Biology

Cell Biology and Neuroscience

Chemistry and Biochemistry

(CHEM rubric changed to CHMY rubric as of Fall 2009, 580 changed to 591 as of Fall 2010)

Civil Engineering

Computer Science

Earth Science

(ESCI changed to ERTH & GEOL changed to GEO as of Fall 2009)

Education

Electrical Engineering

Health and Human Development

Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

 

Microbiology

 

Plant Sciences

 

Physics

Range Science

 


Biology

BIOE 513 Terrestrial Ecology of Plains and Prairies
Credits:
1
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Joe Bradshaw, MSSE and Ecology Department, MSU-Bozeman

Grassy areas – plains, prairies and meadows – rarely get the attention that lakes do, for example, or forests. But are grassy areas really that boring? What is the difference between the grass in your lawn and the bunchgrass in the field? Why are grasslands of any size important? How does land use change community composition?

In this course, we will take a closer look at one or two grass communities near your home or school and address these questions and others. You will complete six activities in this course:
1) Examine grass plants and learn some of their biology.
2) Locate and describe an important grassland in your area, a park, for example, explaining why it is special.
3) Locate and describe one or two study areas for your class project that ideally could be used for your own classroom activities.
4) Identify 8-10 major plants in your study areas and construct a dichotomous key to the plants that could be used by your students.
5) Quantitatively compare two features between or within your study areas, collecting data and analyzing them statistically (a sample statistics problem will be provided).
6) Write a short paper on your project, following scientific paper format. A “Question of the Week” will spark discussion among class members.

This course will get you outside, investigating areas that you find interesting and relevant to you and your students. It may be combined with BIOL 519, Biology of Riparian Zones and Wetlands, for observing similarities and differences between drier and wetter communities.

Additional Course Information

BIOE 516 Terrestrial Ecology of the Northern Rocky Mountains
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Tad Weaver, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

A field oriented study of Montana ecosystems that uses facts and methods which can be extrapolated beyond the region. Objectives are 1) to introduce Rocky Mountain ecosystems, 2) to relate them to North American and world ecosystems, and 3) to review measurements used to extend our knowledge. Discussion will focus on ways to use material for teaching with 'the scientific method'. The course will be plant and ecosystem oriented; attention to animals will depend on student input.

The ecosystems considered occupy the entire altitudinal gradient ranging from grassland/shrubland through dry forest, and cool moist forest to alpine. Climax communities will be compared with seven traditional questions: what is its ... composition (plants and animals), structure (layers, etc), processes (PS and respiration), distribution in time and space, relation to environment (e.g. temperature and water requirements), and classification (Daubenmire HTs).

An ecosystem may be occupied by vegetation other than climax vegetation. Immature vegetation might be seral, i.e. communities occupying the site soon after disturbance. Or the vegetation might be held in a stable sub-climax by forces such as repeated cultivation or fire. 'Seral' and 'disclimax' vegetation will be observed and compared to each other and to climax vegetation in the light of the seven questions posed above.

While content will focus on Montana ecosystems, the process is central to science and extend beyond ecology to most human pursuits. We will practice discovery using a method (scientific method), associated statistics, and ecological tools. Of tools, we will test some - such as shears, rulers, scales, remote (air/satellite) photos, and the library. Each student will design a project, gather data, analyze it, and write a short paper.

BIOE 519 Biology of Riparian Zones and Wetlands
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Joe Bradshaw, MSSE and Ecology Department, MSU-Bozeman

Building a home along the bank of a river (riparian zone) or draining a wet area (wetland) for “useful” purposes are commonplace activities throughout the country. But how do these activities change the functions of naturally occurring riparian zones and wetlands?

In this course, we will explore the structure and functions of these areas transitional between dry and aquatic communities, and their importance in the natural world. You will complete six activities in this course:
1) Read some on-line material about riparian zones and wetlands, and discuss the material.
2) Locate and describe an important riparian zone or wetland, a park for instance, in your area, explaining why it is special.
3) Locate and describe one or two study areas for your class project that ideally could be used for your own classroom activities.
4) Identify 8-10 major plants in your study areas and construct a dichotomous key to the plants that could be used by your students (or friends).
5) Quantitatively compare three features between or within your study areas, collecting data and analyzing them statistically (a sample statistics problem will be provided).
6) Write a short paper on your project, following scientific paper format. We will have a “Question of the Week” for sparking discussion among class members.

Science standards, federal and state, usually require field activities and ecological understanding. This course will get you outside, investigating areas that you find interesting and relevant to you and your students. This course can be combined with BIOL 513, Terrestrial Ecology of Plains and Prairies, for heightening awareness of the similarities and differences between grasslands and wetter areas.

Additional Course Information

BIOE 520 Understanding & Managing Animal Biodiversity in Yellowstone National Park
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Jay Rotella, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is a dramatic setting composed of lands that vary widely in terms of their elevation, soils, habitat features, & animal diversity, as well as in terms of land ownership, land use, and wildlife management. This course is designed to explore how animal diversity is distributed across the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), why such a distribution exists, & the consequences of those distributions to animal conservation. To gain a better understanding of the causes & consequences of spatial patterns of biodiversity, we will explore a variety of locations in Yellowstone National Park and its surrounding National Forests, Wildlife Refuges, and private lands.

This course will have the following components for studying animal conservation in the GYE in today’s changing world:

  1. Who are the animals of the GYE? Field identification, species ecology and life histories, and species-specific habitat needs.

  2. How are species distributed across the GYE? Where is diversity high versus low? Why might such patterns exist?

  3. How well do the distributions of species overlap with (a) existing National Park lands, (b) other wildlife reserve lands, and (c) private lands?

  4. How can we use knowledge of such patterns to conserve diverse species of wildlife in the GYE?

The course builds foundations in morning lectures, discussion, quizzes and lab exercises. Field trips include visits to diverse habitats in Yellowstone National Park and surrounding lands, techniques of animal identification, and in-depth discussion of key topics in the course. Field trips seek to build an understanding of the unique challenges of and innovative strategies for managing diverse species in a complex and changing world.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Field trips require walking up to 2 miles on moderate slopes on established trails.

Additional Course Information

BIOE 522 Birds of Prey of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternate years (odd)
Instructor:
Dr. David Willey, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed to explore the ecology and habitats of raptor species that live in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Birds of prey include all species of raptors. Raptors are birds with unique specializations for killing prey, e.g., raptorial claw-like feet and massive bills designed to rip, tear, and crush their prey. The course will explore strategies raptors use to find things to eat and safe places to nest. We will pay special attention to the influence of human activities on raptors and their habitats.

This course will have the following components for studying birds of prey in the GYE:

1) Who are the Birds of Prey in the GYE? Field identification of raptors, species ecology and life histories, and species-specific habitat needs.
2) Examination of key principles of raptor population ecology (studying survival and reproduction).
3) Reinforce methods of discovery: raptor responses to human encroachment into wilderness.
4) Review inquiry-based learning: the scientific method and things raptors eat (the concept of “resource availability”).

The course builds foundations in morning lectures, discussion, quizzes and lab exercises. Afternoon field trips include techniques of raptor identification and studying raptor ecology. Field trips will integrate methods to study trends in raptor population status and habitat quality.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Field trips require walking up to 2 miles on moderate slopes on established trails.

BIOE 523 Wildlife Ecology of the Northern Rocky Mountains
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. David Willey, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

The course is designed as an introduction to the Ecology of the Rocky Mountains as showcased within Yellowstone National Park. The Park may well be one of the few intact wild ecosystems in the lower 48 states. The course content will include principles and techniques for studying wildlife populations in the field. This course will also focus on large mammalian and avian wildlife populations that occupy terrestrial ecosystems within the Northern Rocky Mountains. The course will have the following components:

  1. Examine key principles of ecology, particularly population ecology, and review fundamental connections among species, populations, communities, and ecosystems.

  2. Use the platform of ecology to discern methods to study wildlife responses to human disturbances (e.g., habitat loss, increased urban development and encroachment in wilderness, and global warming).

  3. Explore contemporary issues of wildlife management within the Northern Rockies (e.g., wolf reintroductions in Yellowstone National Park).

This course will be based in the wildlife lab on MSU's campus on Monday. During Tuesday through Friday, the course will be field-based. We will leave Bozeman on Tuesday and return to Bozeman on Friday mid-day. We will camp for three nights during the week and cook our meals at campsites. Transportation will be provided by the MSU motor pool (vans) - no personal vehicles permitted (no exceptions).

A maximum of 10 students are allowed to take this course. To enroll in this campus summer field course, email the MSSE Office (dianap@montana.edu) and ask to be added to the waiting list.

Students are expected to provide the following minimum equipment for their camping needs:

  1. One- or two-person, light-weight, non-bulky tent (no big, heavy “family” tents – we won’t have room for these); team up with another student to share a two-person tent if possible

  2. Sleeping bag and pad (no bulky air mattresses)

  3. Basic cooking equipment + utensils (team-up with another student) – no big Coleman stoves or lanterns (bring small, lightweight, back-packing equipment)

  4. Minimal clothing for one week (layers for hot and cold weather)

  5. Largest can available of bear “pepper-spray” (active ingredient = capsaicin)

  6. Personal toiletries, sunglasses, hat, daypack, water bottle, sunscreen, camera, field notebook and pen, etc.

  7. Food for 1 day (we will restock food supplies on a daily basis, or as needed)

  8. Large coolers will be provided for perishable food.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Physical Fitness requirements. The course requires moderate outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to walk several miles, often in relatively steep terrain without established hiking trails. Please contact the instructor before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet these requirements.

See the Summer Bulletin for more information

BIOL 593 Alpine Ecology
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer 
Instructor:
Dr. John Winnie, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

Our primary goals in this course will be to understand how altitude affects the structure, function and evolution of alpine and sub-alpine plants and animals, and to create ways to bring this understanding into the grade 6-12 classroom. A major theme of this class is constraint, which is really the theme of all ecology. Constraints are things that limit distribution and abundance of living things. We will explore and gather data describing the biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) constraints of sub-alpine and alpine environments to infer how these factors affect the form, abundance and niches of a variety of plants and animals.
Through a mix of online, class and field work, students will move rapidly from basic concepts, to hands-on field work and data collection, to the synthesis and presentation of those data. In the field, students will collect data that can in turn be analyzed and interpreted later by their own students. During nightly break-out sessions, students will work on ways to integrate the material we gather in the field into multimedia presentations that can be used in teaching modules. Students will present and share data and teaching module components with each other on the last day of class.
For us to progress smoothly during the class week based out of MSU, 4 weeks of background reading and study are necessary. Pre-class week materials, including homework assignments, will be posted on the course’s Desire to Learn (D2L) website beginning June 15th.
Field Work: We will be based out of Bozeman. During the day, students will work cooperatively to gather data, photos and (optional) video clips in the field, then in the evenings will work together to link visual materials back to the data. The goal here is to create a virtual field trip for primary and secondary level students, illustrating every aspect of a simple descriptive natural history study, from initial observations, to hypothesis generation, to data gathering, to data summary and finally to drawing overall conclusions.

Additional Course Information

 BIOE 595 Ecology and Conservation of the World's Marine Ecosystems
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall alternate years (odd) 
Instructor:
Dr. Tom McMahon, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed for students to gain a broad understanding of structure and function of the world's marine ecosystems and a broad knowledge of the major conservation issues in the oceans including climate change, overfishing, coral reef loss, and ocean acidification. The course will integrate in-depth study of each of the major marine ecosystems with reading and discussion of major conservation issues. 

Additional Course Information

 BIOE 596 Land Use Issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer 
Instructor:
Dr. Jerry Johnson, Department of Political Science, MSU-Bozeman

This course will lay the groundwork for an understanding of the legal and political basis for scientific management of natural resources on public and private lands in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Readings, field visits and skill-building exercises will equip science educators with the social context of complex ecological issues.

