Fuel Cells

Ryan Anderson

Dr. Ryan Anderson is an assistant professor in the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department and manages a low temperature PEM fuel cell lab. The focus is on the transport phenomena occurring within the cell, and how that relates to overall performance. Dr. Anderson can be reached at 406-994-5701 or ryan.anderson@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.chbe.montana.edu/staff/anderson.html

Paul Gannon

Dr. Paul Gannon, an associate professor in the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, manages MSU's high temperature corrosion and corrosion protection laboratory. There, Dr. Gannon develops protective surface coatings to prevent corrosion on metallic components that are vital to solid oxide fuel cell systems and many other high-temperature energy conversion devices.

Website: www.chbe.montana.edu/sofc/

Hongwei Gao

In the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dr. Hongwei Gao develops power converters for solid oxide fuel cell systems. These DC-to-AC converters condition the power produced by fuel cells. Dr. Gao has developed soft-switched converters for residential fuel cell power systems and is working on modular inverters for large-scale fuel cell systems. Dr. Gao can be reached at 406-994-5973 or at hgao@ece.montana.edu.

Website: www.coe.montana.edu/ee/hgao/

Yves Idzerda

Physics professor Dr. Yves Idzerda researches high-performance, low-cost solid oxide fuel cells. He focuses on the places in fuel cells where different materials meet “the "interfaces." These areas can degrade during fuel cell operation, which reduces the cell's performance and life-span. Dr. Idzerda uses X-rays to probe the interface material and find the causes of degradation, which he hopes will ultimately lead to more reliable sources of clean energy. Dr. Idzerda can be reached at 406-994-7838 or at idzerda@physics.montana.edu.

Website: www.physics.montana.edu/people/facview.asp?id_PersonDetails=16 

Hashem Nehrir

Electrical and computer engineering professor Dr. Hashem Nehrir's research has produced physically-based, dynamic models of fuel cells that can be used to study distributed power generation and fuel cell vehicles. He also looks at how to get fuel cells and other power sources, such as wind and solar, to work together efficiently. Dr. Nehrir can be reached at 406-994-4980 or at hnehrir@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.coe.montana.edu/ee/hnehrir

Mark Owkes

Dr. Mark Owkes, an assistant professor in the Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Department, develops computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods and applies to many gas-liquid multiphase flows including PEM fuel cells and the atomization of bio-fuels. The high fidelity CFD simulations are run on thousands of compute cores and provide a large amount of data. This data can provide insight into the phenomenological processes of the flow and lead to discoveries that improve the efficiency of engineering devices. Dr. Owkes can be reached at 406-994-6300 or at mark.owkes@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.montana.edu/mowkes/

Hugo Schmidt

Physics professor emeritus Dr. Hugo Schmidt uses light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements to study materials used in solid oxide fuel cells. Schmidt wants to understand how well ions, which carry charges inside fuel cells, flow through those materials. Dr. Schmidt can be reached at 406-994-6173 or at schmidt@physics.montana.edu.

Website www.physics.montana.edu/people/faculty/schmidt-hugo.html 

Steven R. Shaw

Dr. Shaw is a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, working on modeling and control of energy systems, storage, and conversion devices. Dr. Shaw can be reached at 406-994-5982 or sshaw@montana.edu.

Website: http://matrix.coe.montana.edu/

Stephen Sofie

Dr. Stephen Sofie is Assistant Professor in the Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Department. Metal electro-catalysts represent the standard for high performance, low cost high temperature fuel cell electrodes. Moving towards solution infiltrated catalysts to achieve nano-scale (10-80 nm), high surface area electro-catalyst coverage, yields some detriment to the use of nano-metallic catalysts. Thermodynamic degradation and hence coarsening of fine catalyst particles can lead to catalyst attrition and performance drops, ultimately limiting the long term stability of these nano-scale materials at temperatures up to 900C. Research activities are examining novel approaches to stabilizing nano-metal catalysts by the incorporation of tailored secondary phases at the catalyst/support interface to mitigate degradation by physically binding the catalyst. Mixtures of aluminum and titanium oxides have been shown to react in-situ to fuel cell electrolyte materials forming complex functional oxides that dramatically enhance fuel cell electrode longevity. Dr. Sofie can be reached at 406-599-4481 or ssofie@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.coe.montana.edu/me/faculty/sofie/

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Wind

Doug Cairns

Dr. Doug Cairns, a professor in the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, studies composite materials used in primary structures. This research includes developing materials and manufacturing processes, as well as design, analysis and testing. He is currently working on manufacturing and testing new materials for wind turbine blade structures.

