Montana State University

2014 Special Summer Courses

A selection of unique academic credit courses offered at MSU this summer

A wide variety of special courses is available at MSU during Summer Session 2014, and we’ve highlighted a few of them here.  Many of these courses are offered only during the summer and take advantage of southwestern Montana’s natural environment; others provide professional development opportunities for teachers and coaches; still others offer unique experiences in archaeology.  There’s a little something for everyone—including selections in art, music, languages, theatre, geology, ecology, and gardening.

Course registration will take place through the MSU Registrar; through Extended University; or through the School of Art.  The method of registration is noted with each course description.  To enroll in courses through the Registrar or the School of Art, students must be admitted to MSU; Extended University courses do not carry this requirement.

Please note: This is not a complete listing of Summer Session courses.   For a list of all courses and information on how to register, click on the following links:

To go directly to your area of interest, click on the subject headings listed below.

 


ACCOUNTING

ACTG 524-01

International Accounting

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-30, 3 credits

Prerequisites: ACTG 328 and admission to MPAc Program

Instructor: Marc Giullian

This course introduces students to international accounting with special emphasis on four major topics: 1) accounting systems as expressions of cultural, political, and ideological forces, 2) comparative international accounting patterns, 3) efforts to harmonize international accounting standards worldwide, and 4) accounting issues faced by multinational corporations.


ACTIVITIES - GENERAL

Try an activity this summer and earn academic credit for it! All courses will run 12 weeks, from May 12-Aug. 1, and are worth 1 credit each.

Enroll through the Registrar for all courses.

ACT 110-01 – Beginning Weight Training

  New!  ACT 115-01 – Soccer

ACT 150-01 – Beginning Yoga

  New!  ACT 163-01 – Race Training 5/10 K

ACT 169-01 – Beginning Tennis

For more information, contact Abbey Keene, Recreational Sports and Fitness, 994-6278 or abbey.keene@montana.edu.


ANIMAL & RANGE SCIENCES

ARNR 529-801

Yellowstone Wildlife Habitat Ecology

(cross-listed with WILD 429)

(Enroll through Extended University)

June 9-14, 2 credits

Prerequisites: WILD 426, 428, or equivalent

Instructor: Carl Wambolt

This course considers the native communities of the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range as wildlife habitat, explores ecosystem interrelationships, and interprets the consequences of past management.  Topics include plant taxonomy and geography; ecology of plants and wildlife; ungulate foraging relationships; habitat types and their successional trends and value to wildlife; fire ecology; and Park policy evolution.  Two one-day field trips (returning to Bozeman each evening) provide field experiences on all of the above topics.


ART - ART HISTORY

ARTH 310-01

Art and Architecture of Ancient Mesoamerica

(Enroll through School of Art, 994-4501)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Instructor: Regina Gee

This course is a comparative survey that will examine the art and architecture of selected cultures of Mesoamerica, Central America, and South America, commonly grouped under the designation of New World Civilizations.  The material presented will focus on the Aztecs and Maya of Mesoamerica (southern Mexico and northern Central America) and the Incas of Central Andes of South America.

New!  ARTH 491-01

Art Now

(Enroll through School of Art, 994-4501)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: ARTH 200 and ARTH 201

Instructor: Melissa Ragain

Art Now (aka “Art Since You Were Born”) is designed as a seminar course surveying the most recent trends in contemporary art, focusing in particular on developments that have occurred within the art world of the last 20 years.  We will discuss not only the artists that populate the art world, but also the institutions and theories that structure it.  The function of the curator will be a central area of focus, and particular attention will be given to women, minority, and international artists.


ART - VISUAL ARTS

New!  ARTZ 491-01

New York Field Study

(Enroll through School of Art, 994-4501)

May 25-June 1, 3 credits

Prerequisites: The course is primarily for intermediate to advanced students who have a working knowledge of the fine arts and a minimum of 200-level art production experience.  Students not meeting these prerequisites may seek instructor consent at smast@montana.edu.

Instructor: Sara Mast

New York is arguably the epicenter of the international art world, with its rich history, great art museums, teeming gallery life, and thousands of artists.  This field study will focus on an intense, week-long immersion into the vast contemporary and historic visual arts culture of one of the world’s great cities, and will provide students with an experience of the many aspects of New York that define global art, such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum, the Guggenheim, the Whitney, and the New Museum, in addition to the extensive network of contemporary galleries in Chelsea, the lower east side, and elsewhere throughout New York.

