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Liberal Studies

University College

http://www.montana.edu/lsdegree/

All students are required to choose one of two program options, either the Quaternity (option I), which offers the more traditional broad-based liberal arts education, or a cross-disciplinary cluster of thematically related courses (option II), which currently includes the Environmental Studies and the Global and Multicultural Studies options. Courses that are used to satisfy one degree requirement cannot be used to satisfy another. Students must complete a minimum of 45 credits in the program after declaring themselves to be Liberal Studies majors.

Students who have successfully completed the first two years of any MSU-Bozeman degree with a minimum of 60 credits (all degree requirements and completion of the university core) will be able to construct a program of study for completion of the Quaternity option, in consultation with the Program Director and the Liberal Studies Program Committee, requiring no more than 60 additional credits.

For details about the Liberal Studies degree, contact the Office of the Provost by calling 406-994-4371, sending e-mail to liberalstudies@montana.edu or checking the liberal studies web site at www.montana.edu/lsdegree.

Liberal Studies Seminars
All students in Liberal Studies, regardless of option, will take a series of integrative seminars (LS 101 and LS 301). These seminars are designed to provide a sense of academic community, improved critical thinking and communication skills, and a better understanding of the factual knowledge and theoretical foundations of the disciplines encompassed by the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.

Integrative Studies Requirement
Students are required to take 4 courses (minimum of 12 credits) in addition to the university's Core curriculum, one course each in arts, humanities, natural science, and social sciences.

Foreign Language Requirement
Students in the Quaternity option are to complete the first two courses in a foreign language (8 credits) or to demonstrate equivalent competency. Students in the Global and Multicultural option are to complete the first three courses in a foreign language (11 credits) or to demonstrate equivalent competency.

Capstone Experience
All students in the major take a common 4-credit capstone course in their final year. Students work together in small groups to design solutions to contemporary public policy issues (e.g., overpopulation). Each small-group project results in a scholarly product (typically a paper or presentation) that serves as a tangible and measurable indication of the extent to which students have mastered the critical thinking, reading, writing, and oral communication skills that are the principal learning objectives of the program.


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES OPTION

This option is designed for students interested in developing a broad understanding of environmental issues from scientific and public policy perspectives. In addition to some common foundations courses, students select 21 credits each from approved lists of science and public policy courses. Proposed substitutions must be submitted in writing to the Program Director.

Freshman YearFS
LS 1013
WRIT 101W*3
BIOL 1014
GPHY 1114
STAT 216Q3
GPHY 121D3
University Core 3
Electives25
1515
Sophomore YearFS
LS 3011
Integrative Studies 6 6
Natural Science Electives** 6
Public Policy Electives*** 3
University Core32
Electives3
1515
Junior YearFS
LS 3011
PHIL 3403
Natural Science Electives** 3 6
Public Policy Electives*** 3 6
University Core3
Electives23
1515
Senior YearFS
LS 3011
LS 4014
Natural Science Electives** 6 3
Public Policy Electives*** 6 3
Electives25
1515

A minimum of 42 credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above. In addition to LS 401, at least 9 credits must be in courses numbered 400 and above.

* Students have the option to take WRIT 101W in the spring semester and 3 additional university core electives in the fall semester.

