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Building Bridges ~ Creating Community

Bozeman – Dr. Tim Meade, who has provided medical and educational support to hundreds of HIV-infected orphans, pregnant women and vulnerable children in Zambia, will speak at Montana State University at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16, in SUB ballrooms B and C.

Meade, medical director of the Tiny Tim project in Zambia, will talk about how his organization came into being and the HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa during his speech, "Working Towards a Better World -- The Tiny Tim and Friends Project." The lecture is free and open to the public.

Meade's work began in 2003 when a woman with AIDS, seven months pregnant and living in a bus terminal in Lusaka, Zambia was found by the sisters of Kasisi Children’s Home. After delivering the baby, Meade and a team of volunteers took turns bringing warm formula to the child. Unable to care for her newborn son, the mother asked “Dr. Tim” to take care of the baby. As a sign of gratitude, she named the baby Tim.

It was Tiny Tim’s story that inspired friends and family around the globe to become involved in Meade's work, resulting in the creation of Tiny Tim & Friends. The organization is dedicated to providing life saving medicine to children and families in Zambia who are in need of HIV/AIDS medication.

A graduate of the University of Minnesota Medical School, Meade lives in Africa with his adopted son, (Tiny) Tim.  He is currently the medical director of Corpmed Medical Centre in Lusaka, Zambia and a volunteer physician at several area orphanages and hospices

Meade's lecture is sponsored by the MSU Leadership Institute, the Diversity Awareness Office at MSU, Montana Student Nurses Association and ASMSU Lively Arts and Lectures.

For more information, please call 406-994-2933 or 994-5828. To learn more about the Tiny Tim project, go to http://www.tinytimandfriends.org/

For Immediate release:

From a faraway place comes a story that will find a home close to your heart. 
Working Towards a Better World – The Tiny Tim and Friends Project
Tuesday September 16, 2008
7pm SUB ballrooms B & C

In 2003, a woman with AIDS, seven months pregnant and living in a bus terminal in Lusaka, Zambia was found by the good sisters of Kasisi Children’s Home. After delivering the baby, Tim Meade, M.D. and a team of volunteers took turns bringing warm formula to the child. Unable to care for her newborn son, the mother asked “Dr. Tim” to take care of the baby. As a sign of gratitude, she named the baby Tim.

It was Tiny Tim’s story that inspired friends and family around the globe to get involved. As a result, Tiny Tim & Friends was created. On September 16, Montana State University welcomes Dr. Tim Meade, Medical Director of Tiny Time and Friends, who will share about his experiences providing medical and educational support to hundreds of HIV-infected orphans, pregnant women and vulnerable children in Zambia. The Tiny Tim & Friends organization is dedicated to providing life saving medicine to children and families in Zambia who are in need of HIV/AIDS medication. All members of the community are invited to attend free of charge.

Sponsored by the MSU Leadership Institute, the Diversity Awareness Office at MSU, Montana Student Nurse's Association and ASMSU Lively Arts and Lectures.

For more information, please call 406-994-2933 or 994-5828.

Interview Opportunities: Interview with Dr. Tim Meade, Medical Director of Tiny Tim and Friends, and keynote speaker for this event. Learn how he’s working to make a difference in the lives of many Zambian families affected by AIDS.

FACTS:

  • AIDS kills as many as 400 people a day in Zambia.
  • AIDS has orphaned over 1 million children in Zambia.
  • 75% of all Zambian families are caring for at least one orphan.
  • More than 50% of all hospital beds in Zambia are now occupied by AIDS related cases.
  • Regionally, about a million children a day need AIDS medications or face imminent death – currently leass than 20% of these children are finding their way to treatment.