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Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

http://www.coe.montana.edu/mie/

The mission of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department is to provide and support the professional fields of industrial and mechanical engineering and affiliated programs within the land-grant framework of Montana State University. These programs include not only the undergraduate instruction and granting of accredited degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Technology, and Industrial Engineering, but they necessarily embody graduate studies, research and scholarship, and service activities.

The Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department endorses the mission, goals, and objectives of the College of Engineering. A complete and up-to-date listing of these objectives as well as assessment strategies and outcomes is provided in the College of Engineering Web site at http://www.coe.montana.edu.

The Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department provides undergraduate programs leading to BS degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Technology, and Industrial Engineering. Students in all programs are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam prior to graduation. The Department provides graduate programs leading to the MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Engineering. The Department also participates in an inter-disciplinary doctoral program leading to the Ph.D. degree with options in mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, or engineering mechanics. Further information on all of these programs may be found at http://www.coe.montana.edu/mie

Curricula in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Grade Policies

The Montana Board of Regents grade policy requires C- or higher marks in all courses required for a degree. (This policy affects students who entered or were readmitted to the system starting in Fall, 2005.) Students who enrolled prior to Fall, 2005, and have not had a break in attendance of one year or more, are exempt from the Board of Regents C- policy. The complete policy is presented in the on-line catalog under Academic Policies - Courses, Credits, and Grades - Minimum Competency Requirements.

Prerequisite Policy

The Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department enforces prerequisites. A prerequisite course is one which must be successfully completed before a student may enroll in the follow-on course. By Board of Regents policy, in order for a course to serve as a prerequisite, a grade of "C-" or higher must be earned. M&IE students who earn below a "C-" in a course will be instructed to repeat the course during its next offering. They will also be instructed to drop any follow-on course that is affected by the unsatisfactory prerequisite grade.

D- Grade

For students exempt from the Board of Regents C- policy requirements, D+, D, and D- grades must be addressed. The M&IE Department does not consider D- to be a passing grade. A course in which a D- grade is earned must be repeated, and a grade of D or higher earned, for it to apply to degree requirements. By M&IE Department policy, in order for a course to serve as a prerequisite, a grade of D or higher must be earned. M&IE students who earn below a D in a course will be instructed to repeat the course during its next offering. They will also be instructed to drop any follow-on course that is affected by the unsatisfactory grade. It is important to note that students exempt from the BOR policy are, however, required to earn C- or higher grades in all Core 2.0 courses.



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

The mission of the undergraduate program in Industrial Engineering (IE) is to produce graduates well grounded in both classical and current industrial engineering knowledge and skills consistent with the land-grant mission of MSU. Graduates will be prepared to be productive citizens and contributors to the economic well-being of employers. The IE undergraduate program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410)347-7700. The educational objectives for the IE program follow.

Industrial Engineering graduates will:

  1. Undertake professional careers in industrial engineering;
  2. Employ effective communication;
  3. Work in multidisciplinary professional teams;
  4. Engage in life-long learning, including post-graduate education for some graduates;
  5. Contribute to industry and society, in Montana or elsewhere, including involvement in professional and other service activities;
  6. Design, manage, improve, and integrate systems across a broad range of organizations; and
  7. Participate in ethical leadership in design and operational activities that contribute to the success of the organization and the community.

The undergraduate curriculum in Industrial Engineering (IE) includes Mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, social sciences, engineering sciences, design, and communication courses distributed over a four-year period. An important feature of the program is to teach students to foster the ability to comprehend, define, and analyze problems; synthesize alternatives; and rationally choose appropriate solutions. This requires a broad technical education that motivates life-long learning to keep pace with technological and social changes.

Industrial Engineering is a broad engineering discipline. Since IEs are employed in every facet of American business and industry, they are usually "people-oriented problem solvers" who enjoy diversity in their assignments and careers. For example, IE alumni include plant managers, manufacturing engineers, teachers, hospital administrators, consultants, quality assurance managers and engineers, technical sales engineers, production supervisors, and department heads. Today IEs are active in all kinds of manufacturing, as well as in service operations such as hospitals, banks, airlines, transportation and distribution companies, retailers, utilities, and local, state, and federal governments.