**Natural science electives to be selected from: AGEC 315, Follow the Grain; ARNR 101, Natural Resource Conservation; ARNR 102, Principles of Rangeland Management Lab; ARNR 125, Nature of Yellowstone; ARNR 240, Natural Resource Ecology; ARNR 345, Riparian Ecology & Management; ARNR 353, Grazing Ecology & Management; ARNR 354, Fire Ecology & Management; ARNR 438, Wildlife Habitat Ecology; CHMY 123, Intro to Organic & Biochem; BIOL 103, Environmental Science & Society; BIOL 106, Insects & Human Society; BIOL 251, Botany: An Introduction to Plant Biology; BIOL 303, Principles of Ecology; BIOL 405, Behavioral & Evolutionary Ecology; BIOL 407, Alpine Ecology; BIOL 421, Yellowstone Wildlife Ecology; BIOL 424, Freshwater Ecology; BIOL 439, Stream Ecology; BIOL 447, Conservation Ecology; CHMY 102, Applying Chemistry to Society or CHMY 121, Intro to General Chemistry or CHMY 141/151, College/Honors Chemistry I; CHMY 143/153, College/HonorsChemistry II; GEO 101, Into to Physical Geology; ERTH 212, Yellowstone Scientific Lab; ERTH 307, Principles of Geomorphology; ERTH 432, Surface Water Resources; ERTH 440, Hydrogeology; F&WL 301, Principles of Fish & Wildlife Management; GPHY 411, Biogeography; ERTH 303, Weather & Climate; GPHY 441, Mountain Geography; GEO 103, Intro to Envrmntl Geology; GEO 211, Early History and Evolution; LRES 110, Land Resources & Environmental Sciences; LRES 201, Soil Resources; LRES 244, Introduction to Water Resources; LRES 344, Water Quality; LRES 351, Nutrient Cycling; LRES 355, Soil & Environmental Chemistry; LRES 426, Remote Sensing; LRES 444, Watershed Hydrology; LRES 453, Soil & Environmental Physics; LRES 454, Landscape Pedology; LRES 460, Soil Remediation; LRES 461, Restoration Ecology; MBEH 210, Principles of Environmental Health Science; PSPP 102, Plant Science, Resources & the Environment; PSPP 105, Miracle Growing-Intro to Horticulture; PSPP 424, Ecology of Fungi; UNIV 125, Microbes & the Environment.

***Public policy electives to be selected from: AGEC 210, Economics of Agricultural Business; AGEC 337, Agricultural Law; AOT 425, Water Management; ARNR 456, Conflict Resolution in Natural Resource Management; BREN 330, Water Resources Law; ECNS 101, Economic Way of Thinking; ECNS 132, Econ & the Environment; ECNS 317, Economic Development; ECNS 332, Econ of Natural Resources; LIT 414, Lit of Place; GPHY 141, Geography of World Regions; GPHY 284,Intro to GIS Science & Cartog; GPHY 365, Geographical Planning; GPHY 321, Urban Geography; GPHY 322, Economic Geography; GPHY 461, Tourism Planning; HSTA 468, History of Yellowstone; HSTA 470, American Environmental History; HSTR 484, World Environmental History; LRES 421, Holistic Thought & Management; MGMT 406, Negotiation & Dispute Resolution; MGMT 473, Modern Management of Western Resources; PSCI 210, Intro to American Government; PSCI 260, Intro to State and Local Govt; PSCI 306, Legislative Process; PSCI 365, Pub Policy Issues and Analysis; PSCI 441, Montana Local Politics; PSCI 436, Politics of Food and Hunger; RELS 223, Nature & Culture; SOCI 355, Population & Society; SOCI 470, Environmental Sociology; SOCI 352, Society & Consumption. Up to 12 credits required in a minor or in a second degree program may be applied toward the Natural Science and Public Policy electives.

 



GLOBAL AND MULTICULTURAL STUDIES OPTION

In addition to selecting 27 credits from an approved list of global/multicultural courses spanning a wide range of disciplines, students in this option select a specific area studies focus in which they take 12 additional credits to provide deeper understanding of that region or field of study. In addition, students are required to achieve competence, at an intermediate level, in a foreign language appropriate to their field of area studies. Students in this option are encouraged to study abroad in a region appropriate to their field of area studies. Credits earned abroad may, with the approval of the Program Director, be substituted for global/multicultural or area studies courses as appropriate.

Freshman YearFS
LS 1013
WRIT 101W*3
Modern Language 4 4
University Core36
Electives25
1515
Sophomore YearFS
LS 1021
Modern Language3
Integrative Studies 6 6
University Core36
Electives32
1515
Junior YearFS
LS 3011
Global & Multicultural Electives** 6 9
Area Studies Electives*** 6 3
Electives23
1515
Senior YearFS
LS 3011
LS 4014
Global & Multicultural Electives** 6 6
Area Studies Electives***3
Electives55
1515

A minimum of 42 credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above. In addition to LS 401, at least 9 credits must be in courses numbered 400 and above.

* Students have the option to take WRIT 101W in the spring semester and 3 additional university core electives in the fall semester.

