Montana State University

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

http://ece.montana.edu

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (ECE) offers degrees in three areas: a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, a Ph.D. in Engineering with an ECE option; and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering. The programs leading to the B.S. in Electrical Engineering and B.S. in Computer Engineering are both accredited accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410) 347-7700.

The breadth and quality of each degree program are driven by the goals of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department.

The mission of the department is to provide an excellent environment for the scholarly pursuits of education, discovery, and dissemination in electrical and computer engineering in support of Montana State University and the state of Montana. We strive to excel in teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. We seek to attract and retain well-qualified undergraduate students and provide them with educational, research, and scholarship opportunities. We strive to train the next generation of academics and researchers by providing opportunities in world class research and experience in teaching. And, we seek to develop a competitive research program of regional, national, and international importance.

The goals of the Department are to:

  1. Serve the State of Montana and the nation through education, research, and service to meet the mission of Montana State University and the College of Engineering.
  2. Provide ABET accredited undergraduate programs in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering.
  3. Be recognized by academic and industrial colleagues as delivering excellent undergraduate programs which provide students with a strong foundation in the contemporary and traditional areas of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
  4. Encourage faculty members to maintain professional expertise through continued professional development so they can sustain excellence in teaching and advising and be competitive in research.
  5. Provide excellent learning opportunities in lectures and modern laboratory facilities.
  6. Provide graduate research opportunities which, coupled with undergraduate excellence, prepare students through advanced studies in current and emerging fields of state, national, and international importance.
  7. Develop a competitive research program and disseminate new knowledge while mentoring graduate students completing requirements for advanced degrees.

Educational objectives for the BSEE and BSCpE degree programs are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years after graduation.

In their first few years on the job, graduates of the Programs:
  1. Pursue a professional career based on an education in the fundamentals of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
  2. Engage in post-graduate education programs.
  3. Provide a positive impact to the engineering community and to the community at large.

Internship Opportunities

Internships are encouraged for students seeking engineering experience during summer employment. A wide variety of engineering companies recruit undergraduate interns from MSU. A total of three credits of internship can be applied towards graduation as a professional elective at the rate of one credit per full-time summer engineering employment. An intern experience allows students to gain engineering industrial experience that complements their formal academic education. Students in the Electrical Engineering and the Computer Engineering degree programs are encouraged to investigate the possibilities of an internship experience according to opportunities announced each year. The MSU office of Career, Internship & Student Employment Services helps students identify internship opportunities.

Research Opportunities

Students in the Electrical Engineering and the Computer Engineering degree programs are also encouraged to investigate opportunities to work under the supervision of an ECE faculty member in a research lab either during the summer or during the academic year. All members of the ECE faculty have active research programs which regularly involve undergraduate students. Hands-on research experience complements the student's formal academic education while providing familiarity with career opportunities in the research field. Students in the ECE department have opportunities for paid research positions in addition to receiving credit for conducting research by registering for EELE 492 - Independent Study or EELE 490R - Undergraduate Research.

Graduate Program

Graduate school can provide an opportunity to gain education and experience in specialty areas that go beyond the scope or depth of the undergraduate curriculum, and offers advanced work in such areas as design, development work, research, and university-level teaching. The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department offers graduate programs leading to the research-based M.S. in Electrical Engineering, the coursework-only M.Eng. in Engineering with an ECE option, and Ph.D. in Engineering with an EE option. Exciting leading to research provides excellent learning opportunities, including participation in interdisciplinary teams. A number of research and teaching assistantships are available for qualified graduate students. Information regarding the ECE graduate program can be found at http://ece.montana.edu/research/eegrad1.htm.

For more information about the department and its programs, see the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department home page at http://ece.montana.edu


Curricula in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering


Computer Engineering

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department offers an accredited program for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Engineering (BSCpE). The Computer Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410) 347-7700.

