Montana State University

Department of History and Philosophy

Montana State University
P.O. Box 172320
Bozeman, MT 59717-3440

Tel: (406) 994-4395
Fax: (406) 994-7420
Email: history@montana.edu
Location: Wilson Hall 2-155

Department Chair

Dr. David Cherry
dcherry@montana.edu

Department Business Accounts Manager

Cassandra Balent
cassandra.balent@montana.edu

Paul Sivitz, PhD Candidate

Current Semester

Dissertation ResearchPaul Sivitz

Email: psivitz@montana.edu

Curriculum Vitae:CV

Research Interests

Accumulation and dissemination of scientific knowledge in 18th-century America and Britain

Select Publications

Invited Manuscript. “GIS Technologies and Early American Studies” for History Compass (Wiley-Blackwell). Expected publication, Summer 2011.

“Epidemic Disease East and West: America, Japan, and Eighteenth-Century Medicine” in SAGAR 19 (South Asia Institute at the University of Texas-Austin). Spring 2010.

“Lewis & Clark Perish While Crossing the Rocky Mountains” in Volume 3: Manifest Destiny (Turning Points in History Series). (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2006). 

Select Conference Presentations

Mapping Philadelphia in the 1790s: History, Geography, and GIS Technology”; Front Range Early American Consortium; Boise, Idaho; 10/2010.

“Gender and Science Education in Eighteenth-Century America”; British Group in Early American History Conference; University of Oxford (UK); 9/2010

 “The Political Identity of the Scientific Community in Revolutionary America”; Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, 1750-1850/40th Annual Conference-Charleston, South Carolina; 2/2010

“The Scientific Movement: Physical and Virtual Migrations of the Eighteenth-Century Scientific Community”; Glocal Imaginaries: Writing/Migration/Place-Lancaster (UK) University; 9/2009

“The Scientific Public Sphere: Making English the Language of Science in Eighteenth-Century Britain and America”; Public Opinion, The Press, and Journalists in the Eighteenth Century-University of Paris-Diderot; 11/2008 (Accepted invitation to present an expanded version of this paper for the follow-up conference 11/2009)

Courses Taught

Early America
Slavery in America
Jefferson's West, 1783-1814
Knowledge in America, 1680-1820
Gilded Age to 1940