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Health and Human Development

College of Education, Health and Human Development

http://www.montana.edu/hhd/

The Department of Health and Human Development prepares students for careers that are dedicated to the enrichment of human well-being. Consequently, rewarding career opportunities are available to graduates within human service professions in private, educational, and public settings. Specific areas of study include community health, dietetics/nutrition science, exercise science/kinesiology, early childhood education and child services, and family and consumer sciences. Students interested in teaching can pursue programs in family and consumer sciences and health enhancement (health and physical education) K-12.

Health and Human Development offers graduate master's-level degrees with options in counseling, including marriage and family counseling, mental health counseling, and school counseling; family and consumer sciences, including early childhood education and family science; family financial planning; exercise and nutrition sciences; and health promotion and education. (See the graduate catalog for further information on graduate programs.)

In addition to the career options, the department offers a variety of recreational activity courses. Some physical activity courses are offered as a service to the general student population with no prerequisite. These include skiing, fly fishing, bowling, billiards, etc. User fees for HHD 100 and some courses are charged. The fees vary depending on the activity. Each student enrolling in an activity course will be asked to sign an activity course waiver and release form.

Mission Statement

The Department of Health and Human Development strives to enrich human well-being through teaching, research, and outreach.

Degrees and Options

The department offers six Bachelor of Science degrees. They include a B.S. in Community Health; a B.S. in Early Child Education and Child Services; a B.S. in Family and Consumer Sciences with Teaching or Nonteaching options; a B.S. in Food and Nutrition with options in Dietetics, Nutrition Science; a B.S. in Health Enhancement K-12 (health and physical education teaching); and a B.S. in Health and Human Performance with options in Exercise Science or Kinesiology.

The department offers a Master of Science in Health and Human Development with options in Counseling (including marriage and family counseling and mental health counseling); Family and Consumer Sciences (including early childhood education and family science); Family Financial Planning; Exercise and Nutrition Sciences; and Health Promotion and Education.

The department offers a Master of Education in School Counseling.

Minor Fields of Study

Minors provide a concentration of courses outside the student's major and are intended to complement major course work. The minor is posted on the student's transcript. Minors are available in Coaching and in Child Services. A teaching minor is available in Family and Consumer Sciences. (See the course requirements on minors in the appropriate section of this catalog.)

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Science degrees in Community Health, Early Childhood Education and Child Services, Family and Consumer Sciences (nonteaching), Food and Nutrition, and Health and Human Performance shall be conferred upon the successful completion of specified requirements and a minimum of 120 credits. The Bachelor of Science degrees in the teaching options of Family and Consumer Sciences and Health Enhancement K-12 (health and physical education) shall be conferred upon the successful completion of specified requirements and a minimum of 128 credits. All undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 42 upper division credits.

The Master of Science in Health and Human Development shall be conferred upon completion of specified requirements and a minimum of 30 credits for the options of Family and Consumer Sciences, Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, and Health Promotion and Education. A minimum of 42 credits is required for the Family Financial Planning program. A minimum of 60 credits is required in the graduate Counseling programs. The Master of Education in School Counseling carries a minimum of 48 credits. (See the graduate catalog for further information.)

Certifications and Licensures

Certifications and licensures are dependent on the student's eligibility to sit for certification and licensing examinations and passing those examinations. Several fields of study in the Department of Health and Human Development prepare students to sit for certification and licensing examinations. Many, but not all, certifications and licensures are offered as post-baccalaureate opportunities. See your advisor for additional information. The following certifications are related to Health and Human Development disciplines:

Accredited Family Financial Counselor. The Department of Health and Human Development offers a three-course series (HDCF 338 Personal and Family Finance I, HDCF 339 Personal and Family Finance II, and HDCF 342 Family Financial Counseling) that can aid students in becoming credentialed as an Accredited Financial Counselor (AFC). The AFC credential is offered nationally through the Institute for Personal Finance. The credential requires two tests, an internship and a year of work experience in helping consumers and families with financial matters. The three courses prepare students to take the two tests. The department then helps the student find placement for an internship in helping consumers and families with finances. The AFC credential allows students to credibly indicate their expertise in personal and family finance to potential employers.

Certified in Family and Consumer Sciences. Students completing the Family and Consumer Sciences major and the restricted electives will be eligible to sit for the Certification in Family and Consumer Sciences (CFCS) exam set by the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. The CFCS Credential communicates to others within and outside of the profession that the individual certified in family and consumer sciences possesses a broad professional knowledge base in the field.

Certified Family Life Educator. Students completing the Family and Consumer Sciences major and the restricted electives will be eligible to apply for the CFLE granted by the National Council on Family Relations. Interested Community Health students may also complete additional courses and apply for provisional certification. Certified Family Life Educators serve as consultants, directors, educators, and coordinators in settings such as social services, child care, health and welfare, recreation, youth programs, community action, drug/alcohol rehabilitation centers, senior citizen programs, parent education, family service agencies, extension, and retirement/convalescent care centers.

