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WWAMI Medical Education Program
Montana State University 308 Leon Johnson Hall
P.O. Box 173080
Bozeman, MT  59717
wwami@montana.edu

Phone (406) 994-4411
Fax (406) 994-4398
> WWAMI Medical Education Program
First Year WWAMI Courses


MSU-Bozeman Catalog Course Descriptions of Medical Science Courses


MEDS 510 MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY (HISTOLOGY)

  • Course Chair: Susan Gibson, M.S.
  • Office: 505 Leon Johnson Hall
    Phone: 994-3151
    E-mail: skgibson@montana.edu
  • 3 Cr (Lec 2, Lab 1)
  • Course Description:

    This is a course in the anatomy of the organ systems of the body as seen with the light and electron microscope. Each organ system is covered in both lectures and laboratories. Correlations with Gross Anatomy and the physiological function of the organ systems are emphasized. The course is an important building block for the understanding of pathology, which is taught during the second year at UW. A few examples of the microscopic anatomy of diseased organs are presented in order to illustrate the importance of microscopic anatomy in understanding human disease. Students participate in the teaching of this course by presenting short introductions to laboratories. A textbook, laboratory syllabus and CD are used.  Computers will be used for most laboratory assignments.


MEDS 511 ANATOMY (GROSS)

  • Course Chair: Cassie Cusick, Ph.D.
  • Office: 508 Leon Johnson Hall
    Phone: 994-3993
    E-mail: ccusick@montana.edu
  • 4 Cr (Lec 2, Lab 2)
  • MEDS 511 Gross Anatomy Course Web Page
  • Course Description:

    The course has three major components: dissection anatomy, living or surface anatomy, and embryology. The three components are integrated into an overview of anatomy with frequent mention of practical relevance in the clinical setting. This course covers the thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum. Head and neck are covered spring semester in MedS 531, followed by the extremities, MEDS 551.

    Students typically meet for lecture and for laboratory once per week. Because anatomy is a visual, three-dimensional subject, lectures focus on preparation for dissection by the use of projected images and drawings, as well as providing perspectives about learning the material and its practical relevance, the relationships of structures to each other, and integration of development with gross anatomy. Notes are provided for most of the lectures so that the student can concentrate on the visual presentations. The dissection laboratory requires students to work in teams of two or three and to use the dissection of human cadavers to learn anatomy as visual images. Preparation, including reading, diagraming, and lecture absorption, is essential to best use the laboratory time. Surface anatomy laboratories require students to work in teams of two or three to demonstrate on each other the placement, size, and shape of individual organs. This is done by using felt-tip pens to map out internal organs. All students participate in surface anatomy drawing and palpation, but participation as a "model" is not required.

    Performance is evaluated in bi-weekly quizzes (that include both lecture and lab material) and a comprehensive final exam common to all WWAMI sites. The quizzes include tag or "show me" examinations in the laboratory and written quizzes use short answer questions, some involving drawings or relationships.

    Several texts and atlases are available in the bookstore. It is best to buy texts after orientation when the options are explained.


MEDS 512 MECHANISMS IN CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY

  • Course Chair: Steve Eiger, Ph.D.
  • Office: 507 Leon Johnson Hall
    Phone: 994-5612
    E-mail: eiger@montana.edu
  • 4 Cr (Lec 4)
  • Course Description:

    Physiology incorporates and integrates knowledge from a handful of related disciplines, including physics, chemistry, and biochemistry. The course is taught with an eye towards developing a strong conceptual as well as factual understanding of bodily functions. Such an understanding of normal functions is crucial to appreciate the mechanisms of diseases.

    We have three goals for this course. The first is to give you an in-depth introduction to the mechanisms of cell physiology that are common to the organ systems you will be studying. The second is to have you develop a conceptual framework that will enable you to use the factual material to solve real or hypothetical problems. The third is to have you become comfortable with the fact that our current understanding of physiological mechanisms is far from complete; this will hopefully develop in you a healthy skepticism towards all so-called facts presented to you from now on. If these goals are achieved, I'll be happy and you'll learn a lot of physiology.


