Montana State University

MSU offers Dec. 6 program to celebrate King James Bible and Shakespeare's Tempest

November 29, 2011 -- MSU News Service

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MSU News Service
Tel: (406) 994-4571
msunews@montana.edu
BOZEMAN - Montana State University will commemorate the 400th anniversary of the completion of the King James Bible and William Shakespeare's "The Tempest" with birthday cake and a program that explores the cultural legacy of both texts.

Participating in a world-wide celebration of the two works, MSU's Department of History, Philosophy and Religious Studies will offer a one-hour program, "Book of Many Colors," at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6, in Reynolds Recital Hall in Howard Hall.

The program, which is free and open to the public, will compare the English-speaking world in 1611 and 2011 and look at aspects of translation and the interlocking themes of the sacred and secular texts. The program will be directed by humanities professor Lynda Sexson, assisted by student Derek Brouwer. It will feature English professor Michael Sexson, as well as students Dustin Dallman, Troy Duker, Joel Forrest, Kate Fulbright, Alyssa Kreikemeier, Jill Melcher and Michael Wilson.

Event organizers said no two bodies of literature have influenced western culture and language as much as the works of William Shakespeare and the King James Bible. The King James version is still heralded as a literary masterpiece, and remains the dominant version in the history of the Bible. Similarly, Shakespeare has been credited with "inventing the human." "The Tempest," completed in 1611, is thought to be the last play Shakespeare wrote alone. It contains some of the author's most powerful lines and images that are ubiquitous in the English language.

The program is sponsored by Corona Productions and the Department of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies.

For more information, contact Jessica Marks, Corona Program coordinator, at (406) 994-4395 or jessica.marks2@montana.edu

Evelyn Boswell, (406) 994-5135 or evelynb@montana.edu