CENTER FOR BISON STUDIES

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY-BOZEMAN




Current Literature on Culture, History and Other Issues Regarding Bison


last update: May 20, 1997

  1. Bement, L.C. 1997. The Cooper Site: A Stratified Folsom Bison Kill in Oklahoma. Plains Anthropologist. 42:85.

    Abstract Not Available

  2. Berger, J. 1996. Animal behaviour and plundered mammals: Is the study of mating systems a scientific luxury or a conservation necessity? Oikos. 77: 207-216.

    Abstract: Darwin claimed ''the practice of polygamy leads to the same results as would follow from an actual inequality in the number of the sexes'' Biologists interested in conservation have focused on offshoots of this deceptively simple theme including reproductive competition, sexual selection, and copulatory dynamics. Few would dispute that an understanding of mating relationships is important. Here, I ask - important for what? Using two species of large mammals that have suffered 97% reductions in population size, I make two points. First, in attempts to restore populations some individuals or even lineages may be competitively inferior, leaving behind few or no progeny, a scenario depicted empirically using two lineages of North American bison (Bison bison). Second, where human utilization of economically valuable morphological structures has been proposed (as for rhino horns), knowledge of current utility is required to predict possible biological effects. Preliminary data on black rhinos (Diceros bicornis) suggest that dehorned mothers are less able to defend their calves from spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) than intact mothers. For conservation, some issues in animal behaviour will always hold greater relevance than others. The study of mating systems, unless defined very broadly, is likely to have more relevance in captive propagation and population restoration than other issues involving the conservation of biodiversity.

  3. Brink, J.W. 1997. Fat Content in Leg Bones of Bison bison, and Applications to Archaeology (as960109). Journal of Archaeological Science. 24:259.

    Abstract Not Available

  4. Buehler, K.J. 1997. Where's the Cliff? Late Archaic Bison Kills in the Southern Plains. Plains Anthropologist. 42:135.

    Abstract Not Available

  5. Farrow, S. 1995. Extinction and market forces - 2 case studies. Ecological Economics. 13(2): 115-123.

    Abstract: Extinction defines a loss in biodiversity. An established economic model suggests that extinction can be avoided, even in common property settings, if the initial stock is sufficiently large that price and cost evolve to a non-extinction equilibrium. Alternatively, privatization has been suggested as a means to avoid extinction. The empirical validity of these conclusions are investigated by studying the collapse of two species that signaled the end of the United States frontier--the passenger pigeon and the buffalo. The historical studies suggest that the theoretical possibility of a non-extinction equilibrium is unlikely to hold in practice. Similarly, while privatization in a single species context may appear feasible, in a multi-species context the apparent profitability of privatization may be superseded and the species driven to extinction. The latter conclusion also depends on species- specific characteristics of minimum viable population size and habitat requirements.

  6. Flores, D. 1997. When The Buffalo Roamed. Wild West. 9(6):46.

    Abstract Not Available

  7. Hill, M.E. Jr. 1997. Paleoindian Bison Remains from the 12 Mile Creek Site in Western Kansas. Plains Anthropologist. 41:359.

    Abstract Not Available

  8. Hill, M.H. Jr., and J.L. Hofman. 1997. The Waugh Site: A Folsom-Age Bison Bonebed in Northwestern Oklahoma. Plains Anthropologist. 42:63.

    Abstract Not Available

  9. Hofman, J.L., and L.C. Todd. 1997. Reinvestigation of the Perry Ranch Plainview Bison Bonebed, Southewestern Oklahoma. Plains Anthropologist. 42:101.

    Abstract Not Available

  10. Lucas, S.G., M. O'Neill, and G.S. Morgan. 1997. Radiocarbon-dated Bison from Taos County, northern New Mexico. Texas Journal of Science. 49: Iss. 1, pp 78-79

    Abstract Not Available

  11. Lupo, K.D. 1996. The Historical Occurrence And Demise Of Bison In Northern Utah. Utah Historical Quarterly. Spring, 64(2):168.

    Abstract Not Available

  12. Quigg, J.M. 1997. Bison Processing at the Rush Site, 41TG346, and Evidence for Pemmican Production in the Southern Plains. Plains Anthropologist. 42:145.

    Abstract Not Available

  13. Shaw, J.H. 1995. How many bison originally populated western Rangelands? Rangelands. 17(5):148-150.

    Abstract Not Available

  14. Shaw, J.H., and M. Lee. 1997. Relative Abundance of Bison, Elk, and Pronghorn on the Southern Plains, 1806-1857. Plains Anthropologist. 42:163.

    Abstract Not Available

  15. Turpin, S.A., L.C. Bement, and H.H. Eling, Jr. 1997. Stuck in the Muck: The Big Lake Bison Kill Site (41RG13), West Texas. Plains Anthropologist. 42:119.

    Abstract Not Available

  16. Wilson, M.C. 1996. Late Quaternary Vertebrates and the Opening of the Ice-Free Corridor, with Special Reference to the Genus Bison. Quaternary International: The Journal of the International Union of Quaternary Research. 32:97.

    Abstract Not Available

  17. Wyckoff, D.G., and W.W. Dalquest. 1997. From Whence They Came: The Paleontology of Southern Plains Bison. Plains Anthropologist. 42:5.

    Abstract Not Available


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