Certified Health Education Specialist. Completion of the Community Health major establishes eligibility to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist examination (CHES). The CHES exam measures the possession, application, and interpretation of knowledge essential to the practice of community health/health education. The CHES certification is a national standard for health education practice and assists employers in identifying qualified health education practitioners.

Certified Personal Trainer/Certified Strength Coach. The National Strength and Conditioning Association provides opportunities to become a certified personal trainer or a certified strength coach.

Coaching Certification. Faculty in Health and Human Development partner with the Montana High School Association (MHSA) in the development and implementation of a coaching certification program. Although MHSA awards the certification, successful completion of the Coaching Concentration offered in the department will prepare the future coach for the profession.

Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher. The Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Preparation program is designed for students who want to become teachers of Family and Consumer Sciences in public or private schools. Upon completion of the degree, students are eligible for licensure from the State of Montana in teaching grades 5-12.

Health Enhancement (Health and Physical Education) K-12 Teacher. The Health Enhancement K-12 Teacher Preparation program is designed for students who want to become teachers of Health Enhancement (Health Education/Physical Education) in public or private schools. Upon completion of the degree, students are eligible for licensure from the State of Montana in teaching grades K-12 with reciprocity in other states.

Health Fitness Instructor and Exercise Test Technologist. The American College of Sports Medicine, the premier organization for health/fitness professionals and clinicians, offers the Health/Fitness Instructor and Exercise Test Technologist certifications at sanctioned test locations throughout the Pacific Northwest. The certification exams include written and practical components that emphasize the application of knowledge and hands-on skills typically acquired in an undergraduate Exercise Science or Kinesiology program.

Licensed Professional Counselor or Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor. Counseling programs in the graduate program in Health and Human Development lead to the opportunity to become licensed in Montana as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC). Following completion of a master's degree, the student must complete a minimum of 1500 hours of supervised counseling practice prior to sitting for and passing the LPC examination.

Registered Dietitian. The Food and Nutrition Dietetics option gives the students an opportunity to apply to a national post-baccalaureate supervised practice/dietetic internship. Upon its completion, the student may sit for the RD examination given by the Commission on Dietetic Registration, the credentialing agency for The American Dietetic Association. The RD status enables a person to become licensed in Montana as a Licensed Nutritionist by the Board of Medical Examiners.

Academic Advisors

The Health and Human Development academic advising office, staffed with academic advisors to serve the needs of students, is located in Hosaeus PE Complex. Students are expected to meet with an advisor each semester to discuss their plan of study, select courses, and register for courses. In addition, students are encouraged to meet with an academic advisor to discuss issues and questions regarding professional programs, career opportunities, and academic concerns. Academic advisors can assist students to appropriate referrals when necessary.

To receive advising or to inquire about programs in the Department of Health and Human Development, contact the Health and Human Development Advising Center by phone at 406.994.4001 or by e-mail at hhdadvising@montana.edu.

Course Requirements and Curricula for Majors

The curriculum and specific course requirements for each major and minor within the Department of Health and Human Development are listed below.


Curricula in Health and Human Development


COMMUNITY HEALTH MAJOR

Graduates of the community health major are employed in entry-level positions conducting planning, administration, evaluation, research, and teaching in community health settings. The undergraduate program is concerned with improving health and well-being for all through the promotion of healthful lifestyles, healthy family functioning, community actions for health, and conditions that make it possible to live healthful lives. The program draws on public health, education, psychology, sociology, family science, and other social and behavioral sciences. Students are prepared to work in a variety of settings including family planning agencies, nonprofit agencies, state and federal health agencies, schools, and community health centers. This program stresses community involvement because community health emphasizes an interactive process in which target populations are active participants in their health, rather than passive recipients. Student involvement will take the form of class assignments, practicum, internships, and service. Students will be prepared to assess individual and community needs; plan, implement, and evaluate effective health programs; coordinate provision of services; act as a resource person; and communicate health needs, concerns and resources. Persons enrolling in this option should seriously consider earning a graduate degree in public health or some related area at some point in their career.

Completion of the community health major establishes eligibility to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) examination. The CHES exam measures the possession, application, and interpretation of knowledge essential to the practice of community health/health education. The CHES certification is a national standard for health education practice and assists employers in identifying qualified health education practitioners.

Interested students may also complete additional courses and apply for provisional certification for the Certified Family life Educator (CFLE) program accredited by the National Council on Family Relations.

