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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Department of Health and Human Development
Montana State University
218 Herrick Hall
Bozeman, MT 59717-3540
Tel: (406) 994-3242

www.montana.edu/hhd/

Department Head
Dr. Mark Nelson
219 Herrick Hall
406.994.3242

Graduate Coordinator
Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Health Promotion and Education
Dr. Mary Miles
20 Herrick Hall
406.994.6678

mmiles@montana.edu

Counseling Academic Coordinator
Dr. Rebecca Koltz
223 Herrick Hall
406.994.3299

rebecca.koltz@montana.edu

Professors

    • S. Bailey; extension specialist, family and human development
    • J.C. Christopher; mental health, counseling
    • S. Christopher; community health
    • D. Heil; exercise science
    • M. Nelson; school counseling
    • L. Paul; extension specialist, food and nutrition
    • C. Stewart; adaptive physical education, sport pedagogy, coaching

Associate Professors

    • A. Harmon; food and nutrition/sustainable food systems
    • D. Haynes; family and consumer sciences
    • H. Hunts; family and consumer sciences
    • B. Letiecq; family health
    • L. Massey; early childhood education/child services
    • M. Miles; exercise science/nutrition
    • S. Osborne; family and consumer sciences
    L. Owens; health enhancement teaching K-12
    • J. Seifert; exercise science
    • A. Smith; marriage and family counseling

Assistant Professors

    • C. Byker; food and nutrition
    • N. Colton; health enhancement teaching K-12
    • R. Koltz; counseling
    • G. Olson; health enhancement teaching K-12
    • R. Pitcher; health enhancement teaching K-12
    • E. Rink; community health
    • D. Tarabochia; community health

Adjunct Faculty

    • M. Anacker; food and nutrition
    • C. Blank; counseling
    • P. Donahoe; counseling
    • K. Franklin; school counseling
    • R. Johnson; health and human performance
    • D.C. Kaiser; food and nutrition, dietetic internship
    • C. Lux; early childhood education/child services
    • W. Morrison; human development
    • M. Stein; sustainable food systems

Degree Offered

M.S. in Health & Human Development with options in:
          • Counseling
          • Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
          • Family & Consumer Sciences
          • Health Promotion and Education
M.Ed. in School Counseling

Graduate programs in the Department of Health and Human Development lead to a Master of Science degree in Health and Human Development with options in counseling, exercise and nutrition sciences, family and consumer sciences, and health promotion and education. The Master of Education degree is given to those completing the school counseling degree.

Graduate programs are coordinated by a graduate coordinator for the counseling program or by a graduate coordinator in exercise and nutrition sciences, family studies, and health promotion and education. General descriptions of the graduate options are included below. More detailed information regarding curricula and requirements may be obtained from the respective graduate coordinators listed above. Information may also be obtained on the Department of Health and Human Development web site at www.montana.edu/hhd.

A minimum of 30 credits is required for the Master of Science degree in exercise and nutrition sciences, family and consumer sciences, and health promotion and education. Both thesis and non-thesis plans are available. Because of professional licensure requirements, a minimum of 60 credits is required for the counseling programs. The school counseling program requires a minimum of 48 credits. Transfer credits may not exceed the limit of nine set by the Graduate School and must be assessed by the respective graduate coordinator before acceptance to the program.

Admission

In addition to the requirements listed in the Application Requirements and Admission Policies sections, admission requirements for specific options can be obtained from the department web site at www.montana.edu/hhd or by calling (406) 994-3242.

Provisional admission as a graduate student is possible if there is a deficiency in one or more of these areas. Students accepted provisionally will be required to: 1) successfully complete the undergraduate prerequisites for graduate-level classes, 2) successfully complete the specific undergraduate or graduate classes needed for acceptance, and/or 3) take a required course load and earn a specific grade point average while on a provisional status.

Counseling Program Options

The Department of Health and Human Development offers a Master of Science degree with an option in counseling (marriage and family counseling or mental health counseling) and a Master of Education degree with an option in school counseling. All three programs, marriage and family counseling, mental health counseling, and school counseling are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The marriage and family and mental health counseling programs are 60 credits and require a minimum of two years of study. The school counseling option is 48 credits. All programs are designed to meet Montana licensure requirements for professional counselors. Students obtain up to 1,500 hours supervised counseling experience and training in core counseling areas. Completed applications must be filed by February 15 as students are expected to begin their graduate program the following summer session. Applications are screened only once each year following the February 15 deadline. A maximum of 25 students shall be admitted into the counseling areas each year.

Interested students may obtain more descriptions by visiting the department web site at www.montana.edu/hhd or by calling (406) 994-3241.

