Montana State University

World-renowned stem cell researcher to speak March 25 at MSU

March 1, 2011 -- MSU News Service


Dr. Irving Weissman, director of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine, will speak on "Normal and Neoplastic Stem Cells" at 4 p.m. Friday, March 25, in the Procrastinator Theater in MSU's Strand Union Building. A reception will follow in the Leigh Lounge. MSU photo by Kelly Gorham.   High-Res Available

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MSU News Service
Tel: (406) 994-4571
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A free public lecture about using stem cells to address human disease will be given on Friday, March 25, at Montana State University.

Dr. Irving Weissman, director of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine, will speak on "Normal and Neoplastic Stem Cells" at 4 p.m. in the Procrastinator Theater in MSU's Strand Union Building. A reception will follow in the Leigh Lounge.

In 1988, Weissman became the first to isolate in pure form any stem cell in any species when he isolated the blood-forming stem cell in mice. He subsequently isolated the human blood-forming stem cell, the human neuronal stem cell, and the human leukemia stem cell. His work has opened up an entirely new area of scientific research with enormous potential for life-saving therapies.

Weissman is a Montana native and a 1961 Montana State College graduate. He received his medical degree from Stanford in 1965. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1989 and was named California Scientist of the Year in 2002. In 2008, he won the Robert Koch Prize, which is widely regarded as the leading international scientific prize in microbiology.

Weissman's lecture is part of the Kopriva Science Seminar Series, which is funded through an endowment created by Phil Kopriva, a 1957 microbiology graduate from MSU. Kopriva, who died in 2002, also created an endowment to fund the Kopriva Graduate Fellowship Program, which provides support and opportunities for graduate students in the College of Letters and Science, particularly in the biomedical sciences. The series features six seminars annually, with talks provided by MSU graduate students, faculty members and guest speakers.

For more information about this and other Kopriva lectures, visit www.montana.edu/lettersandscience/kopriva.html.

Jody Sanford, (406) 994-7791 or jody.sanford@montana.edu