Montana State University

Author lectures March 30 at MSU about Hollywood Blacklist and making of ‘High Noon’

March 23, 2017 -- MSU News Service

Glenn Frankel, author of the book “High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic,” will lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 30, in the Hager Auditorium at the Museum of the Rockies, with a book signing to follow. The event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the Montana State University Center for Western Lands and Peoples. Photo courtesy of Glenn Frankel.

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Glenn Frankel, author of the book “High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic,” will lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 30, in the Hager Auditorium at the Museum of the Rockies, with a book signing to follow.

The event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the Montana State University Center for Western Lands and Peoples.

“High Noon” is one of the most admired movies of the Golden Age of Hollywood. Starring Montana native Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly, the film achieved instant box-office success. However, Frankel points out that what is often overlooked is the fact that “High Noon” was made during a time when the United States was terrified of Communism, and blacklisted those affiliated with it. The Committee on Un-American Activities called “High Noon” screenwriter Carl Foreman to testify about his former membership in the Communist Party during the middle of the movie’s filming. Frankel writes that as Foreman wondered whether to give up names or sacrifice his career, “High Noon” became a story about fear, repression and the cost of courage.

A longtime Washington Post reporter, editor and bureau chief in London, Africa and Jerusalem, Frankel won the 1989 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for reporting about Israel and the first Palestinian uprising. He also served as editor of the Washington Post Magazine. His first book, “Beyond the Promised Land: Jews and Arabs on the Hard Road to a New Israel,” won the National Jewish Book Award. His second book, “Rivonia’s Children: Three Families and the Cost of Conscience in White South Africa,” was a finalist for the Alan Paton Award, South Africa’s most prestigious literary prize.

Frankel has worked as the director of the School of Journalism and G.B. Dealey Regents Professor at the University of Texas at Austin and also spent four years as a visiting journalism professor at Stanford University. His latest book, “The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend,” was a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller.

Kori Robbins (406) 994-4395, kori.robbins@montana.edu