Montana State University

Past Issues

Mountains and Minds: Spring 2014

Spring 2014

An international team led by MSU scientists is putting the past, present and future of wildfire into global perspective
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Mountains and Minds: Fall 2013

Fall 2013

Saul Martinez lost his legs in Iraq. Now he stands up for MSU veterans and those he left behind.
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Mountains and Minds: Spring 2013

Spring 2013

Montana State University faculty and staff members saluted Albert Einstein's wide-ranging legacy with a series of events, "Celebrating Einstein." The celebration was a cavalcade of offerings that not only focused on science, but also on art and creativity. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: Fall 2012

Fall 2012

Just as the Gallatin Valley was waking from its winter hibernation, a Montana State University geology professor and graduate student plunged back into the ice and snow, setting off on a quest that would take them halfway around the world and more than 20,000 feet above it.
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Mountains and Minds: Spring 2011

Spring 2012

Montana State University photography major Sean Foulkes served with the Montana National Guard in Iraq where he carried a camera with him to document life in Iraq. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: Fall 2011

Fall 2011

From the time that Montana State first began more than a century ago, students from small towns have been at the heart of its student body. Rooted in the remote corners of Montana or the tiny towns between them, the road that brought these students to Bozeman carried them far from home and a long way from the familiar. Learn more about 11 MSU students who explain what's great about their Montana small town.
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Mountains and Minds: Spring 2011

Spring 2011

There are people who climb, and then, there are climbers. The Gallatin Valley has plenty of both, but it's the climbers--those with the dirt under their fingernails, the bloody rock bites and vagabond hippie-bus stories to prove it--who have put the local climbing scene on the map. Photo cover by Kelly Gorham. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: Fall 2010

Fall 2010

The Solar Physics Group is prominent because its members don't just study one part of the sun. They delve deep into the interior to learn about its dynamics. They examine the surface to learn how the magnetic fields get pushed around by dense plasma. They look at the area just above the surface--the chromosphere. They study the area above that to understand solar flares and magnetic fields, and then go even farther up to understand how solar wind and space weather interact with the Earth's magnetic field. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: Spring 2010 - VOL. 4, NO. 1

Spring 2010

MSU scientists brave grizzlies, scalding water and leeches in search of new microorganisms in Yellowstone National Park. A dozen MSU scientists hike to a remote area of Yellowstone National Park to study the microbes they collect from one of the hot pools. Cover photo by Kelly Gorham. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: Fall 2009 - VOL. 3, NO. 2

Fall 2009

Geoff Gamble brought a new era and a new optimism to Montana State University when he became the university's 11th president in 2000. As Gamble retired at the end of 2009, Mountains and Minds took a look at his nine-year tenure and how the university was transformed by his vision and leadership. Cover photo by Kelly Gorham. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: Spring 2009 - VOL. 3, NO. 1

Spring 2009

Trout fry create a rainbow of light in a lab near the Aquatic Sciences Lab in Pony. The lab is one tool helping Montana State University scientists understand the mysteries of whirling disease, which once threatened fish in Montana's wild streams and rivers. The project is just one of the reasons MSU has often been called Trout U. Cover photo by Kelly Gorham. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: FALL 2008 - VOL. 2, NO. 2

Fall 2008

An ice-dammed stream of melt water runs along the margin of the Taylor Glacier in Taylor Valley, Antarctica, a Montana State University research site. From the North Pole to the Antarctic, MSU scientists are at the forefront of cold regions research. The university recently opened a $2 million, 2,700-square-foot suite of laboratories, making cold research hot science at MSU. Photo by Scott Montross. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: SPRING 2008 - VOL. 2, NO. 1

Spring 2008

For more than 37 years, MSU's Horseshoeing School has attracted students from around the world, ranging from California cowgirls to a U.S. senator. Affiliated with the MSU College of Agriculture and considered one of the best in the country, the farrier school trains students in a lot more than old-fashioned horse sense. Cover photo by Kelly Gorham. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: FALL 2007 - VOL. 1, NO. 2

Fall 2007

Montana's Crow Reservation is the backdrop for Messengers for Health. The joint project of MSU and a group of Crow women has been so successful using traditional methods to shift local health patterns that it is regarded as one of the country's best community-based research programs. Cover photo by Kelly Gorham. Read the issue

Mountains and Minds: SPRING 2007 - VOL. 1, NO. 1

Spring 2007

It is often said that Montana State University is the "University of the Yellowstone." That's because more MSU faculty use the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as their living laboratory than faculty at nearly any other university. One project, a bear tracking study utilizing cutting-edge Global Positioning System technology, is based in Grand Teton National Park. It was there that MSU photographer Jay Thane captured the cover shot for the inaugural issue of Mountains & Minds. Read the issue