 

BIOLOGY - ECOLOGICAL

BIOE 416-01

Alpine Ecology

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1 (required field trip July 18-20), 3 credits

Prerequisites: Junior standing, BIOB 170

Instructor: Carol Johnson

Explore the ecological characteristics of alpine areas.  A three-day field trip will confirm and reinforce material presented in class and is a course requirement.

BIOE 420-01

Field Ornithology

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-30 (required field trip May 17), 3 credits

Prerequisites: Junior standing, and either BIOB 100 or BIOB 170

Instructor: Robert Moore

Field identification, habitat affinities and life histories of birds of the northern Rockies.  Includes early morning field trips.  The class will go outside in all kinds of weather, so students should be prepared with warm/dry outdoor clothing and footwear.  Pair of binoculars required.

BIOE 421-01

Yellowstone Wildlife Ecology

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20 (required field trip, date TBA), 3 credits

Prerequisites: Junior standing, and either BIOB 100 or BIOB 170

Instructor: Harold Picton

Basic ecology of the major animal species of the Yellowstone area, covering life, fire, ice, and land.  The course will examine the ecological controversies surrounding Yellowstone wildlife management, and explore the role of the area as a “game changer” in affecting many things.


COACHING

COA 205-01

Introduction to Coaching

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Instructor: Craig Stewart

Delivery mode: Online only

This introductory coaching course will cover basic information from the beginning level in the American Coach Effectiveness Program.

COA 395-01

Practicum: Coaching Application

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-Aug. 1, 1 credit

Prerequisite: COA 205

Instructor: Craig Stewart

This course will involve assignment of prospective coaches to specific sports.  Also included will be discussion and feedback on planning and implementation in practical settings.

COA 405-01

Advanced Concepts in Coaching

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisites: COA 205; and COA 395 or coaching experience

Instructor: Craig Stewart

Delivery mode: Online only

The primary goal of this course is to implement the content of an advanced coach certification curriculum in cooperation with the Montana High School Association (MHSA).  The class is intended for experienced coaches who wish to examine current issues in coaching such as the female athlete, sportsmanship, or coach/parent relationships in detail.


COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 145RA-01

Web Design

(cross-listed with MART 145RA)

 (Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Instructor: Hunter Lloyd

Delivery mode: Online

Students will learn how to construct web pages that are well-designed and technically correct.  On the design side, students learn about relevant design principles that apply to the design of web pages.  On the technical side, students learn to implement their designs using HTML, Hypertext Markup Language, and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets).  By the end of the course, students will have designed and built a small website.  The course is team-taught by a computer science professor and a graphic design professor.

Note:  The lecture material for the summer offering is online.  The laboratory may be done either in a supervised setting (Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30-2:50 p.m. in EPS 254) or online.


EDUCATION

EDCI 588-801

Project Archaeology Educator Field School

(Enroll through Extended University)

Aug. 4-8, 2 credits

Instructor:  Crystal Alegria

Location: Virginia City, MT

Join Project Archaeology in historic Virginia City and learn how to bring archaeology and history into your classroom!  You will receive the research-based curriculum guide Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter which addresses the goals of the Montana Common Core.  This guide will help you take learning to a deeper level by incorporating English language arts, social studies and science.  The guide is inquiry-based, cross-curricular, includes performance-based assessments, incorporates the indigenous voice, and promotes cultural understanding.  In the classroom, your students will learn to analyze artifacts, primary documents, and oral histories related to authentic archaeological sites using the basics of scientific inquiry (observation, inference, evidence and classification), providing them with college and career readiness skills. While in Virginia City, you will be immersed in the history of this significant gold rush town, learning from local historians, archaeologists, and members of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe.  Join us as we travel back in time to learn about Montana's historic past!

EDCI 591

Project Archaeology: Investigating a Plains Tipi

(Enroll through Extended University)

June 16-19, 2 credits

Instructor: Crystal Alegria

Location: Museum of the Rockies, Bozeman

Join Project Archaeology at the Museum of the Rockies and learn how to bring archaeology and history into your classroom!  You will receive the research-based curriculum guide Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter which addresses the goals of the Montana Common Core.  This guide will help you take learning to a deeper level by incorporating English language arts, social studies and science.  The guide is inquiry-based, cross-curricular, includes performance-based assessments, incorporates the indigenous voice, and promotes cultural understanding.  In the classroom, your students will learn to analyze artifacts, primary documents, and oral histories related to authentic archaeological sites using the basics of scientific inquiry (observation, inference, evidence and classification), providing them with college and career readiness skills.  Join us as we travel back in time to learn about Montana's historic past!