Freshman Year Credits
COM 110US--Public Communication 3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I 3
HDCF 150IS--Lifespan Human Development 3
HDPE 221--Health Anatomy and Physiology 3
M 097--Survey of Algebra(or higher) 3
PSYX 100IS--Intro to Psychology 3
SOCI 101IS--Introduction to Sociology 3
University Core and Electives 9
30
Sophomore Year Credits
WRIT 221--Intermediate Tech Writing 3
HDCF 263--Relation & Family System 3
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDHL 230--Drugs and Society 3
HDHL 240--Human Sexuality 3
STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
University Core and Electives 9
Take at least one of the following
     BCHM 104RN--Biochem of Health NS Major 3
     MB 201--Infectious Disease 3
     MBEH 210RN--Princ of Environ Health Science 3
     PSCI 210IS--Intro to American Government 3
     or PSCI 260--Intro to State & Local Govt 3
     PSCI 214IS--Principles of Political Sci 3
     SOCI 201--Social Problems 3
30
Junior Year Credits
HDCF 319--Theories for Helping Relationships 3
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDCF 464--Gen,Race,Class & Fam Div 3
HDHL 410--Human Response to Stress 3
HDHL 452--Health Disparities 3
Take at least one of the following
     HDCF 360--Aging and Adult Devel 3
     HDFN 451--Sustainable Food Systems 3
     HDHL 451--Health and Healing 3
     HDHL 455--The Ethic of Care in HHD 3
     PHIL 338--Biomedical Ethics 3
     PSYX 462--Psychology of Prejudice 3
     SOCI 325--Social Stratification 3
     SOCI308--Population and Society 3
     SOCI 340--Social Movements 3
     SOCI 345--Complex Organizations 3
     SOCI 359--Crime, Justice & Media 3
     SOCI 363--Political Sociology 3
University Core and Electives 12
30
Senior Year Credits
HDCF 425R--Family Law and Public Policy 3
HDCF 472--Program Evaluation 3
HDHL 440--Principles of Epidemiology 3
HDHL 445--Prog Planning & Eval in Health 3
HDPE 415--Mgmt in Health Enhance & Fitness 3
HDPE 425--Health Psychology 3
HHD 498--Internship 6
University Core and Electives 6
30

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CHILD SERVICES MAJOR

The early childhood education and child services major emphasizes the dual focus of education and services within the context of families, educational and child service settings, communities, and society. The major focuses on early childhood education, child development, developmentally appropriate practices, early intervention with children with special needs, assessment and intervention, advocacy, program administration, and working directly with children and families in a variety of early childhood and service settings. The early childhood education and child services major provides a strong background for students seeking careers in a wide variety of settings including early childhood education, child care-related programs and businesses, early intervention with children with special needs and preschool special education settings, child services and child-focused community agencies, state or federal agencies, nonprofit settings that support children and families, and administrators of child service programs. Additionally, this program provides a distance education program to Montana Tribal Colleges and respective Head Start Programs through the Early Childhood Education Distance Partnership Program.

The early childhood education and child services major provides a strong background for admission to graduate programs in early childhood education, child development, child and family studies, social work, counseling, and other related behavioral and social science disciplines.

Freshman Year Credits
WRIT 101W--College Writing I      3
HDCF 160--Early Childhood-Adolescence     3
Math-Any 100-level Math course or
Math Placement test
US 101US--First Year Seminar 3
Supporting Courses     9
University Core     9
30
Sophomore Year Credits
HDCF 250--Signing Exact English I 3
HDCF 263--Relations in Family System 3
HDCF 271--Paraprofessional 1
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
NAS 201D--American Indians in Montana 3
Supporting Courses     11
University Core and Electives 6
30
Junior Year Credits
HDCF 319--Theories & Skills Help Relation 3
HDCF 350--Relations & Mgmt in ECE 3
HDCF 352--Curriculum for ECE 4
HDCF 356--Exceptional Children 0-21 3
HDCF 357--Exceptional Children Lab 1
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
Supporting Courses     13
30
Senior Year Credits
HDCF 432--Social Competence in EC 3
HDCF 442--Literacy in EC 3
HDCF 454--Practicum in EC Teach 5
HDCF 455R--Admin of Human Svc Prog 3
HDCF 458--Assess & Intervention 4
HDCF 466--Health & Movement in EC 3
University Core and Electives 12
30

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES MAJOR

The Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) profession is dedicated to enhancing the relationships among individuals, families, communities and the environments in which they function. The family and consumer sciences profession takes leadership in improving individual, family, and community well-being; impacting the development, delivery, and evaluation of consumer goods and services; influencing the creation of policy; and shaping societal change, thereby enhancing the human condition.

Students in FCS take a common core of foundation courses in content areas based upon American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) standards. In addition, students take restricted supporting courses in the program.

Both teaching and nonteaching options are available.

Both teaching and nonteaching options take the following core classes:

  Credits
HDCF 138--Surv of Family Finance & Cons Iss 3
HDCF 160--Early Childhood-Adol Devel 3
HDCF 239--Contemp Consumer Issues 3
HDCF 263--Relationships & Family Sys 3
HDCF 338--Personal and Family Finance I 3
HDCF 360--Adult Development & Aging 3
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDCF 425R--Family Law & Public Policy 3
HDCF 437--Managing Work and Family 3
HDCF 440--Parenting 3
HDCF 447--Family Life Education 3
HDCF 464--Gen,Race,Class & Fam Div 3
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDHL 240--Human Sexuality 3
HDHL 410--Human Response to Stress 3
Take one of the following
         HDCF 339--Pers & Family Finance II 3
and  HDCF 342--FamFinancial Counseling 3
or    HDCF 319--Theories Help Relations 3

Nonteaching Option

The family and consumer sciences nonteaching option emphasizes the family as a dynamic social unit and examines diverse families in contemporary society. The program focuses on family behavior, strengths, and challenges using family-specific theoretical frameworks (family systems, family crisis) and research methods. Social, cultural, historical, political, and economic trends that influence family functioning and well-being are addressed. Students study a wide range of family issues including development across the lifespan, changing family structures, intergenerational relations. Additionally, human response to stress and crisis, family policies and laws, family finance and economics, work and family issues, and human service delivery and decision-making are included.