Marriage and Family Counseling

The 60-credit marriage and family counseling program prepares counselors to address mental health and relationship problems from a family systems perspective. Students are taught a conceptual framework for assessment and intervention which focuses on the multiple systems and family context of individual development. Emphasis is on a positive, competency-based view of individual and family strengths. This approach examines the larger environments in which individuals and families interact and the plethora of influences (i.e. social, cultural, and economic) that affect human growth and development. Interpersonal issues between family members and the family and outer environmental systems are highlighted.

In addition to family systems theory, students are well grounded in individual and group counseling theories. Collaboration between marriage and family counselors and other mental health care providers is emphasized.

Graduates of the program qualify for certification through The National Academy for Certified Family Therapists (an affiliate of the International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors). Upon completion of this program and additional licensing requirements, graduates are eligible to apply for clinical privilege with Montana's mental health centers.

Summer

HDCO 502 Counseling Ethics/Orientation 2 credits
HDCO 508 Counseling Theories I 3 credits
HDCO 558 Career Counseling 2 credits

Fall

HDCO 503 Professional Issues 3 credits
HDCO 510 Counseling Theories II 3 credits
HDCO 521 Counseling Skills Lab 1 credit
HDCO 522 Group Counseling 3 credits

Spring

EDCI 506 Educational Research 3 credits
HDCO 525 Counseling Children & Adol 3 credits
HDCO 564 Diagnosis & Mental Health

3 credits

HDCO 571 Prof Counseling Practicum 3 credits

Summer

HDCO 523 Counseling Addictions 2 credits
HDCO 551 Appraisal 3 credits
HDCO 571 Prof Counseling Practicum 3 credits

Fall

HDCF 563 Multicultural Awareness 3 credits
HDCO 554 Developmental Theory & Concept 3 credits
HDCO 565 Marital and Relationship Couns

3 credits

HDCO 598 Internship 3 credits

Spring

HDCO 569 Advanced Family Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 598 Internship 3 credits
XXX Electives

5 credits

Program Total 60

Partial List of Electives

EDCI 502 Educational Stats II 3 credits
HDCO 526 Adventure Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 530 Mind-Body Medicine

3 credits

HDCO 556 Sexuality Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 568 Mental Health Methods 3 credits
HDCO 575 Professional Paper 4 credits

Mental Health Counseling

Mental health counseling involves the application of principles of psychotherapy, human development, learning theory, group dynamics and the etiology of mental illness and dysfunctional behavior to individuals, couples, families and groups for the purposes of treating psychotherapy and promoting optimal mental health. (Definition of Mental Health Counseling adopted by the board of the National Academy of Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselors Association, April 1986.)

The mental health counseling area of study provides students with 700 hours of supervised experience in appraisal, individual, family and group counseling, and consultation in clinics, agencies, schools and/or hospitals. Students are eligible for national certification as Clinical Mental Health Counselors and they have equivalent status to persons from "core provider" professions (psychiatry, clinical psychology, clinical social work and psychiatric nursing) when applying for clinical privilege with Montana's mental health centers.

Summer

HDCO 502 Counseling Ethics/Orientation 2 credits
HDCO 508 Counseling Theories I 3 credits
HDCO 558 Career Counseling 2 credits

Fall

HDCO 503 Professional Issues 3 credits
HDCO 510 Counseling Theories II 3 credits
HDCO 521 Counseling Skills Lab 1 credit
HDCO 522 Group Counseling 3 credits

Spring

HDCO 530 Mind Body Medicine 3 credits
HDCO 564 Diagnosis and Mental Health 3 credits
HDCO 568 Mental Health Methods & Treatment 3 credits
HDCO 571 Prof Counseling Practicum

3 credits

Summer

EDCI 506 Educational Research 3 credits
HDCO 551 Appraisal 3 credits
HDCO 571 Prof Counseling Practicum 3 credits

Fall

HDCF 563 Multicultural Awareness 3 credits
HDCO 554 Developmental Theory & Concept 3 credits
HDCO 598 Internship 3 credits

Spring

HDCO 523 Addictions Counseling 2 credits
HDCO 598 Internship 3 credits
XXX Electives

8 credits

Program Total 60

Partial List of Electives

HDCO 525 Counsel Child and Adolescent 3 credits
HDCO 526 Adventure Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 556 Sexuality Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 565 Marital & Relationship Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 569 Advanced Family Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 575 Professional Paper 4 credits

School Counseling

The Master of Education in School Counseling is a 48-credit program designed to prepare students to work in public or private schools as professional counselors. Upon completion, students are eligible to apply for certification as a school counselor with the Montana Office of Public Instruction. School counselors in Montana can be certified with a class 6 (specialist) certificate (for those without a Montana teaching certificate), or certified with a Guidance and Counseling endorsement on a Montana teaching certificate. In addition, graduates may apply for licensure as a licensed professional counselor with the Board of Social Work Examiners and Professional Counselors after completing 2200 hours (post-graduate) of supervised counseling experience in the field.

