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Caption This series of maps depicts the heat content found in the Earth's crust beneath Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces in Yellowstone National Park, as observed by the heat-sensitive channels on the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) on the Landsat 7 satellite and on the Thematic Mapper on the Landsat 5 satellite. The energy level broadly rises (becoming a deeper red) in the 1980s to late 1990s to a peak in 2000, followed by subsiding through the 2000s. A NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen, with data provided by Shannon Savage, Montana State University.
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Caption Satellite measurements of heat emitted from Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces in Yellowstone National Park from 1986 to 2007.
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Caption The change in activity of Minerva Terraces in the Mammoth Basin was reflected in satellite data examined by Lawrence and Savage. In 1998, mineral-rich, near-boiling water bubbled over the Minerva's broad steps, depositing calcite on the face of each terrace. Heat-loving organisms colored the white surface a dozen shades of pink, yellow, and green. A year later, the terraces were dry and the satellite imagery showed the amount of energy had markedly declined. Photo courtesy of NASA/Yellowstone National Park.
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