The family and consumer sciences nonteaching option provides a strong background for students seeking careers in human services, family life education, family policy, and financial counseling. However, graduate training will be necessary for students wishing to enter the counseling/therapy fields. The curriculum prepares students to work in a wide range of organizations and settings, state or federal agencies, nonprofit settings, and for admission to graduate programs in family science, family resource management, human development, social work, law, and other related behavioral and social science disciplines. Also, graduates of the program may be involved in family-owned business and work in occupations requiring knowledge of family finance including financial counseling.

Students completing the degree may apply for provisional certification as a Certified Family Life Educator. MSU's family and consumer sciences major is accredited by the National Council on Family Relations. Provisional certification is awarded at the completion of a baccalaureate degree and course work in the 11 family life substance areas. After two years' work experience, you may apply for full CFLE certification.

Freshman Year Credits
WRIT 101W--College Writing I 3
HDCF 138--Surv Fam Finance & Cons Iss 3
HDCF 160--Early Child-Adolescent Dev 3
US 101US--First Year Seminar 3
Univ Core (D,IA,US) and Electives 18
30
Sophomore Year Credits
HDCF 239--Contemp Consumer Iss 3
HDCF 263--Relationships in Family Systems 3
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition

3

HDHL 230--Drugs and Society

3

HDHL 240--Human Sexuality

3

STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
Univ Core (D,IA,US) and Electives 11-13
30
Note: STAT 216 must be completed with passing grades
of "C " or better, before taking upper division courses.
Junior Year Credits
HDCF 338--Pers & Family Finance I 3
HDCF 360--Adult Devel & Aging 3
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDCF 440--Parenting 3
HDHL 410--Human Response to Stress 3
Take one of the following:
         HDCF 339--Pers & Family Finance II 3
and  HDCF 342-- Fam Financial Counseling 3
or    HDCF 319--Theories Help Relations 3
Restricted Electives     9-12
30
Senior Year Credits
HDCF 425R--Family Law and Public Policy 3
HDCF 437--Managing Work & Fam 3
HDCF 447--Family Life Education 3
HDCF 455R--Admin of Human Svc Prog 3
HDCF 464--Gend, Race Class & Div 3
HDCF 472--Program Evaluation 4
HDCF 474--Senior Seminar: Prof Issues 4
Restricted Electives     8
30

Teaching Option

Family and consumer sciences students learn to work through credit and not-for-credit education systems to empower individuals and families across the lifespan to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. The unique focus is on families, work, and their interrelationships. The curriculum at MSU is in synch with the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers and the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Students. Therefore, students choosing this option will be well qualified to seek employment in a variety of educational settings including secondary public and private schools, extension, and public and private agencies. Students completing the program successfully will qualify for a Montana teaching license in Family and Consumer Sciences grades 5-12. Students are encouraged to complete the Certified Family Life Educator and Accredited Financial Counselor designations as well as a teaching minor in a second field while attending MSU to further increase their professional opportunities.

Additionally, the family and consumer sciences major prepares undergraduate students to pursue graduate degrees in a variety of areas including family and consumer sciences, curriculum and instruction, school counseling, and adult education.

Note: The family and consumer sciences teaching option requires 128 credits.

Freshman Year Credits
DE 161--Intro to Design 3
EDCI 102--In School Experience 1
WRIT 101W--College Writing I 3
HDCF 138--Surv Fam Finance & Cons Iss 3
HDCF 160--Early Child-Adolescent Dev 3
HDHL 106--Drug Health Issues for Ed 3
Take one of the following
     M 121--College Algebra 3
     M 151Q--Language of Math 3
     or test into STAT 216
Univ Core (US,IA,IH,IN,IS) and Electives 18
32-35
Sophomore Year Credits
EDCI 209--Ed Psych & Human Dev Adol 3
HDCF 218--Textiles and Fashion 3
HDCF 219--Apparel Construction 3
HDCF 239--Contemp Consumer Issues

3

HDCF 263--Relationships and Family Sys

3

HDCF 338--Personal & Family Finance I

3

HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition

3

HDFN 226--Culinary Fundamentals

3

HDFN 227--Culinary Fundamentals Lab

2

HDHL 240--Human Sexuality

3

STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
Restricted Elective     3
35
Junior Year Credits
EDCI 240--Multicultural Education 3
EDCI 320--Instruc Found of Computing 2
EDCI 360--Foundations of Assessment 2
EDSD 301--Paraprofessional Experience 1
EDSD 459--Methods of Teaching FCS 3
HDCF 335--Program Planning in FCS 3
HDCF 356--Exceptional Children 0-21 3
HDCF 360--Adult Devel and Aging 3
HDCF 437--Managing Work & Family 3
HDCF 440--Parenting 3
Take one of the following:
         HDCF 339--Pers & Family Finance II 3
and  HDCF 342--FamFinancial Counseling 3
or    HDCF 319--Theories Help Relations 3
29
Senior Year Credits
EDSD 410--Student Teaching 12
EDSD 413--Professional Issues 2
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDCF 425R--Family Law and Public Policy 3
HDCF 429--Small Business Operations 3
HDCF 447--Family Life Education 3
HDCF 464--Gend, Race, Class & Div 3
HDHL 410--Human Response to Stress 3
32

