The Office of Student Engagement and the Associated Students of Montana State University are committed to elevating the voices of diverse students and organizations of campus, and creating safe, inclusive spaces through programming and best practices. These initiatives are lead by the Student Director of Diversity and Inclusion.

diversitysymposium

The Office of Student Engagement and the Associated Students of Montana State University hosted the second annual MSU Diversity Symposium on March 27th, 2019. The intention of the event was to create a space and time that recognizes, validates, and appreciates all the services, research, and knowledge offered at MSU and the Bozeman Community. 
 
 

Diversity Symposium 2019 Schedule

*Click this link to view the schedule as a PDF

Presenter(s) Name

Presentation Title

Description

Location

Start Time

End Time

Breakfast & Opening Remarks

Join us for breakfast and opening remarks in SUB Ballroom A

SUB Ballroom A

8:00 AM

8:55 AM

Erika Ross

Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women: A Call to Action All of Us Can Answer

Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) is an international crisis making its way into current conversation. Although this crisis has been impacting Indigenous communities since colonization, the incorporation of this ongoing tragedy into mainstream discussion has sparked a new wave of attention and activism from a variety of aspiring allies. Nonetheless, this topic and its corresponding data is confusing, especially when we consider how this crisis impacts Montana and our diverse Native American population. This presentation aims to provide participants with: basic information about MMIW; a look at the causes of this crisis and its relationship to human trafficking; a brief summary of current efforts supporting this crisis; and, most importantly, how aspiring allies, like you, can get involved to support Indian Country defeat this ongoing situation. Solving this issue is not the sole responsibility of Native communities - We are all responsible for finding an end to this crisis.

SUB Ballroom B

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

Micah McFeely

Woahhh… Did They Just Say That?

 

This session will focus on skills for inclusive leadership and facilitation skills for dialogues around challenging topics. The Diversity & Inclusion Student Commons Program Coordinator, Micah McFeely, and a Program Coordinator from Sustained Dialogue will engage attendees by deepening their understanding of identity in the context of power, privilege, and oppression. All session attendees will leave with an enhanced understanding of social identity and more skills to succeed in our increasingly diverse student organizations and clubs on campus.

SUB Ballroom C

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

Kelsay Jensen & Panelists

How to be a Good Ally

Five representatives from different student organizations affiliated with marginalized groups will present as a panel on how people can act as appropriate and effective allies.

SUB Ballroom D

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

Sonja Benton

Re-Mythologizing the Classroom

The classroom is a revolutionary place, or at least it can be. As a part of an institution, classrooms can both uphold and challenge the status of the larger community. The myth of the classroom is a myth of strict guidance, of conformity, or, conversely, as a place to find your meaning in the larger culture. The myths we see of the classroom - in movies, TV, books - paint the space as either wildly outside of the norm or deeply within it. But the classroom can be more than either. It can be a path to learning about structure for the purpose of dismantling it. To illustrate this, I will use Gloria Anzaldúa’s “Seven Stages of Conocimiento,” guided by Kendall Leon and Stacey Pigg’s essay “Conocimiento as a Path to Ethos” (Borderlands/La Frontera 165). Not as a linear, step-by-step process, but as an all at once process of knowing. A creation of community within a culture that largely tries to separate us from one another.

SUB Ballroom B

10:05 AM

11:05 AM

Barbara do Amaral &

Monte Meyerink

Using Storytelling to teach CS in Middle School

The presenters will discuss the Storytelling team's progress on several lesson plans under development, targeted at middle-school students in Montana. The discussion will include background information on how the team incorporates traditional American Indian stories into the lesson plans, and how these lessons will help students gain an understanding of American Indian culture and tribe diversity, as required by IEFA, and in alignment with the Essential Understandings. After the background discussion, the presenters will describe how the lessons are designed to introduce students to computational thinking by using ALICE, a drag-and-drop program. The Storytelling team uses creative techniques to achieve the integration of storytelling with computer science. To showcase our recent work, a copy of the lesson “The Beaded Bag,” used in our first pilot study, will be available for audience perusal.

SUB Ballroom C

10:05 AM

10:35 AM

Que Tran

How do US and International Master Students Explore Their Careers?

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of four US and international master-level student’s career decision making processes. The study was framed using a social cognitive career self-management model. The findings show students’ self-efficacy beliefs are stronger at graduate level than when they were in undergraduate level to explore career horizon, regardless of gender, age, nationality, and majors. Faculty and mentor interactions play a key contextual support role for students to identify their career goals and job search behaviors as well as professional networking. Family support indirectly influences on the US and non-US students’ career decision. Local cultural insights have effects on US students’ job landing expectations, while international students expect to work for international organizations. Students’ self-efficacy directly influence their career exploration goals and adaptive career behaviors such as job applications and director-level-jobs.

SUB Ballroom C

10:40 AM

11:10 AM

Jamelle Phillips & Lyla Brown

Contemporary Issues in the Black Community

This presentation will cover contemporary issues affecting the Black/African American Community, and explain the generational trauma and disparities that are still affecting Black people today.

SUB Ballroom D

10:05 AM

11:05 AM

Lunch & Conversation

This is an opportunity for Symposium to attendees to network and dialogue about their experiences with Symposium presentations. Food for all dietary restrictions will be provided

SUB Ballroom A

11:05 AM

11:30 AM

Keynote Speech

Keynote Speaker to be Announced Soon

 

SUB Ballroom A

11:30 AM

12:35 PM

Lunch & Conversation

Lunch, dialogue, and networking continued

SUB Ballroom A

12:35 PM

1:00 PM

Rachel Tang

The Privilege of Mediocrity

We learn by our mistakes, but who is allowed to make them? When we talk about privilege and its effects on education, we tend to hone in on the access to various opportunities. We picture the upper class legacy scholar whose parents attended Ivy Leagues or could afford expensive SAT tutors. These students, we imagine, work with the opportunities afforded to them and go on to get excellent jobs, maintaining their position at the top of the socioeconomic ladder.