Website: www.coe.montana.edu/me/faculty/cairns/ 

Robb Larson

Along with other activities, Dr. Robb Larson's teaching assignment at MSU includes the “Wind Energy Engineering” and “Renewable Energy Technologies” courses. He created these two senior-level courses in the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department to provide students with a diverse background in Wind, Solar, Hydroelectric, Biofuels, and other engineering and non-engineering issues associated with the dynamic, evolving field of renewable energy. He also serves as the Director of the NREL-designated Montana Wind Applications Center at MSU, and has worked in support of outreach, teaching, and research efforts in Wind Energy. Dr. Larson's research reaches across the areas of energy in wind, solar, hydroelectric, biofuels, and renewable & sustainable energy systems and issues. Dr. Larson can be reached at 406-994-6420 or at robb.larson@montana.edu

Dan Samborsky

In the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, materials specialist Dr. Dan Samborsky studies levels of fatigue in materials intended for use in wind turbine blades. Fatigue data gathered at MSU is used in conjunction with federal data to help students and researchers learn what factors affect the design of composite materials and structures. Dr. Samborsky can be reached at 406-994-7186 or at daniels@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.montana.edu/composites

Paul C. Stoy

Dr. Paul Stoy is Assistant Professor of Surface-Atmosphere Exchange in the Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department. His research reaches across the areas of energy in carbon sequestration, wind, solar, and biofuels. Dr. Stoy's research focuses on the transport of carbon, energy, and water between the land surface and the atmosphere, primarily using the eddy covariance technique. Research interests also include solar radiation measurements and modeling, bioclimatology, and hydrometeorology. Dr. Stoy can be reached at 406-600-3577 or at paul.stoy@montana.edu.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/stoylab/homebit.ly/StoyGScholar 

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Carbon Sequestration

Dave Bowen

Dr. Dave Bowen, a research professor in the Earth Sciences Department, studies the structure and geology of underground reservoirs to determine how much carbon dioxide they might be able to sequester. Much of his attention has been focused on Kevin Dome, a geologic formation in north-central Montana that acts as a natural CO2 reservoir. Dr. Bowen can be reached at 406-994-6916 or at dbowen@montana.edu.

Website: www.montana.edu/wwwes/facstaff/bowen.htm 

John Carlsten

Physics professor John Carlsten works with professors Kevin Repasky and Joe Shaw to develop LIDAR systems that use lasers to monitor carbon sequestration sites and watch for any leakage. Dr. Carlsten can be reached at 406-994-6176 or at carlsten@montana.edu

Dr. Carlsten also collaborates with professors Kevin Repasky and Joe Shaw of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department on optical source development and applications to LIDAR studies. Current areas of interest in the LIDAR studies involve detection of water vapor as well as aerosols in the atmosphere, scattering of laser light from honey bees in connection with explosive detection, and monitoring of CO2 in connection with sequestration for global warming.

Website: http://www.physics.montana.edu/people/faculty/carlsten-john.html 

Sarah Codd

Dr. Sarah Codd is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and co- director of the Magnetic Resonance Laboratory in the MSU College of Engineering. The MR Lab is a world leader in applying MR methods to characterize transport processes in porous media, including the use of low field MR techniques to study and monitor in the subsurface. Dr. Codd can be reached at 406-994-1944 or at scodd@montana.edu.

Website: www.montana.edu/mrm

Al Cunningham

Dr. Cunningham is responsible for strategic planning and project management for Energy Research Institute (ERI) projects involving Biomineralization for CO2 storage security, well bore integrity, and fly ash stabilization. Dr. Cunningham can be reached at 406-994-6109 or at al_c@erc.montana.edu.