  

Restricted Electives Credits
HDCF 474--Senior Seminar: Prof Issue 4
Courses Leading to Area Expertise
Early Childhood:
HDCF 350--Relations & Mgmt in ECE 3
HDCF 352--Curriculum in ECE 3
HDCF 454--Practicum in EC Teaching 3-5
Food Science, Nutrition, Food Production
HDFN 321--Nutrition in the Lifecycle 3
HDFN 322--Culinary Skills & Mgmt 3
HDFN 323--Culinary Mgmt Practicum 3
Improved Teaching and Program Delivery
EDCI 223--Basic Media Production 1
EDCI 469--Public School in American Society 2
HDCF 357--Exceptional Children Lab 1
HDCF 472--Program Evaluation 3
HDPE 267--Intro to Coaching 3
TE 250--Technology & Society 3

FOOD AND NUTRITION MAJOR

The Department of Health and Human Development offers a major in the study of food and nutrition. Students who choose the nutrition science option intend to pursue a health profession or research-related career, for example, medicine, dentistry, industry, academia, etc.

Dietetics Option

The dietetics option at Montana State University-Bozeman has been granted initial accreditation as a Didactic Program in Dietetics by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation and the United States Department of Education, 120 Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, (312) 899-0040, x. 5400. A graduate will attain a verification statement upon completing the CADE-approved dietetics program curriculum in addition to a minimum of a "C-" or better in each required program course at graduation. A graduate is then eligible to apply for an CADE-accredited supervised practice/dietetic internship or other post-baccalaureate experience. Upon completion of the post-graduate dietetic internship, students are eligible to take the national registration exam for dietitians. Once the individual has passed the exam, the individual is then a &“registered dietitian.&” The dietetics option has a strong foundation in food and nutrition, food service management, and science components. Registered dietitians may find employment in health care facilities; industrial, school, and university food services; community nutrition services; private practice; sales for food service or health products; and other related fields.

Nutrition Science Option

The nutrition science option is designed to prepare a student for admission to medical (allopathic or osteopathic), dental, or graduate school with an emphasis on nutrition and biochemistry. A student can receive a verification statement if additional didactic program in dietetics course requirements are met. Although the nutrition science option provides a strong background for most professional schools, students must contact individual schools for specific post-baccalaureate entrance requirements. Information about degree requirements can be obtained from the Health and Human Development advising office, Hosaeus PE Complex.

Standards of Work

Students must receive a grade of C or higher in all required courses as outlined in the major.

Dietetics Option
Freshman Year Credits
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I 4
CHMY 143--College Chemistry II 4
COM 110US--Public Communication 3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I 3
Take one of the following:
     ECNS 101IS--Economic Way of Thinking 3
     HDCF 138--Surv Family Finance & Cons Iss 3
     HDCF 239--Contemporary Consumer Issues 3
Take one of the following:
     M 121Q--College Algebra 3
     M 145Q--Math for Liberal Arts 3
Take one of the following:
     HDCF 150IS--Lifespan Human Development 3
     PSYX 100IS--Intro to Psychology 3
Take one of the following:
     ANTH 101D--Intro to Anthropology 3
     SOCI 101IS--Introduction to Sociology 3
University Core 4
30
Sophomore Year Credits
BIOL 102--Molecular & Cellular Biology    4
CHMY 211--Elements of Organic Chemistry 5
HDCF 338--Personal and Family Finance I 3
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDFN 226--Food Science I 3
HDFN 227--Food Science I Lab 2
University Core and Electives 4
Take one of the following:
     MB 101IN--Unseen Universe: Microbes 3
     MB 201--Infectious Diseases 3
Take one of the following:
     STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
     PSPP 318--Biometry 3
30
Junior Year Credits
BCHM 340--General Biochemistry 5
BIOL 208--Anatomy & Physiology II 4
HDCF 319--Theories & Skills for Help Relations 3
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDFN 321--Life Cycle Nutrition 3
HDFN 322--Culinary Skills & Mgmt 3
HDFN 323--Culinary Mgmt Practicum 3
HDFN 351--Nutrition and Society 3
HDFN 401--Nutrition Assmt & Counseling 3
30
Senior Year Credits
HDCF 429--Small Business Operations in HHD 3
HDFN 400--Seminar 1
HDFN 421--Macronutrient Metabolism 3
HDFN 422--Micronutrient Metabolism 3
HDFN 425--Medical Nutritional Therapy I 3
HDFN 426--Medical Nutritional Therapy II 3
HDFN 451R--Sustainable Food Sys 3
University Core and Electives 11
30

See the Food and Nutrition major website at www.montana.edu/hhd for a suggested list of electives and additional courses specifically needed to attain the CADE-approved verification statement.

