Montana State University

Kopriva MSU Faculty Lectureship Recipients

2013-2014

Blake Wiedenheft, Department of Immunology & Infectious Diseases
Blake Wiedenheft examines the mechanisms that viruses use to manipulate their hosts and the counter defense systems that microbes employ to defend themselves from infection. The resilience of life in these seemingly inhospitable environments (i.e., +80C and ~pH3) fueled his curiosity to understand the genetic, biochemical and structural basis for life at high temperatures. He continues to focus his work on the mechanisms of resistance, but instead of high temperate his lab aims to understand how bacteria contend with pervasive viral predators. His work focuses primarily on understanding the structural and functional basis of adaptive immunity in bacteria.

2012-2013

Sandra Halonen, Department of Microbiology
Sandra Halonen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Montana State University. She studies the effects of the parasite Toxoplasma Gondii on the human brain.

2011-2012

Tomáš Gedeon, Department of Mathematical Sciences
Professor Gedeon's interests lie in applied dynamical systems, neuroscience, discrete optimization theory and modeling. He actively collaborates with Center for Computational Biology at MSU on neural coding problems and with colleagues in the Computer Science Department on algorithm development.

2010-2011

Bern Kohler, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Bern Kohler is a professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at Montana State University. He is the recipient of a Kopriva MSU Faculty Lectureship in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Kohler's research focuses on ultrafast laser spectroscopy, DNA photophysics and photochemistry, and solar energy conversion.
   
Mary Cloninger, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Mary Cloninger is an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at Montana State University. She is the recipient of a Kopriva MSU Faculty Lectureship in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Cloninger's research program is based on key questions in chemical biology, including the signaling mechanisms used to control cell functions and the processes that mediate the adhesions and metastatic migrations of cancer cells. Her lab's approach is to synthesize synthetic multivalent frameworks for the study cellular recognition events.