significant other attends the lunch, the number of College representatives may be four. The College will pay for the entire search committee to take the candidate to lunch on one day during the candidate’s visit.

4.   Dinner.  For each day the candidate has dinner in Bozeman, the College will pay for dinner expenses for a total of up to five representatives of the College. These representatives may consist of any combination of faculty, staff, administration, students and spouses as the search committee chair deems necessary to accomplish the mission of the College. If the candidate is accompanied by his/her spouse or significant other, the total number of College representatives may be six. Please remember that no alcohol may be charged to the P-card during these meals. 

Exceptions.  Appropriate exceptions to the above rules will be made upon request by the chair of the relevant search committee. A request for an exception must be directed to, and may be granted by, the Dean, the Associate Dean for Administration & Finance, or the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

NEW FACULTY MENTORING POLICY

This policy requires mentoring for all new tenure track and non-tenure track faculty in the College at Montana State University-Bozeman. Each new faculty member will be assigned a mentor for the first semester of employment, after which the faculty member may select a new mentor and/or adapt the mentoring relationship as deemed appropriate.

Tenure-Track Faculty Mentors:

New tenure-track faculty will be assigned a first semester mentor based on the consensus of the group of academic faculty teaching in the same option area, i.e. accounting, finance, management or marketing.

Non-Tenure Track Faculty Mentors:

Prior to the beginning of the first day of the semester the new NTT faculty member will be assigned a mentor as follows:

Coordinated or Supervised Courses - the coordinator, supervisor or lead instructor for courses being taught by new NTT faculty will be responsible for assigning mentors from among the experienced faculty also teaching the course. It is preferred that when appropriate the coordinator, supervisor or lead instructor for the course will be the assigned mentor.

Autonomous Courses - new NTT faculty teaching in courses for which they are the sole instructor or teaching courses taught only by new NTTs will be assigned a mentor by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the College.

Role of the Mentor

The mentor’s role is to answer questions, provide support and give advice. The mentor supplements the required College orientations which are described in the College faculty orientation policies.

Mentor/Faculty Orientation

In addition to the general College orientation provided by the Associate Dean’s office (see below) prior to the beginning of classes, the supervisor and/or mentor will provide an orientation for the new faculty providing, but not limited to:

  • the course syllabus for each course assigned, or, if the new faculty member will be expected to write his/her own syllabus, several sample syllabi used in previous semesters
  • list of past course instructors
  • the required text(s) and other course materials, or, if the new faculty member is expected to order his/her own texts, texts and other required course materials used in previous semesters
  • course rolls for the upcoming semester
  • unique course management policies
  • unique course grading policies
  • unique course objectives and/or requirements

Tenure-Track Topics - topics which must be included in the orientation of new tenure-track faculty, but which are not required in the orientation of new NTT faculty include:        

  • Research expectations for promotion and tenure
  • Service expectations for promotion and tenure
  • Teaching expectations for promotion and tenure
  • The promotion and tenure process including required reviews and documentation

New Faculty Orientation by Associate Dean’s Office

The topics covered in the orientation provided by the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for all new NTT and tenure-track faculty will include but not be limited to:

Structure, Policies and Expectations

  • the mission of the College
  • the governance structure of the College
  • the structure of the curriculum including university core, College pre-core, College core and option requirements
  • teaching and advising expectations including grading, office hours, syllabi, student evaluations, colleague coverage, add/drops, and academic integrity guidelines
  • annual reviews and evaluation of currency
  • computers and other technology needs
  • travel/professional development funds and policies
  • College student clubs and activities
  • policy documents including all College policies and the University academic grievance policies

Physical Facilities/Functions

  • keys
  • offices
  • computers
  • payroll
  • parking
  • mailboxes
  • faculty services

FACULTY ADVISOR GUIDANCE

Overview of Advising Roles and Responsibilities of Students, Faculty and OSS

Advising in the College is a 3-way collaboration among faculty, students and the JJCBE Office of Student Services. Each party has an important role in maximizing students’ opportunities to excel academically (academic capital), and to develop the professionalism required to successfully navigate the organization and to be successful in their chosen professions (social capital). Advising FAQs are available at http://www.montana.edu/business/current-students/advising-faq.html.