IEs are qualified for this wide variety of careers because their education is unique. First of all they are people-oriented, but they are also technically trained. IEs take the standard core of engineering courses, including two years of calculus, to provide a background for understanding production, fabrication, assembly processes, etc., required to design systems for business and industry. All engineering curricula require graduates to meet accreditation standards in Mathematics, basic science, engineering science, engineering design, as well as in humanities and social sciences. However, IEs are more knowledgeable of management functions in companies than are other engineering majors. A technically trained, management-oriented man or woman who can solve problems by working with people--that's an IE graduate.

The IE is an "integrator" of resources, people, material, and equipment. This is accomplished by "designing systems" so that the right people with the proper mix of skills, combined with the right quantities of equipment and materials, are available at the right time to produce a product or provide a service at a cost that will allow a profit to be made. Since these professionals frequently work on problem solving teams, the ability to communicate, coordinate, and work with others is essential. Because IEs design systems for producing products, specifying processes, or providing services, their expertise is applicable to many businesses and industries. Frequently, they become supervisors and managers of the same systems they design.

Today much is written about "re-engineering companies." IE graduates are uniquely qualified to analyze a company's customer needs, relate those to products or services, and examine the flow of materials, processes, documentation, information, etc., that result in "re-engineering" the company to compete more effectively. World class companies must have "systems" that consistently provide on-time delivery of defect-free products (or services) that delight the customers--and for a competitive price that allows the company to make a reasonable profit. Industrial Engineers are actively involved in designing these systems, integrating the resources required to make them function, and quite often managing them.

Graduate Program

Students who have graduated from a four-year degree program which has sharpened their Mematical and communication skills will greatly benefit by completing the Master of Science degree in Industrial & Management Engineering or the Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering with Industrial Engineering option. Emphases in Manufacturing, Human Factors/Ergonomics, Manufacturing Automation, Operations Research/Computer Applications, Quality Management, and Systems Analysis and Modeling are available. Flexible guidelines permit broadening or customizing to meet career objectives. Further details may be found in the Graduate Catalog.

Student Performance and Retention Requirements

No further requirements apply in order to advance in the Industrial Engineering program.

Freshman Year F S
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I   4
Take one of the following:
    CLS 101US--College Seminar   3  
    COM 110US--Public Communication   3  
CS 160--Intro to CS     4
WRIT 101W--College Writing I     3
I&ME 101--Intro to IE     1
I&ME 142--Intro to Production       2
M 171Q--Calculus I      4
M 172Q--Calculus II     4
ME 117--ME Design Graphics      1
ME 116--Engr Design Graphics Lab 1
PHSX 220--Gen & Mod Phys I     4
University Core Elective 3  
18 16
Sophomore Year F S
CHBE 213--Materials Science    3
EE 250--Circuits,Devices,and Motors    4
EM 251--Statics & Particle Dynamics     3
I&ME 264--Intro Models/Computers     3
I&ME 313--Work Design & Analysis      3
I&ME 271--Microcomputers in Industry 3
M 273Q--Multivariable Calculus     4
M 274--Intro to Diffential Equations     4
PHSX 222--Gen & Mod Phys II     4
University Core Elective       3
18 16
Junior Year F S
EM 253-- Mechanics of Materials     3
I&ME 300--Professional Practice & Responsibility 2
I&ME 325--Engineering Economy     3
I&ME 354--Engineering Probability & Statistics I    3
I&ME 355--Engineer Statistics Lab     1
I&ME 364--Principles of Operations Research I     3
I&ME 454--Engineering Probabilty & Stats II 3
I&ME 458--Production & Engr Management 3
ME 255--Manufacturing Processes 3
University Core Electives 3 3
15 15
Senior Year F S
I&ME 422--Intro to Simulation    3
I&ME 434--Project & Engr Management     3
I&ME 442--Facility/Material Handling Design 3
I&ME 444R--Senior Design Project     2
I&ME 445R--Independent Senior Design 1
I&ME 477--Quality Assurance     3
ENGR 499--Engr Prog Assmnt 0
Professional Electives     6 6
University Core Electives       3
15 15

