MSU STRATEGIC INVESTMENT PROPOSAL FOR INSTITUTIONAL PRIORITIES
PROPOSAL OVERVIEW
TitleIndian Education for All Professional Development Opportunities Request Date2012-12-04
DepartmentEducation Emailcarjuzaa@montana.edu
RequestorJioanna Carjuzaa Phone994-4941
INSTITUTIONAL BENEFIT
Campuses Bozeman Billings Havre Great Falls FSTS Extension MAES
Cross Depts Education Native American Studies
TIMEFRAME
Proposed Dates Start: Summer 2012 End: On-Going
PROPOSAL SUMMARY
In recognition of our history and in harmony with our vision as a leading 21st century land-grant university, embracing Indian Education for All (IEFA) as a model for inclusiveness raises MSUs national and international prominence as an institution that promotes social justice and educational equity. IEFA professional development plays a key role in training the next generation of faculty and students to be culturally competent, influential leaders in their disciplines. This IEFA Strategic Investment Proposal addresses the need for a stable revenue source in order to deliver professional development programs that have proven to be effective.
STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT
This Indian Education for All (IEFA) Strategic Investment Proposal addresses several of the objectives listed under Learning, Discovery, Engagement, Integration, Access, and Stewardship in the MSU Strategic Plan 2012. Most notably, it supports the goals and metrics related to increasing global and multicultural understanding and experiences for students, as well as providing opportunities for leadership development for faculty, staff and students, while widening access to higher education and ensuring equality of opportunity for all.

Under Engagement, Objective E.2 Metric E 2.1 and Objective E.3 Metrics E. 3.1 and E.3.2 students, faculty and staff will develop their cultural competence by participating in IEFA professional development opportunities and learning about the unique cultures and histories of Montana’s American Indians. Under Access, Objective A.2: Diversify the student body Metric A.2.1 it is stated that the number of Native American students enrolled at MSU will increase by 45 percent by 2019. In order to recruit, retain, and graduate American Indian students, we need to create a welcoming and supportive campus community. IEFA professional development opportunities will help us accomplish this.

I think an important connection which is often overlooked is that the goals of IEFA do not focus exclusively on content. The reason why IEFA is important across disciplines is that preparing faculty and staff to be more culturally sensitive helps us to be more connected to our students as learners and prepares us to successfully teach a diverse student population by modeling inclusivity. A portion of cultural awareness is bringing in content from multiple perspectives that relates to course goals and provides for a richer learning experience for all students. Another aspect of it is understanding that students have different learning styles, cultural heritages, historical contexts, and life experiences, and that educators in higher education have to pay attention to these variables if we want to recruit, retain, and graduate American Indian students. Every member of the MUS community must be committed to making our American Indian students feel welcomed, to provide them with a positive experience in our classrooms and on our campuses, and to support their social and academic success. Embracing IEFA bridges teaching, research and service, and brings the university’s intellectual resources to bear on meeting the legal obligations of Montana’s constitutional mandate.

COST AND REQUIREMENTS
Funding Type: One-Time Only Funding Base (3-yr Recurring) Funding
  FY13 FY14 FY15 Base ($) OTO Startup ($)   FTE;
Salaries       19320      .20% 
Benefits       5491       
Materials & Supplies       2500       
Travel       3000       
Contracted Services       5000       
Capital              
Other Operations              
TOTAL 35311    .20% 
Please comment, if necessary, regarding cost and requirements.

Cost and Requirements: Total  $35,310.62

Personnel:  responsibilities

Jioanna Carjuzaa, Director:

  • serve as facilitator for IEFA professional development opportunities at MSU
  • collaborate with the Director of Minority and American Indian Student Achievement at OCHE
  • collaborate with Indian Education Specialists at the Montana Office of Pubic Instruction
  • outreach to local school districts, Extension offices, institutions of higher education, etc.
  • network with leaders in Indian Education and Multicultural Education
  • meet with Indian educators, scholars, Tribal members, researchers, graduate and undergraduate students, policy makers, and others
  • collect and analyze data to plan, organize, and facilitate workshops
  • invite and host speakers
  • advertise the workshops, field calls, answer requests
  • research, evaluate and purchase materials
  • oversee the budget
  • hire and supervise Undergraduate Technology Education Intern, Education/NAS Student Support Person, and administrative support person
  • disseminate materials and resources to faculty
  • disseminate, to a community of scholars and practitioners, research on culturally responsive pedagogy and IEFA locally, statewide, across the U.S. and internationally
  • make presentations on IEFA in Native American Studies, Sociology, Education, Nursing, and in other courses, departments and colleges across campus as well as for other institutions of higher education and international organizations
  • publish research on IEFA as a model for culturally responsive pedagogy in practice
  • host international scholars interested in researching culturally responsive pedagogy/IEFA

