Montana State University

Schoene to discuss human adaptation to high altitudes at Nov. 19 Café Scientifique

November 2, 2009


Dr. Robert Schoene, a cardio pulmonologist, climber, author and expert on human adaptations to high altitudes such as Machu Picchu, shown, will lecture on "Humans on High: An Exploration of Human Adaptation to the World's High Places" at the next Café Scientifique, to be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, at the newly renovated Baxter Ballroom. Photo courtesy of Dr. Robert Schoene.    High-Res Available

Subscribe to MSU Newsletters


Bobcat Bulletin is a weekly e-newsletter designed to bring the most recent and relevant news about Montana State University directly to friends and neighbors via email. Visit Bobcat Bulletin.

MSU Today e-mail brings you news and events on campus thrice weekly during the academic year. Visit the MSU Today calendar.

MSU News Service
Tel: (406) 994-4571
msunews@montana.edu
Dr. Robert "Brownie" Schoene, an expert on cardiopulmonary function at high altitudes, will present "Humans on High: An Exploration of Human Adaptation to the World's High Places" at the next Café Scientifique to be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, at the newly renovated Baxter Ballroom in downtown Bozeman.

Schoene, a pulmonary/critical care physician practicing in Bozeman will discuss research into the limits of human physical and mental performance during forays to extreme altitudes. Schoene will explain why humans can or can't go higher and will discuss the human populations that have lived at high altitude for thousands of years, including insight to some evolutionary adaptations in the Himalaya and Andes. Schoene will speak about the advantages and disadvantages of training at high altitude for lowlanders who are high-level athletes, and will make comparisons with animals who thrive in thin air.

Schoene has combined his passion for mountains with his career. An endurance athlete who has climbed all over the world, he has spent most of his career as a professor at the University of Washington and University of California San Diego medical schools. He was a climber-scientist on the 1981 American Medical Expedition to Mt. Everest, as well as an investigator of high altitude pulmonary edema on Mt. McKinley in the 1980s. He also has studied the high altitude natives in the Andes of Chile and Peru and is the co-author of "High Altitude Medicine and Biology" with Drs. John West and James Milledge, colleagues on Mt. Everest and many other high places.

Café Scientifique, co-sponsored by Montana's INBRE Program and Montana State University's College of Letters and Science, provides a relaxed setting for people to learn about current scientific topics. The concept started in England in 1998 and has spread to a handful of locations in the United States. Following a short presentation by a scientific expert, the majority of time is reserved for questions, answers and lively discussion.

For more information, contact Laurie Howell at (406) 994-7531 or lhowell@montana.edu.

For more information about the Café Scientifique concept, check the Web at http://www.inbre.montana.edu/?page=news-and-events/cafescientifique .

Laurie Howell (406) 994-7531, lhowell@montana.edu