The Student:

The Faculty Advisor:

The Office of Student Services:

  • Be familiar with and adhere to MSU and JJCBE academic policies.
  • Be familiar with JJCBE performance standards for formal admission to the JJCBE and for graduation.
  • Be familiar with the course requirements in your option (Acct, Fin, Mgmt, Mktg).
  • Take full responsibility for your course schedule and graduation requirements.
  • Create and maintain an academic planner to help you comply with academic policies and meet performance standards.
  • Meet with your advisor at least once per semester.
  • Be prepared for all advising meetings; bring your completed option worksheet and academic planner!
  • Understand which courses are offered in which semester and plan accordingly.
    • Keep copies of all forms you submit to or receive from the JJCBE and/or other MSU offices.
  • Explore your career interests and goals, and seek your advisor’s input on your plans.
  • Check your official email address daily – all official MSU and JJCBE communications are sent to this address and only this address.
  • Follow up as needed with the appropriate office on all communications you receive from the JJCBE and/or any MSU offices.
  • Interact professionally and ethically with all internal and external stakeholders of the JJCBE
  • Be a mentor to advisees.
  • Engage students in discussion and exploration of their career objectives and aspirations.
  • Be knowledgeable about general JJCBE academic policies and procedures and your option’s requirements.
  • Maintain current knowledge about resources at the JJCBE.
  • Discuss and sign advisees’ formal admission applications and pre-graduation worksheets as appropriate.
  • Work with students in their assessment of their professional strengths and weaknesses, including professional skills such as effective problem solving and academic planning, appropriate organizational communication strategies and setting personal and professional priorities.
  • Be prepared to refer students to appropriate university services should a student request such assistance.
  • Be available to advisees during regularly scheduled office hours and by appointment as necessary.
  • Return emails and phone calls in a timely manner.
  • Refer inquiries from parents to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

 

  • Provide timely and accurate information to students concerning general university and College policies and procedures, performance standards for the College and general degree requirements
  • Clarify degree requirements across multiple catalogs
  • Manage registration and the seat reservation system for restricted courses
  • Manage requests for course substitutions.
  • Provide orientation information for all new first year and transfer students.
  • After review by advisor, sign forms relating to National Student Exchange and study abroad, and degree progress forms for athletics and ROTC.
  • Sign forms relating to degree progress for veterans and financial aid.

Through the Director:

  • Certify that each student who is admitted to the JJCBE meets all of the performance standards set by the faculty
  • Monitor all provisional admittees for compliance
  • Handle all matters related to JJCBE student suspensions and appeals
  • Manage the JJCBE application and certification of degree requirements
  • Clarify deficiency notifications from the Registrar’s Office

Role of the Faculty Advisor at the Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship

As a faculty advisor, you are critical to accomplishing the mission of the JJCBE to create a personalized learning environment. You are also critical in representing the JJCBE’s Code of Excellence, which states that “faculty, staff and administration initiate and cultivate interactive student mentoring relationships in support of the academic and professional development of students, and engender student commitment to learning, personal responsibility, effective problem-solving, and ethical judgment.”

As a faculty advisor it is your responsibility to be:

  • A mentor to your advisees;
  • Available to your advisees during regularly scheduled office hours;
  • Knowledgeable about general JJCBE academic policies and procedures and your option’s requirements;
  • Willing to engage students in discussion and exploration of their career objectives and aspirations;
  • Prepared to facilitate work with students in their assessment of their professional strengths and weaknesses.  This interaction may be akin to giving advisees periodic performance reviews to assist the students in improving professional skills such as effective problem solving and academic planning, appropriate organizational communication strategies and setting personal and professional priorities. 
  • Prepared to refer students to appropriate university counseling services should a student request such assistance.

 

Please see more detail on next page.

