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Contact Us
International Student & Scholar Services
Debra DeBode, Director
Tel: (406) 994-7180
Fax: (406) 994-1619
debode@montana.edu

MSU Office of International Programs
Montana State University
P.O. Box 172260
400 Culbertson Hall
Bozeman, MT 59717-2260
Office of International Programs
Financial Information

Tuition & Fees

Up-to date information on tuition and fees, as well as estimates for living costs and books, can be found at http://www.montana.edu/wwwcat/expenses/exp2.html . International students on non-immigrant visas are required to pay the non-resident tuition rate. Expenses vary depending on curriculum and personal preferences for accomations.

SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY! SAT-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
Non-resident Freshmen Scholarships for Fall 2009 Applicants
Freshmen students (graduates from secondary school who have not yet attended a post-secondary school or university) who are applying for Fall 2009 admission and take the SAT exam can compete for valuable scholarships. If you qualify, scholarships will be automatically awarded when you are offered admission to Montana State University. To be eligible, you must complete the following as soon as possible:

  1. Apply to MSU by completing the International Undergraduate Application for Admission. The application is downloadable at:
    http://www.montana.edu/international/isss/apply.htm

  2. Have your ACT and/or SAT test scores sent to Montana State University directly from the testing company.
    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/scores/sending.html
Here is what you may qualify for:
 
Your test score:   Amount you may be awarded:
 
33 or greater composite ACT and/or
2140 or higher total SAT*
$60,000 Achievement Award
($15,000 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
29 to 32 composite ACT and/or
1920 to 2130 total SAT*
$30,000 Achievement Award
($7,500 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
28 composite ACT and/or
1860 to 1910 total SAT*
$24,000 Achievement Award
($6,000 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
27 composite ACT and/or
1800 to 1850 total SAT*
$20,000 Achievement Award
($5,000 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
26 composite ACT and/or
1740 to 1790 total SAT*
$16,000 Achievement Award
($4,000 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
25 composite ACT and/or
1680 to 1730 total SAT*
  $12,000 Achievement Award
($3,000 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
24 composite ACT and/or
1620 to 1670 total SAT*
  $8,000 Achievement Award
($2,000 per year renewable for 4 years)
 
23 composite ACT and/or
1560 to 1610 total SAT*
  $6,000 Achievement Award
($1,500 per year renewable for 4 years)

* For Fall 2009, MSU Achievement Awards will be based upon ACT composite scores and / or SAT scores (Math, Critical Reading and Writing)

For more information on other scholarship opportunities, please go to: http://www.montana.edu/wwwnss/scholarships.shtml#sch

International Undergraduate Scholarships

All international undergraduate applicants will automatically be considered for new student scholarships valued at up to US$3,500*. These scholarships are available to qualified international students, freshmen or transfer, applying to begin their studies either fall or spring semester. Documents required in the international undergraduate application will determine eligibility, and no separate scholarship application is required.

Selection is based on previous academic achievement, test scores, potential for success at MSU, and overall fit with the institution and its academic programs. SAT exam score results are not required to compete for these scholarships. Scholarships will be available until all are awarded; therefore, students are encouraged to submit their MSU application early.

These scholarships are available to students during their first year of study at MSU and are renewable on a competitive basis, depending on availability of funds.  To renew, the student must maintain a 3.0 (B) average, demonstrate involvement and contributions to the campus or the community, and apply by the stated deadline each semester. 

*This amount may change if the student is awarded other scholarships from MSU that add up to more than $3,500.

Undergraduate Scholarship Recipients
The Office of International Programs wishes to congratulate the following new undergraduate students who have been awarded scholarships for 2008/2009.


Ankur Saxena

India

Biotechnology

Hongzhi Qilin

PR China

Biotechnology

Precious Mbata

Nigeria

Mechanical Engineering

Yue Sun

PR China

General Studies

Tiphaine Lenoir

France

General Studies

Dapeng Zhang

PR China

Electrical Engineering

Ran Zhu

PR China

Marketing

Yiqing Xu

PR China

Health & Human Development

Da Kun Hu

PR China

Finance

Zi Chun

PR China

Business

Heng Bin Feng

PR China

Finance

Sail Sabnis

India

Computer Science

Janki Patel

India

Biotechnology

Qi Cai

PR China

Business

Chirag Modi

India

Computer Science

Xiaojie Wu

PR China

Nursing

Rajid Chaudhary

Nepal

Biology

Jaeil Byun

South Korea

Business

Yueyang Chen

PR China

Finance

Prashantreddy Keshireddy

India

Electrical Engineering
 

 

International Graduate Assistantships

Teaching and research assistantships are available in many graduate departments. Prospective graduate students should contact their department of choice for information regarding assistantship availability. Non-degree graduate students are not eligible for graduate assistantships nor the associated tuition waivers.

