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Caption Hot springs, such as those in Yellowstone National Park, host microbial communities supported by mineral forms of energy. As such, they provide a readily accessible portal for studying the processes that give rise to nutrients that support microbial life in the deep, hot biosphere. Photo courtesy Eric Boyd.
Contact Eric Boyd, eboyd@montana.edu or (406) 994-7046
Caption Hot springs, such as those in Yellowstone National Park, host microbial communities supported by mineral forms of energy. As such, they provide a readily accessible portal for studying the processes that give rise to nutrients that support microbial life in the deep, hot biosphere. Photo courtesy Eric Boyd.
Contact Eric Boyd, eboyd@montana.edu or (406) 994-7046
Caption Dan Colman is lead author of a 25-year retrospective about the search for life deep in Earth's crust. The paper was published July 3 in the scientific journal PNAS. MSU photo by Kelly Gorham.
Contact Eric Boyd, eboyd@montana.edu or (406) 994-7046
Caption Eric Boyd, assistant professor of environmental microbiology and associate director of the Thermal Biology Institute at Montana State University, works in the Boyd Lab on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, in Bozeman, Montana. Boyd is co-author of a 25-year retrospective about the search for life deep in Earth's crust. The paper was published July 3 in the scientific journal PNAS. MSU Photo by Kelly Gorham
Contact Eric Boyd, eboyd@montana.edu or (406) 994-7046
Caption Exploratory drill cores, such as this granite core, are collected from deep in the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Colorado. These cores provide access to microbial habitats from the deep, hot biosphere. Microorganisms inhabit microscopic fractures in the rock and use minerals within the rock as a source of nutrients. Photo courtesy Eric Boyd.
Contact Eric Boyd, eboyd@montana.edu or (406) 994-7046
Caption Exploratory drill cores, such as this dunite core, are collected from deep in the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Colorado. These cores provide access to microbial habitats from the deep, hot biosphere. Microorganisms inhabit microscopic fractures in the rock and use minerals within the rock as a source of nutrients. Photo courtesy Eric Boyd.
Contact Eric Boyd, eboyd@montana.edu or (406) 994-7046