($4,000 per fall, spring, summer semesters = $12,000 + benefits of $3,922.00 = total $15,922.00)

 Jim Vernon, graphic designer

  • design, print, and distribute workshop posters
  • design and print workshop agendas
  • support technology intern
  • provide support for taping and uploading of podcasts

($18.00/hour x 40 hours = $720.00 + benefits of $309.16 = total $1,029.16)

 Education/NAS Student Support Person

  • help with participant registration
  • help with coordination of workshops – space rental, catering, purchasing materials
  • photocopying, assembling materials

($10.00/hour x 150 hours = $1,500.00 + benefits of $9.45 = total $1,509.45)

Undergraduate Technology Education Intern

  • design and maintain IEFA web site
  • upload resources
  • video-cast fall and spring IEFA workshops
  • edit and finalize production of video-casts
  • post video-casts of IEFA workshops and related materials to web site
  • collect and upload IEFA workshop poster session materials
  • upload previous IEFA workshop podcasts
  • coordinate Webinars

($14.00/hour x 300 hours = $4,200.00 + benefits of $26.46 = total $1,029.16)

Administrative Support Person

--  Appointments Support

  • generate employment contracts
  • oversee payroll arrangements

--  Budgetary Support

  • pay invoices
  • answer budgetary questions

--  Clerical support

  • help with dissemination of announcements
  • print badges and help prepare materials for workshops
  • create and print participant list
  • enter, distribute, and post participant feedback
  • transcribe interviews
  • compile survey, FAD, Banner, and other data

-- Public Relations Support

  • place workshop announcements in MSU Today
  • communicate with MSU News Service on upcoming events
  • photograph, write up, and publish IEFA updates in the College of EHHD’s newsletters

($12.00/hour x 75 hours = $900.00 + benefits of 288.00 = total $1,188.00)

 

Additional Costs Included for Materials and Supplies/Travel/and Contracted Services Are:

Workshop Honorariums for Presenters  

Mileage/Airfare/Lodging for Presenters 

Advertising Fliers/ Name Badges/Supplies/Posters                    

Books/Copies/Folders/Supplies for Workshop Attendees     

MSU Space Rentals/Equipment Rentals                                       

MSU Catering Lunch Buffet/Beverages/Snacks                            

PROPOSAL SCOPE
Describe the Proposal

Indian Education for All Professional Development Opportunities

Prior to the treaty period and the Morrill Act of 1862, for thousands of years American Indian tribes, Shoshone, Nez Perce, Blackfeet, Flathead, Crow, and Sioux, travelled through the area called the Valley of the Flowers.  Renamed Gallatin Valley by white settlers, Montana State University now sits on what was primarily Crow territory.  In recognition of our history and in harmony with our vision as a 21st century university, embracing Indian Education for All (IEFA) as a model for inclusiveness raises MSU's national and international prominence as an institution that promotes social justice and educational equity.  IEFA professional development plays a key role in training the next generation of faculty and students to be culturally competent, influential leaders in their disciplines.

This IEFA Strategic Investment Proposal addresses the need for a stable revenue source in order to deliver professional development programs that have proven to be effective and that directly support MSU’s strategic priorities.  I am requesting sustainable, predictable, secure funding in support of a proven program.  IEFA is a mandate for higher education and is supported through the Board of Regents policy and planning. This proposal addresses key metrics of MSU’s strategic plan, the institution’s goals for 2019, and our IEFA Montana Constitutional obligation.  It serves the local, state, national and global communities by integrating learning, discovery and engagement and serving as a model for how culturally responsive pedagogy should be done.  I am asking that MSU attach resources to programming that support these efforts.

In the past seven years I have offered 13 IEFA workshops.  Continual grant writing is not good stewardship of time and resources, and is a hindrance to program effectiveness.  Base budgeting would allow me to put my time and energy into program planning and delivery of high quality professional development opportunities rather than having the worry of finding and stitching together enough funding.  A Strategic Investment grant is the ideal mechanism for me to do this.  