A minimum of 128 credits is required for graduation; 42 of these credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

The specific mission of the undergraduate Mechanical Engineering (ME) program is to prepare students for successful mechanical engineering careers, responsible citizenship, and continued intellectual growth. The goal of the program is to produce graduates strong in fundamentals, applications, design, communication, and professional responsibility. The ME undergraduate program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410)347-7700. The educational objectives for the ME program follow.

Mechanical Engineering graduates will:

  1. Undertake professional careers;
  2. Assume leadership roles by advancing in the engineering profession;
  3. Employ effective communication;
  4. Work in multidisciplinary professional teams;
  5. Engage in life-long learning, including post-graduate education for some graduates;
  6. Contribute to industry and society, in Montana or elsewhere, including involvement in professional and other service activities; and
  7. Solve technical problems in design, analysis, manufacturing, project management, or testing.

The undergraduate Mechanical Engineering program is principally oriented toward career preparation, providing students with the engineering and technical education appropriate to the challenges presented by today's technologically complex and difficult problems. The coursework in mechanical engineering provides four years of study in Mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, social sciences, and engineering topics. The overall curriculum provides an integrated educational experience directed toward the development of an ability to apply pertinent knowledge to the identification and solution of practical problems in mechanical engineering. The basic mechanical engineering curriculum includes two stems of course offerings in (1) energy, and (2) structures and materials.

The profession of mechanical engineering is very broad, with practitioners employed in most areas of technological and industrial management endeavor. Examples of industrial employers which require mechanical engineering background are: process industries including pulp and paper, steel, aluminum, food, petroleum, chemicals and others; manufacturing industries including highway vehicles, instruments, airplanes, rockets and engines, toys, agricultural machinery, and many others; power plants including steam, nuclear, and hydroelectric plants; federal laboratories performing a wide variety of defense and non-defense related engineering design, analysis, and experimental work; and a wide variety of consulting work including heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system design, and forensic engineering. This brief sample gives a view of the wide spectrum of employment possibilities in mechanical engineering. It is the mechanical engineer's responsibility and challenge to conceive, plan, design, and perform analysis and testing related to devices, machines, and systems used by or manufactured by the employer. This work may include liaison with other engineers, engineering technologists, technicians, outside vendors, and departments within the company. Areas of responsibility following design and prototype testing may include direction of a manufacturing line.

It should be evident that career opportunities abound within this very wide array of employers and engineering activities. The job market for engineers often follows the nation's economy in general. In spite of these natural fluctuations, however, it is expected that our nation will always depend on uses of technology for creating an improved standard of living and a more efficient industrial base to maintain and enhance international competitiveness. Therefore, we can expect that mechanical engineering graduates will have excellent employment opportunities.

Course requirements include Mathematics, basic sciences (physics and chemistry), engineering design, humanities and social sciences, and at least one year of engineering science. The program also includes engineering graphics, statistics, computer application, solid mechanics, materials science, manufacturing processes, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electronics, and design of structural, mechanical, and energy systems. Computing and computer applications are stressed throughout the curriculum. The program culminates with a capstone design set of courses in which the student is involved in a team that must create a solution to a real-world engineering design problem, and develop a working prototype. Often times these teams are multidisciplinary.

Graduate Program

Students who have completed a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or closely related discipline may take graduate work leading to the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering or Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering with Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Mechanics options typical. Advanced degrees are necessary for university teaching and are increasingly important in industry, particularly in the areas of new product development and research. Further details may be found in the Graduate Catalog.

Student Performance and Retention Requirements

No further requirements apply in order to advance in the Mechanical Engineering program.

