First, to check whether a course has been approved and transferred to MSU in the past, access the MSU Transfer Equivalency Guide at https://prodmyinfo.montana.edu/pls/bzagent/hwzkxfer.p_selstate. This guide includes courses (but not necessarily the entire catalog) from other institutions that have been transferred to MSU, and the associated MSU equivalency. If the course you wish to take at another institution exists and is directly equivalent to the MSU course of interest, no further action is required.

If the course has been evaluated as an elective (ELEC), then unless any other action is taken, it will count as an elective and not necessarily be directly substitutable for an MSU course. For example, if a microeconomics course from an international university is evaluated to transfer to MSU as ELEC 200, then the credit hours from this course will count toward your 120-credit hour requirement, but will not count toward satisfying your economics, agricultural business, or financial engineering program requirements.

If you are not certain whether an economics or agricultural business course at another institution will fulfill the requirements of the Economics or Agricultural Business program, contact Dr. Isaac Swensen, Certifying Officer with the following information: name and location of the institution, name and number of the course, and course syllabus (or at least a course description). If the course is evaluated as equivalent to a course in the Economics or Agricultural Business programs, you will receive a written course equivalency confirmation. It is always advisable to receive confirmation of course equivalency prior to taking a course at another institution.

Please contact Dr. Isaac Swensen, Certifying Officer with the following information: name and location of the institution from which the transfer occurred, name and number of the course, and course syllabus (or at least a course description). If the course is evaluated as a direct equivalent to a course in the Economics or Agricultural Business programs, you will receive a written course equivalency confirmation and your transcript will be changed to reflect the change.

If a student believes he or she knows the course material, then, as mandated by the Curriculum, Enrollment, and Graduation's "Advanced Standing by Challenge" policy, for any course in any department, the student may challenge the course.  To be successful, the student would have to perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive challenge exam that tests the student’s detailed knowledge of all the material in the challenged course. The challenge exam is composed by the DAEE resident instruction committee (RIC) by compiling questions from past comprehensive final exams. The completed challenge exams are then graded by members of the RIC and a course exemption is recommended for students who are able to demonstrate knowledge of course materials at least at the C level. The RIC is a standing committee and can administer and grade challenge exams whenever students request them. This course challenge policy has been consistently in place in the DAEE for many years. 

Please contact Dr. Isaac Swensen, Certifying Officer for more information about the challenge exam.