Issues facing policy makers in complex administrative jurisdictions like the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem require a consideration of the social, legal and economic environment as well as understanding the scientific questions. Both are necessary if society is to successfully address issues like recovery of endangered species, rural sprawl, or wildfire. The laws that govern the development of the vast storehouse of natural resources in the West are based in a time some call the era of the "Lords of Yesterday". They are the product of a more freewheeling period of our economic and political history. They include water law, hardrock mining law, timber and grazing, and the designation of Yellowstone National Park in 1872. These laws play a direct role in how and why the resource agencies manage public lands in the West.

Today, economic, social, and political changes are sweeping the West. The emergent New West is often in conflict with the Old as extractive industry gives way to tourism, retirees, and a service-based economy. While the impacts of our extractive history are well understood, those resulting from rapid land use and social change are less so; from employment patterns to politics, the new west is different from the old.

Additional Course Information

BIOL 597 Ecology of Trout Streams
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternate years (even) 
Instructors:
Dr. Tom McMahon, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. Billie Kerans, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozeman

Montana is home to world-renowned trout streams, and this course is designed to delve into how trout and trout streams function and some of the current issues surrounding their management. The course content will include principles and techniques for studying trout and trout streams in the laboratory and the field. The course will have the following components:

  1. Identification of the main types of trout and stream insects found in Montana streams and their life history, habitat use, adaptations for living in fast water.

  2. Examine key environmental components of a trout stream (e.g., water temperature, physical habitat features) and how these factors affect population dynamics of both trout and their main insect prey.

  3. Explore contemporary issues of trout stream management within the Northern Rockies (e.g., whirling disease, habitat restoration).

This course will combine laboratory lectures and exercises with day-long field visits to area streams to collect aquatic insects, conduct habitat analyses, and view various types of stream management practices. On one field trip, students will don wet suits and directly observe trout behavior. Final Projects will emphasize applications to K-12 science classrooms.

Additional Course Information

BIOL 599 Advanced Ecology
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Fall (Winter)
Instructor:
Dr. John Winnie, Department of Ecology, MSU-Bozema

Our primary goals in this course will be to understand the theoretical underpinnings of ecological interactions and link these theories to the real world study of ecology. Through a mix of class and field work, students will move rapidly from foundational theory, to hands-on field work and data collection, to the basics of analyses. For us to progress smoothly during the class week, 2+ weeks of background reading and study is necessary.  Pre-class week materials, including not less than 2 homework assignments, will be posted on the course’s Desire to Learn (D2L) website beginning 2 months before the first day of class.

Daily class work will be a combination of lecture, readings, and exercises designed to familiarize students with foundational ecological theories. More generally, we will explore the overall utility of mathematical and statistical models in describing natural interactions. Field work will center on general field craft (seeing and understanding ecology), study design, and techniques for gathering data and recording observations. 

Field Trips: Two field trips per day are scheduled regardless of weather. During outings, students will study field craft and data gathering techniques in an area that has been studied extensively by researchers.

Additional Course Information

  BIOL 591 Plant Science: It Grows on You
Credits: 1
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor: 

Joe Bradshaw, MSSE and Ecology Department, MSU-Bozeman

For teachers K-8. This course will look at familiar seeds and their early growth into seedlings (with experimentation with the seedlings). You will  grow the little mustard known as Brassica, the Wisconsin Fast Plant. It is called the fast plant because it goes from seed to seedling to mature plant with flowers and fruits, and back to seed, in six weeks. In order to get the plant to grow satisfactorily, you must have a grow-light (shipped as part of your  materials) that can be on 24/7 (24 hours a day all week) for the entire six weeks, and you must get the seeds planted on Day 0.
The goals of this course are to... 

  • Watch seeds germinate
  • Learn about uptake of water in seeds
  • Think about seeds as food
  • Observe how plants respond to gravity
  • Learn the parts of a flower
  • Act like a pollinating bee
  • Watch a flower part turn into fruit with seeds

You will keep journals with growth data, answer questions from the instructor based on your journals and the manual, and participate in discussions. If you are already familiar with Wisconsin Fast Plants, you can either participate in this class with more experimentation with your plants.

BIOL 591 Teaching Evolution
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
Dr. Louise Mead, Education Project Director, National Center for Science Education

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to teach evolution effectively. In this course, students will get an overview of evolutionary history and theory, an introduction to current topics of evolution research, tools for making evolution relevant to the science classroom and students' lives, and strategies for lesson development, as well as practical techniques and background knowledge for responding to challenges to evolution instruction.

Additional NTEN Course Information

Cell Biology and Neuroscience

 BIOH 595 Anatomy & Physiology
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer

This course is designed for high-school and post-secondary instructors who are either currently teaching an anatomy and physiology course, or are interested in developing one. The goal of the course is to help instructors develop an A&P curriculum that integrates Next Generation Science Standards. Participants from all A&P instructional backgrounds are welcome, and should expect to work in a collaborative environment.

Chemistry and Biochemistry

 CHMY 505 Critical Concepts in Chemistry
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Chris Bahn and Dr. Bill McLaughlin, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

This course explores new learning strategies that encourage discovery-based learning. A practical laboratory component will enable students to develop laboratory and/or demonstration projects using new approaches and new technology. For each concept, students will pool their current understanding, review texts, develop increased depth and facility in the topic and invent and share practical projects related to the topic.

CHMY 506 Integrating Computers in Laboratory Instruction
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
Dr. Candace Goodman, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

This course provides an opportunity for grades 7-14 science teachers to explore innovations in curriculum, technology, modern laboratory facilities, and new learning strategies that encourage discovery-based learning. Properly used, a personal computer and an inexpensive data acquisition interface can enhance the teaching of laboratory science. Graduate students enrolled in this class will learn ways to use computer technology to engage students in discovery-based learning, to improve laboratory time utilization, to reduce equipment and chemical costs, and to improve safety.

This course involves three integrated content threads. The first introduces the basic principles and tools involved in electronic and computer-based laboratory measurement. The second uses these tools to build understanding of chemical principles, and the third uses technology and laboratory design to support inquiry-based teaching strategies.

Chemists and scientists in other fields profit from an understanding of the electronic principles involved in use of common environmental sensors. The first thread provides a “hands-on” introduction to sensors for measurement of light, temperature, pressure, pH, colorimetry, turbidity, and the simple electronic circuits that support them. It presumes no background in electronics

The second thread involves use of computer based measurement and software tools to investigate real chemical systems. Experiments involve thermochemistry, spectroscopy and atomic structure, acid-base chemistry and indicators, kinetics, colorimetry, fluorescence, turbidimetry, and nuclear chemistry.

The third thread introduces teaching strategies that use computer technology and innovative laboratory architecture to engage students in experiment design, fast high quality data acquisition, and group discussion and concept synthesis from real data.

This course will be held in a state-of-the-art laboratory facility equipped with a networked high resolution computer data acquisition system at every lab station. Modern software tools permit projection and group discussion of any team’s data, as successes and mistakes create learning situations for the entire laboratory group.

Each afternoon, students will work with faculty as individuals or teams to develop experiments useful in the courses they teach. These experiments can be drawn from their course content, or from experiments and lab equipment they wish to learn to use.

Friday afternoon the group convenes to present experiments that they have developed. These reports are printed and provided as curriculum resource for course participants.

CHMY 587 Exploring Chemistry
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
Dr. Candace Goodman, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

This course provides an in depth discussion of critical concepts in chemistry. Chemical principles will be presented in the context of real-world issues including energy production (biofuels), chemistry of water, and polymers. Additional emphasis will be placed on the role of experimental sciences in teaching reading, writing, and logical thinking across multiple student backgrounds. Appropriate student laboratory designs will be addressed.

Additional Course Information

CHMY 591 Special Topics: Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, & Kinetics 
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Dr. Candace Goodman, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics explain why reactions stop where they do, why they get hot or cold, and how fast they occur.  The rusting of a car and the explosion of a stick of TNT are actually the same type of process – thankfully happening at a different rate.  How can reactions be so similar and so different at the same time?

These three topics make up a large portion of the “Reactions” section of the AP exam (35-40%) as well as a significant portion of the second half of an International Baccalaureate Chemistry course.  These topics also represent some of the more difficult material to understand in General Chemistry. 

This course is designed to help instructors bolster their background in equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics as well as provide assistance in the teaching of these topics. A classroom population represents a distribution of learning styles and a goal of this course is to provide a variety of instructional tools for teachers to utilize in their classrooms.

Textbook: ISBN 978013443652 - Chemistry: Structures and Properties 2nd Ed 18 (TRO-Pearson) OR ISBN 9780134777559 (loose-leaf version)

                  Older version also accepted: ISBN 9780321729736  - Chemistry: Structures and Properties (Tro - Pearson)

Additional Course Information

CHMY 594 Science Lab Safety and Risk Management
Credits:
 1
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
Dr. Steven Holmgren, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

This seminar provides information on safe school laboratory practices including protocols for chemical purchase, storage and disposal, as well as the use of personal safety equipment.  Fire control procedures will be addressed including a hands-on fire extinguishing experience.  Personal risk and liability will be discussed.  Biological lab safety issues will also be considered.

Additional Course Information

CHMY 595 Chemistry of the Environment: Water, Air, Earth
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
Dr. Bill McLaughlin, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. Steve Holmgren, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman
Amy Washtak, IPSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic general science and chemistry concepts of the environment, including water, air and Earth - as well as to provide opportunities to enrich these chemistry concepts through applications and examples. Since this course will be building upon basic chemistry concepts, it is assumed that teachers taking this course have taken general chemistry at the undergraduate level, or the equivalent.

The course will integrate chemistry concepts of water, air and Earth with environmental context. Instructors will use narratives, supplemental reference book examples, internet examples as well as material complied on the student’s part. The textbook will be used as a basis for the course but students will be required to utilize materials from various resources, including but not limited to: the Internet, local professionals and their own classroom materials. Students will complete two original curriculum teaching projects derived from course content, which are designed to compliment existing classroom content.

Students will be assessed through the following ways:
  • Weekly on-line discussions of a topic posed which is derived from the weekly narrative
  • Concise weekly homework questions derived from chemistry concepts explored in narratives and supplemental textbook
  • The development of two complete and original curriculum projects derived from course content and one original essay response pertaining to chemistry content.

Additional Course Information

Textbook: ISBN 9780199228867 - Environmental Chemistry: A Global Perspective, 3rd Ed

Optional Supplementary Resource text for Grades 6-9: ISBN 0825150450 - Environmental Chemistry

CHMY 596 Exploring Organic Chemistry 
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
Robert DesEnfants, MSU – Chemistry

This online course targets science teachers, Grades 6-12. The course will provide a general review/background in organic chemistry with an emphasis on functional groups and covalent chemistry reaction mechanisms while focusing on applications including polymers. Providing a solid foundation of basic principles of organic chemistry will allow teachers to describe and explain practical applications of organic chemistry.

A class discussion forum will be part of the course and allow teachers to share and explain teaching, demonstrations and lab activities from the course. In addition to on-line homework sets and exams, participants will also design a teaching project that uses course topics to develop an original teaching component to use in their own teaching setting. Participants will receive extra help with course topics through a chapter-by-chapter commentary.  Where appropriate, emphasis will be on applications of organic chemistry to everyday life.  

This course provides background for future courses in biochemistry for middle and high school teachers.

Textbook: ISBN 9781118152188 - Intro to Organic Chemistry 5th Ed (Brown - Wiley) *4th and 6th editions also accepted

Additional Course Information

CHMY 597 Exploring Biochemistry
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer (Odd years only)
Instructor:
Dr. Angie Sower, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

The course will consider the reactions of the principle biochemical molecules (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) with additional emphasis on biomedical topics.  The primary goal of this course is to promote critical thinking about important, current health issues and to examine the role of laboratory modules in teaching these concepts.  General biochemistry principles will be presented to understand the diseases under review. Written material will be provided on advanced topics.

Additional Course Information

CHMY 598 Exploring Biochemistry II: Metabolism
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer (Even years only)
Instructor:
Dr. Angie Sower, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed to serve as the second semester of a two-semester sequence of biochemical principles. The course will build on topics covered in CHMY 591 (Exploring Biochemistry I) such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The proposed course will investigate the metabolism of each of these biological molecules while exploring applications of these topics to a classroom setting. The textbook will be used as a basis for the course but students will be required to utilize materials from various resources including chapter summaries, related internet websites, scientific journals, and material compiled on the students's part.

