Montana State University

Dartmouth economist probes economics of preschool education on Oct. 13  

October 4, 2016

Dartmouth economist Elizabeth Cascio will lecture about the impacts of preschool education from an economic perspective will be given at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, in 125 Linfield Hall at Montana State University. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Cascio.

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Tel: (406) 994-4571
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BOZEMAN -- A free public lecture about the impacts of preschool education from an economic perspective will be given at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, in 125 Linfield Hall at Montana State University.

Elizabeth Cascio, associate professor of economics in the Department of Economics at Dartmouth College will present "Child's Play? The Economics of Preschool Education in America."

Cascio will argue that dramatic changes in the economic landscape since the 1960s, from the rise in women's labor force participation to an evolution in the very meaning of preschool, limit the modern-day prescriptive value of findings from famous preschool experiments of the past. She will discuss how an analytical approach to preschool policy shows that the benefits of public preschool vary in size and form depending on family income, and that defining preschool quality might not be as easy as it first appears.

Cascio is an applied economist specializing in the study of education, with specific interests in how policy and other external forces shape educational opportunity and how that opportunity transforms lives. Her current research projects include studies on the impacts of universal preschool, how and why the test score advantages from early intervention "fade out" across the lifecycle, and the educational response to recent economic shocks.

In addition to her faculty appointment at Dartmouth, Cascio is a research associate in the Programs on Education, Development of the American Economy, and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a research associate at the Institute for the Study of Labor. She also currently serves as a co-editor at the "Journal of Human Resources."

Cascio's lecture is sponsored by the Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics, and is presented by the College of Letters and Science's Distinguished Speakers Series. The series, which began in the spring of 2011, brings distinguished scholars to MSU to give a public talk and to meet with faculty and students in order to enrich the intellectual life on campus and to enhance research connections.

For more information about this and other L&S Distinguished Speakers Series lectures, please www.montana.edu/lettersandscience/speakers/or call 994-4288.

 

Jody Sanford, 994-7791, jody.sanford@montana.edu