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DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL AND RANGE SCIENCES

Department of Animal and Range Sciences
P.O. Box 172900
Bozeman, MT 59717-2900
Tel: (406) 994-5582

Department Head
Dr. Glenn Duff

Professors

    James Berardinelli – Reproductive Physiology
    Janice Bowman – Beef Cattle Nutrition
    Patrick Hatfield – Range Sheep Nutrition and Management
    Gregory Johnson – Veterinary Entomology
    Rodney Kott – Extension Sheep Specialist
    John Paterson – Ruminant Nutrition
    Dennis Cash – Forage Production Management
    Clayton Marlow – Plant and Animal Interactions, Riparian Mgmt
    Jeffrey Mosley – Grazing Management, Foraging Behavior
    Bret Olson – Rangeland Ecology
    Bok Sowell – Range Improvements and Nutrition

Associate Professor

    Jane Ann Boles – Meat Science

Assistant Professors

    Rachel Endecott – Extension Beef Cattle Specialist
    Shannon Moreaux – Equine Science

Degrees Offered

M.S. in Animal and Range Sciences
M.S. in Land Rehabilitation (interdisciplinary)
Ph.D. in Animal and Range Sciences

Admission

 A minimum of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is required by Division of Graduate Education for admittance. We do require that a student take the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) and that the scores be included as part of the application material. If you have not taken the GRE exam, you should do so at your earliest convenience. In addition to the above requirements international applicants must have a TOEFL (English proficiency) score of 550 (paper) or 213 (computer).

The undergraduate work should have been in Animal Science, Range Science or a closely related field. A faculty member must agree to advise a student before they will be accepted into the Animal and Range Sciences department. Acceptance to the MSU Animal and Range Sciences department does not imply automatic acceptance to the MSU Division of Graduate Education. Financial support in the form of research assistantships and/or tuition and fee waivers is limited and will be awarded on a competitive basis.

Master of Science

Animal Science Emphasis
Graduate students in the Animal Science emphasis receive broad based training resulting in experiences that qualify them for many agricultural jobs. Areas of emphasis include nutrition, breeding and genetics, physiology, production systems, and meat science/muscle growth. Research problems may involve beef cattle, sheep and biochemical or other properties of agricultural products. Supporting course work may be taken from Animal Science, Range Science, Biology, Wildlife Management, Biochemistry, Statistics, Plant Sciences, Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, and Economics.

Research laboratories are available in the department and specialized equipment is also available through cooperation with other departments.

The department conducts cooperative research with the U.S. Livestock and Range Research Station at Miles City, Montana, and the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station at Dubois, Idaho. Facilities for the maintenance of beef cattle and sheep are available at the Red Bluff Research Ranch, 30 miles west of Bozeman, the Fort Ellis Research Center, near Bozeman, and the Northern Agricultural Research Center at Havre. The main station has facilities for sheep, horses and beef cattle (a cattle feedlot and nutrition laboratory). A wool laboratory is located on campus.

Range Science Emphasis
Research and training opportunities in the Range Science programs are diverse, and students with a wide variety of backgrounds, goals, and educational needs are accepted. Major areas of study are range ecology, habitat management, watershed management, grazing management, monitoring, riparian ecosystems, measurements, and plant-animal (livestock and wildlife) interactions. A graduate degree in range science prepares for careers in rangeland management, wildlife management, habitat management, natural resource conservation and restoration, research, land-use planning, and consultation. Research facilities include the Red Bluff Research Ranch, several research centers of the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station, U.S. Livestock and Range Research Station at Miles City, Montana, and the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station at Dubois, Idaho. Cooperative projects with ranchers and federal and state agencies are also conducted. Supporting courses at the graduate level include botany, wildlife biology and management, soils, animal science, earth science, plant science, statistics and biochemistry.

Biology Emphasis
Graduate students in the Biology emphasis receive training directed toward the basic biological functions as they relate to animal production, meat science/meat food safety or entomology. Research projects may involve beef cattle, sheep and biochemical or other properties of agricultural products. Supporting course work may be taken from Animal Science, Range Science, Biology, Wildlife Management, Biochemistry, Statistics and Plant Sciences.

Interdisciplinary M.S. Degree in Land Rehabilitation
Animal and Range Sciences participates with the interdisciplinary M.S. Program in Land Rehabilitation. The program offers advanced study in rehabilitation of disturbed lands. Site revegetation, soil remediation, riparian zone restoration, stream channel restoration, investigation of impacted geologic resources and remediation of contaminated sites are included in areas of study. Emphasis is placed on developing a broad understanding of soil, plant, and hydrologic processes. Students may focus in a subject area of direct importance to land rehabilitation, such as plant ecology, soil sciences, hydrology, geology, geography, biology, or range science.

The M.S. degree in Land Rehabilitation is offered through each of the following departments: Animal and Range Sciences; Biology; Civil (Bio-resource) Engineering; Earth Sciences, and Land Resources and Environmental Sciences. Please refer to the College of Agriculture, where a more detailed program description can be found.

Interested students should contact Graduate Programs Secretary, Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, 334 Leon Johnson Hall, 994-7060, lresinfo@montana.edu .

Requirements for a M.S. in Animal & Range Sciences

  • At least one upper level (400 or 500) course in statistics.
  • Two semesters of ARNR 507 – Research Methods.
  • Students must declare either the Animal Science, Range Science or Biology Emphasis:
    • Course requirements for students in the Animal Science Emphasis:
      • At least two courses from the Graduate Animal Science block (must be 500 level course)
    • Course requirements for students in the Range Science Emphasis:
      • At least two courses from the Graduate Range Science block (must be 500 level course)
    • Course requirements for students in the Biology Emphasis:
      • At least two biology-related 500-level courses in their area of emphasis
      • AND
      • At least one course from the Graduate Animal Science block or Range Science block
      • NOTE: students emphasizing meat science in the Biology Emphasis can substitute BCHM 441–Biochemistry of Macromolecules for one of the two 500-level courses.

