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Tom McCoy

Tom McCoy
MSU Vice President
for Research, Creativity and Technology Transfer

Foreword



THIS PAST YEAR WAS ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL ONE FOR RESEARCH AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES AT MONTANA UNIVERSITY GRANT AD CONTRACT EXPENDITURES INCREASED TO $87.9 MILLION, WE RECEIVED REGENTS' APPROVAL TO BUILD A NEW CHEMISTRY/B1O CHEMISTRY BUILDING, AND WE INITIATED A NEW CORE CURRICULUM, CORE 2.0, WHICH OFFERS HANDS-ON RESEARCH/CREATIVE PROJECT TO EVERY STUDENT.

These are signs of a healthy university, where learning and discovery combine to the advantage of our students, the faculty and the Montanans we directly serve through a rich variety of outreach programs.

As vibrant as our research/creative programs are, however, MSU can't be all things to all people. We must strategically invest in specific areas where we believe we can grow to the next level of inquiry, MSU must also build partnerships with other public and private-sector entities in order to leverage funding and build productive programs.

Learning and discovery combine to the advantage of our students, the faculty and the Montanans we directly serve through a rich variety of outreach programs.

This report highlights some of the successes we've had; however, I want to emphasize that there are many other equal successful programs that we didn't have room to include here. These other programs are also excellent testimonials to the high quality of our students, staff and faculty.

The article on nano weapons describes how we are taking our infectious disease research into a realm in which the science is done on, a multi-investigator, multidepartmental scale.

The same is true for MSUs fuel cell project, which draws from chemistry, engineering and physics. Such crossover offers students a rare combination of experiences in an emerging high-tech field right here in Montana and represents an excellent partnership between MSU, Department of Energy national labs and the Private fuel-cell industry (Fuel Cells). Our faculty are also looking at the humanities in new ways. Here you will find MSU art history professor Todd Larkin's reinterpretation of Marie-Antoinette.

The article on Historians smiling explains the growth of MSLFs history department, including the addition of a new Ph.D. degree program.

Our took at agriculture includes an exciting program that harnesses the appetites of sheep in the war on noxious weeds. We feature the development of a cross-state dinosaur trail for tourists, and we bring you a story on the energetic and successful Center for Entrepreneurship for the New West.

One of our writers spent time with the Messengers for Health, a dedicated group of women on the Crow Indian Reservation developing programs to lower the incidence of cervical cancer there. Another writer went to Yellowstone National Park to report on efforts to measure the health of Yellowstone's northern winter range. And another spent a day on the central Montana prairie with two students calculating nesting success of greater sage grouse.

MSU is an exciting place to be. I hope you enjoy what you read here, and I welcome any comments you may have.



Tom McCoy
MSU Vice President for Research,
Creativity and Technology Transfer


Aspen and willows tell Yellowstone tales | Historians smiling with boost from federal grants
Montanans hope dinosaur trail leads to tourist dollars | She never said, "Let them eat cake"
Students forgo lawn mowing and painting for submarines and ships
Fuel cells electrify researchers and students | Researchers fling nano—weapons at lung disease
Students tune radio to sage grouse | Roving sheep chew on Montana weeds
Center pairs bootstrapping companies with MSU students
Program on Crow Reservation sends a healthy message | Foreword
Research Notes | Faculty and Student Awards | Research Expenditures for Fiscal Year 2004 | Home


(c)2004 Montana State University—Bozeman For permission to reprint any part of this report, contact:
Editor • Report on Research • P.O. Box 172460 • Bozeman, MT 59717—2460 • (406) 994—5607