In the fast-paced field of computers, the computer engineering graduate will be prepared for careers in exciting innovative technologies including embedded systems, programmable logic, hardware/software co-design, and digital signal processing. With increased processor capacity and processing speeds, re-programmable logic devices offer far-reaching opportunities for the computer engineer to create new applications unheard of today. The computer engineer uses knowledge of both electronics hardware and software to achieve state-of-the-art solutions, often involving programmable logic devices and microprocessors. The computer engineering curriculum is designed to prepare students for engineering careers where programming and software skills are blended with the understanding of hardware design.

The computer engineering program at MSU is interdisciplinary and incorporates substantial coursework from both the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and the Computer Science Department. All students in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department develop common skills in basic science, mathematics, basic electronics and circuits; however, the computer engineering student diverges from the electrical engineering student by taking more computer science and computer architecture courses, as well as a full complement of courses in microprocessors and programmable devices.

In the senior year each computer engineering student takes part in a capstone design project. This project allows the student to function as part of a team on a real world problem, and the student, in addition to accomplishing the design, must also communicate his or her work in both a written paper and an oral presentation. All projects are intended to bring the student's academic training to a logical conclusion and further develop the problem-solving skills and the communication skills of the computer engineering graduate.

The computer engineering program educational outcomes are:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.
  4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively.
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  12. Knowledge of the principles of project management and design trade-offs.
  13. An ability to program microcontroller/microcomputer systems using assembly and high-level languages.
  14. An ability to design digital systems using modern design tools.
  15. An ability to analyze electrical and electronic systems.
  16. An ability to implement real-time systems.

Computer Engineering Minor (Non-Teaching)

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers a non-teaching minor in Computer Engineering that provides a focus in computer programming, digital logic design, and microprocessor hardware/software. The minor requires a minimum of 30 credits: 23 credits in seven specified CS and EE courses and at least 7 credits (2 or 3 courses) of electives selected from among a specified list of upper-division EE courses. This minor is a useful complement to majors in science or engineering for those seeking a cross-disciplinary academic program.

An EE major can complete a minor in Computer Engineering by taking CSCI 111, 132, and 232 (a total of 12 credits) plus two courses (7 cr min) from the specified elective list for the CpE minor. Completing the Computer Engineering minor requires 3 credits of professional electives beyond the minimum of 18 professional elective credits required for EE majors. Thus, an EE degree with a CpE minor can be completed in 128 credits.

Student Performance and Retention Requirements: Students commencing their academic program in the fall 2005 or later are required by Board of Regents policy to achieve a C- or better grade in each class used to satisfy the BSCpE degree requirements. This minimum grade must be achieved in each prerequisite course prior to taking the follow-on course.

Curriculum in Computer Engineering


Freshman Year F S
Take one University Seminar course:    
Recommended:    
     COM 110US--Public Communication    (or) 3
     CLS 101US--Knowledge and Community 3
CSCI 111--Programming with Java 1 4
CSCI 132--Data Structures      4
EELE 101--Intro to Electrical Fundamentals   3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I     3
M 171Q--Calculus I      4
M 172Q--Calculus II     4
PHSX 220--Gen & Mod Phys I     4
14 15
Sophomore Year F S
CSCI 112--Programming with C I   3
CSCI 246--Discrete Structures 3
EELE 201--Circuits I for Engineering     4
EELE 203--Circuits II for Engineering     4
EELE 261--Intro to Logic Circuits 4
M 273Q--Multivariable Calculus 4
M 274--Intro to Differential Equations     4
PHSX 222--Gen & Mod Phys II     4  
University Core Electives*  3  
18 15
Junior Year F S
EELE 308--Signal and System Analysis 3
EELE 317--Electronics 4
EELE 334--Electromagnetic Theory I 3
EELE 367--Logic Design     4
EELE 371--Microprocess Hardware & Software Systems      4
EGEN 310R--Multidisc Engineering Design     3
EELE 465--Microcontroller Applications     4
Take one of the following:    
     EELE 321--Intro to Feedback Controls   4
     EELE 447--Digital Signal Processing   4
Elective*     3  
17 15
Senior Year F S
EELE 466--Computational Computer Arch 4
EELE 475--Hrdwr and Sftwr Eng for Emb Sys 3
EGEN 350--Applied Engr Data Analysis   2
EELE 488 --Electrical Engineering Capstone I 2
EELE 498 --Electrical Engineering Capstone II 2
EELE 487--Professionalism, Ethics & Engr Practice        1
EGEN 488--Fund of Engineering Exam 0
Electives* 6 3
University Core Electives* 6 3
17 15

