Research Funding Opportunities



Internal Opportunities and Announcements

Open Access Author Fund at MSU - Pilot Project
MSU Library

The Open Access Author Fund

The MSU Library will run an author's fund on a two year pilot to judge if we can help remove the barrier between MSU authors and open access publishing. The Library will contribute $50,000 to the fund to be dispersed to authors who are being charged an APC. Authors will receive no more than $2,000 per fiscal year on a rolling basis.

Goals

  • To allow MSU created research to reach the greatest number of potential readers.
  • To remove some of the burden on authors as they work to make an impact in their field of expertise.


The Application Process

Eligible Publications and Data repositories

The publication venue must be an established journal or data repository, either, one that does not charge readers or their institutions for access to peer-reviewed articles or datasets, or an established hybrid journal.

Journals or Data repositories should fit at least one of the following criteria:

  • Be listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (unless the journal is too new for DOAJ eligibility) or similar list of data repositories, OR
  • Be a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association or adhere to its Code of Conduct, OR
  • Be a publicly available data repository, OR
  • Have a publicly available standard fee schedule.

Eligible Articles and Data

Articles/data should:

  • Be a peer-reviewed article submitted to an open access/hybrid journal or the associated data.
  • Have Publication Status of 'accepted-for-publication', funds are not available for articles still in process.
  • Not have been published prior to the authors' request for funds. Already-published articles are ineligible.
  • The library will not reimburse any author fees that have already been paid by an author.

Articles will be considered only if there is no other source of funding available. The fund is a limited resource intended to support open access publishing across the University. We expect researchers to request funding for open access publication from their funding agency if they can do so. For example, the National Institutes of Health will fund open access publications as part of their research grants. If such funds are not available, we welcome your application.

Eligible Authors

Funds are available for faculty, staff, professional and research positions, and students at MSU - Bozeman.

Eligible Fees

Article processing fees may include publication fees (charges levied on articles accepted for publication, including Open Access page charges). Eligible fees must be based on a publication's standard fee schedule that is independent of the author's institution. Reprint fees are not eligible. Reimbursement will cover only direct costs for open access publication (not the cost of reprints, color illustration fees, non-open access page charges, etc.). Requests for funding will be reviewed by the Library's Scholarly Communication Steering Group and a decision for funding support will be communicated to the author.

Fund Limits

The fund for FY15 is $50,000. Each author is limited to $2,000 per FY. Unused fund amounts do not roll over to future years. If the demand for funds exceeds expectations, publication charges will be paid to the publisher on behalf of an author on a first-come, first-served basis.

Institutional Repository

As an added service, the library will deposit a copy of funded articles in the institutional repository, and willingness to deposit here is a requirement of receiving funding. The placement of an article in the repository helps to build the collection of publications, supports the self-archiving arm of the open access movement, and provides institutional preservation and discoverability.

How do I apply?

Complete the online form.

View Program URL


Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Resources

EVENT DESCRIPTION:

The United States Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Office invites high-technology small businesses to participate in a timely webinar session about attaining success with the Department of Defense SBIR and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. The webinar will provide a general overview of the DoD SBIR/STTR Programs as well as information on specific needs of the participating agencies: Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), Army, Navy, Air Force, Missile Defense Agency (MDA), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense (JPEO-CBD). Program managers or their representatives will be available for questions following the presentation. Please mark your calendar and join us for this exciting and informative opportunity.

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, Sept 16 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. MST

To join the webinar by computer:

Go to https://www.connectmeeting.att.com

Meeting Code: 888-858-2144

Access Code: 2915776

To join the webinar by *telephone only* (no computer):

1. Choose one of the following numbers to dial:

* Toll-free (in USA): 888-858-2144

* Caller-paid: 646-746-3008

* Blackberry (toll-free): 8888582144x3774847#

* A number in your country or in a country close to you (may be toll-free):

https://www.teleconference.att.com/servlet/glbAccess?process=1&accessNumber=8888582144&accessCode=3774847

2. When prompted, enter the Meeting Access Code: 888-858-2144

EVENT DESCRIPTION:

MSU TechLink and the Montana Technology Innovation Partnership Program (MTIP) will be co-sponsoring an SBIR & STTR (Small Business Innovation Research, and Small Business Technology Transfer) workshop on Monday, Sept. 22 in Bozeman, featuring Mr. David Sikora, Program Manager for the Air Force SBIR/STTR Program. The workshop will be held from 8am - 12:30pm in the WTI/MMEC Conference Room at 2310 University Way, Building 2 (from Kagy, take 7th Ave. south past the stadium). It will start with an overview of the federal SBIR/STTR programs, which provide over $2.2 billion per year in funding to small businesses, often in collaboration with university researchers, for innovative R&D that leads to new products or services. SBIR/STTR funding has enabled the start-up and growth of a number of successful Montana companies, and even firms like Qualcomm and iRobot got their starts through SBIR/STTR funding. 

Mr. Sikora will provide overviews of the DoD SBIR/STTR programs, which account for roughly one-half of all federal SBIR/STTR funds, and the Air Force SBIR/STTR programs, the largest of all DoD programs. He will be available to answer individual questions, and to meet for  one-on-one consultation sessions. 

To sign up for the workshop, and register for one-on-one sessions, please contact Audrey Wooding:  awooding@mt.gov or 406-994-3885. 


Introduction to the DoD SBIR Program Webinar
Montana District Office of the Small Business Administration and the Montana Technology Innovation Partnership Program

Event takes place on September 16, 2014

EVENT DESCRIPTION: 

The United States Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Office invites high-technology small businesses to participate in a timely webinar session about attaining success with the Department of Defense SBIR and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. The webinar will provide a general overview of the DoD SBIR/STTR Programs as well as information on specific needs of the participating agencies: Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), Army, Navy, Air Force, Missile Defense Agency (MDA), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense (JPEO-CBD).  Program managers or their representatives will be available for questions following the presentation.  Please mark your calendar and join us for this exciting and informative opportunity.

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, Sept 16 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. MST

To join the webinar by computer:

Go to https://www.connectmeeting.att.com

Meeting Code: 888-858-2144

Access Code: 2915776

To join the webinar by *telephone only* (no computer):

1. Choose one of the following numbers to dial:

            * Toll-free (in USA): 888-858-2144

            * Caller-paid: 646-746-3008

            * Blackberry (toll-free): 8888582144x3774847#

            * A number in your country or in a country close to you (may be toll-free): 

https://www.teleconference.att.com/servlet/glbAccess?process=1&accessNumber=8888582144&accessCode=3774847

2. When prompted, enter the Meeting Access Code: 888-858-2144


Montana NASA EPSCoR Research Initiation Proposals
Montana Space Grant Consortium and NASA EPSCoR

October 17, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

Proposals are welcome in all fields of science and engineering normally funded by NASA (refer to http://www.spacegrant.montana.edu/documents/NASA_Research_Areas_2014.pdf and the MSGC office for guidance). It may be beneficial to research NASA's website for recently funded areas of research. Research Initiation Grants from the Montana NASA EPSCoR Program are intended to help faculty at MSGC member institutions develop nationally competitive research programs in fields related to NASA's mission. In addition, the awards are meant to assist in Montana's economic development in aerospace-related fields by strengthening existing Montana high-tech companies, seeking new connections between Montana faculty researchers and state industries, and building university research enterprises that will foster "spin-off" startup enterprises. Grants are generally for a period of one year (see note below), and all grantees are expected to submit a follow-on proposal to NASA for continued funding within the period of the grant. It is strongly suggested that faculty make contact with NASA researchers in their field before submitting a proposal to determine and document NASA's interest in the proposed research area. Proposals should include evidence of interest and potential support from NASA, e.g., in a letter(s) of support. The stronger the indicated support, the better the chance of obtaining funding from Montana NASA EPSCoR.

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Fellowships

Student Internship Research Participant Program
National Renewable Energy Laboratory/DOE

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides internships at its facilities for undergraduate and graduate students enrolled full-time in a U.S. college or university. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. The applicant may be eligible for round-trip transportation.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Graduate and undergraduate students have the opportunity to participate in the laboratory's research and development programs, initiate new areas of research, and establish a base for ongoing collaborations through NREL's Research Participant Program. Students with new ideas and talents can contribute to research of mutual interest in NREL's research and deployment disciplines, while also contributing to the transfer of the technology resulting from that research.