Freshman Year F S
CHMY 141--College Chemistry I     4
Take one of the following:
    CLS 101US--College Seminar   3  
    COM 110US--Public Communication   3  
WRIT 101W--College Writing I     3
M 171Q--Calculus I     4
M 172Q--Calculus II     4
ME 101--Intro to Mech Engr     1
ME 117--Mech Engr Design Graphics      1
ME 118--ME Design Graphics Lab     1
PHSX 211--Gen & Mod Phys I     4
University Core Electives     6 3
16 18
Sophomore Year F S
CHBE 213--Materials Science     3
EM 251--Statics& Particle Dynamics    3
EM 252--Rigid Body Mechanics     3
EM 253--Mechanics of Materials     3
M 273Q--Multivariable Calculus     4
M 274--Intro to Diffential Equations     4
ME 102-- Engr Computer Applications     1
ME 251--ME Material Sci Lab     1
ME 255--Manufacturing Processes     3
ME 257--Manufacturing Processes Lab     1
PHYS 222--Gen & Mod Phys II     4
EE 250--Circuits,Devices,& Motors     4
16 18
Junior Year F S
EM 335--Mechanics of Fluids I     3
ME 315--Engineering Analysis 4
ME 320--Thermodynamics I     3
ME 321--Thermodynamics II     3
ME 326--Fund of Heat Transfer     4
ME 341--Intro Machine Design     4
ME 342--Mech Component Design     4
ME 360--Measurement & Instrument     3
ENGR 310--Intro to Engineering Design 3
I&ME 350--Applied Engr Data Analysis 2
16 17
Senior Year F S
ME 404R--Mech Engr Design II     2  
ME 405R-- Mech Engr Design III     2
ME 430--Thermal System Design     3
ME 445--Mechanical Vibrations     3
ME 461--ME Senior Laboratory     2
ENGR 499--Engr Prog Assmnt 0
Professional Electives     6 6
University Core Electives     3
14 13

Students cannot enroll in any course without successfully completing prerequisites and the co requisite requirements to those prerequisite courses.

A minimum of 128 credits is required for graduation; 42 of these credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) program is to prepare students for successful Mechanical Engineering Technology careers, responsible citizenship, and continued professional growth. The MET program seeks to produce graduates with a good foundation in engineering fundamentals as well as one strong in applications, design, problem recognition and resolution, project management, communication, and professional and ethical responsibility. The MET undergraduate program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone: (410)347-7700. The educational objectives of the MET program follow.

Mechanical Engineering Technology graduates employed in the field will:

  1. Undertake professional careers in engineering technology;
  2. Employ effective communication;
  3. Work effectively in multidisciplinary professional teams;
  4. Engage in life-long learning, including post-graduate education for some graduates;
  5. Contribute to industry and society, through service activities and/or professional organization;
  6. Engage in professional problem-solving activities using applied methods;
  7. Fulfill their responsibilities ethically; and
  8. Advance in the profession.

The undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Technology program is designed with an applications-oriented structure. Many of the technical science courses have an accompanying laboratory component providing hands-on activities, as well as emphasizing measurement, data collection and analysis, documentation, and written/oral report preparation/presentation. The program aims to develop core competencies in engineering fundamentals (statics, strengths of materials, materials science, fluid dynamics, and electrical circuits), manufacturing applications (manufacturing processes, machining, welding, design for manufacturing and tooling, and quality assurance), mechanical design (computer-aided design, mechanisms, machine design, fluid power technology, measurement and test, etc.), and thermal sciences(thermodynamics, heat transfer, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Extensive course work in the physical sciences and Mathematics is included. Technical elective courses are chosen by the student in consultation with an academic advisor. Courses in the humanities and social sciences are also included. The overall curriculum is designed to provide the student with an ability to apply scientific and engineering knowledge and methods combined with technical skills in support of engineering activities.