* Elective requirements include 12 credits of humanities, social science, diversity, and arts classes as part of the University Core requirements, 12 credits of approved professional electives from the list below, including a minimum of  6 credits in Computer Science. There must be a minimum of  7 credits at the 300 level or above in the student's professional elective package.

Professional Electives

ACTG 201--Principles of Fin Acct
ACTG 202--Principles of Mang Acct
BMKT 325--Principles of Marketing
ECNS 309--Managerial Economics
ASTR 371--Solar System Astronomy
ASTR 373--Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
BCH 380--Biochemistry
BIOB 105--Intro to Biotech
BIOB 160--Principles of Living Systems
BIOB 170--Organismal Biology
BIOB 256--Intro Biol Cells to Organisms
BIOB 260--Cellular & Molecular Biology
BIOH 185--Integrated Physiology I
BIOH 201--Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOH 211--Human Anatomy & Physiology II
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I
CHMY 143--College Chemistry II
CHMY 211--Elements of Organic Chemistry
CHMY 321 - Organic Chemistry I
CHMY 323 - Organic Chemistry II
CS 204--Multimedia Development Methods
CSCI 232--Adv Data Structures and Algorithms
CSCI 300 and 400 level courses, with CSCI 494--Seminar (limited to 1 cr)
ESOF 322--Software Engineering
ESOF 422--Advanced Software Engineering
EELE 300 or 400 level courses, excluding EELE 354.
EGEN 201--Engineering Mechanics-Statics
EGEN 202--Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics
EGEN 205--Mechanics of Materials
EGEN 335--Fluid Mechanics
EGEN 325--Engineering Economic Analysis
EIND 354--Engineering Probability & Stats I
EIND 364--Principles of Operational Research I
EIND 434--Project & Engineering Management
EIND 454--Engineering Probability and Statistics II
EMEC 300 or 400 level courses
GEO 101IN--Intro to Physical Geology
GPHY 111CS--Intro to Physical Geography
GPHY 284--Intro to GIS Science & Cartography
M 221--Introduction to Linear Algebra
M 242--Methods of Proof
M 300 and 400 level courses, excluding M 330
PHSX 224 --General & Modern Physics III
PHSX 300 and 400 level courses, with PHSX 494--Seminar (limited to 1 cr), and excluding PHSX 305 and PHSX 499.
WRIT 221--Intermediate Tech Writing
WRIT 429--Professional Writing

Computer Engineering Minor (Non-Teaching Minor) Credits
CSCI 111--Programming with Java I 4
CSCI 112--Programming with C I 3
CSCI 132--Data Structures 4
CSCI 232--Adv Data Structure & Algorithms 4
EELE 261--Intro to Logic Circuits 4
EELE 371--Microprocess Hardware & Software Systems 4

Take 7 credits minimum from the following:

EELE 367--Logic Design 4
EELE 465--Microcontroller Applications 4
EELE 466--Computational Computer Arch 4
EELE 475--Hrdwr and Sftwr Eng for Emb Sys 3

Students must receive a grade of "C-" or better in all required courses for the CpE minor.


Electrical Engineering

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department offers an accredited program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE). The Electrical Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410) 347-7700.

Electrical Engineering offers the graduate extensive opportunities in such fields as telecommunications, control systems, microprocessors, instrumentation, electromagnetic systems, optical and electro-optical systems, power electronics, fuel cells, electrical power, and computer-controlled devices. In addition, electrical engineers play key roles in interdisciplinary efforts such as communications networks, remote sensing, aerospace systems, medical instrumentation, transportation systems, manufacturing, and numerous other applications of great social impact. Electrical engineers are leaders in the development of such technological innovations as the Internet, high definition television, fiber optic communications, and personal communication systems. As an electrical engineer, employment opportunities are available in numerous engineering careers, such as advanced research and development, design and applications engineering, manufacturing engineering, sales, and management.