Applications are accepted as positions become available.

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U.S. and Canadian Competition Fellowships
Guggenheim (John Simon) Memorial Foundation

September 19, 2014

Often characterized as "midcareer" awards, Guggenheim Fellowships are intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.

Since the purpose of the Guggenheim Fellowship program is to help provide Fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible, grants are made freely. No special conditions attach to them, and Fellows may spend their grant funds in any manner they deem necessary to their work.

Eligible applicants are citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada. The Foundation understands advanced professionals to be those who as writers, scholars, or scientists have a significant record of publication, or as artists, playwrights, filmmakers, photographers, composers, or the like, have a significant record of exhibition or performance of their work.

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American Council of Learned Societies

September 24, 2014

The Fellowship Program invites research applications in all disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences. The Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing. An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate's current academic year salary. Tenure of the fellowship may begin no earlier than July 1, 2015 and no later than February 1, 2016.

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Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowships
American Council of Learned Societies

September 24, 2014

The Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowships support advanced assistant professors and untenured associate professors in the humanities and related social sciences whose scholarly contributions have advanced their fields and who have well-designed and carefully developed plans for new research.

The fellowships are intended to provide time and resources to enable these faculty members to conduct their research under optimal conditions. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

Ryskamp Fellowships are intended to support an academic year of research (nine months), plus an additional summer's research (two months) if justified. Fellows have three years from July 1, 2015 to use the fellowship funds, and considerable flexibility in structuring their research time: the nine-month period may be taken as one continuous leave, or divided into two single-semester leaves; the two months of summer research may be taken before, after, or between the semesters of the year's leave. Fellows are encouraged to spend substantial periods of their leaves in residential interdisciplinary centers, research libraries, or other scholarly archives in the United States or abroad. If personal circumstances preclude extended absence from their home campuses, applicants need to demonstrate that they will be released from all academic and administrative responsibilities, and that continual residence at home will successfully advance their projects in other ways -- through access to particular colleagues, for example, or to valuable research collections.

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Digital Innovation Fellowships
American Council of Learned Societies

September 24, 2014

This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that projects of successful applicants will help advance digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating such works.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended to support an academic year dedicated to work on a major scholarly project that takes a digital form. Projects may: address a consequential scholarly question through new research methods, new ways of representing the knowledge produced by research, or both; create new digital research resources; increase the scholarly utility of existing digital resources by developing new means of aggregating, navigating, searching, or analyzing those resources; and propose to analyze and reflect upon the new forms of knowledge creation and representation made possible by the digital transformation of scholarship.

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Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR)
Office of Science

September 24, 2014 at 5:00PM ET

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science is pleased to announce that the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program is now accepting applications for the 2014 solicitation.  Applications are due 5:00pm ET on Wednesday September 24, 2014.

The SCGSR program supports supplemental awards to outstanding U.S. graduate students to conduct part of their graduate thesis research at a DOE national laboratory in collaboration with a DOE laboratory scientist for a period of 3 to 12 consecutive months--with the goal of preparing graduate students for scientific and technical careers critically important to the DOE Office of Science mission.

The SCGSR program is open to current Ph.D. students in qualified graduate programs at accredited U.S. academic institutions, who are conducting their graduate thesis research in targeted areas of importance to the DOE Office of Science. The research opportunity is expected to advance the graduate students' overall doctoral thesis while providing access to the expertise, resources, and capabilities available at the DOE laboratories. The supplemental award provides for additional, incremental costs for living and travel expenses directly associated with conducting the SCGSR research project at the DOE host laboratory during the award period.

The Office of Science expects to make approximately 100 awards in 2014, for project periods beginning anytime between January and September 2015.

Detailed information about the program, including eligibility requirements and access to the online application system, can be found at: http://science.energy.gov/wdts/scgsr/.

The SCGSR program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS), in collaboration with the six Office of Science research programs offices and the DOE national laboratories, and the Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE).