MEDS 513 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL MEDICINE I

 
  • Course Chair: Michael Herring, M.D.
  •  
     
  • Office: 905 Highland Blvd. Suite 4500
        Phone: 522-2400
        E-mail: herrboz@aol.com
  • 2 Cr (Lec 1, Lab 1)
  • Course Description
  •  

    The ICM course provides an introduction to patient interviewing techniques and the screening physical examination. Interviews will be conducted with patients at Bozeman Deaconess Hospital. Additional emphasis will be placed on interviews in nursing homes and on the imortance of continuity of case. Experiences with a video taped interview and a standardized patient will be provided. University of Washington visiting faculty will conduct special sessions in medical ethics and cross-cultural interviewing. A view of medical practice in Montana is a major goal.


    MEDS 514 MOLECULAR & CELLULAR BIOLOGY (BIOCHEMISTRY)

    • Course Chair:  Martin Teintze, Ph.D
      Office:  155 Chemistry & Biochemistry Building
      Phone:  994-5390
      E-mail: mteintze@montana.edu 
    • Dr. Teintze's web site: https://catalysttools.washington.edu/workspace/somalt/13469/73020
    • Other Instructor: Valerie Copie, Ph.D. vcopie@chemistry.montana.edu
    • 5 Cr (Lec 4, Rct 1)
    • Martin Teintze's MEDS 514 Course Web Page
    • Course Description:

      Biochemistry is a five credit course offered fall semester. The class will meet in Gaines Hall 344 on TWRF from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Lectures will be distributed between two faculty members (Drs. Teintze and Copie), plus several guest speakers, including University of Washington faculty and local physicians. The course covers the medically relevant aspects of biochemistry at an advanced undergraduate level. Topics include protein structure/function, nucleic acids and molecular biology, signal transduction, bioenergetics and carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism and nitrogen metabolism. Clinical correlations will be stressed. The textbook: Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry, 4th edition by Champe et al. will be used as a reference, particularly for the metabolism part of the course and it is available in the MSU Bookstore. In addition, copies of Molecular Biology of the Cell, by Alberts et al., the Molecular Cell Biology by Lodish et al., which are excellent references for the molecular biology portions of the course, and some general Biochemistry textbooks are available in the cave. A detailed course syllabus will be available from the WWAMI office.

      Tests and Grading: There will be bi-weekly quizzes and a final examination (in which some of the questions will be common to all WWAMI sites).  A passing grade requires both an aggregate score of 70% or more for the quizzes and a score of 70% or better on the final exam.


    MEDS 516 CLINICAL PRECEPTORSHIP

    • Course Chair: Michael Spinelli, M.D.
    • Office:  931 Highland Boulevard, Suite 3210
      Phone:  556-5533
      E-mail: 
    • 1 Cr (Lab 1)
    • Course Description: 

      Students spend one morning a week in this course observing the practice of a primary care physician in the Bozeman area. The goal of the course is to demonstrate how physicians relate to patients and how physicians use their basic science and clinical knowledge to solve health care problems. The majority of the time is usually spent in observing hospital rounds and office practice; however, students may also have the opportunity to observe operations, deliveries, and other procedures.

      Amid all the basic science taught in the first year, this course helps students understand the purposes of the curriculum and reassures them that they are indeed learning to be physicians.


    MEDS 521 MICROBIOLOGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    • Course Chair:  Jovanka Voyich-Kane, Ph.D.
    • Office: 155 Molecular Biosciences Building
      Phone: 994-7184
      E-mail: jovanka@montana.edu
    • 5 Cr (Lec 3, Rect 1, Lab 1)
    • Course Description: 

      As you prepare for a career in medicine, you will, with one major exception, focus on a single species -- Homo sapiens. The major exception is the study of infectious diseases, where you will ponder the interactions of humans and dozens of infectious agents of remarkable diversity which may cause diseases of humans. These agents of disease vary in size from tapeworms, which may be several feet long, down to viruses, which may be as small as 20 nanometers in diameter. They vary in complexity from multi-cellular organisms having eukaryotic cell structure to prions which are structurally simpler than viruses.

