Montana State University

MSU professor shares research about public and political will at United Nations commission

April 30, 2015 -- MSU News Service

Amber Raile, assistant management professor in the MSU Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship, was featured recently at the 59th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, held in March at the New York headquarters of the United Nations. Photo courtesy of the Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship.

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A Montana State University business professor was featured recently at the 59th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, held in March at the New York headquarters of the United Nations.

Amber Raile, assistant management professor in the MSU Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship, was a featured member of a panel, “Gender Advocacy Opportunities and Challenges for Both Political Will and Public Will,” where she discussed applications for her research on political will and public will. Specifically, Raile shared how the political will and public framework served as the basis for a current research project, funded by the Women’s Foundation of Montana, studying equal pay issues for women. The panel featured women’s rights advocates from around the world discussing how this framework for analyzing and developing political will and public will could be used to address their specific issue areas.

“It was very exciting to have an opportunity to engage with experts and to provide tools that can be used to advance women’s rights worldwide,” Raile said.

Raile and colleagues have defined political will as existing when decision makers are committed to supporting a policy solution, and public will as existing when a social system has a shared recognition of a particular problem and resolves to address the situation through collective action.

In addition, key research that Raile published along with Eric Raile, assistant research professor in the MSU College of Letters and Science’s Department of Political Science, and Lori Post from Yale University was previously distributed via the Women's UN Report Network as tools to catalyze political and public will to impact social policy.

The Women’s UN Report Network noted when sharing the research that political will is often mentioned as a necessary component of advancing human rights issues, but “only recently do we have systematic analysis and research on Political Will and Public Will.”

“Seeing how a research line that my colleagues and I have developed over the last seven years can be used to make positive changes in the lives of women worldwide was an incredible experience” Raile said.

Contact: Amber Raile, (406) 994-6188 or amber.raile@montana.edu