Nutrition Science Option
Freshman Year Credits
BIOL 101IN--Organism Function 4
BIOL 102--Molecular and Cellular Biology 4
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I 4
CHMY 143--College Chemistry II 4
COM 110US--Public Communication 3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I 3
M 161Q--Survey of Calculus 4
STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
29
Sophomore Year Credits
BIOL 207--Human Anatomy & Phys I 5
CHMY 321--Organic Chemistry I 4
CHMY 323--Organic Chemistry II 4
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
PHYS 205--College Physics I 4
PHYS 206--College Physics II 4
University Core and Electives 6
30
Junior Year Credits
BCHM 340--General Biochemistry 5
BIOL 208--Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIOL 301--Genetics 3
HDCF 319--Theories & Skills for Help Relations 3
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDFN 321--Life Cycle Nutrition 3
HDFN 351--Nutrition & Society 3
HDFN 401--Nutrition Assmt & Counseling 3
MB 301--Gen Microbiology 3
31
Senior Year Credits
BIOL 302--Adv Cell Molecular Biology 3
HDFN 421--Macronutrient Metabolism 3
HDFN 422--Micronutrient Metabolism 3
HDFN 425--Medical Nutritional Therapy I 3
HDFN 426--Medical Nutritional Therapy II 3
Univ Core and Electives 15
30

HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE MAJOR

The undergraduate major in Health and Human Performance (HHP) at Montana State University is a general pre-health professional curriculum that prepares students for health-related graduate programs (e.g., physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical school, etc.), exercise science graduate programs (e.g., exercise physiology, health promotion, biomechanics), as well as entry-level occupations within the health and wellness industry. HHP majors can choose to focus their course work within one of the following curriculum options: exercise science or kinesiology. Students within the exercise science option intend to pursue a health-related graduate degree to meet their career aspirations, whereas students within the kinesiology option will pursue careers within the health and wellness industry that do not require a graduate degree.

Exercise Science Option

The exercise science option within the Health and Human Performance (HHP) major focuses on both clinical and performance-based understandings of human movement. The exercise science option emphasizes a cross-disciplinary understanding of human movement through non-departmental courses in biology, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, physics, M, and statistics. These courses then serve as the foundation for mechanical (e.g., biomechanics) and nutritional perspectives within the departmental courses. The exercise science option specifically allows students to customize their junior and senior year course work as needed for later application to health-related graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical physician assistant, sports medicine, exercise science graduate programs (exercise physiology, health promotion, biomechanics), as well as medical school. Additional careers for exercise science students can include those within the health and fitness industry (e.g., those requiring ACSM Health-Fitness Instructors and/or Exercise Test Technologist certifications), corporate wellness programs, exercise rehabilitation programs (cardiac rehabilitation, gait laboratories, sport medicine facilities, older adult programs, etc.), as well as careers in the sport and rehabilitative medicine equipment industries. Regardless of a student's career goals, each student's course work will culminate in one of the following "capstone experience" courses: HDPE 465, Exercise Testing and Prescription; HDPE 489/490, Undergraduate Research; or a preapproved internship (HDPE 475/HHD476). Students must receive a grade of "C" or better in all upper division department core courses for graduation.

Freshman Year Credits
BIOL 102--Molecular & Cell Biology 4
BIOL 207--Anatomy & Physiology II 5
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I 4
CHMY 143--College Chemistry II 4
M 161Q--Survey of Calculus 4
University Core and Electives 9
30
Sophomore Year Credits
BIOL 208--Anatomy & Physiology II 4
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDPE 222--Foundations of Exercise Science 3
Take one of the following sequences:
     PHYS205--College Physics I 4
     PHYS 206--College Physics II 4
                            (or)
     PHYS 211--General & Mod Physics I 4
     PHYS 212--General & Mod Physics II 4
PSYX 100IS--Intro to Psychology 3
STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
STAT 217Q--Intermediate Statistical Concepts 3
University Core and Electives 3
30
Junior Year Credits
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDPE 320--Anatomical Kinesiology 4
HDPE 322--Exercise Physiology 4
HDPE 323R--Biomechanics 4
University Core and Approved Electives 15
30
Senior Year Credits
Take one of the following:
     HDPE 465--Exercise Testing & Prescription 4
     HDPE 489R--Undergrad Research 2-6
     HHD 476--Internship 2-6
University Core and Approved Electives 24-28
30

 

Kinesiology Option

The kinesiology option within the Health and Human Performance (HHP) major prepares graduate for careers requiring leadership in organizing, directing, and managing fitness and wellness programs in corporate and commercial settings. The overall goal of the kinesiology option is to develop basic knowledge, comprehension, and appreciation of a) historical and cultural perspectives of human movement, b) social and psychological influences of human movement, and c) physiological and biomechanical correlates of human performance. From this broad knowledge base, the program's inherent flexibility allows students to pursue a variety of areas related to physical activity and sport. This option also prepares students for professional certifications in fitness and conditioning through professional organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Finally, each student's course work will culminate in one of the following "capstone experience" courses: HDPE 465, Exercise Testing and Prescription; HDPE 489/490, Undergraduate Research; or a preapproved internship (HDPE 475/HHD476). Students must receive a grade of "C" or better in all upper division department core courses for graduation.