School Counseling students take a common core of counseling and human development courses. This core of course work provides all students with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a professional counselor and follows the standards developed by CACREP. In addition, students in the School Counseling option also study aspects of counseling germane to the school setting. The program focuses on a comprehensive and developmental approach to designing and implementing a school counseling program, and follows the standards developed by the American School Counselor Association. The program emphasis strives to provide the necessary self-awareness, knowledge, and skills for counseling students to become competent and capable professional school counselors.

Summer

HDCO 502 Counseling Ethics/Orientation 2 credits
HDCO 508 Counseling Theories I 3 credits
HDCO 558 Career Counseling 2 credits

Fall

EDCI 506 Educational Research 3 credits
HDCO 510 Counseling Theories II 3 credits
HDCO 521 Counseling Skills Lab 1 credit
HDCO 522 Group Counseling 3 credits

Spring

HDCO 523 Addictions Counseling 2 credits
HDCO 525 Counseling Children/Adolescents 3 credits
HDCO 571 Prof Counseling Practicum

3 credits

Summer

HDCO 506 School Counseling Programs 3 credits
HDCO 551 Appraisal 3 credits
HDCO 526 Adventure Counseling (recommended elective) 3 credits

Fall

HDCF 563 Multicultural Awareness 3 credits
HDCO 505 Prof Issues School Counseling 3 credits
HDCO 554 Developmental Theory & Concept 3 credits

Spring

HDCO 598 Internship 6 credits
XXX Electives

2 credits

Program Total 48

Family and Consumer Sciences Option

The Department of Health and Human Development offers a Master of Science degree with an option in family and consumer sciences. The option offers an area of study in early childhood education/child development and family science. Students must successfully complete a 36-credit minimum course of study. Interested students may obtain descriptions by visiting the department web site at www.montana.edu/hhd.

Early Childhood Education/Child Development Program

The Early Childhood Education/Child Development master's program requires 36-credits of course work and offers both a non-thesis and thesis option. A non-thesis requires the completion of a professional paper or project that is designed by the student. A thesis is recommended for individuals interested in pursuing scholarly research or continuing on in a Ph.D. program. The early childhood program emphasizes the advanced study of education, care, and development of children within the context of families, educational and human service settings, communities, and societies. The program focuses on early education, child development, families in social context, and research methods and design. Flexibility within the program enables students to select supporting courses in the areas of specialized early childhood education, working with adults, business, administration, program evaluation and policy, research, internship and individual studies. Students are encouraged to be creative in the development of their program to help them accomplish their professional goals. Students develop skills necessary for working with diverse children and families, planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating programs for children and families, and conducting research. The program prepares students for a variety of careers in early childhood settings, child care related programs and businesses, child-related community, state or federal agencies, non-profit settings, early intervention settings, public policy, parent education, and teaching adults.

Thesis Option (Plan A)

EDCI 501 Educ Statistics I 3 credits
HDCF 555 Perspct Child & Adol Dev 3 credits
HDCF 563 Multicultural Awareness

3 credits

HDCF 598 Internship 3 credits
HDCF 590 Master's Thesis 10 credits
 
Take one of the Following
 
EDCI 506 App Educ Research 3 credits
EDCI 507
Qualitative Methods
3 credits
HHD 512 Research Des in HHD 3 credits
XXX Supporting Courses 11 credits

Total Program 36 credits

Non-Thesis Option (Plan B)

HDCF 555 Perspect Child & Adol Dev 3 credits
HDCF 563 Multicultural Awareness 3 credits
HDCF 575 Prof Paper/Project

4 credits

HDCF 598 Internship 3 credits
 
Take one of the Following
 
EDCI 506 App Educ Research 3 credits
EDCI 507
Qualitative Methods
3 credits
HHD 512 Research Des in HHD 3 credits
XXX Supporting Courses 20 credits

Total Program 36 credits

 

Family Science Program

This program is structured to prepare scholars in the field of family science. Students have the opportunity to develop skills necessary for professional achievement in basic and applied research settings and in public and private organizations. The strength of this master's program is based on its focused study of the health and well-being of families. One goal of the program is to facilitate student proficiency in producing and consuming research. Curriculum development, program, evaluation, and policy analysis are also emphasized. Nonthesis and thesis plans are available. A nonthesis plan requires the completion of a professional paper and additional course work. Students can also choose to do an internship in a professional setting to further enhance their understanding of the family field. Students must successfully complete a 36-credit minimum course of study. Interested students may obtain more information about the program by visiting the department web site at www.montana.edu/hhd or by contacting Bethany Letiecq at 406.994.7396 or via e-mail at bletiecq@montana.edu.