      Just as there is remarkable diversity among the agents which cause infectious diseases of humans, there is also remarkable diversity in the ways humans and infectious agents interact -- the host-parasite interaction. Infections may be inapparent, trivial, acute, chronic, recurrent, and fatal. In some cases, the host immune and inflammatory responses to the infectious agent are protective and the infection resolves. In other cases, the immune and inflammatory responses contribute to the damage done during the infection.

      Many concepts of immunology and pathology (inflammation) are essential to the study of infectious disease, and these concepts are discussed in MEDS 523. In MEDS 521, we will consider the biology of infectious agents with particular regard to those aspects important to health and disease in humans; properties of important pathogenic organisms and their relationship to the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases; and epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical characteristics of important infections. Agents considered include bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, and unclassified agents.


    MEDS 522 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL MEDICINE II

     
  • Course Chair: Michael Herring, M.D.
  •  
     
  • Office: 905 Highland Blvd.
        Phone: 522-2400
        E-mail: herrboz@aol.com
  • 2 Cr (Lec 1, Lab 1)
  • Course Description
  •  

      See MEDS 513 Introduction to Clinical Medicine I for further information.

       


    MEDS 523 IMMUNOLOGY & HUMAN DISEASES

    • Course Chair: Mark Jutila, Ph.D.
    • Office: 960 Technology Blvd.
      Phone: 994-4540
      E-mail: uvsmj@montana.edu
    • 2 Cr (Lec 1, Lab 1)
    • Course Description:

      The Immunology course will be given at the beginning of the spring semester, because an understanding of the concepts of immunology is very useful for studying Infectious Diseases (521), course also given during spring semester.

      From its origins in the field of microbiology-infectious diseases, immunology has broadened into a distinct discipline of the biological sciences that has both fundamental and practical importance. For basic scientists, the immune system ranks with the nervous system as a complicated, regulated system of many interacting parts and is a challenge to unravel and understand -- many Nobel prizes in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded to immunologists.

      Physicians must know something about the immune system owing to its participation in: 1) the diagnosis, prevention, control, and pathogenesis of infectious diseases; 2) the rejection of transplanted organs and tissues; 3) many hypersensitivity states including anaphylactic shock, asthma, contact dermatitis, and glomerulonephritis; 4) the etiology of autoimmune disease; and 5) iatrogenic (chemotherapy), and acquired (AIDS) immune deficiency diseases of humans as well as immunoproliferative disorders.

      In this course you will be introduced to the cells of the immune system -- T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages, mast cells and others. You will study the structure, function, and genetics of the products of these cells including immunoglobulins (antibodies), T cell receptors, lymphokines and cytokines, and the complement system. You will think about how this complex circuitry of cells and molecules is regulated to protect humans from disease and the important consequences of breakdowns of such immune regulation.

      It's an active, fascinating field!


    MEDS 531 HEAD, NECK, EAR AND THROAT GROSS ANATOMY

    • Course Chair: Cassie Cusick, Ph.D.
    • Office: 508 Leon Johnson Hall
      Phone: 994-3993
      E-mail: ccusick@montana.edu
    • 4 Cr (Lec 2, Lab 2)
    • Course Description: 

      The course is a dissection course that includes all the detailed anatomy of the head and neck plus some related embryology. The brain is removed in this course but studied in the Nervous system course.

      KEEP UP! The material in HENT moves at a rapid pace; although the material is usually straightforward, there is a LOT of it. The lab assistant will do some of the tedious parts of the dissection for you -- but there will be many hours of dissection left for you. For many people, the dissection lab is more difficult than the fall course because many of the structures are small and hard to isolate; also difficult are the many complex parts of the autonomic nervous system in this region and of course mastering a complete understanding of cranial nerves takes time. Therefore, it is important to prepare for lab by reading the relevant parts of the text and identifying key structures in your atlas beforehand. If you make this effort for each class, you'll learn more and retain the information longer.

      Moore's Clinically Oriented Anatomy is the recommended text along with Gilroy or Netter atlas. If you are using another text and/or atlas and are satisfied with it, you may use it for this course as well.