Freshman Year Credits
BIOL 102--Molecular & Cell Biology 4
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I 4
M 151Q--Precalculus 4
Take one of the following:
     BIOL 207--Anatomy & Physiology 5
     HDPE 221--Health Anatomy & Physiology 3
University Core and Electives 13
30
Sophomore Year Credits
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDHL 221--First Emergency Response 1
HDHL 222--First Emergency Response Lab 1
HDPE 210--Exercise Prog for Older Adults 3
HDPE 222--Found of Exercise Science 3
HDPE 267--Intro to Coaching 3
PHYS 205--College Physics I 3
PSYX 100IS--Intro to Psychology 3
STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
University Core and Electives 3
28
Junior Year Credits
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDPE 320--Anatomical Kinesiology 4
HDPE 322--Exercise Physiology 4
HDPE 323R--Biomechanics 4
University Core and Approved Electives 15
30
Senior Year Credits
Take two of the following:
     HDFN 411 --Nutr for Sport & Exercise 3
     HDPE 425--Health Psychology 3
     HDPE 436--Principles of Strength & Cond 3
Take one of the following:
     HDPE 465--Exercise Testing & Prescription 4
     HDPE 475--Senior Seminar 1
     HDPE489R/490R --Undergrad Research 2-6
     HHD 476--Internship 2-6
University Core and Approved Electives 21-26
32

HEALTH ENHANCEMENT: HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING K-12 BROADFIELD MAJOR

The Health Enhancement Teacher Preparation program is designed for students who want to become teachers of Health Enhancement (Health and Physical Education) in public schools. Upon completion of the degree, students are eligible for certification in teaching K-12 Health Enhancement, Physical Education, and/or Health Education in Montana and other states.

Health Enhancement is a comprehensive approach to combining the traditional areas of Health Education and Physical Education. It is a contemporary curriculum where healthy lifestyles and concepts are achieved through skillful movement with an emphasis on physical fitness, healthy lifestyle management skills, and understanding of the total self (physical, intellectual, emotional, and social). In addition to the traditional approach to teaching fundamental movement, skills, games, and dance, this curriculum emphasizes the overall health of the individual as a value in life and enhances critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills of future teachers and their students. Courses within this curriculum represent a combination of content knowledge (health enhancement, health education, and physical education) along with a strong background in pedagogical content knowledge (teaching methods and curriculum). Students majoring in Health Enhancement develop a professional development portfolio based on national beginning teacher standards. The final semester consists of student teaching in two public school placements.

Criteria for selection and retention:

Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Any student who wishes to enter the Teacher Education Program must complete an "Application for the Teacher Education Program." These forms are available at www.montana.edu/ehhd/fpcert/index.html. The plan must be signed by the advisor and the forms turned into the Education Advising Center, 132 Reid Hall. Students should apply to the Teacher Education Program during the semester prior to the semester they will take their first methods class (EDEL 335).

The requirements for admission are 1) cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5; 2) A 2.5 grade point average in the teaching major, minor, and professional area with no grade below a "C "in any of these areas; 3) a 2.5 grade point average in the communication and quantitative areas of the University Core course requirements (9 credits minimum) with no grade lower than a "C" (courses designated core U, W, and Q); 4) approval of the advisor; and 5) no record of immoral conduct related to the teaching profession nor been judged guilty of a criminal offense as outlined by Section 20-4 110 of the Montana Code Annotated.

Application and approval for student teaching. Certain requirements must be met by all students desiring to student teach. These are 1) maintenance of the same standards required for admission into the program including satisfactory clearance on a federal criminal background check; 2) completion of all required courses; 3) certification of first aid and CPR; and 4) approval of advisor.

Student teaching is limited to seniors. Application must be made to the Director of Field Placement and Certification no later than the following times:

  • Fall student teaching: by the end of the first week in December of the year prior to student teaching.
  • Spring student teaching: by the end of the second week of April of the year prior to student teaching.

The Praxis II exam in the area of physical education must be successfully passed one semester prior to student teaching.

Recommendation and approval for licensure. The requirements for recommendation by Montana State University for licensure include completion of courses in the Teacher Education Program as outlined in the individual's approved plan; maintenance of the same standards as required for student teaching; and approval of the advisor and the Director of Field Placement and Certification.