EDCI 501 Educ Statistics I 3 credits
HDCF 555 Current Res in Child/Adol Dev 3 credits

HDCF 563

or

HDCF 464

Multicultural Awareness

 

Gen, Race, Class, Fam Div

3 credits

HDCF 598 Internship 3 credits
HDCF 590
Master’s Thesis
3 credits (Plan A Only)
HDPE 520 Curriculum Design 3 credits
HHD 501
Prof Comm Skills in HHD
3 credits
HHD 512 Research Des in HHD 3 credits

POLS 559

or

HDCF 425

Prog Eval & Policy

 

Fam Law & Pub Policy

3 credits

Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Option

The Department of Health and Human Development offers a Master of Science degree with an option in exercise and nutrition sciences with two programs of study: 1) exercise physiology and nutrition, and 2) sport and coaching sciences. The exercise physiology and nutrition program allows students to focus on understanding the determinants of physical activity and energy expenditure, adaptations to exercise that impact human work performance and disease risk, and exercise metabolism and nutrition. Although not required, a graduate student may simultaneously complete course work needed to become a Registered Dietitian. The sport and coaching sciences program is designed to meet the need in advanced coaching and sport science abilities at the local, state, national and international levels. Course work includes knowledge pertinent to coaches of all sports at developmental, competitive, and high performance levels as well as sport administrators in both public and private sectors. Interested students may obtain descriptions by calling (406) 994-3242, or visiting the department website at www.montana.edu/hhd. Depending on the students' goals, undergraduate degree, and course work, additional courses may be added or deleted to supplement the curriculum.

Required Courses for all Exercise Physiology and Nutrition programs:

Fall

HDPE 515

or

HDPE 545

Exercise Performance & Nutr

 

Graduate Exercise Physiology

3 credits
HHD 501 Professional Comm Skills 3 credits

STAT 401

or

EDCI 501

Stat for Researchers

 

Educ Statistics

3 credits

Spring

HDPE 465

or

Elective

Exercise Test & Prescrip

 

4 credits
HHD 512 Research Design in HHD 3 credits
NUTR 511 Exercise Metabolism & Health 3 credits

Fall

HDPE 515

or

HDPE 545

Exercise Performance & Nutr

 

Grad Exercise Phys

3 credits

NUTR 411

or

Elective

Nutr for Sport & Exer

 

3 credits
Electives   3 credits

Spring

HDPE 575

or

HDPE 590

Research or Prof Paper/Project

 

Thesis

3-6 credits

 

10 credits

Electives   3-6 credits

Total Program 36-38 credits

 

Required Courses for Sport and Coaching Sciences program:

Fall

EDCI 501

Educational Statistics I

3 credits
HDHL 455

or

HDPE 445R

The Ethic of Care

 

Applied Sport Psychology

3 credits
HHD 501 Prof Communications in HHD 3 credits

Spring

HDPE 506

Exercise and Chronic Disease

3 credits
HHD 512

Research Design in HHD

3 credits
Electives   3 credits

Fall

HDPE 467

Advanced Concepts in Coaching

3 credits
HDPE 520

Curriculum Design

3 credits
Electives   3 credits

Spring

HDPE 575

or

HDPE 590

Research or Prof Paper/Project

 

Thesis

3-6 credits

 

10 credits

Electives   3 credits

Health Promotion and Education Option

The Department of Health and Human Development offers a Master of Science degree in Health and Human Development with an option in health promotion and education. Programs of study are developed with the approval of a graduate faculty committee depending on the student's interest. Programs of study are available in community health and health enhancement K-12. Interested students may obtain descriptions by calling (406) 994-3242, or by visiting the department web site at www.montana.edu/hhd.

This option requires a minimum of 33-36 graduate credits including a required class, Research Methods in Health and Human Development, at least one graduate-level statistics course and either a thesis or project. Additional course work will be individually determined based on the student's interests and goals and the availability and interests of graduate faculty. Depending on the student's goals, undergraduate degree, and course work, additional courses may be added or deleted to supplement the curriculum.

Financial Assistance

Teaching assistantships may be available within the Department of Health and Human Development. Assistantships are typically nine-month appointments. Counseling assistantships can include a summer appointment in addition to the academic year appointment. Research assistantships may be available with individual faculty members who have funded grants or contracts. Stipends vary depending on the type of appointment, the requirements of the job, the experience of the applicant, and available funding.

See the Graduate Assistantships sections for detailed information on appointment criteria. Assistantships are requested from the student’s home department.


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