Montana State University
Academics | Administration | Admissions | A-Z Index | Directories

Montana State Universityspacer Mountains and Minds
MSU AcademicsspacerMSU AdministrationspacerMSU AdmissionsspacerMSU A-Z IndexspacerMSU Directoriesspacer
 


Contact Us
HiTEC
Montana State University

Director: Lee Spangler

Assistant to the Director: Michelle Leonti

Tel: (406) 994-1658
Fax: (406) 994-2893
hitec@montana.edu
> Research, Creativity and Technology Transfer  > HiTEC
Hashem Nehrir

Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Contact

Phone: 406-994-4980
E-mail: hnehrir@ece.montana.edu

About

Hashem Nehrir

Hashem Nehrir is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at MSU, where his research is focused on alternative energy power generation system modeling and control. His activity in the HiTEC program is on dynamic modeling and control of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and their distributed power generation applications. Under his direction physically-based dynamic models have been developed for PEM and solid oxide fuel cells. He is continuing his work on modeling of stand-alone and grid-connected of SOFC power generation systems, and hybrid applications of SOFC.

Research

Dr. Nehrir's research is focused on alternative energy power generation system modeling and control. A summary of his HiTEC-related activities is given below.

Fuel Cell Dynamic Modeling: Physically-based dynamic models have been developed for PEM and solid oxide fuel cells. These models are used to evaluate the fuel cell response under different operating conditions and for a variety of applications.

Fuel Cell Power Generation System Modeling: Models of Fuel cell power plants and power electronic interfacing devices (i.e., DC to DC converters and inverters) have been developed and interconnected. Using the above models, dynamic response and control of fuel cell power generation systems, including hybrid fuel-cell/wind/photovoltaic systems, are investigated in grid-connected and stand-alone configurations.

Fuel Cell Load Transient Mitigation: In general, fuel cells are good energy sources under steady-state operation, but they do not respond well under transient conditions. In this research control algorithms are developed so that an auxiliary storage device (such as a battery bank) connected in parallel with the fuel cell power generation system is used to provide power to the load transient and mitigate the transient loads from affecting the fuel cell power plant. As a result, the fuel cell will move slowly from one operating point to another without being negatively affected by the load transient.

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Operation of Fuel Cells: In addition to providing electrical power, fuel cells used in power generation applications provide exhaust heat. The heat can be used for a variety of applications. Under this scenario, the efficiency of the fuel cell system can be improved significantly. In this research, physically-based approaches are used to calculate the efficiency of SOFC and PEMFC power generation systems under CHP operation, and to investigate different CHP applications of these fuel cells.

Publications

  • C. Wang and M.H. Nehrir, “A Physically-Based Dynamic Model for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells,” IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion (accepted).
  • C. Wang and M.H. Nehrir, “Load Transient Mitigation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells,” Proceedings, Fourth ASME International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, Irvine, CA, June 19-21, 2006.
  • C. Wang and M.H. Nehrir, “Distributed Generation Applications of Fuel Cells,” Proceedings, 2006 Power Systems Conference, Clemson, SC, March 14-17, 2006.
  • C. Wang and M.H. Nehrir, and H. Gao, “Control of PEM Fuel Cell Distributed Generation Systems,” IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2006.
  • Caisheng Wang and Hashem Nehrir, “A Dynamic SOFC Model for Distributed Power Generation Applications,” Proceedings, Fuel Cell Seminar, Palm Springs, CA, Nov. 14-18, 2005.
  • M. Hashem Nehrir, Caisheng Wang, and Steven R. Shaw, “Fuel Cells: Promising Devices for Distributed Generation," IEEE Power & Energy Magazine, Vol. 4, No. 1, Jan./Feb. 2006.
View Text-only Version Text-only Updated: 1/5/2009
spacer
spacer
© Montana State University 2006 Didn't Find it? Please use our contact list or our site index.