Montana State University

Lecture on causes of cancer set for Oct. 8 at Museum of Rockies

September 19, 2013 -- MSU News Service

David Eaton from the University of Washington will speak Oct. 8 on the causes of cancer.   High-Res Available

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 BOZEMAN -- A free public lecture about the causes of cancer will be given Tuesday, Oct. 8, at Montana State University’s Museum of the Rockies. 

David Eaton, dean and vice provost of the graduate school and professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Washington, will present "Why me, Doc? What Scientists Know -- and Don't Know -- about the Causes of Cancer."  He will speak at 5:30 p.m. in the Hager Auditorium. A reception will follow.

Nearly everyone knows someone -- a family member, close friend, neighbor -- who has received a cancer diagnosis, Eaton said. Among the many questions that arise are, "Is it my genes? Was it something I ate or something in my workplace? Was there something I could have done to avoid it?"  

Cancer is a term used to describe a disease process that exists in hundreds, if not thousands, of different forms, each with its own genetic and environmental risk factors, Eaton said. This talk will discuss cancer etiology, with a few examples of recent discoveries about genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the global cancer disease burden. 

Eaton’s research and teaching program focus on the molecular basis for environmental causes of cancer, with an emphasis on how chemical carcinogens are metabolized in the liver. He has published more than 150 scientific articles and book chapters on toxicology and risk assessment. He is an Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences and the Washington State Academy of Sciences in 2011.


Eaton’s lecture is presented by the Kopriva Science Seminar Series, which is funded through an endowment created by Phil Kopriva, a 1957 microbiology graduate from MSU. Kopriva, who died in 2002, also created an endowment to fund the Kopriva Graduate Fellowship Program, which provides support and opportunities for graduate students in MSU’s College of Letters and Science, particularly in the biomedical sciences. The series features four to six seminars annually, with talks provided by MSU graduate students, faculty members and guest speakers. For more information about this and other Kopriva lectures, visit http://www.montana.edu/lettersandscience/kopriva.html.

 

Evelyn Boswell, (406) 994-5135 or evelynb@montana.edu