If funded, this proposal will benefit all Montanans, Indians and non-Indians alike. A permanent budget will allow me to devote the necessary time, energy, and commitment to maintain and expand our leadership position across the state and around the globe in modeling how best to embrace culturally responsive pedagogy.  In addition to offering workshops, I have made numerous presentations, published many articles, provided discipline-specific support to colleges, departments, organizations and institutions of higher learning as well as K-12 educators across Montana, and hosted international scholars in Indigenous studies. I have been creative in partnering with others to obtain financial support and resources to accomplish these tasks. I have sought and been awarded grant funding totaling over $85,000 to plan and facilitate professional development workshops/institutes on IEFA for: 1). faculty, staff, administrators, and students at MSU across all disciplines, and at other institutions of higher education throughout the state; 2). teacher educators across Montana and 3). K-12 teachers and personnel in local school districts. These funds included costs to bring in speakers, provide research stipends to support curriculum development, and purchase, for participants, a variety of materials/resources/books by and about American Indians in general and Montana Tribal Nations specifically. Unfortunately, these revenue sources have made clear they will no longer be available. In order to continue to offer high quality professional development opportunities and support preparing faculty and staff to meet our obligations to integrate IEFA across the various disciplines, and increasing students’ cultural competency, I request that MSU demonstrate support by funding IEFA as an institutional priority.  

The IEFA initiative is an unprecedented reform effort 40 years in the making. This audacious legislation has acknowledged the inadequacy of K-12 public school and university curricula which excludes American Indians. In 1972 the Constitutional Convention met to revise the state’s constitution. High school students from FortPeck inspired the delegates, all non-Indian, with their moving testimony. The delegates responded by adding language to the state’s constitution in Article X, pledging, “The state recognizes the distinct and unique cultural heritage of American Indians and is committed in its educational goals to the preservation of their cultural integrity” (Mont. Const. art. X, §1). Early efforts to implement the requirement, though numerous, were not robust. Teacher education programs statewide were inadequately prepared to offer coursework, and the Montana Office of Public Instruction (OPI) systems of support were not yet in place. In addition, the seemingly sudden expectation of cooperation between tribes and non-tribal educators overlooked decades of public schooling that excluded, marginalized, and at times abused American Indian students. Until relationships could be built between Montana educators and those who could provide authentic cultural instruction, goals set forth in Article X were unattainable. In 1999 the Legislature passed House Bill 528, now known as Indian Education for All. The law states, “Every Montanan. . .whether Indian or non-Indian, [is] encouraged to learn about the distinct and unique heritage of American Indians in a culturally responsive manner. . .all school personnel should have an understanding and awareness of Indian tribes to help them relate effectively with Indian students and parents. . . Every educational agency and all educational personnel will work cooperatively with Montana tribes. . .when providing instruction and implementing an educational goal.” (Mont. Code. Ann. ttl. 20, ch.1, pt. 5 § 1, 1999)

Consequently, MSU has legal obligations, ethical commitments, and instructional responsibilities to educate all Montanans about the state’s first inhabitants. To carry out the intent of IEFA, it is also important to emphasize our commitment as 21st century multicultural educators. It is our duty to combat stereotypes, address misconceptions and inaccuracies, and confront educational inequities. If our students are to serve all citizens in their future leadership positions, we need to empower them to advance equity and inclusivity.

Neither a prescribed curriculum nor an add-on program, IEFA is a comprehensive approach to be infused into every aspect of education. The primary goal of IEFA, like all other multicultural education approaches, is to promote the education and achievement of ALL students, especially those who are traditionally ignored by and underserved in our education system. In addition to providing our students with a multicultural and global perspective, IEFA compliments our efforts to recruit, retain, and graduate American Indian students.

Mont. Code. Ann. ttl. 20, ch.1, pt. 5, § 1. Indian Education for All. 1999.

Mont. Const. art. X, §1.

   

 
Describe the broader impacts and benefits of this proposal

As President Cruzado reminds us, our campus is the state of Montana.  As the state’s land-grant institution, we are committed to sharing our resources, knowledge, and exemplary outreach and serve MSU campuses and Tribal Colleges among others.  In addition, Montana’s mandate to teach Indian cultures and histories in a culturally responsive manner has impact beyond the classrooms of our state. If we truly are to embrace the diversity we have, and provide equitable educational opportunities for all of our students, then the ethical and instructional aspects play very important roles. In our classrooms we have to validate our students’ cultural heritages and value their life experiences. IEFA exemplifies the shared tenets of multicultural education theorists and the practice of culturally responsive pedagogy. It addresses historical and contemporary oppressions of Indigenous peoples by transforming educational policy, curriculum, and pedagogy. In fact, its implications reach beyond Montana’s borders with a hopeful example, inspiring educators across the U.S. and around the world to become more culturally inclusive in their classrooms and communities. The Montana IEFA initiative serves as a model for a variety of international educational contexts where culturally responsive pedagogy is embraced as well as for schools across the U.S. where educators are concerned with closing achievement gaps.