Mechanical engineering technology (MET) is concerned with the application of scientific and engineering knowledge in support of engineering activities. Specifically, the mechanical engineering technologist provides the professional services needed in transforming the results of scientific endeavors into useful products and services. Students who choose a career in mechanical engineering technology may pursue any number of career paths including, but not limited to: machine and product design, product and system evaluation, research laboratory experimental support, prototype evaluation, plant operation and management, quality assurance, technical sales, manufacturing methods improvement, HVAC systems design and installation, project management, and energy exploration. The mechanical engineering technologist's mission is to make necessary analysis and plans to convert design drawings into finished products in the most efficient and safe manner. He or she is the professional who produces design drawings and sets up and operates manufacturing equipment, handles inspections, analyzes production problems, and manages the implementation of improvement activities and/or projects. The demand for the engineering technologist in general, and mechanical engineering technologists in particular, has been strong for the past several years, and average starting salaries are very competitive. Indications are that this trend will continue. MSU Mechanical Engineering Technology graduates are actively recruited, and many of our alumni hold positions of considerable responsibility in industry and government.

Student Performance and Retention Requirements

No further requirements apply in order to advance in the Mechanical Engineering Technology program

Freshman Year F S
CHMY 121IN-Intro to General Chemistry 4
Take one of the following:
    CLS 101US--College Seminar   3
    COM 110US--Public Communication   3
WRIT 101W--College Writing I     3
M 165Q--Calculus for Technology I 3
M 166Q--Calculus for Technology II 3
MET 119--Technical Graphics Comm     2
MET 101--Intro to Mech Engr Tech     1
PHSX 205--College Physics I 4
University Core Electives     6 3
17 15
Sophomore Year F S
BUS--Elective* 3
CHBE 213--Materials Science 3
EM 205--Mechanics 3
EM 215--Strength of Materials 3
ME 255--Manufacturing Processes     3
ME 324--Engr Thermodynamics     3
MET 201--MET Comptr Application      1
MET 211--Graphics for Design      3
MET 251--Materials Science Lab     1
MET 256--Manufactur Process Lab     1
EE 250--Circuits,Devices,Motors     4
PHSX 207--College Physics II 4
15 17
Junior Year F S
EM 331--Applied Fluid Mechanic     3
ENGR 310--Intro to Engineering Design     3
I&ME 350--Appl Engr Data Analy  2
ME 360--Measurement & Instrum     3
MET 303--CAE Tools in Mech Design     3
MET 314--Machining and Safety     3
MET 325--Heat Transfer Tech     3
MET 315--Welding Tech I     3
MET 340--Mechanisms     3
MET 345--Machine Design     4
14 16
Senior Year F S
I&ME 325--Engr Economy      3
I&ME 477--Quality Assurance     3
MET 449--Design for Mfg & Tooling 3
MET 454--Refrig and HVAC     3
MET 401--MET Senior Seminar 1
MET 456--MET Capstone I     3
MET 457--MET Capstone II     3
MET 466--Thermal Process Lab     1
ENGR 499--Engr Prog Assmnt 0
Professional Electives     6 3
University Core Electives     3
16 16

*From approved elective list.
A minimum of 126 credits is required for graduation; 42 of these credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above.


AEROSPACE MINOR

Montana State University, Bozeman offers a minor (minor for which there is no major) in aerospace called the Aerospace Minor. This minor provides a suite of courses from a wide variety of disciplines which are relevant to aerospace. The minor requires a minimum of 28 credits. Required courses comprise 16 credits in four (4) specified courses, which are common to Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Physics, Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and Industrial Engineering at MSU Bozeman. An additional 12 elective credits (minimum of four courses) are required from a specified list which comprises the Aerospace Elective Courses. This minor is a useful complement to majors in science or engineering for those seeking a cross-disciplinary academic program with topics in aerospace. The required courses are carefully selected to ensure that students seeking the Aerospace Minor at MSU have the requisite math and science background to engage in specific applications to aerospace. The Aerospace Elective Courses were developed to provide students with the minimum background of specific topics applicable to aerospace. These are Materials and Structures (needed for development of aerospace systems; structures, hardware, sensors, system packages, etc.), Thermo/Fluids (needed for an understanding of aeronautical systems, momentum equations relevant to propulsion systems, environmental needs, etc.), and Focused Topics (a series of focused and advanced topics applicable to aerospace. These courses include design, dynamics and control, Computer Aided Design (CAD), space science, etc.) The Certifying Officer for the Aerospace Minor is the current MSU Lysle A. Wood Distinguished Professor, and students with questions are encouraged to seek him/her out by contacting the MSU Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Department.

