Publications

(Click year for a pdf version of, or link to, the publication.)

 

Handley, I. M., & Goss, R. J. (in press). How mental simulations of the future and

            message-induced expectations influence purchasing goals. Psychology and Marketing.

 

Handley, I. M., Rasinski, H. M., Fowler, S. L., Helfer, S. G., & Geers, A. L. (in press). Beliefs

            about expectations moderate the influence of expectations on pain perception.

            International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

 

Handley, I. M., & Runnion, B. C. (2011). Evidence that unconscious thinking influences

            persuasion based on argument quality. Social Cognition, 29(6, Unconscious

            Thought), 668-682.

 

Albarracín, D., & Handley, I. M. (2011). The time for doing is not the time for change:

            Effects of general action and inaction goals on attitude accessibility and attitude change.

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 983-998.

 
Noguchi, K., Handley, I. M., & Albarracín, D. (2011). Participating in Politics Resembles 
               Physical Activity: General Action Patterns in International Archives, US Archives, and 
               Experiments. Psychological Science, 22, 235-242.

 

Miller, A. K., Handley, I. M., Markman, K. D., & Miller, J. H. (2010). Deconstructing self-

            blame following sexual assault: The critical role of cognitive processing. Violence

            Against Women, 16(10), 1120-1137. DOI: 10.1177/1077801210382874

 

Handley, I. M., Albarracín, D., Brown, R. D., Li, H., Kumkale, E. C., & Kumkale, G. T. (2009).

When the expectations from a message will not be realized: Naďve theories can eliminate

expectation-congruent judgments via correction. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology,45, 933-939.

 

Smith, J. L., Wagaman, J., & Handley, I. M. (2009). Keeping it dull or making it fun: Task

            variation as a function of promotion versus prevention focus. Motivation and Emotion, 33, 150-160.

 

Albarracín, D., Handley, I. M., Noguchi, K., McCulloch, K. C., Li, H., Leeper, J., Brown, R. D.,

            Earl, A., & Hart, W. P. (2008). Increasing and Decreasing Motor and Cognitive Output:

            A Model of General Action and Inaction Goals. Journal of Personality and Social

            Psychology, 95, 510–523.

 

Miller, A. K., Markman, K. D., & Handley, I. M. (2007). Self-blame among sexual assault

            victims prospectively predicts re-victimization: A perceived sociolegal context model of

            risk. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 29, 129-136.

 

Lassiter, G. D., Munhall, P. J., Berger, I. P., Weiland, P. E., Handley, I. M., & Geers, A. L.

(2005). Attributional complexity and the camera perspective bias in videotaped

confessions. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 27(1).

 

Handley, I. M., Lassiter, G. D., Nickell, E. F., & Herchenroeder, L. M. (2004). Affect

and automatic mood maintenance. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 40, 106-

112.

 

Geers, A. L., Handley, I. M., & McLarney, A. (2003). Discerning the role of optimism

in persuasion: The valence-enhancement hypothesis. Journal of Personality and Social      

Psychology, 85, 554-565.

 

Lassiter, G. D., Beers, M. J., Geers, A. L., Handley, I. M., Munhall, P. J., & Weiland, P. (2002).

Further evidence of a robust point‑ofview bias in videotaped confessions.

Current Psychology (thematic issue on jury simulation and eyewitness testimony

studies) 21, 265-288.

 

Handley, I. M., & Lassiter, G. D. (2002). Mood and information processing: When

            happy and sad look the same. Motivation and Emotion, 26, 223-255.

 

Lassiter, G. D., Geers, A. L., Handley, I. M., Weiland, P. E., & Munhall, P. J. (2002).

Videotaped interrogations and confessions: A simple change in camera perspective alters

verdicts in simulated trials. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, 867-874.

 

Lassiter, G. D., Munhall, P. J., Geers, A. L., Handley, I. M., & Weiland, P. E. (2001). Criminal

confessions on videotape: Does camera perspective bias their perceived veracity? Current

Research in Social Psychology, 7, (1), 1‑10 http://www.uiowa.edu/‑grpproc.

 

Lassiter, G. D., Munhall, P. J., Geers, A. L., Weiland, P. E., & Handley, I. M. (2001).

Accountability and the camera perspective bias in videotaped confessions. Analyses of

Social Issues and Public Policy, 1, 53‑70.

 

Lassiter, G. D., Geers, A. L., Munhall, P. J., Handley, I. M., & Beers, M. J. (2001) Videotaped

confessions in the courtroom: Guilt is in the eye of the camera. In M. P., Zanna, (Ed),

Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, (Vol. 3, pp. 189‑254). New York: Academic Press.

 

Shelly, R. K., Handley, I. M., Baer, J., & Watson, S. (2001). Groups and affect: Sentiments,

emotions, and performance expectations. Current Research in Social Psychology, 6, (10), 135‑150

http://www.uiowa.edu/‑grpproc.