    Students will be assessed through the following methods:
  • online discussions of a topic related to the weekly material
  • homework sets and/or unit/chapter exams that reflect the application of material from weekly content (composed of multiple-choice questions)
  • final exam (composed of multiple-choice questions)
  • development of a project (classroom lesson or other application) that incorporates content from the course

Additional Course Information

Required Textbook: ISBN 9780321707338 - Principles of Biochemistry 5th ed.

Required Textbook: ISBN: 978-0073522975 - Chemistry in Context, 7th or 8th Edition

CHMY 599 An Atoms-First Primer for AP/IB Chemistry Teachers
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall 
Instructors:
Dr. Candace Goodman, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed to introduce teachers of Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) Chemistry courses to an Atoms-First pedagogy in the teaching of their courses. The course is an elective content course for students in the MSSE program at MSU, but will also attract teachers needing credits for re-licensure, salary advancement, or re-assignment. The textbook and its ancillary materials will be used as the primary basis for the course, but students will be required to utilize materials from various resources, including but not limited to the Internet. Students will be exposed to the an Atoms First approach to teaching AP or IB Chemistry which emphasizes a pedagogy of building chemical foundations before moving onto more difficult topics. Students will finish by developing lesson plans using this pedagogy to teach AP or IB Chemistry at the high school level.

Textbook: ISBN 13: 9780321834683  - Chemistry: Structure and Properties  (Tro - Pearson)

Additional Course Information

Civil Engineering

 ECIV 562 Snow and Avalanche Physics for Science Educators

Credits: 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Ry Phipps, Department of Civil Engineering, MSU-Bozeman

This course begins with establishing the necessary background for understanding snow and avalanches. The course then progresses into methods for solving problems related to snow and avalanche mitigation including topics from route selection to explosives placement. This course is designed to educate the teachers in the basics of snow and avalanche physics such that they may apply what they learn in their own classrooms to excite their students about science and physics. The course requires comfort with simple mathematical calculations, independent research, and communication with your peers and instructor via the on-line interface.

 Textbooks: ISBN 9780898868098 - Avalanche Handbook (McClung)

                    and ISBN 9781594850844 - Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain (Tremper)

Additional Course Information

Computer Science

CSCI 591 Computer Science in the Classroom: Computational Thinking for Teachers

Credits: 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
John Paxton, Computer Science Department, MSU-Bozeman

The course examines the computing field and how it impacts the human condition. Exciting ideas and influential people are introduced. A gentle introduction to computational thinking using the Python programming language is provided. The course also introduces participants to robotic platforms.

Additional Course Information

CSCI 591 Computer Science in the Classroom: The Joy and Beauty of Data

Credits: 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
John Paxton, Computer Science Department, MSU-Bozeman

Teachers who enroll in this course will extend their knowledge of the Python programming language and be gently introduced to the world of data science. The course builds upon the the pre-requisite course listed below: the 2-credit, MSSE course entitled Computer Science in the Classroom: An Introduction to Computational Thinking. Teachers who complete this course will be better prepared to teach material covered in CSCI 108, The Joy and Beauty of Computing. 

Additional Course Information

Earth Science 

 ERTH 516 Northern Rocky Mountain Geology
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Dave Lageson, Department of Earth Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

This course will investigate the geological history and evolution of the Northern Rocky Mountain region. Topics to be covered will include local stratigraphy, the Laramide and Sevier orogenic events, volcanism in and around Yellowstone National Park, earthquake activity within the Intermountain Seismic Belt, and many more. Daily field trips from campus will provide “hands-on learning” in some of the best-exposed, classic geologic localities in the Rocky Mountains. The course will integrate many aspects of physical geology, historical geology, geomorphology, structural geology, seismology, volcanology, and tectonics in a manner that is relevant and applicable to the region surrounding Montana State University.

Additional Course Information

Physical fitness requirements: In order to study the geology of the greater Yellowstone region in the field, this course will involve outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to hike in moderate mountainous terrain in order to accomplish course goals, namely hands-on field experience with geologic observations and interpretations. Interested students should contact Diana in the MSSE office to register for the course and to communicate their ability to meet the physical fitness requirements for the course. Please email Diana at dianap@montana.edu.

ERTH 591 K-14 Earth System Science
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall, Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Jerry Nelson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs/Geology Professor, Casper College, Casper, Wyoming

Participants will learn to find the Internet's abundant digital Earth Systems Science (ESS) resources and use these resources to create integrated mathematics and science lessons. Participants will learn to adapt online resources to their own instructional environments at the K-14 levels.

ESS emphasizes the dynamic interrelationships among changes in the atmosphere, ocean circulation patterns, and environmental processes on and beneath the earth's surface. Internet-Based K-14 Earth System Science Instruction is designed for K-14 teachers already familiar with using basic computer and Internet tools. Participants will integrate concepts from ESS with Internet resources, such as digital weather images, near-real-time earthquake data, and archived climate data, for examples. Necessary ESS scientific background is provided and effective pedagogical strategies are discussed for using computer technology with students at all levels K-14. Although the course science content is based in ESS, emphasis will be on the integration of mathematics and earth systems science, using discovery and constructivist methods.

Additional NTEN Course Information

ERTH 591 Teaching Middle School Earth System Science
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: Spring, Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Jerry Nelson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs/Geology Professor, Casper College, Casper, Wyoming

This course is taught in conjunction with the Earth System Science Alliance. ESSEA has a large repository of modules focused on the subject of earth system science. All modules use problem based learning to explore the events and interactions between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. The middle school course is composed of 3 modules plus an introduction module. Teachers utilize problem based learning to study both event to sphere interactions as well as sphere to sphere interactions and how one interaction can lead to other interactions.

All materials are included in D2L

Additional NTEN Course Information

ERTH 591 Weather and Climate for Teachers
Credits: 
3
Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Robyn Gotz, Earth Science Department, MSU-Bozeman

Few subjects within Earth Sciences are as far reaching as the study of weather (meteorology) and climate (climatology). We plan our days based on the current weather, plant food supplies based on seasonal forecasts, and develop economies based on regional climate. Weather and climate also explain major biogeographic patterns and influence physical processes shaping Earth. With unprecedented climate changes likely inevitable in our lifetimes, the study of weather and climate has also taken on added importance in recent decades. For these reasons and many more, it is imperative that we equip our teacher and educators with the tools to better prepare and motivate the next generation of scientists in this field. In this course we will build a physical understanding of how Earth systems interact to create the weather we see on a daily basis and the climatic patterns that emerge at larger spatial and temporal scales.

The course goals are to:

  • Increase weather and climate content knowledge,
  • Increase pedagogical skills related to teaching weather and climate,
  • Create a "tool-kit" of teaching activities relating to weather and climate, and
  • Engender changes in teacher-participants' classrooms that lead to an increased quantity and quality of weather and climate related instruction.

These goals will be accomplished through a highly structured series of readings, web based activities using a range of on-line resources, development and maintenance of a local weather journal, and the development and peer review of weather and climate class room activities. This course is specially designed for practicing science teachers at the middle to high school level.

You can purchase one of the following physical textbook options or an etext if you prefer. You do not need a text that comes with access to Mastering Meteorology or My Meteorology Lab.

AGUADO & BURT: UNDERSTANDING WEATHER & CLIMATE, Either the 6th or 7th edition will be fine for the class.

Teacher/participants are responsible for purchasing the required text for the course on their own before the course begins.

Additional NTEN Course Information

 ERTH 591 Fundamentals of Oceanography
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor: Dr. Sean Griffin, Marine Science

Fundamentals of Oceanography offers an introduction to the physical, biological, chemical and geological processes of the ocean and its ecosystems. Teachers will learn about the complex interactions between these properties, their influence on terrestrial ecosystems and the impacts humans have on these processes. Exciting laboratory exercises can be adapted to be offered at any grade level.

Textbooks: ISBN 100073376701 - An Introduction to the World’s Oceans, 10th edition (Sverdrup & Armbrust - McGraw) and

                   ISBN 101878663356 - Life on an Ocean Planet: Laboratory and Activities Manual (Current Pub 2006)

Additional NTEN Course Information

ERTH 591 Geology of the Moon
Credits: 3

Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructors: Cassandra Runyon & Lynn Powers, NASA Science & Education Public Outreach Team

The Geology of the Moon online course is designed for practicing teachers who want to understand more about the Moon and its history and relationship to Earth. We will explore theories for its formation and the geologic processes involved in its evolution, including the differentiation of its layers, volcanic activity, and impact cratering, with each discussion encompassing comparisons between the Earth and Moon. We will investigate the Moon’s orbital characteristics (revolution, rotation, phases and eclipses) and explore current and upcoming missions to the Moon. The material will be connected to National Science Education Standards. During this course you will interactively participate through a combination of presentations, assigned readings, on-line discussions, classroom exercises and dynamic activities.

The instructors, Cassandra Runyon and Noah Petro, both have their PhD's in Geology and have been working in the field for over 10 years. They are members of the Science and Education and Public Outreach team for a mission to the Moon—Chandrayaan-1/Moon Mineralogy Mapper—whose data are providing a more complete understanding of the geologic history of the Moon and helping to create a detailed compositional map of the lunar surface.

Additional NTEN Course Information

ERTH 595 Historical Geology
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
Dan Lawver, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Earth Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

Special Goals:  The course will provide grade 7-12 science teachers with a rigorous overview of the evolution of the Earth and life and of the methods that geologists use to investigate the history of our planet.

This course is intended strictly for science teachers enrolled in the Masters of Science and Science Education degree program and other science teachers with a minimum of 2-years teaching experience. Students will be required to complete 2 class projects in addition to participating in online class discussion, completing homework assignments, and taking 2 exams or quizzes. The class projects will require students to create lesson plans designed to adapt content from the course to their own classrooms. The course prerequisites include science teaching experience, enrolled in MSSE degree program, enrolled in MSSE as a non-degree student or instructor approval.  Participants must hold a bachelors degree in science, science education or a related area and should have had a college course in physical geology.

Textbook: ISBN 9781118254677 - Earth Through Time (Levin - Wiley)

Additional Course Information

ERTH 596 Geology of Glacier National Park
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternate years (odd)
Instructor:
Callan Bentley, Assistant Professor of Geology, NVCC

This field course will focus on the geomorphology and history of glaciers, stratigraphy and the history preserved in the strata,  structural geology and tectonic history, and other geo-topics as revealed by the wonderful outdoor laboratory in the vicinity of Glacier National Park. Daily hiking, tent camping and outdoor cooking will be the expectation.

Physical fitness requirements: In order to study the field geology of Glacier National Park, this course will involve very strenuous outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to hike several miles at high elevations in rough, rocky, mountainous terrain in order to accomplish course goals, namely hands-on field experience with geologic observations and interpretations. To assure that all students will have the full benefit of the program, please contact the MSSE Office before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet the expectations of this course. If you require an accommodation because of a disability, please contact the MSSE Office.

Additional Course Information

ERTH 591 Understanding Climate Change
Credits: 
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Jordy Hendrikx, Earth Science Department, MSU-Bozeman

The science of climate change is a complex subject that balances the physical record and scientific fact with politics, policy, and ethics. This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works, what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact. We will also explore how climate has changed in the past and how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate. Finally we will examine the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in land and ocean temperature, changes in the cryosphere, sea level and acidity change due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

In light of the changes we have already observed, and the projected future changes it is imperative that we equip our teacher and educators with the tools to better prepare and motivate the next generation of scientists in this field. In this course we will build an understanding of climate change and how it will impact our future.

    The course goals for teachers in grades 9-12 are to:
  • Increase content knowledge about climate change,
  • Increase pedagogical skills related to teaching climate change topics,
  • Create a "tool-kit" of teaching activities relating to climate change, and
  • Engender changes in teacher-participants' classrooms that lead to an increased quantity and quality of climate change, weather and climate related instruction.

These goals are accomplished through a highly structured series of on-line lectures, web based activities using a range of on-line resources, and participant discussions on developing classroom activities. This course is specially designed for practicing science teachers at the upper middle to high school level.