Aerospace Minor Course of Study

Required Courses Credits
Course
M 171Q 4
M 172Q 4
PHSX 220 4
PHSX 222 4
16
    
Aerospace Minor Courses Credits
Course Category
Materials and Structures     3-4
Thermo/Fluids     3-4
Focused Topics     3-4
Additional Aerospace Minor Elective     3-4
   12-16

The MSU Aerospace Minor = 16 required credits + 12 minimum elective credits = 28 minimum course credits for the Aerospace Minor; In some cases, this may be accomplished within the maximum 128 credits for certain B.S. degrees at MSU (with the Aerospace Minor inclusive).

Aerospace Minor Courses

Materials and Structures (Students take at least one of the following;)
Course
ME 464 Mechanical Behavior of Materials; advanced structural materials in class
ME 463 Composite Materials; advanced materials, very important to aerospace structures
ME 458 Aircraft Structures; unique MSU course developed in conjunction with practicing aerospace engineers
ME 465 Finite Elements; basic analysis technique for aerospace systems
PHYS 442 Novel Materials; specialty materials course
ME 350 Engineering Materials; specialty materials engineering courses

Thermo/Fluids (Students take at least one of the following;)
Course
EM 335 Mechanics of Fluids; fluid mechanics, applicable to aerospace and momentum equations related to aerospace systems
EM 435 Fluid Dynamics; steady and unsteady flow; computer applications
ME 324 Engineering Thermodynamics; engineering thermodynamics
ME 326 Fundamentals of Heat Transfer; heat transfer in mechanical and electrical aerospace systems
ME 426 Dynamics of Fluids; fluid mechanics with topics applicable to aerospace
ME 454 HVAC; applicable to aerospace systems environmental control
ME 435 Fluid Power Technology; applicable to aerospace mechanical control systems

Focused Topics (Students take at least one of the following;)
Course
ME 448 Manufacturing & Tooling; tooling for aerospace manufacturing and structures
ME 411 Computer Aided Design ; advanced CAD principles
I&ME 422 Introduction to Simulation; modeling methodologies, data sampling and analysis
EE 308 Signal Analysis; analysis of system data
EE 321 Controls; aerospace control systems
EE 422 Modern Control; additional controls course
EE 465 Microcontroller Hardware; control of aerospace systems with microcomputers
EE 482 Electro-Optics; advanced aerospace sensor systems
ENGR 310 Introduction to Engineering Design; design process of aerospace structures and systems
ME 422 MEMS; Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems
Phys 426 Modern Optics; aerospace optical systems
Phys 427 Laser Applications; aerospace instrumentation, guidance and control
Phys 435 Astro-Physics; basic problems in astro-physics

An additional three (3) or more credit course from any of the above three categories will comprise the Additional Aerospace Minor Elective to complete the 12 minimum elective credits for the Aerospace Minor.

Notes:

IF A COURSE (or redundant equivalent) IS A SPECIFICALLY REQUIRED COURSE FOR THE STUDENT'S MAJOR DEGREE PROGAM, IT WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS AN AEROSPACE MINOR ELECTIVE.

Additional Clarification: Elective courses in a student's major degree program are not considered as required courses and can, therefore, be used as Aerospace Minor electives. Pre-requisites for courses will be enforced.

An appeal to include additional classes for the Aerospace Minor can be made if the student/instructor can make a cogent argument as to how the course is relevant to aerospace.

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