IEFA benefits Indian students in several ways: by reducing anti-Indian bias resulting from a lack of knowledge, by enriching instruction through cultural relevance, and by instilling pride in cultural identity. Collaboration among Indian and non-Indian stakeholders is a process central to IEFA and is also a desired outcome. Many programs that have charted the course of Indian education in the U.S. have excluded Indian voices. IEFA is a shared responsibility. Statewide collaborations between Indians and non-Indians help educators fulfill that obligation. In fact, IEFA requires and relies upon Indian involvement. That is why I work hard to establish and nurture relationships with members from all of Montana’s tribal groups, collaborate with Indigenous scholars, and serve as the Co-Advisor to American Indian Council. Tribal histories and other instructional resources are developed with continual representation and participation from each of the state’s 12 tribes, 8 tribal governments, and 7 tribal colleges. IEFA is changing education in Montana; Indian students and their families are beginning to feel more welcome in public schools and on MSU’s campuses and are contributing their perspectives to instructional content. Yet as Montana’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, Denise Juneau (Mandan/Hidatsa) asserts, IEFA is for all students: “This constitutional, ethical, and moral obligation, known as Indian Education for All, is not only for Indian students. In fact, its principal intent is that non-Indian students gain a richer understanding of our State’s history and contemporary life” (Juneau, 2006, p. 3).

To carry out the intent of IEFA, it is also important to emphasize our commitment as 21st century multicultural educators.  It is our duty to combat stereotypes, address misconceptions and inaccuracies, and confront educational inequities.  If our students are to serve all citizens in their future leadership positions, we need to empower them to advance equity and social justice.

Juneau, D. (2006). Montana’s agenda: Issues shaping our state, Indian Education for All. The University of Montana Press.

 

 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Implementation Plan

With the necessary funds secured, I would plan to foster the relationships I have already established and pursue new partnerships. I would continue to make presentations and provide support for individuals, instructors, departments, institutions, etc. as needed. I would reach out to those not yet engaged in the integration of IEFA in their courses as well as support educators already implementing IEFA. I would also provide workshops and other IEFA activities geared specifically to students. I would continue to collect formal survey and informal interview data, workshop feedback and suggestions from Indian specialists to determine the scope of the professional development activities. I would plan to use my extensive network to plan and offer a yearly fall workshop and spring presentation comparable to the past IEFA workshops.

 To date, I have hosted 13 IEFA professional development workshops in seven years.  Past workshops have included presentations by Denise Juneau, Superintendent of Education; Mandy Smoker Broaddus, Director of Indian Education at the Office of Public Instruction; Michael Munson,Teresa Veltkamp, and Mike Jetty, Indian Education Specialists at the Office of Public Instruction; Laurie Smith Small Waisted Bear, a language arts teacher from Heart Butte; MSU Council of Elders members; Julie Cajune, Indian Education specialist from Salish Kootenai College; Ellen Swaney, Director of Minority/Indian Student Achievement at OCHE; Walter Fleming, Department Head, Native American Studies; Bill McLaughlin, Department of Chemistry/Biochemistry; Holly Hunts, Department of Health and Human Development; and Florence Dunkel, Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology; Aboriginal Studies professors from Australia; and many others.  The workshops addressed such topics as: Increasing Educational Outcomes for American Indian Students in Montana, the Seven Essential Understandings, an IEFA Gallery Walk exploration of primary sources, artifacts, exhibits, and displays to consider an alternative historical narrative; Social Justice in Education, Integrating IEFA across the Curriculum, the MUS Academic Plan; Indian Education for All in Indian Country and many other topics.

At the recent Fall 2012 annual workshop on October 24th featured speakers included Dr. Henrietta Mann who presented a retrospective view of Indian education through time and Brandi Foster who reviewed the MUS Academic Plan and our responsibility to address IEFA in higher education.  Then Dr. Wayne Stein, Dr. Henrietta Mann, and Dr. Dick Littlebear shared their challenges and triumphs as TribalCollege presidents so we could hear about IEFA in Indian Country.  There were over 200 attendees including faculty, staff and students from across campus, as well as k-12 educators and other members from the community.  I have heard very positive feedback on the workshop.  We taped the event and hope to have it uploaded soon to share with everyone.