Additional NTEN Course Information

 ERTH 594 Geology Seminar: Geology of Earthquakes
Credits:
 1
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Dave Lageson, Department of Earth Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

Geology of Earthquakes is a field-based course that examines the causes and consequences of earthquake activity in the northern intermountain seismic belt of western Montana. We will study landforms that tell the story of geologically recent earthquake activity in the region, and investigate building practices in the Bozeman area for their potential “performance” in an earthquake. The course will feature a day-long trip to the famous Hebgen Lake earthquake site in the southern Madison Range. Hiking shoes, pay pack, lunch, water bottle, jacket and/or rain gear, field notebook (and pens), and personal items for a day-long field trip are all required.

Additional Course Information

GEO 521 Dinosaur Paleontology I
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer 
Instructors:
Dan Lawver, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Earth Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed as an introduction to the geology and dinosaur paleontology of the Hell Creek Formation of eastern Montana. The Hell Creek Formation has long been known for its diverse dinosaur taxa, including Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, as well as exposures of the iridium layer associated with dinosaur extinction 65 million years ago. The combination of slide presentations, labs, and daily hiking in Makoshika State Park will provide both background information and “hands-on” learning experience. Techniques covered during the class include interpretation of sedimentary environments, taphonomy, and fossil collection and preparation. This course will integrate many aspects of biology, physical geology, paleogeography, and tectonics.

Two transportation options are available: 1. Vans will leave from the Strand Union Building (south entrance) on the MSU campus at 8 a.m. Monday morning and drive to Makoshika State Park near Glendive, MT. Approximately driving time is seven hours. 2. Participants may drive their own vehicles and meet Monday at 4pm at the Lion’s Club facility, Sleepy Hollow Lodge within Makoshika State Park. Lunch will be provided on travel days.

The facilities include individual cabins that are rustic but completely furnished and accommodate 4 to 6 students, a lodge where meals will be provided, and a separate shower house with toilet facilities. Students should furnish their own bedding and personal items such as towels, shower shoes, etc. Special dietary requirements should be noted on the registration form. Students should have appropriate hiking boots and be prepared for rain and cool weather. Additional required items include backpack, field notebook and pencils, and water containers (3-4 liters total capacity).

Additional Course Information

Physical fitness requirements: The course requires moderate to strenuous outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to walk several miles, often in relatively steep terrain without established hiking trails. Temperatures are often in the 90°F range. Please contact the instructor before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet these requirements.

GEO 560 Geology of the Yellowstone Volcanic Center
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Jim Schmitt, Department of Earth Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the geology of the Yellowstone Volcanic Center, the largest active explosive continental volcanic center on Earth. To provide the necessary geologic background for understanding the geologic significance of the Yellowstone region, students will first gain insight into volcanism, seismology, geothermal activity, glaciation, and mountain building within the context of the plate tectonics paradigm. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the controls on and types of volcanic processes characterizing active volcanic regions of differing eruptive styles (explosive and effusive). Differing tectonic models for development of Yellowstone volcanism, the history of caldera formation and related volcanic activity, landscape evolution of the Yellowstone Plateau and surroundings, earthquake hazards, the record of Pleistocene glaciation, geothermal processes and the geomicrobiology of thermal features, and implications of all of these for humanity will be investigated in detail.

Application of new technologies aimed at providing a better understanding of the volcanic and earthquake hazards of the Yellowstone Volcanic Center including use of satellite imagery, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and earthquake seismology will also be explored. In addition, the use of Yellowstone thermal features and their microbial life as comparative analogs for understanding the origin of life on the early earth as well as for the exploration for extinct and extant life in the solar system will also be discussed.

Students will also have the opportunity to explore how integration of various aspects of Yellowstone geology may be usable as focal points for student exploration and investigation in their own classrooms employing varying instructional methods and pedagogies.

This course will consist of 3 days of in-class instruction on campus employing lectures, directed learning experiences, and extensive use of web-based resources, and 2 subsequent days of field trips designed to explore the geology of the Yellowstone Volcanic Center. Trips will be designed to specifically examine evidence of caldera formation, differing styles of volcanic eruptions, minerals and microbe interactions at thermal features, consequences of seismic activity, and controls of volcanic activity on such landscape components as topography, soils, plant distribution, and water resources.

GEO 522 Dinosaur Paleontology II
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternate years (Odd)
Instructor:
Dan Lawver, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Earth Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

The goal and purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth course for grade 7-12 teachers in geology and paleontology that builds on previous experience and field techniques acquired from GEOL 521 Dinosaur Paleontology of the Hell Creek Formation. In addition to providing basic information on geology and paleontology, this field course includes information on how paleontologists use rocks, fossils and extant animals and modern environments to formulate interpretations about the past. By the end of this course, students will be able to identify sedimentary rocks in which fossils are found, use sedimentary structures for interpretation of depositional environments, and have a better understanding of Montana's geologic past.

Education

EDCI 504 Assessment and Evaluation in Education
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall and Spring
Instructors:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. Walt Woolbaugh, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

Evaluation is an ongoing process in education. This course will engage teachers in an ongoing discussion and study regarding the construction, selection and use of criterion-referenced, norm-referenced, and alternative assessment methods. The teachers' own instructional settings (classrooms, museums, aquariums, outdoor schools, etc.) are used as "research bases" to conduct classroom assessment studies. The results of the assessments provide immediate feedback on both teacher effectiveness and student learning.

Textbook: ISBN 9781555425005 - Classroom Assessment Techniques (Angelo - Wiley)

Additional Course Information

EDCI 505 Foundations of Action Research in Science Teaching and Learning
Credits: 3
Mode of Delivery:Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructors:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. John Graves, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. Walt Woolbaugh, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

A course in the design of action research-based educational research for practicing teachers and informal science educators.. Students will learn the basis of action research in professional development and construct an action research proposal based on their individual teaching situation.

Textbook: ISBN 9781938946035 - The Basics of Data Literacy (Bowen & Bartley - NSTA Press)

AND ISBN-13: 978-1483389059, ISBN-10: 1483389057 - Action Research: Improving Schools and Empowering Educators (Mertler - Sage)

Additional Course Information by Section:

Dr. Woolbaugh

EDCI 509 Implementing Action Research in Teaching and Learning
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructors:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

Dr. John Graves, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. Walt Woolbaugh, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

A course in the implementation of action research for practicing teachers. Students will learn how to effectively conduct action research based on their individual teaching situation and its implications for their professional development. Prerequisites are EDCI 504 Evaluation and Measurement in Education and EDCI 505 Foundations of Action Research in Science Teaching and Learning.

Textbook: ISBN 9781938946035 - The Basics of Data Literacy (Bowen & Bartley - NSTA Press) 
                and ISBN 9780134029320 - Improving School through Action Research (Hendricks - Pearson)

Additional Course Information

Teacher Quote

The inquiry science notebooks are working amazingly in my classroom. My students are writing and exploring more than I ever would have asked them to. The students having ownership over the labs is really awesome. ~Florida Teacher

EDCI 518 Master Strategies for Science Teachers
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
TBA, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

Becoming a master teacher is a process. Once a teacher is comfortable with the content being taught and the overall curriculum, the focus can shift to instructional strategies. This course will engage students in discussions and practice regarding the construction, use and reporting of numerous master instructional techniques. The emphasis of the course is on classroom instruction with the intent of informing and improving the effectiveness of one's instruction. A classroom or teaching setting such as museum, planetarium, zoo, outdoor school in which to complete the required instructional "assignments" is absolutely necessary.

Textbook: ISBN 9780133749304 - Models of Teaching (Joyce - Pearson)

Additional Course Information

EDCI 536 Construction of Curriculum
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
TBA, MSSE & Department of Education, MSU-Bozeman

So, you've been asked to participate on the science textbook selection committee. Perhaps you've been appointed to chair the committee to write your school's science curriculum or develop instructional materials for an informal science education setting such as a museum or zoo.. If asked by an administrator or a parent, could you describe the curriculum you are currently teaching? All teachers talk ABOUT curriculum, but have you ever considered the factors that drive the construction of curriculum? This course examines the philosophical, historical, and social influences that drive the construction of curriculum. Emphasis is placed on science curriculum past, present, and future. Where did it start? How has it evolved? What is around the bend in the future? Current trends such as standards, inquiry, and high-stakes testing that influence curriculum will be considered in relationship to your own teaching experiences. After completing this course, science teachers will be equipped with a greater understanding of the workings of science curriculum development.

Additional Course Information

EDCI 537 Contemporary Issues in Science Education: The 3 D's of NGSS
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor: 

TBA, MSSE & Department of Education, MSU-Bozeman

The course is designed to survey the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards: science & engineering practices, crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas.  Each dimension will be examined with emphasis on the interconnectness of the dimensions.  The course will help teachers of science, regardless of level or content, teaching in formal or informal settings to better understand the underpinnings of NGSS and to develop strategies to implement NGSS dimensions in their teaching. Weekly assignments include online readings, discussion among colleagues and reflection and application of the content.

Additional Course Information

EDCI 575 Professional Capstone Paper & Symposium in Science Education
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. John Graves, MSSE Interim Director, MSU-Bozeman

Each Master of Science in Science Education (MSSE) student, with the cooperation of her or his graduate committee, identifies and completes a science education capstone project. Each project is designed to provide experience and information that aids our understanding of science teaching-learning or science curriculum. The capstone project topic is identified during the student's graduate program and relates to science education in the student's educational setting; it links multiple courses in the student's program of study in both the core and science content areas. A student begins the capstone in the fall of the final year by submitting a brief proposal to his/her advisor.

The results of each student's capstone project are summarized in a written, professional paper completed by mid-term of the final summer session. In addition, during the final summer session of a student's graduate program each student presents their capstone project to their committee, their classmates, and other interested persons at the Symposium in Science Education.

Capstone Projects from the Symposia in Science Education:

2016 Symposium

2015 Symposium

2014 Symposium

Additional Course Information

 EDCI 591 History of Spaceflight and Space Technology
Credits: 2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall, Spring
Instructor(s): 
Jason Marcks and Andrew Chaikin
The purpose of this course is to introduce space science concepts associated with exploration and technology to build core knowledge that can be incorporated into the classroom. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to do the following:
  • Timeline robotic exploration and development from 1958 to 2015
  • Timeline Human exploration from 1961 to 2015
  • Understand many of the technological and human challenges of spaceflight, as well as the political forces that have shaped the space program's history
  • Understand scientific breakthroughs accredited to the space program
  • Understand the historical significance of space flight and the impact it has had on national identity
  • Evaluate the potential for future exploration and utilization of solar system resources.

Additional NTEN Course Information

 EDCI 591 Technology in the Science Classroom
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Paul Anderson, Biology Instructor, Bozeman Senior High School and 2011 Montana Teacher of the Year

This course provides instructional technology professional development for practicing 7-12 science educators, promoting the use of appropriate instructional technology in the classroom. Teachers will study instructional technology practices through classroom exercises that demonstrate the use of technology to enhance instruction. "Hands-on" experience with technologies in a classroom setting will include both instruction and practice/application time for teachers. Integrating strategies to use instructional technology in current teaching practices will be explored. Technologies include, but are not limited to, the following: Smartboard, videoflex camera, GIS software, integrating internet, video, data probes and PalmPilots.

MSSE 501 Inquiry through Science and Engineering Practices
Credit:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Instructor:
TBA, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

This course takes a practitioner's look at the art of inquiry instruction appropriate to all learning settings, including, but not limited to classrooms, museums, planetariums, etc. Using many of the current pedagogical approaches of instruction including constructivism, misconceptions, the 5 E learning model, reflective practice, conceptual change theory and others, students in this course will critically examine their current instructional practice and together craft new approaches to teaching inquiry in the science classroom through the lens of the Science & Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education. Course assignments include readings, reflections on Science & Engineering Practices, discussions and the completion of an individualized inquiry project. Students in the course can expect a highly active, fully engaging, professionally stimulating class session each week. 