EDCI 591

Project Archaeology: Investigating a Plains Tipi

(Enroll through Extended University)

June 21-24, 2 credits

Instructor: Crystal Alegria

Location: Museum of the Rockies, Bozeman

Join Project Archaeology at the Museum of the Rockies and learn how to bring archaeology and history into your classroom!  You will receive the research-based curriculum guide Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter which addresses the goals of the Montana Common Core.  This guide will help you take learning to a deeper level by incorporating English language arts, social studies and science.  The guide is inquiry-based, cross-curricular, includes performance-based assessments, incorporates the indigenous voice, and promotes cultural understanding.  In the classroom, your students will learn to analyze artifacts, primary documents, and oral histories related to authentic archaeological sites using the basics of scientific inquiry (observation, inference, evidence and classification), providing them with college and career readiness skills.  Join us as we travel back in time to learn about Montana's historic past!


ENGINEERING - GENERAL

General Engineering Courses - Take them on campus or online!

Each of the following General Engineering courses will be offered this summer with both an on-campus section and an online* section. Enroll through the Registrar for all sections.

Contact the Dept. of Civil Engineering for course information at (406) 994-2111.

EGEN 201 – Engineering Mechanics: Statics

Section 001 – On campus; Section 002 – Online

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisite: PHSX 220 or 240; co-requisite: M 273 or 283

Instructor: Anders Larsson

Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; static analysis of structures including trusses, beams, frames and machines; coulomb friction; area and mass centroids, moments and products of inertia.

EGEN 202 – Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics

Section 001 – On campus; Section 002 – Online

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisite: EGEN 201 or 221

Instructor: Daniel Miller

Kinematics, kinetics, work-energy, and impulse-momentum for particles and rigid bodies.

EGEN 205 – Mechanics of Materials

Section 001 – On campus; Section 002 – Online

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisite: EGEN 201 or 221

Instructor: TBA

Stress and strain, Hooke's Law, thermal strain, torsion, bending of beams, combined stress, limit analysis, energy methods, virtual work, column theory.

EGEN 335 – Fluid Mechanics

Section 001 – On campus; Section 002 – Online

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: EGEN 202 and 205

Instructor: Kathryn Plymesser

An introduction to modern fluid mechanics.

*Click here for information about online courses and how they work.


FILM

New!  FILM 381-01

Studies in Film: The Musical

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Any 200-level film studies course or permission of instructor

Instructor: Andrew Nelson

This course will examine the history, themes and aesthetics of the Hollywood movie musical as it developed from the late 1920s to the 1970s. Topics will include ways of understanding the genre’s combination of music, dance and story; the musical’s social significance in the context of the Great Depression, World War II and post-War America; and legendary performers, including Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. For more information please contact Dr. Andrew Nelson, apnelson@montana.edu. 

New!  FILM 481-01

Advanced Studies in Film: Quentin Tarantino and the Cinema of Cool

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Any 300-level film studies course or permission of instructor

Instructor: Lucia Ricciardelli

In the 1980s to 1990s, cinema lovers used to have a favorite video store employee to interact with during rentals, a “film geek” usually overqualified to be there: Quentin Tarantino was exactly that type of video store employee. Before becoming an extremely successful filmmaker, Tarantino worked at the Manhattan Beach's Video Archives in Los Angeles for five years, devouring countless movies and discussing them endlessly with his customers. In 1992, Tarantino's first film, Reservoir Dogs, screened at the Sundance Film Festival and was an immediate hit; the rest is history. Fascinated with pop culture icons and images of “coolness,” Tarantino is attributed with developing one of the most exciting and original styles of contemporary filmmaking. This course focuses on how his filmmaking work has helped define the art of cinema at the turn of the 21st century. Tarantino’s films will be analyzed in terms of theme, structure and cinematic technique. Special attention will be given to Tarantino’s adoption of the "cool gaze" as a way of shocking and undermining both social and mainstream filmic conventions.

New!  FILM 494-01

Seminar: Film and Photoboarding

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 19-30, 3 credits

Prerequisite: FILM 112 or by permission of instructor

Instructor: James Joyce

Film and Photoboarding builds visual storytelling skills with motion and still photography. Studnets will transform screenplays/contexts into storyboards, shoot the storyboards with DSLRs, and ultimately film with HD video cameras.