The undergraduate program is designed to provide the student with the fundamental background in Mathematics, basic science, engineering, and personal communication to allow the graduate to be a contributing member in the engineering community. The electrical engineering curriculum provides the integrated educational experience whereby the student develops the skills to identify and to solve technical problems by applying pertinent electrical engineering knowledge to the solution of practical problems. This breadth of engineering knowledge and the ability to communicate that knowledge requires a broad-based education in various fields as well as professional elective courses. These professional electives enable the student to study in depth one or more of the following areas: logic design, digital signal processing, computer and microprocessor applications, electromagnetic theory, optics and photonics, control systems, electrical power systems, electronic circuits, and telecommunications.

Technical electives available outside the department allow students to broaden their knowledge and understanding of other engineering and scientific areas. These electives can also be used to take relevant coursework in business, finance, law, and management.

The electrical engineering program educational outcomes are:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.
  4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively.
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning.
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  12. Knowledge of the principles of project management and design trade-offs.
  13. An ability to analyze and synthesize electronic devices and electrical systems.

Electrical Engineering Minor (Non-Teaching)

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers a non-teaching minor in Electrical Engineering that provides interested students with an introductory understanding of electrical circuits, electronics, and properties of signals. Students then choose electives from among a variety of electrical engineering topics, such as telecommunications, optics, electronics, electrical power, and control systems. This minor requires a minimum of 30 credits in electrical engineering subjects, with 9 of those credits selected from a list of upper division elective courses. This minor complements majors in science or engineering for those seeking a cross-disciplinary academic program.

A CpE major can complete a minor in Electrical Engineering by taking three EELE classes (9 cr min) from the specified elective list for the EE minor. This can be done within the 126 credits required for the CpE degree alone.

Student Performance and Retention Requirements: Students commencing their academic program in the fall 2005 or later are required by Board of Regents policy to achieve a C- or better grade in each class used to satisfy the BSEE degree requirements. This minimum grade must be achieved in each prerequisite course prior to taking the follow-on course.

Curriculum in Electrical Engineering


Freshman Year F S
Take one University Seminar course:    
Recommended:    
     COM 110US--Public Communication     (or) 3
     CLS 101US--Knowledge and Community 3
EELE 101--Intro to Electrical Fundamentals    3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I     3
M 171Q--Calculus I      4
M 172Q--Calculus II     4
PHSX 220--Gen & Mod Phys I     4
PHSX 222--Gen & Mod Phys I     4
University Core Electives*   3
14 14
Sophomore Year F S
CSCI 112 --Programming with C I   3
EELE 201--Circuits I for Engineering    4
EELE 203--Circuits II for Engineering     4
EELE 261--Intro to Logic Circuits       4
EGEN 350 --Applied Engr Data Analysis      2
M 273Q--Multivariable Calculus      4
M 274--Intro to Differential Equations     4
PHSX 224--Gen & Mod Phys III     4
CHMY 141 --College Chemistry I 4  
16 17
Junior Year F S
EELE 308--Signal and System Analysis 3
EELE 317--Electronics    4
EELE 334--Electromagnetic Theory I      3
EELE 371--Microprocess Hardware & Software Systems      4
EGEN 310R--Multidisc Engineering Design      3
Take two of the following:    
     EELE 321--Introduction to Feedback Controls     4
     EELE 355--Electric Machinery Fundamentals Devices 4
     EELE 445--Telecommunication Systems     4
EE Professional Elective* 3 3
University Core Electives*     3  
17 17
Senior Year F S
EELE 409--EE Material Science    3
EELE 487--Professionalism, Ethics & Engr Practice        1
EELE 488--Electrical Engineering Capstone I 2  
EELE 489--Electrical Engineering Capstone II   2
EGEN 488--Fund of Engineering Exam   0
Take one of the following:    
     EELE 321--Introduction to Feedback Controls     4
     EELE 355--Electric Machinery Fundamentals Devices 4
     EELE 445--Telecommunication Systems     4
EE Professional Elective* 3
Non-EE Professional Electives* 3 3
Professional Elective   3
University Core Electives*     3 3
14 16

