Montana State University

Nanocontainers as MRI contrast agent delivery device discussed Sept. 13

August 19, 2013

Shefah Qazi, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the recipient of a Kopriva Graduate Fellowship, will deliver a free public lecture about the use of nanocontainers to deliver contrast agents for MRI imaging at 4:10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13, in the Byker Auditorium in the Montana State University Chemistry and Biochemistry Building. A reception will follow.   High-Res Available

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A free public lecture about the use of nanocontainers to deliver contrast agents for MRI imaging will be given at 4:10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13, in the Byker Auditorium in the Montana State University Chemistry and Biochemistry Building. A reception will follow.

Shefah Qazi, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the recipient of a Kopriva Graduate Fellowship, will speak on "Investigating Protein Cage Architectures as Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents."

P22 viral capsids are robust and versatile nanocontainers that allow for both encapsulation of cargo and targeted delivery of cargo to desired tissue. These platforms have several major advantages over small molecular contrast agents, including the delivery of large payloads of contrast agents per capsid and directing the capsid to a specific molecular target. Qazi is investigating the use of these viral nanoparticles for targeting and imaging atherosclerotic plaque. These agents can potentially be administered at low doses and still produce very high-contrast images, meeting an important criterion for next-generation diagnostic tools.


Qazi’s lecture is presented by the Kopriva Science Seminar Series, which is funded through an endowment created by Phil Kopriva, a 1957 MSU microbiology graduate. Kopriva, who died in 2002, also created an endowment to fund the Kopriva Graduate Fellowship Program, which provides support and opportunities for graduate students in the College of Letters and Science, particularly in the biomedical sciences. The series features six seminars annually, with talks provided by MSU graduate students, faculty members and guest speakers. For more information about this and other Kopriva lectures, please visit www.montana.edu/lettersandscience/kopriva.html.

 

Jody Sanford (406) 994-7791, jody.sanford@montana.edu