New!  FILM 494-02

Seminar: After Effects Bootcamp

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 19-30, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of digital photography and/or video, and basic computer skills

Instructor: Theo Lipfert

Adobe After Effects is a software application used for creating motion graphics, animation, and for manipulating video.  In this intensive class, students will learn the basics of this powerful tool through hands-on exercises and projects.  The class will conclude with a creative final project in which students will demonstrate their newly honed skills.

New!  FILM 494-03

Seminar: Experimental Cinema

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisite: FILM 212 or equivalent

Instructor: Anjali Sundaram

Rather than adopt the representations of mass media, we will approach film and video in the spirit of the painter, poet, or conceptual artist as a means for formal inquiry, personal expression, absurdist humor, social critique, and storytelling in the broadest sense.  Historical avant-garde film and contemporary moving image art will be presented within a critical dialogue, combining academic seminar with an art studio class.


FISH AND WILDLIFE SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

WILD 429-801

Yellowstone Wildlife Habitat Ecology

(cross-listed with ARNR 529)

(Enroll through Extended University)

June 9-14, 2 credits

Prerequisites: WILD 426, 428, or equivalent

Instructor: Carl Wambolt

This course considers the native communities of the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range as wildlife habitat, explores ecosystem interrelationships, and interprets the consequences of past management.  Topics include plant taxonomy and geography; ecology of plants and wildlife; ungulate foraging relationships; habitat types and their successional trends and value to wildlife; fire ecology; and Park policy evolution.  Two one-day field trips (returning to Bozeman each evening) provide field experiences on all of the above topics.

 

GEOLOGY

GEO 419-01

Field Paleontology

(Enroll through Registrar)

Dates TBA, 2 credits

Prerequisites: GEO 419 provides students selecting the paleontology option in the Dept. of Earth Sciences at MSU, and upper-division geology majors from other institutions, training and experience in field techniques used in vertebrate paleontology.  The course prerequisites include the following classes in geology: GEO 307 Sedimentary Petrology, and GEO 211 Historical Geology, or consent of instructor.

Instructor: David Varricchio

This course covers a variety of topics including field mapping, facies analysis, invertebrate and vertebrate fossils identification, microsite screening, taphonomy, and excavation techniques.  In past years, the course has been taught in the extensive outcrops of the Hell Creek Formation of eastern Montana and the Jurassic and Cretaceous formations of Utah and Nevada.  Extensive hiking and outdoor physical challenges require that students be physically fit.  A fee for transportation, camping fees, meals, and materials is required.  For more information, visit the course’s website at http://www.montana.edu/wwwes/programs/paleocamp.htm.

GEO 429-01

Field Geology

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 6 credits

Prerequisites: ERTH 307, GEO 211, GEO 309, GEO 315, GEO 448 (must receive a minimum grade of "C" in these areas)

Instructor: Colin Shaw

A senior capstone course for the geology, geohydrology and paleontology options.  Early summer field course with application of field procedures and mapping techniques to a variety of field problems and exercises.  Extensive hiking and outdoor physical challenges require that students be physically fit.  A fee for supplies, transportation, and other logistical expenses is required. For more information, visit the course's website at http://www.montana.edu/wwwes/programs/geologycamp.htm.


GERMANGERMAN

GRMN 101-01

Elementary German I

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 4 credits

Instructor: Patricia Simpson

This elementary level course is designed to help students acquire basic proficiency in communication within culturally significant contexts.  An integrated approach will be taken to teaching language skills with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and basic grammatical structures.

GRMN 102D-01

Elementary German II

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 4 credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 101 or equivalent, or two years of high school German

Instructor: Susanne Pannwitz

This course builds upon the foundation established in GRMN 101.  Greater emphasis is placed upon oral and written expression.  Reading and discussions are designed to increase comprehension of more linguistically complex texts and more conceptually complex cultural issues.


GRAPHIC DESIGN

GDSN 360-01

Yellowstone Digital

(Enroll through School of Art, 994-4501)

June 6-14, 3 credits

Prerequisite: One of the following: GDSN 224, ARTZ 211, MTA 260, or ARCH 261

Instructor: TBA

A field workshop located along the Yellowstone River using either 35mm or a digital camera to create fine art digital prints. This course is designed for individuals with a working knowledge of photographic basics and a fundamental familiarity with their own equipment who desire to explore the new media of the fine art digital print.