 

As a faculty advisor, it is not your responsibility to:

  • Advise on whether/how courses from other institutions transfer to MSU (refer students to the transfer equivalency guides under MyInfo or to the Registrar’s Office).  In the case of questions concerning course substitutions, refer students to the JJCBE’s Office of Student Services, 338 Reid.
  • Sign advising agreements for National Student Exchange or International Student Exchange.  These must be coordinated through the Office of Student Services and signed by Dr. Lamb.
  • Sign any university forms which request information about degree progress, e.g. financial aid plan of study forms, prior credit forms for veterans, and degree progress forms for ROTC or Athletics. Refer students to Dr. Lamb; she signs these as certifying officer of the JJCBE.  (As an instructor, you should still complete forms requesting reporting of a student’s grade in your course.)
  • Decide math, language, English or other placement issues (refer students to the relevant department; math placement information at http://www.math.montana.edu/undergrad/mplex.html). 
  • Advise on financial aid matters (refer students to the Financial Aid Office, SUB 183, http://www.montana.edu/wwwfa/)
  • Talk to parents about their students (refer parents to the JJCBE’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs)
  • Be available 24/7


Information to help you with your advising is available to you at http://www.montana.edu/business/faculty-staff/advising-resources.html. Students have access to the information at http://www.montana.edu/business/current-students/advising-faq.html

Your core responsibilities as a faculty advisor in the JJCBE include, but are not limited to:

  • Helping students define and develop realistic academic and career goals
  • Being adequately available to students for advising according to your regular schedule posted on your office door. As a general guideline, you should provide 2 hours per week of availability for every 3-credit course taught. Full-time faculty are required to provide 5-6 office hours per week. You are not expected to be available 24/7.  You are expected to respond to messages from students within a reasonable time, typically 48 hours.
  • Maintaining current knowledge about JJCBE and MSU academic policies, including the JJCBE’s prebus/business course requirements, the JJCBE formal admission procedure/deadlines, and basic JJCBE/university procedures/deadlines for filing for graduation. 
  • Maintaining current knowledge about your option’s curriculum, including prerequisites and sequencing of courses. It is expected you would have general knowledge of the overall JJCBE curriculum, including minors, and detailed knowledge of your option’s curriculum, including changes which have been made from previous catalogs and how these changes affect students’ academic planning and scheduling.
  • Being familiar with DegreeWorks
  • Being familiar with Core 2.0 requirements
  • Maintaining current knowledge about resources at the JJCBE, including the BBCC, internship processes, employment services, study abroad, student clubs, etc. (information about all of which is available in the Bracken Center)
  • Making appropriate suggestions to help students meet their academic and career goals
  • Discussing and signing your advisees’ formal admission applications and pre-graduation worksheets as appropriate
  • Being proactive in helping students understand the link between academic choices and career options and in discussing career opportunities and resources
  • Returning emails and phone calls in a timely manner (this is not an expectation that you be available 24/7)

Enabling students to internalize the PRIDE Code by requiring students to take responsibility for being informed about MSU and JJCBE academic policies and curricular requirements and for planning their own academic and professional choices. Each interaction between faculty advisor and student advisee should be shaped by the PRIDE Code. One way to accomplish this is to ask students to approach their time here at MSU as a job interview and have them reflect on what kind of letter of recommendation they would like you to write for them for their first job.

DATA AND IDENTIFICATION SECURITY POLICIES

February 2010

This statement of policy is provided to guide the actions of faculty, students, administrators, and staff of the MSU College of Business regarding data and identification security policies of Montana State University (MSU), the Montana University System (MUS), the State of Montana (MT) and the Federal Govt (US).  This document provides implementation guidelines for all employees regarding relevant policies, procedures, regulations and laws.

It is the policy of the MSU College of Business to protect the privacy and integrity of personal identifiable information of all stakeholders, particularly in regards to student and employee data.  Additionally, it is the policy of the MSU College of Business to protect individual and institutional intellectual property.  Therefore, all access, transmission and storage of restricted data, both electronic and physical, must use institutionally approved security.  Employees who ignore security procedures assume personal liability for potential theft, loss, and/or public access to restricted data.  The MSU Data Stewardship Policy defines “Restricted data” to be “All data which, if released in an uncontrolled fashion, could have substantial fiscal or legal impacts on the University.”  This includes sensitive or proprietary research data, and personal data containing elements such as Social Security numbers, or student grades.

College of Business faculty and staff must access, transmit and store all restricted data using encryption, system level strong-password protection, file level strong-password protection and physical access protection.  Definitions of these terms appear below. 