Website: http://www.biofilm.montana.edu/

Stacey Fairweather

Stacey Fairweather is the Big Sky Carbon Partnership's (BSCSP) Site Characterization & Data Manager. Her primary responsibilities are to direct the partnership's data management strategy, coordinate research activities with geology and modeling teams, and oversee development of BSCSP’s geospatial resources and tools. Stacey has a B.S. in Geology from the University of Wyoming and a M.S. in Geological Sciences from the University of Oregon. 

Robin Gerlach

Dr. Robin Gerlach is a professor in Center for Biofilm Engineering (CBE), Energy Research Institute (ERI), Thermal Biology Institute (TBI) and the Montana Institute on Ecosystems (IoE) at MSU. Dr. Gerlach's research focuses on the development of microbial biofilm technologies for beneficial purposes, including microbially enhanced carbon sequestration at geologic CO2 injection sites, microbially enhanced coal bed methane production, and phototrophic biotechnology including algal biofuels. Dr. Gerlach can be reached at 406-994-1840 or at robin_g@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.biofilm.montana.edu/people/faculty/gerlach-robin.html

Dave Lageson

Geology professor David Lageson studies the structural geology and tectonic evolution of the Rocky Mountains. His work involves analyzing carbon sequestration sites across the region all the way from the core sample scale to the basin-wide scale. Dr. Lageson can be reached at 406-994-6913 or at lageson@montana.edu.

Website: www.montana.edu/wwwes/facstaff/lageson.htm 

Rick Lawrence

Dr. Rick Lawrence is a professor in the Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department and Director of the Spatial Sciences Center. Dr. Lawrence conducts research on natural and managed landscapes using remotely sensed imagery. He uses multi- and hyper-spectral sensors to monitor carbon sequestration sites for leakage. He uses moderate-resolution multispectral data to map and model feedstocks for conversion of beetle-killed trees to biofuels. Dr. Lawrence can be reached at 406-994-5409 or rickl@montana.edu.

Website: http://remotesensing.montana.edu/

Adrienne Phillips

Dr. Adrienne Phillips is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Civil Engineering Department at MSU. She is also a faculty associate of MSU’s Center for Biofilm Engineering and the Energy Research Institute. Dr. Phillips’ research focuses on the use of biofilm-based technologies for the improvement of deep subsurface wellbore integrity. Dr. Phillips can be reached at 406-994-2119 or adrienne.phillips@biofilm.montana.edu.  

Website:  http://www.coe.montana.edu/ce/faculty/PhillipsAdrienne.html 

Scott Powell

Dr. Scott Powell is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Spatial Analysis in the Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department. His research and teaching interests include the acquisition and analysis of remotely sensed imagery, GPS, GIS, and field observations to quantify terrestrial carbon stocks and fluxes in forest, agricultural, and human-engineered systems. Dr. Powell can be reached at 406-994-5017 or at spowell@montana.edu.

Website: http://landresources.montana.edu/dept/faculty/powell-s.html

Kevin Repasky

Dr. Kevin Repasky works in the field of applied optics and optical remote sensing. Dr. Repasky has developed several lidar and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments for environmental applications including carbon sequestration site monitoring. Dr. Repasky also works with hyperspectral imaging and is developing techniques for large area monitor flight based monitoring for environmental applications. Dr. Repasky also works in the fields of photonics, laser development and non-linear optics. Dr. Repasky can be reached at 406-994-6082 or repasky@ece.monana.edu.

Website: http://www.physics.montana.edu/optics/index.html

Joseph D. Seymour

Dr. Joe Seymour is a Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and co- director of the Magnetic Resonance Laboratory in the MSU College of Engineering. The MR Lab is a world leader in applying MR methods to characterize transport processes in porous media. Dr. Seymour can be reached at 406-994-6853 or jseymour@montana.edu.

Website: www.montana.edu/mrm

Joe Shaw

Electrical engineering professor Joe Shaw develops and tests optical sensors for monitoring underground carbon sequestration sites. Dr. Shaw focuses on multispectral imaging to look for plant stress above a sequestration site that could be a sign of leakage. Dr. Shaw can be reached at 406-994-7261 or at jshaw@montana.edu.