John has over 35 years of experience with middle school and university instruction. He has a passion for inquiry instruction and models thought-provoking, challenging examples of research-based best practices of inquiry instruction through the Science & Engineering Practices. The emphasis of the course will be on helping teachers gain the skills necessary to improve inquiry teaching in their teaching settings.

Choose the text that best supplements the level you teach:

ISBN: 9781452299280 - Inquire Within: Implementing Inquiry 3rd edition (Llewellyn - Sage)
OR

ISBN:  9781452244457 -  Teaching High School Science through Inquiry and Argumentation 2nd Edition (Llewellyn - Sage)

Additional Course Information

 MSSE 502 Emerging Technology & the Science Classroom formerly MSSE 591 Web Tools for Teachers
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

This class will provide educational technology professional development to practicing science teachers.  The purpose of the course is twofold.  First, the course will assist educators in effectively using the web to enhance their professional learning. Second, the course will assist educators in using web tools, many of which students are already comfortable with using in social settings, to enhance student learning and ownership.  The specific goals of this course include the following:

  1. Articulate a rationale for using Internet-based technology during instruction.
  2. Use a web aggregator and social bookmarking to increase efficiency in information gathering.
  3. Develop an initial personal learning network.
  4. Explore a variety of Web 2.0 tools and example projects, including blogs, wikis, Google Docs, Google Earth, podcasting, screen capture, and photo sharing services, for professional growth and enhancing instruction.
  5. Create a plan for integrating at least three Web 2.0 tools into current instructional efforts.

MSSE 506 Crime Science Investigators: Forensics Science for Teachers
Credits: 2
Mode of Delivery: 
Online
Semester Offered: 
Spring
Instructor: 

Dr. Marcie Reuer, MSSE Department, MSU-bozeman

This course will focus on developing an understanding of forensic science discipline that teachers can apply to the classroom. Topics covered will include blood, DNA analysis, fingerprinting, forgery, computer forensics, physical and trace evidence, ballistics and the autopsy process. Using critical thinking, science and engineering practices, science disciplinary content, case studies, forensics labs and more, teachers will plan and perform forensic investigations in their classrooms.  Join the class for an exciting learning experience to solve the crime!

 MSSE 503 Integrating Literature into the Science Classroom
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Joe Bradshaw, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

Integrating Literature into the Science Classroom is a 14 week, 3 credit course. Cross-level instruction will be utilized for elementary, middle, and high school instructors. It provides an effective way to integrate master teaching strategies with current practices of teachers. The goal of this course is to engage and equip teachers in the area of science and literacy by integrating science-related literature into science classrooms. This course is intended for teachers enrolled in the Master of Science in Science Education degree program and other teachers with a minimum of two years teaching experience. The course supports the integrated approach to providing reading and science instruction.

Textbook: ISBN 9780321974617 - Indian Creek Chronicles (Fromm - MAC Higher)
                 ISBN 9780316881791 - Never Cry Wolf (Mowat - Hatchette)
                 ISBN 9781416985846 - George's Secret Key to the Universe (Hawking - S&S)
                 ISBN 9780516259550 - Fishes (Stewart - Scholastic)

                 ISBN 9780064435109 - Look to the North (George - Harp)

Additional Course Information

 MSSE 591 Science Across Cultures
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
Dr. Irene Grimberg, Physics Department, MSU-Bozeman

The goal of the course is to present science knowledge across cultures embedded in inquiry-based instruction. This approach will facilitate the integration of science teaching to other curricular areas and will engage students of diverse cultural backgrounds. The science content will address the ideas presented in the Framework for K-12 Science (2011) and in the New Generation Science Standards (2012) including units in Life Sciences, Astronomy, and Physics. The online course will require science content readings; and research and practice-based readings on science education, and diversity and equity; and the use of interactive multi-media tools. Students are expected to participate in online discussions about science teaching and learning from a multicultural perspective.

 MSSE 591 Capstone Data Analysis
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
John Terrill Paterson, MSSE Program and Ecology Department, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed to provide graduate students in science education with a background in basic descriptive and inferential statistics. By the end of the course, students will be able to choose the most appropriate method to both describe their data and display that data in a clear and concise manner. Students will be able to perform hypothesis tests using a variety of parametric and non-parametric methods with an understanding of the assumptions and limitations of each method as applied to the analysis of capstone data. Students will be able to perform one-way analysis of variance tests in addition to chi-square tests for categorical data. Through the examination of the appropriate use of each of these statistical tools, students will be able to better design their capstone projects so as to maximize the likelihood of addressing their research topics.

Additional Course Information

Electrical Engineering

EELE 508 Solar Cell Basics for Science Teachers
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Todd Kaiser, MSU-Bozeman

Grant support is available from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering for ELEE 591 Solar Cell Basics.  To be considered for funding support, the MSSE graduate student must meet at least one of the following criteria: . 
1)      Graduate student is a member of an underrepresented minority and/or
2)      Graduate student teaches in a setting that serves a large population of underrepresented students
For more information, contact Diana Paterson at dianap@montana.edu.

Solar Cell Basics is a course for science educators, to train them to teach principles of solar cells. The course is designed to help science teachers, grades 6 to 12, understand the operating principles and the fabrication processes of modern solar cells that convert light energy to electrical energy. The course has a laboratory component in which solar cells will be fabricated in the Montana Microfabrication Facility (MMF). Each student will process 4 inch silicon wafers using the various steps necessary to make solar cells.

The course prerequisites are a minimum of 2 years successful science teaching experience, enrolled in MSSE degree, or by instructor approval.  Participants must hold a bachelors degree in science, science education or a related area. Participants should have an understanding of basic chemistry and physics principles.

Additional Course Information

EELE 591 Introduction to Logic Circuits for Teachers 
Credits: 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Brock LaMeres, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, MSU-Bozeman

This course introduces the concepts of classical digital logic design including number systems, interfacing, Boolean algebra, combinational logic design, and finite state machines.  This course also covers Hardware Description Languages for the design and simulation of digital systems.  Modern digital design of combinational logic and state machines is covered using VHDL and a logic synthesizer.  This course contains a laboratory experience where students design and implement logic circuits using discrete parts and programmable logic devices.

Course Overview

Health and Human Development

NUTR 524 Teaching Adolescent Nutrition
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBD
Instructor:
Virginia Lee Mermel, Department of Health and Human Development, MSU-Bozeman

Nutrition habits of children and teens are known to have an impact on their present and future health, their ability to learn and physical performance (athletics). However, many of these young people are not making the grade nutritionally. For example:
• The rate of obesity has doubled in the past decade
• Symptoms of adult diseases (diabetes, hypertension, heart disease) are showing up in younger children and teens largely due to poor nutrition habits
• During the important growth period of adolescence many teen diets lack the recommended amounts of such vital nutrients as calcium, iron and zinc
• According to a recent study done by the US Department of Agriculture, only 1% of children met all of the nutrition recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid
• Eating disorders are on the rise
Throughout this course teachers will investigate various content areas applicable to adolescent nutrition. These areas include:
• Current concerns and health statistics relative to adolescent nutrition,
• Key nutrients of concern in adolescent diets,
• Sports nutrition,
• Dietary supplements,
• Eating disorders and body image,
• The Food Guide Pyramid and nutrition label interpretation,
• Food safety
• The important role of the school environment in supporting sound nutrition.

Selected classroom resources, which engage the student and provide for experiential learning, will be highlighted for all content areas. Course participants will be required to complete weekly reading assignments, take part in online discussion (asynchronous), complete weekly or bi-weekly activities and complete a course project related to the development and implementation of a lesson plan on one of the topics covered.

NUTR 526 Nutrition for Fitness and Performance
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBD
Instructor:
Patti Steinmuller, Department of Health and Human Development, MSU-Bozeman

Exploring nutrition for physical fitness and athletic performance has never been more interesting or exciting! Food provides fluids, energy, nutrients, fiber, and phytochemicals. But what nutritional strategies are optimal? Do dietary supplements work? Using nutrition to meet the demands of physical activity is a dynamic process that combines scientific research, nutrition guidelines, and the practical aspects of fueling active people in specific situations.

This course examines the latest developments that link nutrition with physical fitness, sport performance, and health promotion. Resources include a text, course supplement, nutrition analysis software, peer-reviewed scientific literature, current news, and Internet resources. Participants contribute to asynchronous online discussions throughout each week. Expect to relate each week's topic to your areas of interest and expertise. A diverse group of participants (practicing teachers in various specialties, coaches, trainers, registered dietitians, nutrition educators, exercise consultants, fitness leaders, and other health professionals) ensures that discussions will be interesting, lively, and challenging. Topics include energy, fluid, and nutrient needs for physical activity; nutrition around exercise (before, during, recovery); free radicals and antioxidants; dietary supplements; body composition; weight management; disordered eating; and the female athlete triad. Sport-specific nutrition strategies for endurance, team sports, and strength training are addressed. Controversial issues such as high protein-low carbohydrate diets and creatine supplementation are discussed. Internet resources are used extensively.

Assignments challenge participants to apply science-based nutrition strategies in practical situations such as case studies, classroom activities, athletic training, and client consultations. Participants demonstrate competency in the following areas: locating credible nutrition resources on the internet; accessing, analyzing, and evaluating nutrition information; and using nutrition analysis software to develop meals, snacks, and a personalized fitness menu. The course project entails selecting a dietary supplement to evaluate and investigating a claim for consuming that supplement. Published, peer-reviewed scientific literature retrieved from the National Library of Medicine databases provides the evidence needed to evaluate the claim. Participants demonstrate competency in developing a written evaluation of the safety, legality, effectiveness, quality control, and potential benefits versus risks of consuming the dietary supplement.

Additional NTEN Course Information

Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

LRES 557 Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park (Co-listed as MB 547)
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
Dr. Brent Peyton, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, MSU-Bozeman

This course will provide a survey of the ecology of important organisms common in thermal habitats of Yellowstone National Park, including a review of different life forms and the physical and chemical habitats that define their environment. The course is structured to provide (1) a basic understanding of the ecology of a variety of life forms in thermal habitats, (2) a survey of observational techniques and hands-on activities appropriate for science educators, and (3) a field trip to visit and characterize several geothermal habitats environments. Fundamental principles of thermal biology will be emphasized during lectures and methods of chemical, physical and biological analyses will be emphasized during the laboratory component while on the MSU campus. A two day field trip to Yellowstone National Park (that includes camping in the park) will include discussion, sampling and characterizing diverse geothermal habitats.

Course Outline:
1) Introduction: Ecology of Thermal Environments
2) Chemical and Physical Properties Important in Geothermal Systems
3) Microbial and Viral Diversity in Thermal Habitats
4) Fungi, Algae, and Plants; Eukaryotes in Thermal Environments
5) Field Experience: Observe, describe and characterize diverse geothermal environments.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Field trips will require walking distances of up to 5 miles with moderate slopes and will involve being in the field for the majority of the day. Weather may vary!

Textbook Materials Provided by Instructor

Additional Course Information

LRES 569 Ecology of Invasive Plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Dr. Bruce Maxwell, Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

This five day course includes 3 days in the field making measurements on exotic invasive plants at a range of sites from the Gallatin Valley to the Gallatin National Forest and 2 days analyzing the data and using simulation models to explore plant invasiveness. The focus of this course is to directly involve students with testing methodology for monitoring the invasive potential of several exotic species in otherwise pristine mountain environments.

The questions that we will examine are:

  1. Can we detect change in non-indigenous plant populations that will allow us to judge them as invasive?

  2. What should be the criteria for determining if a non-indigenous plant species can have a significant impact on the ecosystem?

  3. What should be the criteria for determining if a non-indigenous plant species can have a significant impact on the ecosystem?

Students will read the most current theories on what makes species invasive and what conditions invite or detour non-indigenous plant species. At least 1/3 of the field time will be used to discuss how these theories apply to our system.

Data analysis will place each student with a computer and include the use of Excel software. Small groups will be created and each group will analyze a different portion of the field data. Integration of field ecology into K-12 classes will be discussed throughout the course.