GDSN 361-01

Teton Digital

(Enroll through School of Art, 994-4501)

Dates TBA, 3 credits

Prerequisite: One of the following: GDSN 224, ARTZ 211, MTA 260, or ARCH 261

Instructor: TBA

An intensive field workshop located in the Jackson, Wyoming area and the Grand Teton National Park using a digital camera to create fine art digital prints. This course is designed for individuals with a working knowledge of photographic basics and a fundamental familiarity with their own equipment who desire to explore the new media of the digital print.

GSDN 378-01
Guerrilla Advertising

(Enroll through School of Art, 994-4501)

Dates TBA, 5 credits
Prerequisite: GDSN 224 or consent of instructor; photography and marketing majors highly encouraged
Instructor: Meta Newhouse

Students will stretch the boundaries of traditional advertising solutions in this course by placing their work in unusual contexts for maximum impact.  The workshop-like atmosphere involves quick-fire problem solving sessions, working outdoors, guest critiques and socially-driven solutions.  Graphic design, film and photography, and marketing majors are particularly encouraged to apply.


HORTICULTURE & LANDSCAPE DESIGN

HORT 345-01

Organic Market Gardening

See course information under Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems Courses.


LIBRARY

LSCI 121-01

Electronic Library Research Skills

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 2 credits

Instructor: James Thull

Delivery mode: Online only

Library Research Skills is a course focusing on both the concepts and skills needed to conduct library research with an emphasis on electronic information sources.  The purpose of the course is to provide individuals with a basic understanding of the library research process and the skills by which they can successfully find information for research, presentations, and other class assignments.


MEDIA ARTS
 

MART 145RA-01

Web Design

(cross-listed with CS 145RA)

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Instructor: Hunter Lloyd

Delivery mode: Online

Students will learn how to construct web pages that are well-designed and technically correct. On the design side, students learn about relevant design principles that apply to the design of web pages. On the technical side, students learn to implement their designs using HTML, Hypertext Markup Language, and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). By the end of the course, students will have designed and built a small website. 

Note:  The lecture material for the summer offering is online. The laboratory may be done either in a supervised setting (Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30-2:50 p.m. in EPS 254) or online.


MUSIC - EDUCATION

MUSE 591-850

Effective Teaching Strategies for Instrumental Music Education

(Enroll through Extended University)

June 16-19, 2 credits

Location: Camp Paxson, Seeley Lake, MT

Instructor: Sherry Linnerooth

This intensive session is an outstanding professional development opportunity for instrumental music teachers.  It will allow total student/teacher immersion with experts and colleagues in the areas of music teaching and performance.  Topics will include beginning and rebuilding a band program, standard and new repertoire for all band levels, a focus on woodwinds including double reeds, a special session on trumpet pedagogy, beginning drum set, teaching chamber music, and a session on Smart Music.  Multiple sessions will be given to work on band rehearsal warm-ups, technique, and conducting, and class participants will have the opportunity to read new and standard concert band literature.


MUSIC - GENERAL

MUSI 348-02

Bozeman Community Concert Band

(Enroll through Registrar)

June-August (contact the School of Music for specific dates, 994-3562), 1 credit

Instructor: Nathan Stark

Beginning mid-June and continuing through early August, the Bozeman Community Concert Band presents concerts every Tuesday evening in the Bogert Park Band Shell, South Church Avenue.  Programs use traditional concert band literature including overtures, medleys, Broadway show tunes, and marches.  The membership of the band consists of students and adults from throughout the Gallatin Valley as well as MSU students and other guest performers.


NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

NASX 340-01

Native American Literature

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: Junior standing and WRIT 101W

Instructor: Matt Herman

Traditional and contemporary Native American literature including oral narratives, folktales, poetry, short stories, essays, and the novel. Methods of literary analysis will be explored to assist students in determining the meaning and function of the various genre.


PHILOSOPHY

New!  PHL 327-01  

Aesthetics and the Arts

(Enroll through the Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Previous course in Philosophy or consent of instructor

Instructor: Daniel Flory

This course involves the philosophical examination of the nature and function of the arts and the aesthetic experience.