Graduate Animal Science Block

ARNR 520

Nutrient Metabolism in Domestic Animals

3 credits
ARNR 521

Advanced Ruminant Nutrition

3 credits
ARNR 523

Advanced Physiology of Reproduction

3 credits
ARNR 524 Advanced Animal Breeding 3 credits
ARNR 525 Muscle and Growth Biology 3 credits

Graduate Range Science Block

ARNR 541

Range Ecophysiology

3 credits
ARNR 543

Riparian Processes and Function

3 credits
ARNR 544

Advanced Grazing Management & Ecology

3 credits
  • Students must meet the Proficiency Requirements for their emphasis area (see Proficiencies below).

Proficiency Requirements for Animal Science Emphasis

By the time a student completes a M.S. or Ph.D. in Animal & Range Sciences (Animal Science Emphasis), he/she must have successfully completed undergraduate or graduate coursework in three of the four areas listed below.  Examples of MSU courses that fulfill these requirements are given.  Students who have successfully completed an equivalent course may apply that course toward the proficiency requirements, subject to the approval of the student’s Graduate Committee.  Undergraduate courses in these categories are not intended to comprise a substantial portion of a student’s graduate curriculum.  These courses should be taken in addition to, not in lieu of, other courses in a graduate program.  While some courses may apply to Requirements for the M.S. in Animal & Range Sciences and Proficiency Requirements, the student’s Graduate Committee must not allow the need to meet Proficiency Requirements detract from a student completing a rigorous graduate degree program.

  • Breeding/Genetics (ANSC 322 – Principles of Animal Breeding/Genetics or BIOL 301 – Principles of Genetics)
  • Physiology/Reproduction (ANSC 321 – Physiology of Reproduction)
  • Nutrition (ANSC 320 – Animal Nutrition)
  • Production/Management (ANSC 434 – Beef Cattle Management)

Proficiency Requirements for Range Science Emphasis

By the time a student finishes the M.S. degree in Animal & Range Sciences (Range Science Emphasis), he/she must have successfully completed undergraduate or graduate coursework in four of the five areas listed below.  Examples of MSU courses that fulfill these requirements are given.  Students who have successfully completed an equivalent course may apply that course toward the proficiency requirements, subject to the approval of the student’s Graduate Committee.  Undergraduate courses in these categories are not intended to comprise a substantial portion of a student’s graduate curriculum. These courses should be taken in addition to, not in lieu of, other courses in a graduate program.  While some courses may apply to Requirements for the M.S. in Animal & Range Sciences and Proficiency Requirements, the student’s Graduate Committee must not allow the need to meet Proficiency Requirements detract from a student completing a rigorous graduate degree program.

  • Grazing Management (NRSM 353 – Grazing Ecology and Management)
  • Plant Ecology (NRSM 240 – Natural Resource Ecology Or BIOL 303 – Principles of Ecology Or BIOL 534 – Vegetation Ecology)
  • Plant Identification (NRSM 350 – Vegetation of Western Or BIOL 434 – Agrostology)
  • Plant Physiology (PSPP 450 – Plant Physiology Or ARNR 541 – Range Ecophysiology)
  • Vegetation Measurements (NRSM 453 - Habitat Inventory and Analysis)

Proficiency Requirements for Biological Science Emphasis

By the time a student finishes the M.S. degree in Animal & Range Sciences (Biological Science Emphasis), he/she must have successfully completed a minimum of 15 credit hours in the biological sciences with at least 9 credit hours in upper division course work which may include: biological sciences, chemistry, microbiology, food science, entomology, and ecology.  Examples of MSU courses that fulfill these requirements are given.  Students who have successfully completed an equivalent course may apply that course toward the proficiency requirements, subject to the approval of the student’s Graduate Committee.  Undergraduate courses in these categories are not intended to comprise a substantial portion of a student’s graduate curriculum. These courses should be taken in addition to, not in lieu of, other courses in a graduate program. While some courses may apply to Requirements for the M.S. in Animal & Range Sciences and Proficiency Requirements, the student’s Graduate Committee must not allow the need to meet Proficiency Requirements detract from a student completing a rigorous graduate degree program.

  • Biology (BIOL 213, 214, 215 – Introductory Biology)
  • Ecology (BIOL 303 – Principles of Ecology; BIOL 405 – Behavioral & Evolutionary Ecology)
  • Chemistry (CHMY 151, 143 – College/Honors Chemistry I; CHMY 211 - Elements of Organic Chemistry; CHMY 311 –Analytical Chem-Quant Analysis; CHMY 311, 312 – Organic Chemistry)
  • Biochemistry (BCHM 340 – General Biochemistry)
  • Entomology (BIOL 204IN – Insect Biology)
  • Food Science / Meat Science (Introductory Food Science or upper division food science or food safety course)

Requirements for Ph.D. in Animal & Range Sciences

PhD students in Animal and Range Sciences will be required to take 3 credits of ARNR 507 Research Methods. All PhD programs must comply with The Graduate School, including 60 credits hours (18 which must be dissertation credits) above the B.S. degree. Beyond this there are no specific minimum course requirements for the PhD program. Specific requirements are to be decided by the student’s graduate committee.


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