Montana State University

Author Maile Meloy’s Nov. 14 lecture continues MSU American West series

November 2, 2016 -- MSU News Service

Award-winning author Maile Meloy will talk about how growing up in Montana has shaped her writing at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14, at the Museum of the Rockies' Hager Auditorium. Her talk, "Both Ways Is the Only Way I Want It," is part of the MSU College of Letters and Science's Western Lands and Peoples: Perspectives on the American West Lecture Series. Photo courtesy of Maile Meloy.

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Award-winning author Maile Meloy will talk about how growing up in Montana has shaped her writing at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14, at the Museum of the Rockies' Hager Auditorium.

Meloy’s talk, "Both Ways Is the Only Way I Want It," is part of the Montana State University College of Letters and Science's Western Lands and Peoples: Perspectives on the American West Lecture Series and is free and open to the public. It will be preceded by a reception at 5:15 p.m. and followed by a book-signing, both in the museum lobby.

Meloy will read the beginning of a short story set in Montana and talk about the process of writing it.

Meloy was born and raised in Helena and now lives in Los Angeles. Her most recent short story collection, "Both Ways Is the Only Way I Want It," was named one of the 10 Best Books of the Year by The New York Times in 2009. She is also the author of the story collection "Half in Love," the novels "Liars and Saints" and "A Family Daughter," and the "Apothecary" trilogy of novels for young readers. The independent feature film “Certain Women,” now in theaters, is based on one of Meloy’s short stories.

Meloy’s fiction has won The Paris Review's Aga Khan Prize for Fiction, the PEN/Malamud Award, the E.B. White Award, and the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and was chosen as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists. Her short stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review and Granta, and her essays in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, Slate and O, The Oprah Magazine. Her new novel for adults will be published in June.

Meloy’s talk is the third in this year’s American West lecture series, which features experts from around the country discussing the history, literature and culture of the West; issues affecting the wildlife and fisheries of the region; and the West's geography, geology and resources.

The Western Lands and Peoples: Perspectives on the American West Lecture Series is cosponsored by the Burton K. Wheeler Center and is part of the college's Western Lands and Peoples Initiative, a collection of programs and events highlighting interdisciplinary research within the College of Letters and Science that is focused on the places and peoples of the Western United States and Canada.

Jody Sanford (406) 994-7791, jody.sanford@montana.edu

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