Montana State University
Project TRACS > Social Science and Empirical Framework

ADVANCE Project TRACs

Montana State University
P.O. Box 173095
Bozeman, MT 59717-3095

Tel: (406) 994-4690
E-mail: ADVANCE@montana.edu
Location: 319 Leon Johnson

Primary Contacts

Jessi L. Smith, Ph.D.
Special Assistant to the Provost/
Director of ADVANCE
jsismith@montana.edu

Sara Rushing, Ph.D.
Co-Director of ADVANCE/
University Family Advocate
srushing@montana.edu

Theresa Marchwick
Project Manager
tmarchwick@montana.edu

Micaela M. Young
Grant Submission Training Coordinator
micaelayoung@montana.edu

Becca Belou
Equity Data Analyst
rebeccabelou@montana.edu

Co-PIs

Waded Cruzado, Ph.D.
President
Montana State Univerity

Martha A. Potvin, Ph.D.
Provost & V.P. for Academic Affairs

Social Science and Empirical Framework

Social Science Research Team Members (left to right) Becca Belou, equity data analyst; Beth Burroughs, Ph.D., Mathematical Sciences; Ian Handley, Ph.D., Psychology; Joy Honea, Ph.D., Sociology, MSU-Billings; Kelli Klebe, Ph.D., Pyschology, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs; Bethany Letiecq, Health and Human Development; and Liz Shanahan, D.A., Political Science

Click Here to view Conference Abstract Submissions

Data Charrette:

April 9, 2013 Campus Climate Data Charrette Posters and Feedback

Project TRACS: An Empirical Investigation of Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy, and Competence Support

Research Objective 1: Test the extent to which institutional, departmental, and individual markers predict gender cultural transformation among MSU faculty and administrators

Research Objective 2: Test the dynamic and complex ways in which fostering competence, autonomy, and relatedness needs can bring about cultural transformation at MSU. Here we test the fit of an “Additive model” whereby initiatives will have an additive positive effect on the three needs for both faculty and administrators resulting in cultural transformation compared to a “Specialized model” whereby each initiative will have unique and independent positive effects on a particular need for particular people

Research Objective 3: Test the effectiveness of each of the “Enhancing Cultural Attunement” initiative components


Self Determination Theory and Basic Psychological Need-support

Project TRACS uses self-determination theory (SDT) (http://www.selfdeterminationtheory.org/) as the organizing framework for the selection of three initiatives: Enhancing Research Capacity and Opportunity, Enhancing Work-Life Integration, and Enhancing Cultural Attunement. A self-determined environment supports the (universal) psychological needs of people to make meaningful connections with others (relatedness), have flexibility and control over processes and outcomes (autonomy), and engage in opportunities for learning and mastery (competency) (Deci & Ryan, 1985). The theory suggests, and empirical data support, that when these three basic needs of relatedness, autonomy, and competence are satisfied, job satisfaction improves, organizational trust and loyalty increase, and creativity, motivation and performance thrive (Deci & Ryan, 2000).

Figure 1:
The SDT Process of Cultural Transformation

The SDT Process of Cultural Transformation

We predict that a need-supported climate targeted at broadening the participation of women in STEM/SBS will engender institutional cultural transformation benefiting all campus community members (See Figure 1). Thus, SDT not only offers hypothesis driven initiative generation, but also provides a theoretical pathway to study the process of cultural transformation. We will assess not only the outcomes of the transformative initiatives (did the program work?) but the process of transformation over time (why did it work?). An innovative appeal of Project TRACS is our goal of understanding the dynamic and complex ways in which fostering competence, autonomy, and relatedness can bring about institutional cultural transformation. 


Participants and Procedure

Participants will be all full time faculty and administrators at MSU Bozeman. We certainly expect some will decline to participate and address this concern in our incentive plan; we also expect some to drop out over time, and address this in our analyses plan. Our goal is 400 participants.  Data will be collected at specific time points as seen in Table 1. In November of each year, we will collect current institutional indicators with the assistance of our Equity Data Analyst. Faculty and administrators’ baseline perceptions of relatedness, autonomy, and competence need-satisfaction will also be assessed at the onset of the project using well-established survey instruments. We employ both quantitative and qualitative methodological approaches.

Table 1. Data Collection Timeline

 

Yr
1 Fall

Yr
1 Sp

Yr
2 Fall

Yr
2 Sp

Yr
3 Fall

Yr
3 Sp

Yr
4 Fall

Yr
4 Sp

Yr
5 Fall

Yr
5 Sp

Institutional Indicators

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Need-Satisfaction Surveys

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Initiative Indicators

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Cultural Transformation Surveys

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

COACHE Surveys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

Review of Dept. Strategic Plans

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Faculty Annual Reviews

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Pipeline Qualitative Data

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Search Tool Kit & Equity Advisor Data Collection

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Department Head Education Data

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Diversity Depth Hire Data

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

Equity Data Use

 

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Distinguished Professorship Fundraising Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

The research team will use quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods techniques to collect, analyze, and disseminate our results.