Montana State University

Australian scholar discusses Aboriginal ways Nov. 10 at MSU

November 1, 2010


Visiting scholar Blaze Kwaymullina, an Aboriginal academic from the University of Western Australia, will deliver the 2010 Phyllis Berger Memorial Lecture at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 10, in the Hager Auditorium at the Museum of the Rockies. MSU photo by Kelly Gorham.   High-Res Available

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Visiting scholar Blaze Kwaymullina, an Aboriginal academic from the University of Western Australia, will deliver the 2010 Phyllis Berger Memorial Lecture at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 10, in the Hager Auditorium at the Museum of the Rockies.

Kwaymullina, a member of the Palyku and Nyamal peoples of the Pilbara, which is located in the northwest of Western Australia, will lecture on "Learning to Read the Signs: Australian Aboriginal Ways of Knowing, Being, and Doing." His lecture, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Department of Native American Studies at Montana State University.

Kwaymullina comes from a family of writers, artists, singers, playwrights and academics. He majored in history for his undergraduate degree, holds a master's degree in criminology and is currently completing a doctorate in creative writing. His academic work has focused on exploring Aboriginal knowledge systems and the points where they intersect with Western knowledge across an array of disciplinary fields. He is also a creative writer and has published several short children's novels.

The annual Berger Memorial Lecture honors the memory of MSU benefactor Phyllis Berger, and is offered each year at MSU by a nationally recognized Native American, Native Alaskan or Native Hawaiian scholar, artist or leader speaking on Native history, cultures or contemporary issues of interest and importance to both Indian and non-Indian people.

For more information, call the Department of Native American Studies at 994-3881.

Walter Fleming (406) 994-3881, wfleming@montana.edu