Freshman Year Credits
COM 110US--Intro to Public Communication 3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I 3
HDCF 150IS--Lifespan Human Development 3
HDPE 102--Paraprofessional Experience I 1
HDPE 222--Found of Ex Science 3
HDPE 224--Meth Tech Mov Exp 3
HDPE 251--Teaching Fitness/Act 3
HDPE 267--Introduction to Coaching 3
M 145Q--Math for Liberal Arts 3
University Core and Electives 8
33
Sophomore Year Credits
EDCI 209--Ed Psych and Adolescent Devel 3
EDCI 240D--Multicultural Education 3
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDHL 230--Drugs and Society 3
HDHL 240--Human Sexuality 3
HDPE 202--Paraprofessional Experience II 1
HDPE 221--Health Anat & Phys 3
HDPE 252--Teach Seq Skill Dev 3
HDPE 253--Teach Game Conc 3
HDPE 304--Tech Apps in Health Enhance 3
STAT 216Q--Introduction to Statistics 3
31
Junior Year Credits
EDCI 360--Foundations of Assessment 3
EDEL 335--Teaching Elem Hlth Enhanc 3
EDSD 465--Mid & Sec Hlth Enhanc Methods 3
HDCF 357--Exceptional Children Lab 1
HDCF 371--Research Methods 3
HDPE 302--Paraprofessional Experience III 1
HDPE 314--Hlth Enhance for Atypical Populations 3
HDPE 320--Anatomical Kinesiology 4
HDPE 390--Curr Models in Hlth Enhanc 3
University Core and Electives 8
32
Senior Year Credits
EDEL 410--Student Teaching 6
EDSD 410--Student Teaching 6
EDSD 413--Professional Issues 2
HDHL 455--The Ethic of Care 3
HDPE 322--Exercise Physiology 4
HDPE 430R--Instruct Design & Admin of HE Curr 3
Take one of the following:
    HDPE 425--Health Psychology 3
    HDPE 445R--Applied Sport Psychology 3
University Core and Electives 6
32

Electives (select 9 credits from the following courses):

  Credits
HDFN 411--Nutr for Sports & Exer 3
HDHL 221--First Emergency Response 1
HDHL 222--First Emergency Response 1
HDPE 316--Football Coaching Theory 2
HDPE 317--Basketball Coaching Theory 2
HDPE 318--Soccer Coach Theory 2
HDPE 319--Volleyball Coaching Theory 2
HDPE 362--Track & Field Theory 2
HDPE 367--Coaching Application 1-3
HDPE 436--Principles of Strength and Conditioning 3
HDPE 467--Advanced Concepts in Coaching 3
Free electives - Select 3 credits from any University Course

A minimum of 128 credits is required for graduation; 42 of these credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above.


CHILD SERVICES MINOR

The nonteaching Child Services minor emphasizes a dual focus of education and services to children within educational, familial, and community-based programs. Students in the minor examine current research, theory and practice related to child and adolescent development, exceptional children, assessment and intervention practices with children and families, and professional skill development. The minor is designed to enhance the student's major area of study and is a strong complement to human development, education, psychology, nursing, and related social science majors.

  Credits
HDCF 250--Signing Exact English I 3
HDCF 319--Theories & Skills Help Rel 3
HDCF 356--Exceptional Child 0-21 3
HDCF 357--Exceptional Child Lab 1
HDCF 458--Assessment & Intervention 4
Take one of the following:
    HDCF 150IS--Lifespan Human Development 3
    HDCF 160--Early Child-Adol Devel 3
Take one of the following:
    HDCF 454--Practicum in ECE 5
    HDCF 474--Senior Seminar Prof Iss 4
Approved Substitutions 3-6
21-22

COACHING MINOR

This coaching minor is one of the few in the northern Rocky Mountain region and is specifically designed to prepare those interested in coaching any sport at any entry level. It was designed with the National Standards for Sport Coaches that was developed by professional coach educators from the National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) and other sport organizations and universities across the USA.

  1. HDPE 267, Introducton to Coaching is the 'keystone' course for this major. All students should start here.

  2. In most cases, there will be NO credits given for PRIOR coaching experience that has not resulted in a written evaluation from an athletic director, director of coaching, head coach or other sport administrator.

  3. The sports specific courses (Theory of coaching football, basketball, soccer, track and field, volleyball, etc.) have HDPE 267 as their prerequisite. No student should attempt taking any of these classes without successful completion of HDPE 267.

  Credits
Required Classes
HDPE 267--Introduction to Coaching 3
HDFN 221CS--Human Nutrition 3
HDHL 455--The Ethic of Care 3
*HDPE 367--Coaching Application* 3
HDPE 445R--Applied Sport Psychology 3
HDPE 467--Advanced Concepts in Coaching 3
Take one of the following:
    HDPE 222--Foundations of Exercise Science 3
    HDPE 322--Exercise Physiology 4
Take one of the following:
    HDFN 411--Nutrition for Sports & Exercise 3
    HDPE 436--Principles of Strength & Cond 3
24-25
Elective Classes
Take three of the following courses.
     HDPE 316--Football Coaching Theory 1
     HDPE 317--Basketball Coaching Theory 1
     HDPE 318 --Soccer Coaching Theory 1
     HDPE 319--Volleyball Coaching Theory 1
     HDPE 362 --Track & Field Theory 2
27-29

*Taken three times, three different semesters in either three different sports OR three levels (elementary, junior high, high school, etc.) of the same sport.


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