Montana State University and the College of Business provide resources to help all employees follow this requirement including the following:

  • All employees work in offices with locking doors.
  • Shared computing and data storage facilities are provided on COB184 with direct supervision, limited key access, hardened server technology and strong-password system access.
  • Regular reminders and training are provided to all employees.
  • Strong passwords are required to access campus computing resources.

In addition, it is important that all faculty and staff observe the following Do’s and Don’ts of data protection:

Do:

  • Store and transmit student academic information, including grades, on Desire-2-Learn and through its email function.
  • Store restricted data on COB184 with file-level encryption and strong password protection. 
  • Use file level encryption and strong password protection for restricted data stored on your desk top.  Better yet, do not store restricted data on your desktop at all.
  • Lock your door when you are not in your office to protect access to your desktop computer.
  • Use a time-enabled screen-saver (10 min or less) with a strong-password
  • Shred documents containing restricted data

Do Not:

  • Store restricted data on portable media such as a USB flash drive or a laptop
  • Leave your office unlocked while you go to class or to run an errand
  • Send restricted data through e-mail; MSU e-mail servers do not use encryption and are officially insecure.  You may send restricted data, including grades, to students via the D2L email function.
  • Access restricted data through any wireless networks unless you are using encrypted transmission (WEP)
  • Physically or electronically post grades publicly (no exceptions, even if you use only partial student ID numbers)
  • Return or collect graded work through a public access point such as a box outside your door (no exceptions)
  • Place documents containing restricted data in trash bins
  • Click on unfamiliar links in e-mail or on web sites

Definitions

  • Encryption – refers to electronic algorithms which “scramble” data making it difficult to “unscramble” restricted data.  Files containing restricted data should be individually encrypted while in storage and/or transmission. 
  • System level strong password – Direct and indirect access to restricted data storage including desk top computers, laptop computers, hand-held computers, smart phones, USB flash drives, etc. should be protected with strong passwords.  Strong Password Guidelines are found online: http://www.microsoft.com/protect/fraud/passwords/create.aspx
  • File level strong password – Files containing restricted data should each be individually protected using strong passwords.
  • Physical Security – Files and systems containing restricted data should be in physical spaces that are always either directly supervised or behind locked doors.

Reference Links

The following set of resources provides comprehensive, detailed information regarding Montana State University data security policies and procedures.  Please reference these links if you have specific questions.

MSU Policies and Federal Regulations

Other General MSU and MUS Board of Regents Resources Regarding Data Security:

MSU POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The Conduct Guidelines and Grievance Procedures for Students, available at http://www.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct/, contain guidance for both faculty and students. Please review this document to ensure you are familiar with its content.

Non-Tenure Track (NTT) Union Collective Bargaining Agreement
The Non-Tenure Track (NTT) Collective Bargaining Agreement, effective as of July 1, 2013, governs the working conditions of non-tenure track faculty at MSU. It is available at. http://www.montana.edu/provost/nontenure-cba/.

Tenure-Track Faculty Policies
The Tenure-Track union was decertified by faculty vote in spring 2013.  As a result, the Tenure Track Collective Bargaining Agreement is no longer in force, but the old Faculty Handbook is out of date. The Commissioner of Higher Education in a letter to faculty dated May 6, 2013, stated the following about tenure-track faculty policies and procedures:

Members of Montana State University's tenure-track faculty have asked or raised good questions about the university's plans for moving forward without a union contract. This is a good opportunity to share the transition plan. As we know, compensation and other issues that were addressed in the union contract will no longer be established through collective bargaining between the union and the Board of Regents. Those issues, both legally and logically, must be addressed through policy review and policy development by the MSU administration.

The Board of Regents and the Commissioner of Higher Education designate the President and her administrative team to review all provisions of the collective bargaining agreement and to recommend policies and procedures to guide matters that were in the union contract. The university will solicit college and department feedback on a number of these policies and procedures that were previously governed by the union contract. The university will solicit that feedback, depending on the issues or the policies, in a manner that the President and Commissioner and Regents view as most appropriate and responsible. The Board of Regents authority for future normal salary adjustments, instead of being conveyed through the Board's contract negotiators, will be communicated to the President for implementation at MSU. This plan, relative to the past couple of years, constitutes a change in how we handle issues that are mandatory subjects of bargaining with unions. The MSU administration has no legal authority to bargain with a union or any substitute group for the collective faculty on matters of compensation or other terms and conditions that were in the union contract.