Additional Course Information

LRES 586 Lake Ecology
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer

Instructor:
Stephanie McGinnis, Department of Land Resources Environmental Science, MSU-Bozeman

  • Learn about the biotic and abiotic factors that influence lake dynamics; we will specifically address lakes within Yellowstone National Park
  • Understand and perform field sampling and taxonomic and genetic identification techniques in the laboratory
  • Synthesize and apply learned skills and knowledge in the classroom grades 5-12

MSU educators, National Park Service resource managers, and other agency professionals will be joining the class to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective. The course will take place in Yellowstone National Park and on the MSU campus.

Students will be responsible for reading materials contained in a course packet and additional materials handed out throughout the course. Students should be prepared for short hikes (1-4 miles) and any type of weather while in Yellowstone National Park.  Participants will camp in Yellowstone National Park for two nights.  Camping equipment can be rented inexpensively thorough REI in Bozeman.  A class schedule, camping equipment list, and course reading packet will be available prior to the course through D2L.

Additional Course Information

LRES 591 Streamside Science: Hands-On Approach
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Amber Kirkpatrick, Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

The primary goal of this course is to increase the water resource knowledge of students through hands-on, field-based curriculum. To accomplish this, students will be asked to adopt a local stream and perform lab assignments "in the field" to better understand hands-on water quality monitoring techniques. The course will improve the teaching skills of secondary science teachers utilizing distant delivery technologies. By completing this course, secondary science teachers will have a better understanding and hands-on working knowledge of the characterization and quantification of water quality as it relates to secondary school science curriculum and environmental issues on a global scale. Curriculum standards will be linked to each lesson plan so that teachers can easily incorporate the content into their core curriculum.

Additional Course Information

LRES 591 Twelve Principles of Soil Science
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
Dr. Suzanna Carrithers Soileau, Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

Playing with DIRT! At your age? Believe it or not, soil (to some known as "dirt") is part of all of our lives on a daily basis. And, as environmental issues such as water quality, waste management, ecological biodiversity, land resource carrying capacity, and alternative land uses continue to gain more attention from the public, increasing demands will be placed on earth science, physical science, geology, geography, and general science teachers for curriculum to support our understanding of these issues. Soil science is not a new science, but one that has gained much attention and interest in the past decade. And, the study of soil science has taken on new, "real-life" meaning and significance in the last decade.

The goal of this course is to introduce teachers to the basic principles of soil science as an integral part of the curriculum for environmental sciences, ecology, earth science, geology, water quality, and geography. The course is structured around twelve basic soil concepts, beginning with the significance of soil in our everyday lives and progressing through soil formation, the physical and chemical properties of soils, and the role soil and the earth play in environmental management today and in the future. This course is filled with "how to" classroom teaching opportunities and resources. A good share of the course addresses contemporary issues and readings. We'll integrate teaching DIRT with math, language arts, geography, social studies, artistic expression, chemistry, physics, and biology.

You'll learn about the soil in your own school yard or back yard, who to contact to get local "experts" and how to get your students more interested in environmental studies. This course is "hands on", participation oriented. What goes on in the DIRTY DOZEN?
• Study the significance of soil and the processes involved in soil formation and differentiation (did you know that all soils have names and identities and more than 14,000 different "soils" are recognized in the United States alone?).
• Learn how to use such readily available resources as National Geographic, Science, and other popular magazines to introduce students to soil science and develop lessons that are fun in the classroom.
• Develop better understanding of the relationship between soil and water quality, crop and vegetation management, and environmental science.

Additional NTEN Course Information

LRES 591 Water Quality
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Dr. Suzanna Carrithers Soileau, Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, MSU-Bozeman

Today's science teacher faces challenges and issues, which were just beginning to gain attention 10, 15, or 20 years ago. And, teaching today's science requires both an integrated background and approach in the classroom. Water Quality: Teaching the Science of Water Quality in the classroom - is a 'must' course for teachers involved in any aspect of biological sciences. Water quality can be called an "integrating" science, in that it serves as a platform for expanded applications of chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, geology, earth science, political and social sciences, and creative arts.

The Water Quality course has three central foci: 1) to increase student knowledge and assessment skills about the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of water quality investigations, 2) to develop and implement new pedagogies for teaching water quality concepts in the secondary school science classroom, and 3) increase student awareness and understanding of some of the more significant global water quality issues that will face science teachers and their students in the 21st century. This course teaches water quality concepts and how to demonstrate, explain, and teach them in the science classroom. Course format includes weekly "kitchen counter" experimentation, library and independent research, written homework, discussion.

The Field Manual for Water Quality Monitoring along with other materials will be sent to you by Montana State University shortly before the beginning of the course. 

Additional NTEN Course Information

Mathematics

MATH 518 Statistics for Teachers
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
TBA, Department of Mathematics, MSU-Bozeman

This course will focus on the stochastic concepts that arise in mathematics and science education, including the probabilistic underpinnings of statistics, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation, distributions, sampling, simulation, and experimental design. This course will also focus on the issues of teaching statistics concepts at the pre-college level, including methods and materials.

Additional NTEN Course information

Microbiology

MB 533 Current Topics in Microbiology 
Credits:
 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Dr. Elinor Pulcini, Department of Microbiology, MSU-Bozeman

This course will provide an inquiry based examination of current microbiology related topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be selected by the assessment of what is considered “newsworthy.”  Topics could include but not be limited to hospital acquired and community acquired infections, antibiotic resistance, immunizations, food safety and drinking water. Emphasis will be placed on the ramifications of issues with respect to industry, medicine, and personal health. A review of literature will provide background information for the topics in order to provide teachers sufficient and correct information to hold discussions regarding these topics in their classrooms. The goal of this course is to provide a rigorous examination of these topics for students in the Masters of Science in Science Education (MSSE) Program.

All materials are supplied in the course or as ejournals through MSU Library Proxy access.

Additional Course Information

MB 536 Exploring Microbiology
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Dr. Jim Burritt and Nancy Burritt, Department of Microbiology, MSU-Bozeman

The goals of the course are to provide science educators with fundamental knowledge of microbiology that will allow them to expand and enhance their teaching activities in this subject. Teachers will gain an appreciation of the biology of microorganisms through reading, web searches, assignments and discussions on the life and death of microorganisms, the microbial world and microorganisms in their environments. They will also learn how a fundamental knowledge and understanding of microbiology can be applied in daily life as well as in biotechnology and in studying complex issues such as the origins of life. The course will provide a sound grounding in microbiology for students who intend to take courses on infectious diseases and environmental microbiology.

Textbook: ISBN-13 9780073402406 - Prescott's Microbiology, 9th Edition (Willey, Sherwood, Woolverton)

Additional NTEN Course Information

MB 538 Cell and Molecular Biology
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Delisha Patel, MSU Department of Microbiology

An inquiry-based laboratory in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell and molecular biology, this course provides training in microbiological techniques such as:

  • recombinant DNA
  • phylogenetic analyses
  • growth & cell cycle regulation
  • gene expression
  • protein purification
  • immunoassays

Current literature and laboratory discussions cover molecular approaches for investigating complex cellular mechanisms.

MB 539 Infection and Immunity
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Fall
Instructor:
Dr. Elinor Pulcini, Center for Biofilm Engineering, MSU-Bozeman

The fields of infectious disease and immunology have developed side-by-side, are closely intertwined, and are very active fields of research and practical medical application. Remarkable achievements in these fields have changed our lives. Some examples are the eradication of naturally acquired smallpox, the discovery and development of antimicrobial agents, and the development of vaccines that dramatically decrease the incidence of specific infectious diseases. But new challenges appear each year. We again worry about smallpox - now about the intentional release of this and other potential agents of bioterrorism. The emergence of drug-resistant microbes is an increasing problem. Previously undiscovered infectious agents are being described and associated with disease. The population of immune deficient humans is getting larger and the associated opportunistic infections are an increasingly important and difficult problem.

In this course, we will first address some basic aspects of microbiology as they relate to infectious disease. How are microbes different from each other and from humans, and why do these differences matter? How do antimicrobial agents kill or inhibit microbes without seriously harming humans? How do microbes acquire resistance to antimicrobial agents? Attention will then turn to the immune system, with emphasis on the roles of the immune system in infectious disease. Finally, and for about two-thirds of the course, we will examine important infectious diseases of humans: their causes, pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. In addition to assigned textbook and syllabus readings and online discussion, participants in the course will analyze scientific journal articles and solve case histories involving infectious disease and immunology.

Additional Course Information

MB 540 Environmental Microbiology
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring (alt yrs odd)
Instructor:
Dr. Jim Burritt and Nancy Burritt, Department of Microbiology, MSU-Bozeman

The course will provide students with fundamental knowledge of environmental microbiology. Through reading assignments and discussions on freshwater, marine, food and soil microbiology, students will gain an appreciation of how microorganisms maintain the biosphere in a balanced state. Students will also learn how this fundamental knowledge of microbial ecology has been exploited by man to remediate soils contaminated with toxic wastes and waters polluted with residential, industrial and agricultural waste.

Additional NTEN Course Information

MB 541 Microbial Genetics
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer 
Instructor:
Dr. Elinor Pulcini, Center for Biofilm Engineering, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the fundamentals of genetic processes in bacteria (prokaryotes). Why bacteria instead of higher organisms or eukaryotes?

1) The study of bacterial genetics has provided much of the understanding of fundamental genetic processes for all organisms, especially through the use of in vivo and in vitro genetic tools.

2) Prokaryotic genetics is somewhat simpler than eukaryotic genetics due to the organization of the cell, its genome and transfer of genetic information. However, the basic concepts such as transcription, translation, mutation, and recombination are similar if not identical in all organisms.

3) The short generation time of bacteria lends themselves to genetic studies. Bacterial genetics labs are becoming easier to use, are relatively inexpensive and provide an ideal platform for genetic studies in the secondary school setting. It is critical that science teacher, then understand the fundamental processes of genetics particularly as they apply to microorganisms.

Additional Course Information

MB 542 Microbial Ecology
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring (alt yrs even)
Instructor:
Dr. Jim Burritt and Nancy Burritt, Department of Microbiology, MSU-Bozeman

This course will provide students with fundamental knowledge of microbial ecology and its methods. The ecology of microorganisms in relation to nutrition, growth, control, metabolism, biogeochemical cycling, natural environments and microbial interactions will be covered. Readings from the text and other sources, discussions, and assignments will be included to facilitate learning and for evaluation. This course is intended for middle, high school, and lower level college teachers, as well as others in education roles e.g. at nature facilities such as zoological and national parks.

Additional NTEN Course Information

MB 547 Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park (Co-listed as LRES 557)
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructors:
Dr. Brent Peyton, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, MSU-Bozeman

This course will provide a survey of the ecology of important organisms common in thermal habitats of Yellowstone National Park, including a review of different life forms and the physical and chemical habitats that define their environment. The course is structured to provide (1) a basic understanding of the ecology of a variety of life forms in thermal habitats, (2) a survey of observational techniques and hands-on activities appropriate for science educators, and (3) field trips to visit and characterize several geothermal habitats environments. Fundamental principles of thermal biology will be emphasized during morning lectures on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. Methods of chemical, physical and biological analyses will be emphasized during the laboratory component (afternoons). Two days of field trips (Tuesday and Friday) will be used to visit, discuss, sample and characterize diverse geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park.

Textbook Materials Provided by Instructor

Additional Course Information

Physics

PHSX 401 Physics by Inquiry I
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer (alternates with PHSX 402)
Instructor:
Dr. Greg Francis, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman

Physics 401 is entirely laboratory based. Instead of absorbing facts from a lecture, the students make observations and build scientific models to account for their observations. The course emphasizes the development of basic concepts and reasoning skills, and efforts are made to actively engage students in the learning process. Staff-to-student ratio is of necessity high (two instructors for approximately 20 students), and interactions with staff are through Socratic dialog: the instructors do not give answers, but help the students to find their own. Available computer technology is utilized as appropriate.

Physics 401 will begin with a series of activities/observations that will lead to the development of a scientific model for DC electric circuits. The students will be able to solve both qualitative and quantitative problems involving very complicated circuits containing batteries and bulbs. For example, they will be able to rank the brightness of the identical bulbs without relying on the rote use of equations.