**Global and multicultural electives to be selected from: ANTH 101, Anthropology & the Human Experience; ANTH 204, Culture & Society; ANTH 326, Language & Culture; ANTH 405, Myth, Magic & Religion; ARCH 221, World Architecture: Modern-Contemporary; ARCH 322, World Architecture: Ancient; ARCH 323, World Architecture: Medieval-Baroque; ART 407, Islamic Art & Architecture; ECNS 314, International Economics; ECNS 317, Economic Development; EDCI 240, Introduction to Multicultural Education; EDEL 307, Teaching the Multicultural Child; EDSD 363, Multicultural Education; LIT 285, Mythologies; LIT 214, Regional Lit; LIT 308, Multicultural Lit; LIT 440, Studies in World Lit; ENGL 436, Studies in Emergent Lit; GPHY 141,Geography of World Regions ; GPHY 121, Human Geography; GPHY 325, Cultural Geography; HDPE 410, International Perspective of History & Philosophy in Health, Sport & Physical Education; HHD 205, Dance as Cultural Expression; HSTR 160, Modern World History; HSTR 366, Middle East/20th Century; HSTA 416, Race & Class in America; HSTR 484, World Environmental History; MGMT 245, Cultural Dimensions of International Business; MGMT 464, International Management; MKTG 242, Introduction to Global Markets; MKTG 441, International Marketing; MUS 312, World Music; PHIL 105, Problems of Good & Evil; PHIL 208, Philosophy & Culture; PHIL 362, Philosophy & Race; PHIL 368, Language & the World; PSCI 230, Introduction to International Rel; PSCI 331, International Relations Theory; PSCI 434, International Law; PSCI 436, Politics of Food & Hunger; PSCI 439, International Human Rights; PSCI 437, International Political Econ; PSCI 435, Globalization & Politics; RELS 105, Introduction to the Study of Religion; RELS 110, Religion, Conflict & Politics; RELS 335, Isms-The Religious Background of Social & Political Categories; RELS 402, The Natural, The Unnatural & the Supernatural; RELS 410, Psyche & the Sacred; SOCI 344, Sociology of Race & Ethnicity; SOCI 436, Law and Inequality; SOCI 358, Crime and Inequality; SOCI 352, Society & Consumption; SOCI 370, Sociology of Globalization.

 

With consent of the program director, courses from the Area Studies categories below, excluding Europe, may be applied as Global and Multicultural Electives.

***Area studies electives to be selected from courses on one of the following areas.

Asia: ANTH 252, Contemporary Japan; ANTH 336, Contemporary Pacific Societies; ANTH 347, Sex, Gender & Sexuality in Japan; ANTH 353, Popular Culture In/Out of Japan; ART 302, Survey of Asian Art; GPHY 446, East Asia in the Global System; HSTR 140, Modern Asia; HSTR 145, History of Japan; HSTR 340, Age of the Shoguns; HSTR 342, Japan's Long 19th Century, HSTR 345, Modern China; HSTR 346, Modern India, Pakistan & Bangladesh; HSTR 444, Japanese Women's History; HSTR 446, Science & Medicine in China; HSTR 480, Creatures: Art and Biology from Early Modernity to Now; HSTR 485, Cab of Cur: Travels of Exotica ;  HSTR 445, Sci, Tech & Environment in Japan; HSTR 443, Gender in Asia; JPNS 350, Japanese Cult & Civiliz; JPNS 352, Japanese Portrayals of WWII; JPNS 315, Introduction to Japanese Literature; JPNS 320, Classical Japanese Literature; JPNS 321, Modern Japanese Literature; JPNS 325, Women in Japanese Literature & Culture; JPNS 361, Text & Cinema; JPNS 371, Japanese Film & Anime; PHIL 220, Philosophies of Asia; RELS 202, Asian Religions-Hinduism & Buddhism; RELS 203, Asian Religions: From Taoism to Zen.

Europe: ART 203, Renaissance through Modern Art; LIT 223, British Lit I; LIT 224, British Lit II; LIT 323, Brit/Old/Middle English; LIT 324,16th/17th Cntry Brit Lit; LIT 325, Rest/18th Cntry Brit Lit; LIT 326, 19th Century British Lit; LIT 473, Studies in Shakespeare; HSTR 101, Origins of Western Civilization; HSTR 102, Western Civilization II; HSTR 359, Russia to 1917; HSTR 322,19th Century Europe; HSTR 324, 20th Century Europe; HSTR 350, Modern Britain; HSTR 353, Modern France; HSTR 362, Modern Germany; HSTR 372, The World at War: WWI; HSTR 423, European Intellectual History; FRCH 306, From Reflection to Revolution; GRMN 330, Adv Gram,Conv, Comp I; GRMN 303, Issues in German Cinema; GRMN 360, The Faust Myth; MUS 210, Masterworks in Music; PHIL 305, History of Western Philosophy: Ancient & Medieval; PHIL 306, History of Western Philosophy: Modern; PHIL 390, Reason & Revolution; PSCI 451, Ancient & Medieval Pol Phil.