Website: www.coe.montana.edu/ee/jshaw/index.htm 

Colin Shaw

Dr. Colin Shaw is Assistant Research Professor in the Earth Sciences Department. His research areas are: Structural geology, continental tectonics, rheology of natural materials, reactive transport of fluids in the crust, and applications in carbon sequestration. Dr. Shaw can be reached at 406-994-6760 or colin.shaw1@montana.edu

Website: http://www.montana.edu/earthsciences/facstaff/shaw.html

Mark Skidmore

Dr. Mark Skidmore, an assistant professor in the Earth Sciences Department, conducts experimental studies on the geochemical interactions of rock-brine–supercritical CO2 in a high pressure, high temperature flow-through rock core reactor system, designed and built in his laboratory. Current research is focused on using rock cores from formations that are potential geological CO2 sequestration targets and reacting them with reproduced formation brine- supercritical CO2 mixtures. Dr. Skidmore can be reached at 406-994-7251 or at skidmore@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.montana.edu/wwwes/facstaff/skidmore.htm 

Paul C. Stoy

Dr. Paul Stoy is Assistant Professor of Surface-Atmosphere Exchange in the Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department. His research reaches across the areas of energy in carbon sequestration, wind, solar, and biofuels. Dr. Stoy's research focuses on the transport of carbon, energy, and water between the land surface and the atmosphere, primarily using the eddy covariance technique. Research interests also include solar radiation measurements and modeling, bioclimatology, and hydrometeorology. Dr. Stoy can be reached at 406-600-3577 or at paul.stoy@montana.edu.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/stoylab/homebit.ly/StoyGScholar

Lindsey Tollefson

Lindsey Tollefson is the Project Manager for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. She works on planning, risk analysis, budgeting, resource allocation, scheduling, and tracking and reporting on milestones and deliverables for the project. She works directly with project partners and subcontractors to accomplish the project goals and objectives. She also has a lead role in project communications, stakeholder engagement, public outreach and media relations. She is responsible for overseeing all permitting for the project at the state and federal level. In February 2015, Lindsey obtained her Project Management Professional (PMP) certification through the Project Management Institute. Lindsey holds a B.S. in biology from Montana State University and a M.S. in environmental science from Florida International University.

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Biofuels

Ross Carlson

Dr. Ross Carlson, assistant professor in MSU's Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, and Center for Biofilm Engineering, is part of the Algal Biotechnology Group, a small consortium of MSU faculty members who want to optimize oil production from algae. Others in the group are Drs. Keith Cooksey, Matthew Fields, and Brent Peyton. Dr. Carlson can be reached at (406) 994-3631 or rossc@erc.montana.edu.

Website: www.chbe.montana.edu/rossc/ 

Chengci Chen

Dr. Chengci Chen, superintendent at the Eastern Agricultural Research Center in Sidney, tests the characteristics and compositions of different grasses and crop residues to see which types can best be converted to cellulosic ethanol. Dr. Chen also investigates cropping systems to produce canola and camelina oilseeds for biodiesel. He is part of a regional partnership investigating the use of CRP land for producing cellulosic ethanol feedstock. Dr. Chen can be reached at (406) 423-5421 or cchen@montana.edu.

Website: http://ag.montana.edu/carc/ 

Keith Cooksey

Dr. Keith Cooksey, research professor emeritus in MSU's Microbiology and Immunology Department, formed the Algal Biotechnology Group, a small consortium of MSU faculty members who want to optimize oil production from algae. The group includes Drs. Cooksey, Matthew Fields, Brent Peyton, and Ross Carlson. Dr. Cooksey can be reached at (406) 994-6136 or umbkc@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.montana.edu/mbi/facultyandstaff/KeithCooksey.html

Matthew Fields

Dr. Matthew Fields is the director of the Center for Biofilm Engineering and professor in Microbiology and Immunology. In the area of biofuels, we study eukaryotic photoautotrophs in terms of the accumulation of biomass and lipids as well as the recycling of water and nutrients. In the area of subsurface hydrocarbons, we study the biogenic conversion of coal to natural gas. Dr. Fields can be reached at (406) 994-7340 or matthew.fields@biofilm.montana.edu.