However, we don’t often talk about the privileges of the mediocre college student, who, despite coming from a relatively privileged background, simply does alright. They receive just-passing grades and take on little extracurricular work. They are able to fail once in awhile with no serious long-term repercussions.

How do academic missteps disproportionately affect marginalized populations? This presentation investigates institutional structures,cultural attitudes and academic incentives that perpetuate academic disparity.

SUB Ballroom B

1:00 PM

2:00PM

Monica Kwapisz

Where in STEM? Out in STEM!

Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM) is a national organization focused on empowering LGBTQ+ people in STEM. The organization was founded in 2009, but the Montana State University chapter just turned one year old. MSU has a community of queer students that is organized under the Queer Straight Alliance and a large community of faculty and students in STEM. There are organized groups for multiple minority populations in STEM at MSU, but the queer community is still budding. Come learn more about oSTEM and the realities of being queer in STEM from a combination of research and personal experiences presented by oSTEM at MSU.

SUB Ballroom C

1:00 PM

1:30 PM

Mitchell Meyer

Does College Matter? How Classism Impacts Our Views of Success

In the Fall 2018 semester I conducted research on societal views of success in those who have earned a college degree versus those in trade careers or other workforce areas. In surveying MSU students from the classes of 2019, 20, and 21 I found a significant difference in views of how successful someone was, regardless of how much money they made, in that students saw those with a degree as more successful. My presentation will explore how society instills this class bias in students, especially in high school. I will also present what the data show, the implications of this, and what can be done to change this in the future.

SUB Ballroom C

1:35 PM

1:55 PM

Christy Sofianek, Samuel Buenestro, Emelyn Albright

LIFE Scholars: a Story of Opportunity, Growth and Inclusion

The MSU LIFE (Learning Is For Everyone) Scholars program is the only fully inclusive higher education program in Montana! This pilot program launched in the fall of 2018 and is providing a pathway to education, independence and meaningful employment for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In this lively and engaging presentation, LIFE Scholars and their peer partners (traditional MSU students who provide scholars with academic and social support) will share how their partnerships are impacting themselves, each other, the MSU campus community and beyond. MSU LIFE Scholars staff and faculty will also share details on how the program works and how we can all be part of creating a community where ALL people are valued and included.

SUB Ballroom D

1:00 PM

2:00 PM

Shihua Brazill

Understanding Asian International Students and Their Identity Transformation

The U.S. has become known as a melting pot or salad bowl, and this reputation applies to American universities with many students from diverse Asian cultures. Chinese students make up the largest population of Asian students. The proposed diversity program will introduce the immigration experiences of the first Asians who came to the United States, along with the resulting 1882 Chinese exclusion act. Also, it will focus on identity transformation and Asian American stereotypes in the U.S. The audience will learn about the push-pull factors for Asian American students’ college choice and enrollment patterns. Most importantly, this presentation will share culturally responsive pedagogy for teaching Asian American students

SUB Ballroom B

2:05 PM

3:05 PM

Lizzy Thompson, Ambika Murali, Meagan Key, Rozy Richmond, Jaclyn Wing, Margaret Davies

Women in Engineering: Excelling in a Man's World

This panel will allow attendees the opportunity to understand what role gender plays in an aspiring engineer's path to success. Our panel's goal is to share our personal stories on how we got to where we are with very few role models. Montana State is extremely supportive of Women in Engineering; however, our experiences before college and in industry speak to how the field of engineering is still male dominated. We hope sharing our experiences will not only empower attendees to reach for their career goals regardless of the field, but also help them realize the importance of supporting and mentoring minorities in their career.

SUB Ballroom C

2:05 PM

2:35 PM

Jessica Brito & Dale Hansen

An Introduction to Crescent Montana

This presentation is meant to introduce students to Crescent Montana. Crescent Montana is a 501(c)(3) non-profit and Montana State University student organization whose mission is to serve the public interest by reducing disparities in access to health care in rural and tribal Montana schools, specifically by providing readily available menstrual hygiene products to schools, and access to reproductive health education. We will be discussing Crescent's values, current activities, and future plans as well as who is involved and how one can help us achieve our goals.

SUB Ballroom C

2:40 PM

3:10 PM

Jacqueline Buraga

Being Latino on a Predominantly White Campus

Our goal is to provide an open-question (although we will have some questions to get the ball rolling) panel in which students and faculty can learn about the experiences of Latino students on campus. As one of the fastest growing minorities we feel that there are still many stigmas towards what a Latinx individual looks like, sounds like, or comes from. For that reason we hope to provide a panel of our Latinx students who represent the many definitions of our club.

SUB Ballroom D

2:05 PM

3:05 PM

Liz Preston, Jesse Matthew, Brian Mellott, Liz Garcia, Kaiden Mershon, Jenna Eliel, Kyndra Nevin, Bobbie Zenker

Transitive Property - A Short Documentary

Transitive Property is a short documentary about the lives of four transgender Montanans. We will screen the film and hold a panel discussion with the cast & crew afterwards.

The Procrastinator Theatre

2:05 PM

3:05 PM

Closing Remarks and Call to Action

 

Join us for closing remarks and a unifying call to action.

SUB Ballroom A

3:15 PM

4:00 PM



Jerico Cummings|ASMSU Student Director of Diversity and Inclusion| 406.994.2933