However, as we know, the union contract never governed academic affairs. Academic affairs issues have consistently been administered by the Office of the Provost in collaboration with colleges and departments, and in consultation with the Faculty Senate. On matters that are purely academic affairs, there will be no change in that regard. Neither the Faculty Senate nor any other group is a legal substitute for a union on mandatory subjects of collective bargaining. The administration, however, will continue to look to collaboration with the Faculty Senate on the types of issues we have worked on these past few years. We have enjoyed strong collaboration and expect we will continue to do so.

For now, the Interim Faculty Personnel Policies, available at http://www.montana.edu/provost/documents/InterimFacultyPolices2013.pdf, govern tenure track faculty terms and conditions of employment.  The old Faculty Handbook, available at http://www.montana.edu/policy/faculty_handbook/, governs only in the absence of coverage by the Interim Faculty Personnel Policies.

Web Time Entry
All MSU employees are required to record their monthly sick leave and annual leave, if applicable, online. You will receive an automatic email toward the end of the month reminding you to enter your time and providing a link to the online site. For more information, please visit the HR Department’s website at http://www.montana.edu/hr/WDTE.htm.

Compliance Hotline
University policy encourages faculty and staff to report suspected compliance violations to an appropriate university official. However, the university recognizes that in some circumstances, faculty or staff may feel the need for a more confidential or anonymous way to express concerns about noncompliance.

Because of this, MSU recently created the MSU Compliance Hotline as a way for faculty, staff, students and the general public to make reports about university compliance issues in confidence. These compliance concerns may be related to accounting and financial, athletics, discrimination or harassment, health and safety, human resources, information security and technology and research matters at the university. Please note that the hotline is not to be used for reporting academic matters or non-academic student conduct matters, which should be reported directly to the campus’ academic affairs or student affairs offices, respectively.

To submit a report using the hotline, individuals may either visit a webpage online or call a toll-free number. Reports submitted via the MSU Compliance Hotline will go through EthicsPoint, a third-party provider, to specific university employees charged with reviewing and evaluating reports. If the individual submitting a report indicates that he or she prefers to remain anonymous, the EthicsPoint system will not collect information about that person’s identity. The few MSU employees who have access to the EthicsPoint system will evaluate the validity of reports while treating information received from the system confidentially.

It’s important to note that compliance hotlines like this one are becoming standard at larger universities, in part because of federal guidelines. And, while the university cannot guarantee anonymity, the system is designed to protect confidentiality and anonymity.

To learn more about the MSU Compliance Hotline, or to make a report, please visit www.msucompliancehotline.ethicspoint.com or call 855-753-0486. To learn more about MSU’s and the state of Montana’s compliance requirements, please visit http://www.montana.edu/policy/ or http://leg.mt.gov/bills/mca_toc/2_2.htm.

Tobacco Free Campus

On August 1, 2013 MSU became a Tobacco Free Campus.  This policy was adopted to mitigate exposure to second-hand smoke and to help reduce the amount of litter on campus. Anyone who is present on campus, including employees, students, visitors, guests, and contractors are required to comply with the policy, which is in effect at all times.  The policy is available at http://www.montana.edu/health/healthpromo/tobacco.php/.

MSU POLICIES ON NON-TENURE TRACK FACULTY

Non-Tenure Track Collective Bargaining Agreement
http://www.montana.edu/provost/nontenure-cba/

The purpose of this agreement includes but is not limited to establishing the terms and conditions of employment in regard to working conditions, compensation, benefits and the establishment of an equitable procedure for the resolution of grievances.  This agreement constitutes the entire negotiated agreement between the Parties and supersedes any previous regulations, faculty contracts, previous practices, or policies which are in conflict with the expressed terms of this agreement. This agreement shall constitute the master agreement for all faculty members in the bargaining unit.

MSU JJCBE NON-TENURE TRACK CONTRACT POLICY

Updated Fall 2014

This policy summarizes the terms and requirements of NTT teaching contracts offered in the JJCBE at Montana State University-Bozeman.