The in-service teachers will also use shadow plots to develop a model for the relative motion of the earth and sun during the course of the semester. They will also make careful observations of the moon, and from their observations piece together a model to explain the phases of the moon.

The curriculum used will be the Physics by Inquiry modules developed by the Physics Education Group at University of Washington. This curriculum is based on two decades of research on student misconceptions. Each activity is designed to elicit those misconceptions known to block learning, and to allow the student to confront and resolve the difficulties. Students are often presented with several opportunities to confront the same misconception in increasingly rich contexts to insure that they are completely free of the misconception. This teaching approach has a three-fold advantage when used with future teachers: 1) They come away from the class with a clear understanding of the physics based on their own experience; 2) They acquire an awareness of those difficulties with which their future students are likely to be struggling; 3) Most importantly, they acquire a self-confidence in their ability to do science, to face unknown situations and find their own answers. Their teaching will be free of references to higher authority. They will be able to predict the time of the high tide (a skill more useful in other states) by looking at the phase of the moon and using their model. And it will be their model because they will build it for themselves, from the ground up.

Additional Course Information

Required Textbook: ISBN 978-0471144410 - Physics by Inquiry Vol 2 

PHSX 402 Physics by Inquiry II
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer (alternates with PHSX 401)
Instructor:
Dr. Greg Francis, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman

Physics 402 is a continuation of the Physics 401 experience. Physics 402 is entirely laboratory based. Instead of absorbing facts from a lecture, the students make observations and build scientific models to account for their observations. The course emphasizes the development of basic concepts and reasoning skills, and efforts are made to actively engage students in the learning process. Staff-to-student ratio is of necessity high (two instructors for approximately 20 students), and interactions with staff are through Socratic dialog: the instructors do not give answers, but help the students to find their own. Available computer technology is utilized as appropriate.

The course will begin with a careful investigation of light, color, and geometrical optics. The study of optics will lead to an understanding of pinhole cameras, lenses, and prisms. We will then explore the differences between the concepts of heat and temperature. This will include a study of heat capacity, specific heat, phase change, and heat transfer. The in-service teachers will also use shadow plots to develop a model for the relative motion of the earth and sun during the course of the term.
The curriculum used will be the Physics by Inquiry modules developed by the Physics Education Group at University of Washington. This curriculum is based on two decades of research on student misconceptions. Each activity is designed to elicit those misconceptions known to block learning, and to allow the student to confront and resolve the difficulties. Students are often presented with several opportunities to confront the same misconception in increasingly rich contexts to insure that they are completely free of the misconception. This teaching approach has a three-fold advantage when used with future teachers: 1) They come away from the class with a clear understanding of the physics based on their own experience; 2) They acquire an awareness of those difficulties with which their future students are likely to be struggling; 3) Most importantly, they acquire a self-confidence in their ability to do science, to face unknown situations and find their own answers. Their teaching will be free of references to higher authority. They will be able to say “I know that the acceleration is constant on a sloped incline because I measured it.” They will be able to predict the time of the high tide (a skill more useful in other states) by looking at the phase of the moon and using their model. And it will be their model because they will build it for themselves, from the ground up.

Physics 401 is either a prerequisite or a co-requisite for Physics 402.

PHSX 403 Physics by Inquiry III
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternates with PHYS 402
Instructor:
Dr. Greg Francis, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman

Physics 403 is a continuation of the Physics 401 experience, but it may also be taken concurrently with Physics 401. The course will begin with a careful investigation of geometrical optics, leading to an understanding of pinhole cameras, lenses, and prisms. This will be followed by an exploration of magnetic interactions and magnetic materials.

The curriculum used will be the Physics by Inquiry modules developed by the Physics Education Group at University of Washington. This curriculum is based on two decades of research on student misconceptions. Each activity is designed to elicit those misconceptions known to block learning, and to allow the student to confront and resolve the difficulties.

Physics 401 is either a prerequisite or a co-requisite for Physics 404.

PHSX 405 Special Relativity
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Gregory Reinemer, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman

This course seeks answers to the questions: In what ways does Nature behave differently at high relative speeds than at low speeds? Do moving clocks really "run slow"? Do fast-moving objects really shrink and get heavier? Why can't we move faster than light? Why can't we travel backward in time? Can mass really be converted into energy and energy into mass? What does it mean to say that space and time are part of a larger unity called spacetime? And what predictions do all these statements make for actual experiments? Developing skills in answering these questions will help you to pose and answer your own questions, assisted by interactive visual computer software.

Additional NTEN Course Information

PHSX 491 Conceptual Physics
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Robert Wilson, MSU Extended University

This course describes the workings of the world around us. The everyday: how a ball moves when it is thrown, the forces you feel on a roller-coaster, what happens when you turn on a light switch; and the esoteric: time and space from the perspective of Einstein's relativity, the basic structure of atoms and nuclei. The course is mostly at the conceptual level, with some simple algebraic problem solving. A unique feature of the class is a series of at-home experiments using simple materials to illustrate some basic ideas of physics.

Additional NTEN Course Information

PHSX 511 Astronomy for Teachers
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Ron Hellings, MSU Extended University

As a fundamental science, astronomy is the study of the motions in the sky, the formation of planets, the evolution of stars, and the origin of galaxies. This course, specially designed for practicing science teachers at the middle and high school levels, serves as a survey of topics in astronomy. The topics are closely aligned with the concepts emphasized in the NRC National Science Education Standards and the instructional strategy uses electronic collaborative group discussions in concert with hands-on laboratories and activities that use NASA data easily accessed via the Internet.

Additional NTEN Course Information (Fall)

Summer Session May 31- Aug 05, 2016

Textbook: ISBN-10: 1-4641-2492-2, ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2492-1 - Universe, 10th addition (Freedman - Macmillan)

 PHSX 512 General Relativity
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Tsunefumi Tanaka, MSU Extended University

• How long do you live after you fall through the horizon of a black hole?
• Can you detect the moment at which you cross the horizon?
• As you float comfortably inward, can you see the starry heavens?
• Receive messages and packages from your friend on the outside?
• Why can't you send messages to your friends on the outside?
• Can you tell when you are approaching the center?
• How quickly will it be over at the central crunch point?

You can answer these questions for yourself with calculus, starting from a simple formula, the "metric", for the black hole. In fact, with the metric you can answer every possible (non quantum) scientific question about spacetime surrounding the black hole. You can also answer every possible question about trajectories of light and satellites around the black hole as well as around familiar centers of gravitational attraction such as Earth and Sun.

The metric for the even more interesting rotating black hole may tell us about quasars, the most powerful steady energy sources in the universe. Where do quasars get their power? Is falling into a rotating black hole an experience different from plunging into a static black hole? Ask the metric!

SYLLABUS: The course begins by examining the idea of spacetime curvature and the Schwarzschild metric for a non-rotating black hole. From the metric springs energy as a constant of the motion of radially plunging observers. More general orbits follow after the metric also predicts that angular momentum is a second constant of the motion. Trajectories of light reveal what one will SEE as one stands, falls, or orbits in the vicinity of a black hole. The last part of the course is a series of student projects examining life inside the horizon of a black hole, the spacetime around a rotating black hole, and a simple model of the cosmos as a whole.

Textbooks: ISBN 9780201384239 - Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity (Wheeler, Taylor - Addison, Wesley)

           and ISBN 9780470848357 - An Introduction to Modern Cosmology, 2nd Ed (Liddle - Wiley)

Additional NTEN Course Information

 PHSX 513 Quantum Mechanics Online
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Mingzhen Tian, MSU Extended University

Can quantum mechanics be made SIMPLE? What lies behind wave functions, wave equations, and atomic structure? How is the sub-microscopic world really put together?

In his popular little book, QED, The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, Richard Feynman reduces the rules of quantum mechanics to a simple command for the electron and the photon: Explore all paths. In 1948 Feynman proved that this command leads to all the same results as the usual wave mechanics.

Our course studies the command "Explore all paths" and its consequences. Using hands-on software, you interact with animated illustrations from Feynman's book. On-line, you discuss with other participants the deep paradoxes of quantum mechanics. But deep does not mean mathematical: NO EQUATIONS until one-third of the way through the course. Then the quantum wave function emerges as a natural consequence of the command "Explore all paths." It accounts for the smoothness of a friend's skin and the gold of sunset.

Some comments from students during previous semesters:

The reading was incredible...I really get a kick out of Feynman's totally off-wall way of describing this stuff...Truly a ground-breaker!...He brings up some REALLY interesting ideas that I am excited to discuss with the rest of the class...Feynman does a great job of explaining a post graduate physics topic in nearly everyday language...I enjoy reading him because he seems so honest about what he (and everyone else) does not know...Man, it made me feel good to read that Feynman couldn't understand this stuff either...I was very pleased to have Feynman tell us that what we will learn is absurd.

This course is pretty addictive! I find myself constantly thinking of the concepts presented in the reading as well as the items brought up (in the on-line discussion)...I find it similar to a good novel. Hard to put down or out of my mind...I am learning SO MUCH from all of you. That's one of this course format's strongest features...I'm learning twice as much as I ever hoped to, and we have just scratched the surface...I got an A in my intro qm class without having even a fraction of the understanding I have now...I find the power of this weekly conferencing unmatched by any course or book I have read. This medium allows us all to resonate and reflect our views of Physics.

As I breeze through Feynman, it occurs to me that the reading is easy because of the software simulations we have run...It is very nice to have these computer programs to "experiment" with...This all makes so much more sense now, and I owe a large part of that to the software.

PHSX 514 Comparative Planetology
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman and Jason Marcks, MSU Extended University

As viewed by the modern astronomer, the Solar System is more than 70 diverse worlds interacting as a dynamic system. This online course for K-12 in-service teachers focuses on fundamental questions driving NASA's exploration of the Solar System: How did it form? What's in it? How is it arranged? What does the study of other worlds (planets, moons, asteroids, and comets) teach us about our own? How do we learn about other worlds? How are these worlds similar and different? How do they interact, forming mini-systems within the Solar System? What are their surfaces, atmospheres, and interiors like, and how do we know? By taking advantage of NASA's virtual presence in the Solar System, course participants conduct individual investigations and explore how K-12 students can use similar tools to conduct authentic scientific inquiries. Course participants learn how to integrate NASA products (online images, imaging software, and other resources) effectively in the classroom. Study Guide from previous semester is online and available (btc.montana.edu/ceres/worlds/guide.html). Sponsored by Montana State University NASA CERES Project.

Textbook: ISBN 9781111990657 - The Solar System, 8th Ed (Seeds, Backman - Cengage)

Additional NTEN Course Information

PHSX 582 Astrobiology for Teachers
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA
Instructor:
Dr. Sanlyn Buxner, MSU Extended University

The Invisible Universe Online: The Search for Astronomical Origins for Teachers covers the long chain of events from the birth of the universe in the Big Bang, through the formation of galaxies, stars, and planets by focusing on the scientific questions, technological challenges, and space missions pursing the search for origins in alignment with the goals and emphasis of the National Science Education Standards.
Course Goals:
• Develop scientific background knowledge of astronomical objects and phenomena with peak emissions outside of the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum
• Understand contemporary scientific research questions related to understanding:
• How galaxies formed in the early universe
• How stars and planetary systems form and evolve
• Describe strategies and technologies for using non-visible wavelengths of EM radiation to study various phenomena
• Integrate the related issues of astronomical science, technology, societal issues, and career guidance for classroom teaching
• Develop specific strategies for implementing concepts in the National Science Education Standards related to "invisible" astronomy and the search for astronomical origins
The topics are closely aligned with the concepts emphasized in the NRC National Science Education Standards and the instructional strategy uses electronic collaborative group discussions in concert with hands-on laboratories and activities that use NASA data easily accessed via the Internet.

