The Office of Student Engagement and the Associated Students of Montana State University hosted the very first MSU Diversity Symposium on March 29th, 2018. The intention of the event was to create a space and time that recognizes, validates, and appreciates all the services, research, and knowledge offered at MSU and the Bozeman Community. 

2018 Symposium Schedule

9:00am-10:00am

Breakfast and Opening Remarks

Ballrooms BCD

10:00am-5:00pm

Student Art Market

Intended Audience: All

 

Ballroom A

10:00am-11:30am

Diversity includes Disability: Inclusive Higher Education at MSU

Presented by the College of EHHD and The Taishoff Center from Syracuse University

When the new LIFE Scholars program launches in the fall of 2018, MSU will join over 260 universities and colleges who have opened access to a college experience for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This session will provide an introduction to inclusive higher education for this diverse group of learners. Presenters from Inclusive U at Syracuse University will discuss model programs that have been established, potential barriers programs may face and ways to address them, and preliminary outcomes from across the US. Focus will be on meeting the needs of students with and without disabilities as they co-learn on a college campus using principles of Universal Design for Learning. Presenters from MSU will discuss the development of the LIFE Scholars program and share how students can get involved. Participants will come away with an understanding of disability as diversity in the college setting.

Intended Audience: All

 

Room 235

10:00am-11:00am

My Black Experience at MSU

Presented by the Black Student Union

A panel composed of students on campus, and the experiences that they have had on campus. The students will be talking about what the Black Student Union has done to get started, and the support they are receiving. Open dialogue at the end!

Intended Audience: All              

 

Room 233

11:00am-12:00pm

My Dildo Called Nicaragua: Exploring the Rhetorical Strategies of Queer Women of Color Author-Activists in the 1980s

Presented by Sonja Benton

As I finished my undergraduate time at MSU, I encountered Gloria Anzaldua and Audre Lorde, and was struck by how deeply they spoke to me. These writers were queer women of color that wrote in the 1980s-a time period I felt was increasingly relevant for me to understand. As I learned more about the particular political movements in the 80s, I drew connections. It felt like the activists doing work around me were using the same kind of language and talking about the same kind of concepts as the writers I had come to love. Basically, I’m studying Lorde and Anzaldua so I can learn to walk in their footsteps, and to, hopefully, begin to understand how their words managed to impact me so deeply. Why is their brand of activism so lasting, even in an age which they never managed to see? And what about their rhetorical choices-from their deep integration of the personal, to their unrelenting anger, to their use of multi-lingualism, and beyond-can create a lasting model for activist language?

Intended Audience: All

 

Room 233

12:00pm-1:00pm

Lunch

Ballrooms BCD

1:00pm-5:00pm

Visualizing Diversity and Empowering a Community of Inclusion

Presented by Tia Goebel

In my program, I will engage students and participants in a process of self-discovery and reflection through art making. Students and participants will be welcome to come up to my table throughout the day to share their thoughts on topics of belonging, inclusion, and community. Students that decide to check out my program will be walked through a short ideation process and then asked to respond to the questions "what does diversity look like to you?” and “what would a more inclusive MSU look like to you?", in words or pictures. Answers will be displayed together in a mural, giving students a unique and powerful space to be seen and heard. My hope is that this project captures the learning and the reflection already taking place throughout day of the Diversity Symposium.

Intended Audience: All

 

Room 233

1:00pm-5:00pm

Indie-Genous Film Festival

Presented by the Society of American Indian Graduate Students

"More than a Word," 1:30 pm                              

"Good Meat," 3:00 pm

Intended Audience: All

 

Procrastinator Theater

2:00pm-3:00pm

College Student's Career readiness: Digital competence and Global Perspective

Presented by Que Tran

The world of work is changing at fast pace across industries as the influence of technology advancement, that requires college students’ flexibility and adaptability to pursue their career in the contemporary society. How college students are preparing for their graduation, what obstacles or barriers they are facing with in order to acquire digital skills and global perspective while they are on college, what skills students perceive priorities to access to the labor market, how students develop self-initiated learning practices, what motivates them to prepare necessary skills that employers are looking for, as well as what supporting systems students are looking for on campus. In addition, how STEM and non-STEM students perceive differently their employability opportunities. These questions are discussion topics.