Website: http://www.biofilm.montana.edu/people/faculty/fields-matthew.html

Robin Gerlach

Dr. Robin Gerlach is a professor in Center for Biofilm Engineering (CBE), Energy Research Institute (ERI), Thermal Biology Institute (TBI) and the Montana Institute on Ecosystems (IoE) at MSU. Dr. Gerlach's research focuses on the development of microbial biofilm technologies for beneficial purposes, including microbially enhanced carbon sequestration at geologic CO2 injection sites, microbially enhanced coal bed methane production, and phototrophic biotechnology including algal biofuels. Dr. Gerlach can be reached at 406-994-1840 or at robin_g@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.biofilm.montana.edu/people/faculty/gerlach-robin.html

Rick Lawrence

Dr. Rick Lawrence is a professor in the Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department and Director of the Spatial Sciences Center. Dr. Lawrence conducts research on natural and managed landscapes using remotely sensed imagery. He uses multi- and hyper-spectral sensors to monitor carbon sequestration sites for leakage. He uses moderate-resolution multispectral data to map and model feedstocks for conversion of beetle-killed trees to biofuels. Dr. Lawrence can be reached at 406-994-5409 or rickl@montana.edu.

Website: http://remotesensing.montana.edu/

Chaofu Lu

Dr. Chaofu Lu is associate professor of Plant Sciences. The Lu lab focuses on optimizing fatty acid composition and increasing seed oil production of oilseed crops (e.g., Camelina) for fuel and industrial uses. Dr. Lu can be reached at (406) 994-5741 or clu@montana.edu.

Website: http://plantsciences.montana.edu/facultyorstaff/faculty/lu/index.html

Mark Owkes

Dr. Mark Owkes, an assistant professor in the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, develops computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods and applies to many gas-liquid multiphase flows including PEM fuel cells and the atomization of bio-fuels. The high fidelity CFD simulations are run on thousands of compute cores and provide a large amount of data. This data can provide insight into the phenomenological processes of the flow and lead to discoveries that improve the efficiency of engineering devices. Dr. Owkes can be reached at 406-994-6300 or at mark.owkes@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.montana.edu/mowkes/

Brent Peyton

Dr. Brent Peyton is a Professor on the faculty of the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, is the Director of the Thermal Biology Institute at Montana State University (MSU), and on the Executive Board of the NSF Center for Biofilm Engineering. With 27 years of experience with biological systems, his research is focused on characterizing microorganisms and microbial processes to solve problems in natural and engineered systems, including development of biofuels and bioremediation systems.  Dr. Peyton has authored and co-authored 108 peer-reviewed publications and holds five patents in applications of environmental biotechnology. Dr. Peyton can be reached at at (406) 994-7419 or BPeyton@coe.montana.edu.

Website: www.chbe.montana.edu/BPeyton/ 

Alice Pilgeram

Alice Pilgeram, director of MSU's Biobased Institute and researcher in the Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology Department, focuses on developing camelina as a Montana crop for fuel and food. Camelina oil can be used to make biodiesel or used as an Omega-3 oil. Pilgeram can be reached at (406) 994-1986 or pilgeram@montana.edu.

Website: http://plantsciences.montana.edu/facultyorstaff/faculty/pilgeram

Paul C. Stoy

Dr. Paul Stoy is Assistant Professor of Surface-Atmosphere Exchange in the Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department. His research reaches across the areas of energy in carbon sequestration, wind, solar, and biofuels. Dr. Stoy's research focuses on the transport of carbon, energy, and water between the land surface and the atmosphere, primarily using the eddy covariance technique. Research interests also include solar radiation measurements and modeling, bioclimatology, and hydrometeorology. Dr. Stoy can be reached at 406-600-3577 or at paul.stoy@montana.edu.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/stoylab/homebit.ly/StoyGScholar

Stephanie Wettstein

Dr. Stephanie Wettstein is assistant professor in Chemical & Biological Engineering Department. The overall goal of Dr. Wettstein's research is to increase the sustainability of biofuels and chemicals produced from lignocellulosic biomass by improving processing methods, increasing reaction rates, and increasing the yields of biomass carbon that is converted into biofuels and chemicals. This includes developing novel, high yield biomass deconstruction methods, improved biomass conversion processes to increase catalyst stability, and separation methods using zeolite membranes. Dr. Wettstein can be reached at 406-994-5928 or stephanie.wettstein@montana.edu.

Website: http://www.chbe.montana.edu/staff/wettstein/index.html

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