Latin America: HSTR 130, Latin American History; HSTR/RELS 232 Religion in Latin America; HSTR 330, History of Mexico; HSTR 432, Colonial Latin America; HSTR 430, Latin Amer Soc History; HSTR 431, Race in Latin America; HSTR 434, Gender, Sexuality & Social Change in Latin American; SPNS 330, Latin Amer Cult & Civ; SPNS 332, Contemporary Latin American Literature; SPNS 335, Travel in Latin American Lit & Film; SPNS 362, Hispanic Poetry; SPNS 416, Culture & Revolution; SOCI 368, Latino Immigration: Latinos in the US. 

Native American Studies: ANTH 310, Native North America; ART 316, Indigenous Ceramics; HSTA 450, History of American Indians; NAS 100, Introduction to Native American Studies; NAS 201, American Indians in Montana; NAS 220, American Indian Art; NAS 240, NAS Theories & Methods; NAS 242, American Indians in Contemporary Society; NAS 315, Native American Indians & the Cinema; NAS 320, American Indian Religions; NAS 325, Native Peoples of the Americas; NAS 330, American Indian Policy & Law; NAS 340, American Indian Literature; NAS 405, Gender Issues in Native American Studies; NAS 415, Native Food Systems; NAS 425, Pan-Indianism in American Society; NAS 430, American Indian Education.

Women's Studies: ANTH 347, Sex, Gender & Sexuality in Japan; ART 421, Women Artists; ENGL 330 Women & Literature; HDHL 240, Human Sexuality; HSTA 407, Gender in US & Canadian West; HSTA 408, Gender in America; HSTR 444, Japanese Women's History; HSTR 410, Fam,Gen & Law in Anct Grc/Rome; HSTR 434, Gen & Sex & Soc Chge in Lat Am; HSTR 415, Gender & Technology; HSTR 443, Gender in Asia; HUM 204, Gender & Sexuality; JPNS 325, Women in Japanese Lit & Cult; NAS 405, Gender Issues in Native American Studies; PHIL 363, Philosophy & Feminism; PSYX 235, Contemp Issues in Human Sexual; PSYX 335, Psychology of Gender; RELS 321, Gender & Religion; SOCI 326, Sociology of Gender; WS 201, Introduction to Feminist Theories & Methodologies; WS 301, Integrative Seminar in Women's Studies.

Up to 12 credits required in a minor or in a second degree program may be applied toward the Global & Multicultural and Area Studies electives.


QUATERNITY OPTION

The Quaternity option is a student-centered option that aims at exploring four different but interconnected concepts of knowledge-thinking, feeling, intuition, and sensation-which are derived from the complex interaction of mythos (story, fable, imagination) and logos (truth, fact, reality). Students in the Quaternity are expected to approach and to interrogate all of their courses through this epistemological lens, and to demonstrate that they have done so through writing assignments in the Liberal Studies seminars and other course assignments.

In addition to the integrative seminars, university core, and liberal studies requirements described above, students in the Quaternity require a foreign language (8 cr.) and an additional 4 courses (12 cr.) in each area of the quaternity - arts, humanities, natural science or Mathematics, and social sciences.

Freshman YearFS
LS 1013
WRIT 101W*3
Modern Language 4 4
University Core36
Electives25
1515
Sophomore YearFS
LS 301 1
Integrative Studies 6 3
Quaternity Electives 6
University Core63
Electives32
1515
Junior YearFS
LS 301 1
Integrative Studies 3
Quaternity Electives**912
Electives32
1515
Senior YearFS
LS 3011
LS 4014
Quaternity Elective** 12 9
Electives22
1515

* Students have the option to take WRIT 101W in the spring semester and 3 additional university core electives in the fall semester.

** A minimum of 42 credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above. In addition to LS 401, at least 9 credits must be in courses numbered 400 and above. Up to 6 credits required in a minor or in a second degree program may be applied toward the 12 credit elective requirement in arts, humanities, natural science or Mathematics, or social sciences.


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