Hamerly portrait

Timothy Hamerly

Date: Friday, January 16, 2015
Time: 4:10 PM
Place: Byker Auditorium, Chemistry & Biochemistry Building

Title: Letting Biology Do the Heavy Lifting

Summary:

The ability to rapidly and reproducibly differentiate complex biological fluids is an important part of everything from healthcare to food production. To address this need, we have developed a protein sensor assay that not only speeds analysis but enhances our confidence in differentiating samples. The assay is based on serum albumin, a protein found in the blood stream which transports a wide variety of small molecules throughout the body. Taking advantage of a ready-made biological detector, our protein sensor assay has had great success in tracking biological changes as cells recover from oxidative stress and animals respond to hemorrhagic shock. We have also shown the assay is able to differentiate wine varietals and can be used to follow the aging of whiskey, as well as the spoilage of milk. Current studies are aimed at streamlining biological marker discovery and enhancing the sensitivity of clinical disease markers.

About the speaker:

Timothy Hamerly has developed a novel method for isolating small molecules from complex solutions using serum albumin, a protein found in the blood stream that transports a wide variety of small molecules throughout the body. His method greatly reduces the number of molecules seen by a mass spectrometer, resulting in decreased time spent analyzing data and increased rates of biomarker discovery. Hamerley’s assay has also been used to differentiate stressed animals that have undergone hemorrhagic shock (massive blood loss) from healthy animals in a rapid manner.

He is the recipient of a 2013 Kopriva Graduate Student Fellowship.