    MEDS 532 NERVOUS SYSTEM

    • Course Chair: Frances Lefcort , Ph.D.
    • Office: 522 Leon Johnson Hall
      Phone: 994-5656
      E-mail: lefcort@montana.edu
    • 6 Cr (Lec 4, Lab 2)
    • Interactive Atlases - Digital Anatomist Program
    • Course Description: 

      This course is similar to the ones given in the second year in that it is organized around an organ system rather than a discipline in medical science. Much of the time is devoted to neuroanatomy, but the functions of the various parts of the central and peripheral nervous system receive just as much emphasis as the structure. The course builds upon what you know about cellular neurophysiology (MedS 512) and provides the foundation for the study of neurology during the clinical years. You will learn why strokes cause the symptoms and signs that they do. You will learn much about disorders of vision, hearing and other senses. Much of what you learn will help you understand the components of the neurological examination that you are learning in physical diagnosis.

      There are lectures and laboratories. During the laboratories you will have the opportunity to dissect a human brain and to examine microfiche illustrations of the nervous system. In addition, students will learn neuroanatomy with the use of a CD-ROM brain atlas program. The course also includes a section on neuropathology and numerous opportunities for clinical correlation.

      The amount of information seems overwhelming, especially at the beginning of the course; however, you will return to many of the important concepts again and again during the course. You will be amazed at how much you can learn about the brain with only a brain to work with.


    MEDS 533 SYSTEMS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR I

    • Course Chair: John Christopher, Ph.D.
    • Office: 220 Herrick Hall
      Phone: 994-6943
      E-mail: jcc@montana.edu
    • WEB SITE: http://courses.washington.edu/hubio516
    • 3 Cr (Lec 3)
    • Course Description: 

      Behavioral science presents an introduction to the Integrated Sciences Model of health care, which looks at the role of human behavior in medical practice. During this course, we will focus on a patient's social and psychological well-being as perhaps equally vital (and in some instances more so) as treating the disease process itself.

    • We will first survey some basic processes in human behavior, such as learning, cognition, emotion, psychodynamics, mind-body interactions, and models of change. Next, we will explore how we grow and change across our developmental path and how these developmental issues specific to certain age groups impact our professional relationships. The rest of course will address important clinical practice topics on stress and illness, chronic pain, depression and suicide risk, alcohol and drug abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault, and sleep disorders.

      Classes involve practical exercises, brief presentations by students, and lectures from guest speakers and course chair Dr. John Christopher. Much energy goes into the preparation for this class, but its value is clearly enhanced by the enthusiasm of each individual student. Your active participation in this class is highly encouraged!


    MEDS 551 MEDICAL MUSCULOSKELETAL ANATOMY

    • Course Chair: Susan Gibson
    • Office: 508 Leon Johnson Hall
      Phone: 994-3151
      E-mail: skgibson@montana.edu
    • 3 Cr (Lec 2, Lab 1)
    • Course Description: 

      This course is designed to teach detailed medical musculoskeletal anatomy of the human back and extremeties using laboratory dissections coupled with lecture presentations. The material will include numerous correlations with clinical application of the knowledge in the practice of medicine, as well as the anatomy revealed in common imaging techniques like X-rays and CAT scans.

    • Performance is evaluated in bi-weekly quizzes that include both lecture and lab material, and a comprehensive final exam common to all WWAMI sites. The quizzes include tag or "show me" examinations in the laboratory, and written quizzes use short answer questions, some involving drawings or relationships.


    MEDS 591 MEDICAL INFORMATION AND DECISION MAKING

    • Course Chair: Jane Shelby, Ph.D.
    • Office: 310 Leon Johnson Hall
      Phone: 994-4411
      E-mail: jshelby@montana.edu
    • 1 Cr (Lec 1)
    • Course Description: 

      This course is an introduction to methods for identifying and retrieving Web-based high-quality, relevant evidence, and to methods for describing and applying rigorous criteria when reading primary research studies or reviews of primary studies that report on the effectiveness of therapeutic or preventive interventions.  

    View Text-only Version Text-only Updated: 8/5/2010
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