Montana State University

University of Chicago professor lectures March 10 about Fukushima implications

March 2, 2016

Norma Field, author and professor of East Asian studies at the University of Chicago will give a free public lecture exploring the human implications of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan, at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 10, in Ballroom D in MSU’s Strand Union Building. Photo courtesy of Norma Field.

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An author and professor of East Asian studies at the University of Chicago will give a free public lecture exploring the human implications of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan. The lecture is set for 4 p.m. Thursday, March 10, in Ballroom D in the Strand Union Building at Montana State University.

Norma Field, the Robert S. Ingersoll Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Japanese Studies, will present "Living with/in Fukushima, Five Years Later: Our World."

On March 11, 2011, a 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck off the eastern coast of Japan. The resulting tsunami triggered the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Field will explore the social structures that sustain nuclear power generation, including the divisions produced by the disaster itself. She will also discuss political and moral challenges posed by the Fukushima disaster for those living in provisionally safe, or more accurately, less contaminated places, given that we all inhabit a world transformed by the atomic age.

Field studies modern Japanese literature with an interest in the dialectical pursuit of structural and historical analyses and "naïve" and "scholarly" responses. She is also interested in feminism and translation as an interpretive, creative and scholarly activity and the context of both in contemporary capitalism.

Field is the author of "The Splendor of Longing in the Tale of Genji," "From My Grandmother's Bedside: Sketches of Postwar Tokyo" and "My Grandmother's Land," a collection of her essays including several originally written in Japanese. Her book, "In the Realm of a Dying Emperor," is one of the best-selling books in Japanese studies and used widely in college classrooms. She is a co-author of the 2015 e-book, "Fukushima Radiation: Will You Still Say No Crime Was Committed, Statements by 50 Complainants for Criminal Prosecution of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster." In January she published a co-edited volume, "For Dignity, Justice, and Revolution: An Anthology of Japanese Proletarian Literature," with The University of Chicago Press.

Field's lecture is presented by the new Asian Studies program at Montana State University with support from the College of Letters and Science. The Asian Studies program offers an interdisciplinary major and minor that enable students to learn about the Asia-Pacific region by studying the histories, cultures, politics, and environments of nations such as Japan and China.

Cosponsors of this event include the Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies program, as well as the following departments: History and Philosophy, Modern Languages and Literatures, Native American Studies, Political Science, and Sociology and Anthropology.

For more information, please visit calendar.msu.montana.edu/events/17981 or call 994-7288.

Jody Sanford (406)994-7791, jody.sanford@montana.edu