PHOTOGRAPHY

New!  PHOT 494-01

Seminar: Small Town Documentary

(Enroll through the Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: PHOT 113, PHOT 154, or comparable photography course

Instructor: Jonathan Long

The goal of this course is to engage in a visual examination of a specific town, to be chosen and documented by each individual student extensively. The course offers a rich blend of geography, sociology, history, contemporary issues, education, art and individual curiousity.

New!  PHOT 494-02

Seminar: Landscape Photography

(Enroll through the Registrar)

May 13-June 12 (5 weeks), 4 credits

Prerequisites: A still photography course open to upper division Photography students and Film students in the MFA program.  This advanced level seminar assumes you have a grasp on basic photographic skills and are ready to create and discuss your images, and the work of others, from a critical standpoint.

Instructor: Kyle Bajakian

This class will concentrate on gaining a historical perspective of the practices, movements and trends with the genre of landscape photography.  We will be primarily concerned with the history of landscape photography in the United States since the time of the Civil War.  With a sense of historical and contemporary trends in envisioning the landscape, students will make their own interpretations of the landscapes they encounter.  Weekly field trips, assignments, readings and a final project will comprise the work for the course.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 439-01

International Human Rights

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: PSCI 230 and a minimum of Junior standing

Instructor: Franke Wilmer

The development of human rights in legal and political context of the post-World War II period.  Topics include civil and political rights of due process; political participation and fundamental democratic freedoms; and social, cultural, and economic rights including basic human needs, self-determination, gender equality, and cultural integrity.  National and International implementation is also considered.

PSCI 454-01

Cinema and Political Theory

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 cr.

Prerequisites: PSCI 200, PSCI 210, PSCI 214, and PSCI 230, or consent of instructor

Instructor: Eric Austin

This course explores the intersection of political theory with topics such as civil society, bureaucracy, and public policy through the use of film.  Special attention is given to both descriptive and prescriptive applications of modern and contemporary political theory to these topics.


PSYCHOLOGY

PSYX 263CS-01

The Psychology of Film

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: College Writing (W) and University Seminar (US) core

Instructor: Ian Handley

This course uses psychological science to understand the persuasive power of media as portrayed in popular films.  It evaluates the media's ability to both reflect and affect behavior. The focus is on contemporary themes such as aggression, drug use, sexuality, and prejudice.

PSYX 340-01

Abnormal Psychology
(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisite: PSYX 100

Instructor: TBA

Historical and current perspectives on psychopathology, including neuroscience, behavioral cognitive, psychodynamic, and humanistic/existential approaches. Traditional approaches and recent innovations in therapy and diagnosis are considered along with current diagnostic categories, especially DSM.

PSYX 462-01

Psychology of Prejudice

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisite: PSYX 100 or consent of instructor

Instructor: Keith Hutchison

This course reviews theory and research on prejudice.  Topics include stereotyping and discrimination, cognitive and affective dynamics of prejudice, causes of prejudice, eliminating prejudice, affirmative action and diversity programs, and psychological effects of prejudice.


SOCIOLOGY

SOCI 332-01

Sociology of Family

(Enroll through the Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: SOCI 101IS or equivalent; Quantitative core; or consent of instructor

Instructor: Danielle Hidalgo

This course will examine the family as a structural and functional unit in social life and organization, and as a unit of social control; its status, change, and associated problems.


SPANISH

SPNS 101-01

Elementary Spanish I

(Contact Modern Languages, 994-4448)

May 12-June 20, 4 credits

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Instructor: TBA

An elementary level course designed to help students acquire basic proficiency in communication within culturally significant contexts. An integrated approach to teaching language skills with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and basic grammatical structures.

SPNS 102D-01

Elementary Spanish II

(Contact Modern Languages, 994-4448)

June 23-Aug. 1, 4 credits

Prerequisite: SPNS 101 or equivalent, or two years of high school Spanish; consent of instructor

Instructor: TBA

This course builds upon the foundation established in 101.  Greater emphasis is placed upon oral and written expression.  Reading and discussions are designed to increase comprehension of more linguistically complex texts and more conceptually complex cultural issues.

SPNS 335IH-01

Travel in Latin America Literature and Film

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Location: On campus

Prerequisite: SPNS 220 or Junior standing

Instructor: Patricia Catoira

This course examines travel in Latin America texts and films as exploration and search for individual and national identity.  It also considers disruptive displacements caused by political and economic forces and the problems of adapting to a new environment.  The course will be taught in English.