Graduate students may also hold employment in other capacities (i.e., student employment such as custodial, cafeteria help, tutoring, as well as classified, professional or adjunct positions).  Any non-assistantship position must be approved by the College of Graduate Studies prior to accepting employment. (Refer to the section below on Other Student Employment.)

Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTA)

Graduate Teaching Assistants are those graduate students who are involved in instruction, usually of undergraduates. Teaching conducted by GTAs constitutes a significant portion of the total instruction at MSU. Qualified GTAs perform instructional duties in an area of their particular expertise, most often within their home departments, although qualified GTAs may perform teaching duties outside their departments.

Duties include:

  1. actual instruction in a classroom setting;
  2. instruction in recitation sections;
  3. conducting help sessions and holding office hours to advise students on class assignments;
  4. assisting with laboratory setup;
  5. grading papers, exams, laboratory reports, and homework; and
  6. other duties pertaining to the instructional mission of MSU.

MSU faculty members oversee all GTA teaching duties. GTAs are usually assigned to work from 15 to 20 hours per week. Funding is derived from each college's instructional budget through the State of Montana Budget Office's funding for Higher Education.

GTA tuition waivers are available on a limited basis, and eligibility does not guarantee a waiver. By approval of the department or the Graduate Dean, graduate assistantships may be terminated, tuition waivers withdrawn, or salary rates changed at any time. Appointment approval and continuation authority reside with the Graduate Dean. The College of Graduate Studies is in no way obligated to award tuition waivers based on promises made by departments. Refer to the section on Tuition Waivers.

Graduate Research Assistants (GRAs)

Research conducted by Graduate Research Assistants (GRAs) is at the heart of a significant portion of the total sponsored research at MSU. GRAs conduct research in a relevant area of their major course of study, under the direction of a faculty member.

The research, often in consultation with the student's major advisor, is usually a component of the advisor's research that is directly supported by external funding. GRAs are expected to design and carry out a specific research project, which usually forms the basis for a thesis and advances the faculty member's research at the same time. The research and related duties performed by GRAs directly support the research activities of entire departments at MSU.

Duties include:

  1. purchasing, installing, maintaining and operating scientific instrumentation and /or computer equipment;
  2. locating, reading, and summarizing pertinent research articles;
  3. modeling;
  4. reflecting on the state of the field and proposing new research problems;
  5. performing experiments, calculations, and analyzing the results and disseminating new knowledge orally or in written publications;
  6. attending conferences to present results and collaborate with other researchers; and
  7. training and supervising less experienced research personnel.

GRAs are expected to work 15 to 20 hours per week. Any additional time is normally associated with their academic research. Primary sources of funding are from the faculty member's grant or contract funds sponsored by federal agencies, state granting agencies, private industrial funds, and other private sources. Additional sources include departmental returned indirect costs, scholarship and endowment funds.

 

Campus Employment Opportunities

International students who maintain legal status under the regulations set forth by the U.S. government can generally be allowed to work for wages on campus. Permission to work off campus can also be obtained for the purpose of practical training and in a small number of other situations. Students must always check with the Foreign Student Adviser in the Office of International Programs (OIP) to secure work permission and complete required paperwork.

On-campus employment is widely available, and most employers are aware of the need to allow students some flexibility to work around class schedules. Many students work to earn spending money, to pay their living expenses, or to supplement their school funding. Work can also be a good break from studying, help a student make new friends, practice English, or learn new skills. Students are permitted to work up to 20 hours per week in most cases during the academic year, and full-time (40 hours per week) during vacation periods and in the summer. Pay ranges from approximately US$6.00 to $9.00 per hour. Pay checks are issued once per month. Some taxes will be withheld from each paycheck, but students will often be eligible for a full or partial tax refund at the end of the tax year.

To find a job, students should visit the Office of Career Services in the lower level of the Student Union Building (SUB) and read through the on-campus job listings on the bulletin board. Jobs classified as "student employment" are potentially open to all students. Once a possible job is found in the listings, students can speak with the job coordinator to get details about how to apply for the position. Other ways to find an on-campus job include, asking professors or others in the student's major department about possibilities, talking with other students to find out about job opportunities, contacting some of the major employers on campus directly (Food Service, Library, Residence Life, Family Housing, Computer Labs).

 

First jobs are often found in a service position, but as a student gains experience and knowledge about the opportunities on campus, jobs can often be found that relate more closely to the student's study area and that can be useful to include on a resume. Highly motivated undergraduate students can sometimes find paid positions as part of a research project. Graduate students may be offered teaching assistantships (GTAs) or research assistantships (GRAs) in their major department.

Employers will provide training for student employees and outline their expectations for the job. Employers must follow fair practices and treat employees equally. Student employees are well-advised to arrive to work on-time, notify the employer in advance if illness or some other situation prevents them from working as scheduled, follow rules and regulations, and work to fulfill the responsibilities of the job. Building a reputation as a "good worker" is useful in gaining better positions and positive referrals.


View Text-only Version Text-only Updated: 6/01/06
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