Additional NTEN Course Information

 PHSX 591 Electric Circuits & Magnetism
Credits: 2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer

Instructor: Robert Wilson

This 2-credit course is designed for practicing teachers who are teaching basic electric circuits as part of the science curricula in their classrooms. Its broad purpose is to introduce experienced teachers to core concepts in electric circuits, as those ideas relate to modern hands-on, inquiry-oriented science curricular materials. By helping teachers improve their understanding of the underlying physics, this course will enable them to teach electric circuits more effectively. The specific course goals are as follows:
  • To deepen teachers understanding of basic physics principles underlying electric circuits.
  • To enhance teachers ability to convey concepts of electric circuits through inquiry approaches to learning.
  •  To encourage the sharing of resources and pedagogical methods among course participants.
  • To strengthen teacher knowledge and confidence in teaching electric circuits, and to develop their ability to critically analyze and use commercially available resources.
  • To briefly introduce magnetism, differentiating electric charge and magnet poles and observing the connection between an electric current and a magnetic field.

This course will be taught as an online, D2L-based course involving significant student/instructor and student/student interaction, student team participation in course homework assignments, and independent study. The time commitment is anticipated to be approximately 11-12  hours per week for eight weeks. Course work will involve a mixture of online discussion, hands-on (lab-type) activities, readings from assigned and independently researched sources, and on-line quizzes.

 PHSX 591 Physics for Renewable Energy for Secondary Teachers
Credits: 3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor: Dr. Nicholas Childs, Department of Physics

This course is intended to provide secondary physics teachers with a connection between topics in renewable energy sources to Next Generation Science Standards in physics. The goal of the course is to improve their pedagogical knowledge related to teaching the physics associated with renewable energy sources. Students will focus on developing classroom materials related to the subject.

During this online course, participants will complete a series of online units centered on bringing the physics of renewable energy sources into a high school physics classroom. Students will develop an understanding of the underlying physics associated with renewable energy sources. As this course is intended for secondary classroom teachers, instruction will place an emphasis on creating classroom materials appropriate for secondary science classrooms and consistent with the Next Generation Science Standards. Energy sources covered include power derived from nuclear fusion/fission, wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, hydrogen, biomass and water waves. World energy consumption and energy storage will also be covered.

      Objectives - Secondary physics teachers who successfully complete this course will be able to do the following:
  • 1. Describe the current and projected world energy usage.
  • 2. Describe the necessity of renewable energy sources.
  • 3. Explain how energy is obtained from various renewable energy sources covered in the course.
  • 4. Demonstrate mastery of underlying physics concepts utilized in renewable energy sources covered in the course.
  • 5. Identify Next Generation Science Standards associated with topics in renewable energy.
  • 6. Show the ability to incorporate the underlying physics of renewable energy sources into the teaching of introductory level physics.

Summer Session Dates: Dates: May 23 - Aug 05, 2016 

Additional NTEN Course Information

 PHSX 591 Using Robotics in Lunar Expeditions
Credits:
3
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: TBA

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of unmanned exploration of the lunar surface using autonomous robots. The course will begin with an introduction to past, current, and planned techniques for lunar exploration and the application of robotics to this field. The course will then introduce the students to the building blocks of robotics including locomotion, computer system functionality, sensors, and autonomous decision making. The course will culminate in a final project in which the students will design a robot to accomplish an autonomous task. The robotics platform that will be used in this class is the LEGO® MINDSTORM® NXT Educational Kit. The target audience for this course is K-12 math and science teachers who wish to incorporate robotics learning modules into their classroom for the purpose of promoting the opportunities in the science and technology field. Students taking this course will be provided with enough background to assemble a team of students who will participate in the annual First Lego League robotics competition held at Montana State University in January.

 PHSX 591 World of Motion
Credits: 1
Mode of Delivery: 
Online
Semester Offered: 
Summer

Instructor:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

In this fast-moving six-week course, we will focus on the fascinating concepts of measurement and motion, and how they relate to hands-on physical science in the elementary classroom.

The goals of this course are to…

  • Gain a thorough understanding of the concepts of velocity and acceleration, central to a description of motion
  • Learn how to describe motion graphically and using data tables
  • Study how children’s concepts of motion are developed in the classroom setting
  • Become more effective users of inquiry-based curricular materials in teaching about motion
  • Learn about supplementary materials that help connect motion concepts to Native American cultures and communities
  • Develop our own professional community of course participants, sharing teaching ideas, expertise and experience
 PHSX 591 World of Force
Credits: 1
Mode of Delivery: 
Online
Semester Offered: 
Summer

Instructor:
Dr. Eric Brunsell, MSSE Department, MSU-Bozeman

This course is designed for 4-8 grade teachers who are exploring the concepts of forces in their classrooms. Its broad purpose is to introduce elementary and middle school teachers to core ideas about forces, as they relate to modern hands-on, inquiry-oriented science curricular materials. The course aims to help teachers use such materials more effectively by increasing their understanding of physics concepts, especially as those concepts may emerge in a classroom engaged in hands-on active learning. It is not a course in how to use a particular curriculum.

 The goals of this course are to

  • Gain a thorough understanding of the concept of force and the different kinds of force
  • Develop expertise in representing forces with free-body diagrams
  • Gain a thorough understanding of the relationship between forces and Newton's three laws of motion
  • Understand how forces determine the conditions for balancing
  • Learn how forces explain the operation of simple machines such as pulleys and levers
  •  Study how children's concepts of force, torque, and work are developed in classroom settings
  • Become more effective users of inquiry-based curricular materials in teaching about forces
  • Develop your own professional community of course participants, with whom you can share teaching ideas, expertise, and experience. 

PHSX 595 Teaching Mechanics Using Research-Based Curriculum 
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternate years (even) 
Instructors:
Dr. Greg Francis, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman
Dr. Jeff Adams, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman

The goal of this five-day course is to prepare participants to teach an mechanics integrated course built around Tutorials in Introductory Physics (McDermott, et al.). This research-based curriculum was designed to be used in recitations to augment traditional lecture courses operating essentially independent of the lecture. As a test site for this curriculum, Francis has taken the next step by totally redesigning his courses so that the lectures in fact serve to supplement the tutorials. The course will model both the student-centered tutorial instruction and the supporting active-engagement lectures for a selection of topics from the first semester of the two-semester sequence. A special emphasis will be placed upon training of peer-instructors for the effective use of the Tutorials. Participants will receive 70 PowerPoint lectures, each with its own description and learning outcomes, designed to engage the students in active learning and provide the necessary links to the Tutorial experience. A complete description of supporting demonstrations will also be provided. Finally, participants will receive a large bank of research-based homework and exam questions designed specifically to elicit the common misconceptions addressed in the Tutorials.

Additional Course Information

PHSX 596 Teaching Electricity and Magnetism Using Research-Based Curriculum
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer alternate years (odd) 
Instructor:
Dr. Greg Francis, Department of Physics, MSU-Bozeman

Many science teachers feel more comfortable teaching mechanics than the more abstract concepts of electricity and magnetism. This is unfortunate, as the application of these principles can be so much more exciting that the block-down-the-inclined-plane types of problems treated in mechanics. Students can be taught how to wire their own home or build electric motors.

This five-day course uses essentially the same mode as in "Teaching Mechanics Using Research-Based Curriculum", except that the topics covered will come from the second semester of the typical introductory physics sequence. Participants will learn how to teach an integrated course built around Tutorials in Introductory Physics (McDermott, et al.). This research-based curriculum challenges students to confront their misconceptions and build gut-level models of the key concepts of electricity and magnetism. The course will showcase both the student-centered tutorial instruction and the supporting active-engagement PowerPoint lectures. We will also review the physics education research literature that provides the foundation for these curricular materials.

Participants will receive 70 PowerPoint lectures, each with its own description and learning outcomes, designed to engage the students in active learning and provide the necessary links to the Tutorial experience. A complete description of supporting demonstrations will also be provided. Finally, participants will receive a large bank of research-based homework and exam questions designed specifically to elicit the common misconceptions addressed in the Tutorials.

Instructor: Dr. Francis is the director of the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team in the Department of Physics at Montana State University, where he teaches algebra-based physics in classes of up to 210 students per section. Over the last several years, he has developed a relatively low-budget, high-impact program of physics instruction that is producing gains on the Force Concept Inventory (a widely used test of conceptual understanding in basic mechanics) that are as good or better than lab-based programs that, by their design, require resources that are simply not available to many physics instructors. In addition, a study demonstrating a high long-term retention rate (“Do They Stay Fixed?” The Physics Teacher, 36(8), p. 488 (1998).) suggests that the program is doing much more than training them to give the right answers—it is changing their world view.

Additional Course Information

 Plant Sciences & Plant Pathology

PSPP 547 Biomimicry: The Technology of Biology 
Credits:
 2
Mode of Delivery: Online
Semester Offered: Spring
Instructor:
Robyn Klein, Department of Plant Sciences & Plant Pathology, MSU-Bozeman

Grades 7-12 teachers will:

a.  Practice biomimicry, a design tool that can be used to inspire technological innovation and bring relevancy to science curriculums. 
b.  Learn how biology can inform design for diverse industry disciplines such as engineering, architecture, chemical products, land management and communications.
c.  Apply these skills to biology, chemistry and physics science courses for grades 7 to 12.

Skills needed for this course :

A sense of adventure and wonder
A love of nature
An ability to cooperate with a group
An appreciation of patterns and beauty
A willingness to step out of your comfort zone

Textbook: The Biomimicry Resource Handbook (hardcopy recommended), available at: https://biomimicry.net/shop/

Additional Course Information

PSPP 548 Flowering Plants of the Northern Rocky Mountains
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Robyn Klein, Department of Plant Sciences & Plant Pathology, MSU-Bozeman

A field oriented study of the flowering plants of Montana with an emphasis on plant keying skills. Objectives are 1) to identify the parts of flowering plants and become familiar with botanical terms, 2) to learn morphological characteristics of common plant families, 3) to learn how to use a plant key to successfully identify flowering plants, 4) to apply plant identification skills to the classroom. Discussion will emphasize application of these skills and botanical texts to the classroom.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Field trips require walking up to 2 miles on moderate slopes.

Textbook: Plant Identification Terminology: An Illustrated Glossary 978-0964-0221-64, Second Edition

Additional Course Information

PSPP 549 Plants, People, and Health
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Robyn Klein, Department of Plant Sciences & Plant Pathology, MSU-Bozeman

This interdisciplinary course investigates how plants and people intersect, with a focus on the current popular and scientific interest in using plants and their compounds for health and medicine. The subject will be applied to ethnobotany, botany, and phytochemistry. Enhancing the links between the natural world and the classroom can bring meaning to all the science and instill an interest in the investigation of plants and their uses. The course will have the following components:

  1. Application to Ethnobotany: relationships between people, flora, and environment.

  2. Application to Botany: plant defense, co-evolution, chemical communication.

  3. Application to Phytochemistry: plant biosynthetic pathways for secondary compounds and classes of plant compounds.

  4. Application to Chemistry: making herbal products from plant material.

Laboratory: The last day will be spent with hands-on experience making some herbal products to enhance the learning opportunity.

Additional Course Information

 Range Science

ARNR 529 Yellowstone Wildlife Habitat Ecology
Credits:
2
Mode of Delivery: Campus
Semester Offered: Summer
Instructor:
Carl Wambolt, Department of Animal and Range Science, MSU-Bozeman

This course will describe the native communities of the internationally prominent northern Yellowstone winter range for wild ungulates. The ecology of many organisms, both plant and animal will be studied. Plant identification skills will be incorporated with an emphasis on the recognition of the northern range’s flora and its importance as wildlife habitat. Ecosystem interrelationships will form the basis for understanding the ecology of the range and interpreting the consequences of management alternatives. The course will have the following components:

1) Plant geography of the region and northern Yellowstone winter range (NYWR).
2) Taxonomic principles and identification of important plants on the NYWR.
3) Ecology of plants and wildlife of the NYWR.
4) Ungulate ecology as influenced by Yellowstone National Park.
5) Diets, foraging habits, and nutrition of wild ungulates.
6) Habitat types and their interaction with wildlife.
7) Fire ecology in the region and NYWR.
8) Community successional trends in the region and NYWR.
9) Herbivory on the NYWR.
10) Evolution of policy regarding the region and NYWR.

 

 

 

 



*Campus - course offered on-campus during a summer session
**Distance - distance delivery course offered by asynchronous, computer-mediated communication

 

 

Professional Capstone Paper & Symposium in Science Education