 

SUSTAINABLE FOOD AND BIOENERGY SYSTEMS COURSES

HORT 345-01

Organic Market Gardening

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Prerequisites: BIOB 110, ENSC 245, and Junior standing

Instructor: David Baumbauer (baumbauer@montana.edu)

The course emphasizes high value crops (vegetables, flowers, and herbs) produced with organic techniques and directly marketed through farmers’ markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), restaurants, and specialty markets.  This hands-on course is held at the MSU Horticulture Farm located on the Bozeman Area Research and Teaching Farm, where students will design and install 2½ acres of gardens and cold frames.  Topics include soil fertility, seeding techniques, crop rotation, National Organic Standards, tool selection and maintenance, and irrigation systems.  Field trips to area farms expose students to the local market gardening scene.   Student groups will deliver presentations on such topics as variety selection, crop marketing opportunities, pest management, and cover crops.

SFBS 296-01/02

Practicum: Towne’s Harvest

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisites: SFBS 146 or consent of instructor

Instructor: TBA

This course provides an essential hands-on experience at Towne’s Harvest Garden.  Students will practice all aspects of a community supported agriculture experience from production through distribution and marketing.  Production activities include planting, transplanting, weeding, integrated pest management (IPM), irrigating, managing soil fertility, and harvesting.  Distribution activities include sorting, washing, weighing and recording data, cold storing, and preparing produce for transport to various distribution sites such as the Gallatin Valley Food Bank. Marketing activities include displaying and selling produce at local farmers’ markets and on campus, recording sales and accounting data, displaying produce for community supported agriculture distribution, assisting members with produce identification and selection, and conducting outreach on and off the farm.  Students will work side by side with the Towne’s Harvest production and operations managers to learn both the art and science of small scale sustainable production and distribution methods.  Additional formal trainings will include safe food handling and market procedures.  Students will attend one field trip to visit other farms in Montana.

SFBS 445R-01

(co-convened with SFBS 541)

Culinary Marketing: Farm to Table

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisites: HDCF 371, NUTR 221, NUTR 226, and NUTR 227, or consent of instructor

Instructor: Carmen Byker (carmen.byker@montana.edu)

This course emphasizes gaining a broad and complete perspective on food.  Students will participate in the production of food at Towne’s Harvest Garden.  They are introduced to the philosophy and practice of Community Supported Agriculture and participate in preparing food for distribution in this manner.  In addition, they will assist in the planning, operating, and accounting of a farmers’ market stand and retailing fresh produce.  Students will gain new food preparation and preservation skills by practicing with fresh seasonal produce and will prepare at least one culinary demonstration for an audience of food bank clients or Towne’s Harvest Garden members.  As they come to thoroughly know and understand this local food system by their own involvement, they will plan, propose, and conduct an independent research project related to any aspect of the system, in an effort to provide practical and useful knowledge for its improvement.

SFBS 541-01

(co-convened with SFBS 445R)

Culinary Marketing: Farm to Table

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisites: HDFN 226, HDFN 227, HDFN 322, HDFN 323, or equivalent; and graduate standing

Instructor: Carmen Byker

This course emphasizes hands-on food experience, including market garden tending and harvesting, distribution by community supported agriculture, food marketing and retail at farmers' markets, culinary practice with seasonal garden produce, food preservation and product development, teaching and culinary demonstrations, and marketing plan development.


THEATRE

THTR 122IA-01

Acting for Non-Majors

(Enroll through Registrar)

May 12-June 20, 3 credits

Instructor: Stephanie Campbell

An introduction to the creative process engaged by a performer on a stage. Taught in a workshop format in which the individual student engages in exercises designed to convey stories and emotions through the understanding of human behavior as expressed on a stage.

 

UNIVERSITY STUDIES

US 121US-01

Education, Social Issues, and the Digital Age

(Enroll through Registrar)

June 23-Aug. 1, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (email seminar@montana.edu); successful completion of at least 12 credits including WRIT 101W or its equivalent

Instructor:  TBA

Delivery mode: Online only

This multidisciplinary course, delivered in an online seminar format, draws from psychology, sociology, history, and philosophy and asks students to consider the role of education in their lives and the social responsibilities of educated, engaged individuals living in the digital age.  The course emphasizes critical thinking, communication and support of ideas, and intellectual development.  US 121US fulfills the university seminar requirement of the core curriculum.


 

                                                                                                                                                                                                             Updated 4/4/14