Then on Friday October 26th this year from noon to 4:00, Twila Old Coyote and I hosted the First Thanksgiving: Dispelling the Myths & Misconceptions workshop.  An Indigenous meal was served including bison meatloaf, fry bread and bilapia (berry soup).  Once again Dr. Mann welcomed the attendees with a moving talk about the perpetuation of myths and misconceptions about American Indians.  My friend gkisedtanamoogk, a spiritual leader of the Wampanoag shared the Indian perspective on this encounter and provided a timeline for King Philip’s War. Then Mike Jetty reviewed resources that the Office of Public Instruction has on the First Thanksgiving. Once again, the event was well attended; seventy-five individuals registered for this special get-together. 

For this spring’s IEFA workshop, I have invited James Loewen, author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, to present on campus on February 27th.  The title of his talk will be “Lies My Teacher Told Me about Native Americans and How to Do Better.”  I have also set up an opportunity for Dr. Loewen to given a special presentation to MSU students who have read his bestseller in their social studies, history, and teaching methods courses.  In addition, Dr. Loewen has also agreed to present for faculty members at BozemanHigh School.  There is already a lot of anticipation brewing around these IEFA events. 

For the fall 2013 event I have been in touch with Dr. Joseph McGeshick (Chippewa/Assiniboine/Sioux), Henry Real Bird (Crow), Mandy Smoker Broaddus (Assiniboine), Dr. Richard Littlebear (N. Cheyenne), Heather Cahoon (Peine d’Oreille), Lois Red Elk (Dakota/Lakota), and other poets to serve on a panel discussion and share their wisdom and their life experiences that were featured in Dorothea Susag’s 2012 IEFA collection and lesson plans.  Susag’s book, “Birthright: Born to Poetry - A Collection of Montana Indian Poetry”, includes discussion points and writing prompts and addresses how the Essential Understandings and the Montana Common Core Standards are met. 

At this point I feel it would be important to take a snap shot of where individual faculty members and graduate instructors are as individuals and where we are as an institution regarding the integration and implementation of IEFA in our courses across campus.  I would like to revise the survey I designed and administered in the Fall of 2006 to faculty in Curriculum and Instruction and collect data on what instructors are currently doing to integrate IEFA in their courses and uncover what they need in the way of support.  Their feedback would be used to plan future IEFA events.  I would start by surveying the faculty and graduate instructors in the Department of Education. Then I would reach out to faculty members on UTEC the University Teacher Education Committee that teach students pursuing secondary teaching licensure in the 17 programs offered across campus.  I would then branch out to surveying faculty that have attended previous IEFA workshops followed up with other faculty members from across campus.

Other projects I would like to pursue include partnering with each of the Tribal Colleges to review the Tribal Histories projects that were developed and collaborate with TribalCollege educators to provide our faculty, staff and students with opportunities to network and learn more about IEFA in Indian country.  In year one I would like to partner with Dr. Florence Garcia, President of Ft. Peck Community College, Dr. Joesph McGeshick, Wanda Kirn and other educators at Ft.Peck.  At Little Big Horn College I would partner with Dr. David Yarlott, President; David Small, Dean of Students; Frederica Left Hand, former Academic Dean and Lark Real Bird, Crow Language and Culture Instructor.  At Chief Dull Knife, I would collaborate with Dr. Richard Littlebear, President; Michele Curlee, Dean of Academic Affairs, and Zane Spang, Dear of Students.  In subsequent years I would also collaborate with educators at SalishKootenaiCollege and BlackfeetCommunity College in the second year and with educators at AanaiiihNakodaCollege and StoneChildCollege in the third year.

I would also like to invite Julie Cajune and Dr. Tammy Elser, the authors of Montana Tribal Histories: Educators Resource Guide and Companion DVD and The Framework: A Practical Guide for Montana Teachers and Administrators Implementing Indian Education for All to guide our faculty and staff through a series of experiences that model best practices and explore concepts and content embedded in the Montana Tribal Histories and Framework documents.

 

 
Assessment Plan

Assessment Plan

The indicators listed here were adapted from the MSU Strategic Plan 2012. They will serve to provide data to assess the effectiveness of the IEFA professional development initiative.

Indicators

Targeted Assessment Measures

 Learning: Objective L.1  Metric L.1.2

  • Majors across campus will include coursework which integrates IEFA content and addresses the 7 Essential Understandings.

