Montana State University

College of Letters and Science Distinguished Speakers series hosts Harlan Weaver

September 27, 2016 -- MSU News Service

Harlan Weaver, assistant professor of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies at Kansas State University, will lecture about "It’s Me and the Dog: Imagining MultiSpecies Justice," on Oc.t 6 as part of the MSU College of Letters and Science’s Distinguished Speakers series. Photo courtesy Harlan Weaver.

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Tel: (406) 994-4571
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BOZEMAN – A free public lecture about multispecies justice, or caring about animals in an era when humans still suffer oppression, is set for 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in 346 Leon Johnson Hall on the campus of Montana State University.

Harlan Weaver, assistant professor of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies at Kansas State University, will lecture about "It’s Me and the Dog: Imagining MultiSpecies Justice," as part of the MSU College of Letters and Science’s Distinguished Speakers series.

In his lecture, Weaver will offer a way of thinking and understanding human and animal needs together, demonstrating a form of what can be called multispecies justice.

“Why should we care about animals when humans continue to be oppressed?” Weaver said. “In a world where homophobia and transphobia run rampant, where movements such as Black Lives Matter have transformed our social and political landscape, where violent crime and migration crises entwine, there seems little room left to care for non-humans. Why, then, should we care about animals?”

Weaver received his Ph.D. from University of California Santa Cruz's History of Consciousness Department. He completed a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society at UC Berkeley. He is currently working on a book called “Bad Dog,” which addresses the ways that relationships between humans and animals reflect and shape experiences of race, gender, sexuality, species and breed.

Weaver’s publications include "The Tracks of My Tears: Trans* Affects, Resonance, and Pit Bulls and Parolees;" "Pit Bull Promises: Inhuman Intimacies and Queer Kinships in an Animal Shelter;" "Friction in the Interstices: Affect and Landscape in Stone Butch Blues;" "Trans Species;" "Becoming in Kind: Race, Gender, and Nation in Cultures of Dog Fighting and Dog Rescue;" and "Monster Trans: Diffracting Affect, Reading Rage."

Weaver’s lecture is sponsored by the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program at MSU, and is presented by the College of Letters and Science's Distinguished Speakers Series. The series, which began in the spring of 2011, brings distinguished scholars to MSU to give a public talk and to meet with faculty and students in order to enrich the intellectual life on campus and to enhance research connections.

For more information about this and other L&S Distinguished Speakers series lectures, see www.montana.edu/lettersandscience/speakers/, or call (406) 994-4288.

Contact: Jody Sanford, College of Letters and Science, (406) 994-7791 or jody.sanford@montana.edu