Intended Audience: All

 

Ballroom D

2:00pm-3:00pm

Storytelling and Computer Science

Presented by Barbara do Amaral(Education) and Mike Wittie(School of Computing)

Nationally, Computer Science is a discipline that needs to better serve American Indian students. One obstacle is that many students find it hard to relate to computer science as a discipline, as it is currently being taught. This presentation addresses issues of access into computer science for rural and American Indian middle school students by implementing a combination of Indian Education for All (IEFA) curriculum and “Alice” a computer program that animates a virtual world. In this project, we analyze stories provided by IEFA and approved for use in classrooms in order to develop a computer science middle school curriculum that incorporates computer science. This analysis includes a differentiation between Indigenous legends, or contemporary lived experiences, connection to students who are located on multiple points of an identity continuum, appropriate developmental ontological perspectives, and the ease of animation in Alice.

Intended Audience: Students and Community Members

 

Ballroom B

3:00pm-5:00pm

Exploring Our Cultural Identities

Presented by Counseling and Psychological Services

This workshop will facilitate an exploration and identification of participants' cultural identities

Intended Audience: All

 

Ballroom D

3:00pm-4:00pm

Telling Our Story: the Tribal College Librarians Institute, Going on 3 Decades

Presented by the Montana State University Library

The MSU Library has been coordinating the Tribal College Librarians Institute since 1990. It is a week-long professional Development opportunity for tribal college librarians from across the US, Canada, and beyond. This niche gathering of librarians serving Indigenous college students is THE professional development gathering of choice for many of our participants, as they come together to gain new cultural and professional knowledge, while also engaging in group problem-solving.

Intended Audience: All

 

Ballroom C

3:00pm-4:00pm

Inclusive Leadership: Changing the Conversation around Who Leaders Are

Presented by the MSU Leadership Institute

This will be an intensive leadership training focused around the six signature traits of the inclusive leadership model. Within this training, participants will gain an in-depth understanding of how they can implement the inclusive leadership model within their organization to begin conversations are who leaders are and how their organization can work towards being more inclusive. Additionally, we will be holding a brief question and answer session with our panelists to understand how they have been able to include inclusive leadership within their organizations. This training will be energetic, information, and highly valuable to all that participate.

Intended Audience: Students

 

Ballroom B

4:00pm-5:00pm

Original Short Story Reading: The Grey In Life

Presented by Bayleigh Bird Hat

I would like to read an original short story I wrote about LGBTQ identity and the impact of not having a supportive community. Then, I'll facilitate a discussion about how we can all be better allies. This is not a "happy ending" story, and I think that's important because we talk about the reality people are facing to push us into making a deeper connection with our role as allies.

Intended Audience: Students

 

Ballroom C

4:00pm-5:00pm

Herstory of Montana State University

Presented by the President's Commission on the Status of University Women

Come hear the stories of the amazing women who have played a pivotal role in shaping Montana State throughout its 125-year history. Women like Una Herrick, the first Dean of Women, who taught women skills to promote their financial independence in the 1920s. Women like the group who challenged gender pay inequities in the 1970s. And today, the President's Commission on the Status of University Women - formed by MSU's first female president, Waded Cruzado - continues to work toward the discovery and elimination of institutional barriers to the success of women. These stories are inspiring the leaders, problem solvers, and innovators of MSU today.

Intended Audience: All

Ballroom B

 

If you have any questions please contact Terry Bradley at 406.281.3495 or asmsudiversity@montana.edu


Terry Bradley|ASMSU Student Director of Diversity and Inclusion| 406.994.2933