Data from Faculty/Staff/Student Surveys

  • Department Heads and/or Program Leaders who oversee curriculum development will enrich offerings.

Data from Faculty/Staff/Student Surveys

  • Number of students attending, participating in and volunteering for American Indian Council Events and other NAS sponsored activities will increase.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Our graduates will cultivate a multicultural perspective which includes knowledge about the histories, cultures, and contemporary issues regarding Montana’s tribal groups.

Data from Faculty/Staff/Student Surveys

Data from Structured Interviews

  • Number of graduate students conducting research on or near reservations, with American Indians, and/or in towns with large American Indian populations will increase.

Data Reported in FAD

 

  • Increased enrollment in IEFA course offered through the online graduate certificate in Native American Studies and increased enrollment in other NAS courses.

Data from Banner

  • Number of students participating in IEFA professional development events and webinars will increase.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Students enrolled in the Indigenous Leadership course, other NAS courses, courses in the Teacher Preparation Program, and other courses offered across campus, will have the opportunity to participate in internships designed to promote IEFA.

Data Reported in FAD

Discovery: Objective D.1  Metric D.1.2

  • Increase number of undergraduate and graduate student publications and presentations related to IEFA.

Data Reported in FAD

 

  • Host visiting scholars interested in IEFA and culturally responsive pedagogy.

Data Reported in FAD

 

  • Offer scholarly workshops on IEFA.

IEFA Web Site

  • Collaborate with national organizations, faculty and graduate researchers at institutions of higher learning, policy makers, Tribal College faculty/staff and students, and others researching IEFA.

Data Reported in FAD

Engagement: Objective E.2  Metric E.2.1 and Objective E.3  Metrics E.3.1/E.3.2

  • Number of faculty, staff and students at MSU and from the Tribal Colleges and other institutions of higher learning across Montana participating in IEFA professional development events and webinars will grow.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Proportion of enrolled students from underserved populations who participate in IEFA events and webinars will grow.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Increase number of programs offered in underserved communities.

Data from Structured Interviews

Data Reported in FAD

  • Increase number of outreach activities to Montana communities and to K-12 students reported by faculty.

Data from Structured Interviews

Data Reported in FAD

  • Increase number of K-12 educators participating in MSU IEFA professional development workshops, events and webinars.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

Integration: Objective I.1  Metric I.1.1

  • Increase number of courses that are updated to include IEFA and integrate learning, discovery and engagement.

Data from Faculty/Staff/Student Surveys

Data from Structured Interviews

  • Increase number of students participating in IEFA professional development events and webinars.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Proportion of students participating in identified groups focused on meeting societal needs will increase.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Increase number of faculty outreach activities to Montana communities related to IEFA professional development.

Data from Structured Interviews

Data Reported in FAD

  • Increase number of Extension programs offered as a result of faculty participating in IEFA professional development.

Data from Structured Interviews

 

  • Increase number of community partnerships related to IEFA.

 

Data from Structured Interviews

Data Reported in FAD

  • Increase number of undergraduate and graduate student publications and presentations related to IEFA.

Data Reported in FAD

Access: Objective A.2  Metric A.2.1

  • Increase number of Native American undergraduate and graduate students on campus. 

Data from Banner

  • Recruitment, retention and graduation rates of Native American students will increase.

Data from Banner

Stewardship: Objective S.1  Metric S. 1.3

  • Increase number of faculty, staff, and administrators participating in IEFA professional development programs.

Data from Sign up Sheets/Participant Logs

  • Increase number of identified student groups supporting and encouraging diversity.

 

Data from Structured Interviews

Annual MSU Diversity Plan prepared for OCHE

  • Increase number of community partnerships with Native American communities, schools, OPI, OCHE, and other organizations.      

Data from Faculty/Staff/Student Surveys

Data from Structured Interviews

  • Increase number of public events promoting diversity.

 

Annual MSU Diversity Plan prepared for OCHE

 

 
If assessed objectives are not met in the timeframe outlined what is the plan to sunset this proposal?

IEFA is an on-going commitment that MSU is obligated to meet. Data will be collected and analyzed on a regular ongoing basis. Findings from the data analysis will be shared with appropriate stakeholders and used to guide decisions about program improvement.

 
SIGNATURES
Department Head: Jayne Downey (jdowney@montana.edu)
Dean/Director: Carl Fox (carl.fox1@montana.edu)
Executive/VP: Martha Potvin (mpotvin@montana.edu)