Montana State University

Ecology Seminar Schedule

Spring Semester 2014

Ecological Sciences Seminar Series
Ecology Department
Thursdays 3:30-4:30, 304 Lewis Hall

BIOE 555 Communications in Ecological Sciences SEMINAR SERIES

This new course for graduate students, BIOE 555, will be the basis for the spring Ecological Sciences Seminar Series. This course will require students to gain experience presenting scientific information in a variety of communication methods. The seminar format and schedule will be significantly different than the fall semester series, but the topics will continue to be centered in ecology. Graduate students in the course will be preparing several 10-15 minute presentations for each session. Topics will be presented in a variety of formats. The first four weeks will consist of 12-minute presentations focused on a scientific paper(s), the next four weeks will consist of 12-minute presentations without slides and the topic will be their thesis or dissertation research, and the last three weeks will consist of PechaKucha presentations (these are timed presentations 20 slides and 20 seconds per slide [6:40 to get’r done])—this format is to give them experience presenting complex science to lay audiences. The theme for each date's presentations and individual abstracts will be provided a week in advance. Students will begin preparing their presentations during the first weeks of the semester. The seminar series will begin February 7th.

Attendance from campus and extended communities is encouraged and requested. As most of you know, creating presentations and presenting take a lot of time and energy so please respect their efforts by attending seminar.

All who attend will be invited to evaluate each presentation.

Advance notice is requested so that accommodations can be made for special needs, thank you.

Date
Seminar Details
Feb. 6

12-minute professional paper presentation
  • Mike Davis
  • Does size matter for hypoxia tolerance in fish?
  • Carson Butler
  • Pneumonia in bighorn sheep: different perspectives on a complex disease
Feb. 13

12-minute professional paper presentation
  • Laura Heil
  • Pollinators' Response to Disturbance: To Bee or Not to Bee
  • Luke Holmquist
  • Passage Success of Lake Sturgeon: Effectiveness of an Existing Structure
Feb. 20

12-minute professional paper presentation
  • Heather Bowen
  • The Relationship between Juvenile Survival and Salmon Recovery: Evidence Supports a Change in Strategy
  • Jesse DeVoe
  • Is there science in citizen science? Evidence from mountain goats in Glacier National Park
  • Adam Kehoe
  • Some Like it Hot: The Role of High Severity Fire in Ecological History and Forest Management
Feb. 27
12-minute professional paper presentation
  • Kole Stewart
  • Lake Trout from Bad to Worse: Impacts on Grizzly Bears and Elk in Yellowstone National Park
  • Brittany Trushel
  • Competition in Animal Populations: How Communities are Structured by Competitive Interactions
  • Michael Ebinger
  • Individual Heterogeneity and Ecological Dynamics in Animal Resource Selection Studies
Mar. 6

Postponed
  • AFS and TWS Annual Meetings
Mar. 13
SPRING BREAK
Mar. 20

12-minute thesis or dissertation research presentations
  • Michael Davis
  • Winter Habitat and Survival as Potential Limiting Factors for Arctic Grayling in Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge
  • Luke Holmquist
  • Reproductive readiness and behavioral ecology of wild hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon in the Missouri River upstream from Fort Peck Reservoir
  • Laura Heil
  • Plant Pollinator Communities in Burned and Logged Areas of Montana
Mar. 27

12-minute thesis or dissertation research presentations
  • Carson Butler
  • Bighorn sheep population dynamics and the role of disease, body condition, and habitat use
  • Brittany Trushel
  • Exploitative Competition for Prey Resources among Native Fishes of the Missouri River with Focus on Managing Species of Concern
  • Kole Stewart
  • Using Otolith Microchemistry to Identify Primary Spawning Tributaries of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in Yellowstone Lake
Apr. 3

12-minute thesis or dissertation research presentations
  • Heather Bowen
  • Intraguild trophic interactions among salmonids and potential effects on reintroduction success
  • Jesse DeVoe
  • Habitat selection of bighorn sheep and mountain goats in the greater Yellowstone: deciphering the difference
  • Michael Ebinger
  • Multiscale functional responses in grizzly bear habitat selection
  • Adam Kehoe
  • Home Range and Foraging Site Selection of Breeding White-Headed Woodpeckers in West-Central Idaho
Apr. 8 GUEST
Research Seminar
  • David Pilliod
  • Supervisory Research Ecologist, USGS - Forest and Fangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Idaho
  • Will Environmental DNA Analysis Revolutionize Our Understanding of Species Distributions and Biodiversity?
Apr. 10

Pecha Kucha presentations
  • Carson Butler
  • Stranger than Fiction: The Octopus
  • Luke Holmquist
  • New Zealand's Most Unwanted: Invasive Mammals
Apr. 17

Pecha Kucha presentations
  • Brittany Trushel
  • Reuniting land masses separated by eons: How the Columbian Exchange reshaped the American landscape
  • Michael Ebinger
  • Trouble at the bottom of the food chain from on top of the worl: Can harvest theory help?
  • Laura Heil
  • The Flight of the Honey Bee: Head Butts and Waggle Dances in Apis mellifera
  • Heather Bowen
  • Think Like an Ecogeomorphologist
Apr. 24

Pecha Kucha presentations
  • Kole Stewart
  • Freshwater Mussels: The Original Anglers
  • Mike Davis
  • Title: not received
  • Jesse DeVoe
  • Fleet-footed and fancy-free: the pronghorn and its past
  • Adam Kehoe
  • Wolverine distribution and snow-covered, low-productivity environments