* Elective requirements include 12 credits of humanities, social science, diversity, and arts classes as part of University Core requirements, 18 credits of professional electives with a minimum of 9 credits in Electrical Engineering and a minimum of  6 credits outside of Electrical Engineering all from the professional electives list below. There must be a minimum of 5 credits at the 300 level or above in the student's professional electives package.

Professional Electives

ACTG 201--Principles of Fin Acct
ACTG 202--Principles of Mang Acct
BMKT 325--Marketing
ECNS 309--Managerial Economics
ASTR 371--Solar System Astronomy
ASTR 373--Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
BCH 380--Biochemistry
BIOB 105--Intro to Biotech
BIOB 160--Principles of Living Systems
BIOB 170--Organismal Biology
BIOB 256--Intro Biol Cells to Organisms
BIOB 260--Cellular & Molecular Biology
BIOH 185--Integrated Physiology I
BIOH 201--Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOH 211--Human Anatomy & Physiology II
CHMY 143--College Chemistry II
CHMY 211--Elements of Organic Chemistry
CHMY 321 - Organic Chemistry I
CHMY 323 - Organic Chemistry II
CS 204--Multimedia Development Methods
CSCI 111--Programming with Java I
CSCI 132--Basic Data Structures and Algorithms
CSCI 246--Discrete Structures
CSCI 232--Adv Data Structures and Algorithms
CSCI 300 and 400 level courses, with CSCI 494--Seminar (limited to 1 cr)
ESOF 322--Software Engineering
ESOF 422--Advanced Software Engineering
EELE 300 or 400 level courses, excluding EELE 354.
EGEN 201--Engineering Mechanics-Statics
EGEN 202--Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics
EGEN 205--Mechanics of Materials
EGEN 335--Fluid Mechanics
EGEN 325--Engineering Economic Analysis
EIND 354--Engineering Probability & Stats I
EIND 364--Principles of Operational Research I
EIND 434--Project & Engineering Management
EIND 454--Engineering Probability and Statistics II
EMEC 300 or 400 level courses
GEO 101IN--Intro to Physical Geology
GPHY 111CS--Intro to Physical Geography
GPHY 284--Intro to GIS Science & Cartography
M 221--Introduction to Linear Algebra
M 242--Methods of Proof
M 300 and 400 level courses, excluding M 330
PHSX 300 and 400 level courses, with PHSX 494--Seminar (limited to 1 cr), and excluding PHSX 305 and PHSX 499.
WRIT 221--Intermediate Tech Writing
WRIT 429--Professional Writing

Electrical Engineering Minor (Non-Teaching Minor) Credits
EELE 101--Intro to Electrical Fundamentals 3
EELE 201--Circuits I for Engineering I 4
EELE 203--Circuits II for Engineering 4
EELE 308--Signal and System Analysis 3
EELE 317--Electronics 4
EELE 334--Electromagnetic Theory I 3

Take 9 credits minimum from the following:

EELE 321--Introduction to Feedback Controls 4
EELE 432 --Applied Electromagnetic 3
EELE 355--Electric Machinery Fundamentals 4
EELE 409--EE Material Science 3
EELE 411--Adv Analog Electronics 3
EELE 414--Intro to VSLI Design 3
EELE 422--Introduction to Modern Control 3
EELE 445--Telecommunications System 4
EELE 447--Mobile Wireless Communications 3
EELE 477--Digital Signal Processing 4
EELE 482--Electro-Optical Systems 3
EELE 483--Fiber and Optical Communications 3

Students must receive a grade of "C-" or better in all required courses for the EE minor.


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Updated: June 2013