NTT Teaching Obligations. Individually and collectively NTT faculty play a vital role in the teaching mission of the Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship. In addition to the basic instructional obligations in the teaching role, NTT faculty members have the obligation to provide professional mentoring to our students. The teaching and mentoring obligations are satisfied through pedagogical preparation, classroom presentation, office hours and informal interaction with students.

NTT Service Obligations. Many NTT faculty play a vital role in service to the College, the institution and the academy through committee service, service to student organizations, service to professional/academic organizations, and in other various functions. Unless specified in the contract NTT faculty members do not have formal service obligations to the College beyond the required service to students through professional mentoring. Service contracts will be stated in workload units for FTE calculations.

NTT Advising Obligations. As described under teaching obligations above, College faculty including NTT faculty members have a primary obligation as professional mentors to all MSU students. In addition, if specified by contract, NTT faculty members may play a formal role as the assigned faculty advisor to JJCBE students. Advising contracts will be stated in workload units for FTE calculations and typically will be 3 workload units per academic year or 1.5 workload units per semester.

Full-time NTT Contracts.  A full-time (1.0 FTE) contract is 30 workload units, most of which will normally be devoted to teaching.  NTT faculty members employed under full-time contracts are expected to work at least 40 hours per week for the College. This expectation does not imply that full-time NTTs work in their MSU offices only; rather, it requires full-time work associated with the College contract. Full-time faculty are expected to hold 5-6 hours per week of regular office hours. Based on agreement with the College administration, service and advising components may be included in an NTT contract (see notes above regarding service and advising). Consulting, expert witnessing, research and service which benefits the College and supports the College mission, are encouraged.   

Part-Time Assignments. Part-time NTT contracts require meeting the teaching and office hour obligations for the courses assigned as well as providing appropriate professional mentoring in all student interactions. Based on agreement with the College administration, service and advising components may be included in part-time NTT contracts (see notes above regarding service and advising). The office hour requirement for part-time NTTs is 1-2 hours per course per week, up to 5-6 hours per week maximum.

Currency. All full-time and part-time NTTs are required to maintain professional and/or academic currency (reference AACSB Standards: http://www.aacsb.edu/accreditation/standards.asp).  Professional currency is achieved through continuing professional practice in the teaching field.  Academic currency is achieved through refereed scholarly contributions, similar to tenure-track faculty. Full-time NTTs are annually provided a faculty development account to support the maintenance of their professional currency. 

Summer Teaching Opportunities. Opportunities for summer teaching are provided to College faculty in the following priority order:

  1. Full-time tenure-track faculty
  2. Full-time NTT faculty
  3. Part-time NTT faculty.

MSU JJCBE NTT FACULTY COMPENSATION POLICY

Compensation for all NTT faculty contracts is calculated on a workload unit basis. Teaching compensation is normally calculated directly from course credits taught, while advising and service assignments are compensated based on a conversion to comparable workload units

The base rate per credit for a new non-tenure track faculty member is $1,697.430 per workload unit

END OF EMPLOYMENT PROCEDURES

At the end of the semester, if you will not be returning to the College the next semester, please:

1.      Make arrangements for returning student work. NO student work should ever be left in a common area for student retrieval. Any student work not given back to the students, along with any grading records, should be placed in a large manila envelope. Please include the course number, semester taught, and your name on the front of the envelope, and give it to Rilla Esbjornson or Eleanor Inglis in Faculty Services, Reid 451. It will be stored for one academic year and then shredded.

2.      Remove all personal belongings from your office.

3.      Remove all personal materials from your computer. If you need assistance with this, contact Jerry Carvalho (jcarvalho@montana.edu, Reid 311, 994-6396).

4.      Update your contact information with Halina Rickman, Reid 412.

5.      Return all MSU keys.

TEACHING RESOURCES

The Bracken Center, Jake Jabs College of Business & Entrepreneurship (457 Reid Hall)

The Bracken Center is working to become a teaching/learning resource center. Accordingly, there is a small library of books on teaching in Reid 457A (Susan Dana’s office). Please drop by to have a look and borrow any books you wish. Titles include:

Curriculum/Course Design

  • Laurie Richlin, Blueprint for Learning: Constructing College Courses to Facilitate, Assess, and Document Learning
  • L. Dee Fink, Creating Significant Learning Experiences
  • Larry K. Michaelsen, Arletta Bauman Knigh & L. Dee Fink, Team-Based Learning: A Transformative Use of Small Groups in College Teaching
  • Alenoush Saroyan & Cheryl Amundsen, Rethinking Teaching in Higher Education: From a Course Design Workshop to a Faculty Development Framework
  • John P. Hertel & Barbara J. Millis, Using Simulations to Promote Learning in Higher Education
  • Barbara J. Duch, Susan E. Groh & Deborah E. Allen, The Power of Problem-Based Learning
  • John C. Bean, Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom
  • M. Neil Browne & Stuart M. Keeley, Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking

Assessment of Learning & Grading

  • Kathryn Martell & Thomas Calderon, Assessment of Student Learning in Business Schools: Best Practices Each Step of the Way (2 vols.)
  • Amy Driscoll & Swarup Wood, Developing Outcomes-Based Assessment for Learner-Centered Education
  • Dannelle D. Stevens & Antonia J. Levi, Introduction to Rubrics: An Assessment Tool to Save Grading Time, Convey Effective Feedback and Promote Student Learning
  • Barbara E. Walvoord & Virginia Johnson Anderson, Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment
  • Peggy L. Maki, Assessing for Learning: Building a Sustainable Commitment Across the Institution

Student Characteristics

  • Bette LaSere Erickson, Calvin B. Peters & Diane Weltner Strommer, Teaching First-Year College Students
  • Neil Howe & William Strauss, Millenials Go to College

Policy

  • National Center on Education and the Economy, Tough Choices, Tough Times: The Report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce

Team Based Learning

Several faculty members at the JJCBE have adopted Team-Based Learning as their teaching strategy (see Michaelsen et al, Team-Based Learning, above). For more information, please see Susan Dana, Director of the Bracken Center, 457A Reid Hall, and take at look at the University of Oklahoma’s TBL website at http://atlas.services.ou.edu/idp/teamlearning/index.htm.

MSU Center for Faculty Excellence

The MSU Center for Faculty Excellence supports the professional development of all faculty (tenure and non-tenure track) across all career stages in the areas of teaching, research/creative activity, outreach/service, leadership, and work/life integration. The Office offers a variety of workshops, seminars, discussion groups, mentoring opportunities, and grants to support professional development and serves as a clearinghouse to connect faculty with shared interests.  The Office maintains a very helpful website at http://www.montana.edu/teachlearn/index.html containing links to a variety of useful resources.

Desire to Learn (D2L)

You are strongly encouraged to use D2L to support your courses. D2L allows you to post online any information about your course you choose. Access is restricted to students enrolled in your course. You might wish simply to post your syllabus and assignments. You may also wish to conduct online chats with your students, provide online quizzes, and/or use the gradebook function which allows students to check their grades in the course online. For more information, visit http://eu.montana.edu/online/faculty/.

Students in the past have used D2L’s email system to attempt to sell class notes. This is a violation of MSU policies. Policies relevant to online teaching and learning can be found at or are linked to http://eu.montana.edu/btc/tlt/resources/MSU_policies.htm.

Rubrics

The College has developed rubrics to assist in assessing student learning in critical thinking, written communication, oral communication and ethical decision making. These rubrics are included in Appendix A. Electronic copies are available on pccommon$ on COB184 in the folder entitled “AoL Committee.”

ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING RUBRICS RESOURCES

The following rubrics are used by the JJCBE Assessment of Learning (AoL) Committee to assess the level of mastery by graduating students of writing, oral communication, critical thinking and ethical decision making skills. With some modification, they can also very effectively be used by faculty to:

  • Communicate expectations for student performance
  • Allow students to assess their own work before they submit their final work to you
  • Allow students to assess each others’ work
  • Grade student work

You can also use the Frameworks included in this Appendix to make explicit for students how you expect them to approach a problem. The JJCBE’s goal is that by the time they graduate, all business students will be able to apply the PEAS concept in their analyses. The Frameworks can also help you design your assignments to ensure that students follow the PEAS process in their work.

The following rubrics can be found on pccommon$ on COB184.

Writing Rubric

Oral Communication Rubric

Critical Thinking Rubric

Ethical Decision Making Rubric

PEAS Framework for Critical Thinking

Ethical PEAS Framework for Ethical Decision Making