For any questions, please contact the SCGSR Program Manager, Dr. Ping Ge, at sc.scgsr@science.doe.gov.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science

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Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship (NNF) Grants Program
USDA - NIFA

September 30, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This grant program supports: (1) training students for Master's and doctoral degrees in food, agricultural and natural resource sciences, and; (2) Special International Study or Thesis/Dissertation Research Travel Allowances (IRTA) for eligible USDA NNF beneficiaries. Awards are specifically intended to support traineeship programs that engage outstanding students to pursue and complete their degrees in USDA mission areas. Applicants provide clarity about the philosophy of their graduate training, and relevance to USDA mission sciences, NIFA priorities and national science education policies and statistics. Applications are being solicited from institutions that confer a graduate degree in at least one of the following Targeted Expertise Shortage Areas: 1) animal and plant production; 2) forest resources; 3) agricultural educators and communicators; 4) agricultural management and economics; 5) food science and human nutrition; 6) sciences for agricultural biosecurity; and 7) training in integrative biosciences for sustainable food and agricultural systems.

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GEM Fellowships
National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science, Inc.

November 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of this program is to increase the number of minority students who pursue doctoral degrees in the natural science disciplines - chemistry, physics, earth sciences, mathematics, biological sciences, and computer science. Applicants to this program are accepted as early as their senior undergraduate year, as well as candidates currently enrolled in a Master's of Engineering program and working professionals. Fellowships offered through this program are portable and may be used at any participating GEM Member University where the GEM Fellow is admitted.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of this program is to increase the number of minority students who pursue doctoral degrees in the natural science disciplines - chemistry, physics, earth sciences, mathematics, biological sciences, and computer science. Fellowships offered through this program are portable and may be used at any participating GEM Member University where the GEM Fellow is admitted.

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Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program
Kauffman (Ewing Marion) Foundation

September 10, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program (KDFP) is an annual competitive program that awards up to 15 Dissertation Fellowship grants of $15,000 each to Ph.D., D.B.A., or other doctoral students at accredited U.S. universities to support dissertations in the area of entrepreneurship.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program is one of three academic recognition programs established by the Kauffman Foundation to aid the Foundation in achieving its goal of building a body of respected entrepreneurship research and making entrepreneurship a highly regarded academic field.

Proposals submitted to the Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program must address research issues of theoretical and practical importance to the domain of entrepreneurship. While dissertations can be written on any topic of importance to entrepreneurship, for the 2014-2015 cycle, the Kauffman Foundation is particularly interested in regional dynamics, human capital dimensions of entrepreneurship, economic growth, entrepreneurship policy, and programmatic research (research that investigates and uses data from entrepreneurship programs such as accelerators, training programs, etc.).

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Research Report Stipends
IBM Center for The Business of Government

October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides research stipends for individuals working in universities, nonprofit organizations, or journalism. Applications are reviewed in terms of the following criteria: Will the proposed report be of high value and timely to government executives and managers? Will the report provide practical insight and understanding of the topic? Does the applicant demonstrate the potential to produce a final report that will be clear, understandable and highly communicable to government executives and managers? Does the applicant demonstrate outstanding command and knowledge of the topic? $20,000 for each report may be awarded. The manuscript should be submitted no later than six months after the start of the project. Recipients will select the start and end dates. The report should be written for government executives and managers, providing them practical knowledge and insight.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The aim of the IBM Center for The Business of Government is to tap into the best minds in academe and the nonprofit sector who can use rigorous public management research and analytic techniques to help public sector executives and managers improve the effectiveness of government. The Centers looks for very practical findings and actionable recommendations - not just theory or concepts - in order to assist executives and managers to more effectively respond to mission and management challenges. 

The Center seeks to bridge the gap between research and practice by helping to stimulate and accelerate the production of research that points to actionable recommendations. For this reason, The Center solicits proposals that result in reports that have sound research, insightful findings, and actionable recommendations for government leaders and public managers in the following areas of interest:

--Fostering Innovation and Transformation;

--Aligning Mission Support with Mission Delivery;

--Developing Cost Savings Strategies That Improve Efficiency and Effectiveness;

--Making the Best Use of Performance and Results Management;

--Managing Risk in a Rapidly Changing World;

--Developing New Models of Public Leadership Within and Across Agencies.

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Visiting Scholar Program
Sage (Russell) Foundation

September 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Russell Sage Foundation annually awards up to 19 residential fellowships to selected scholars in the social sciences, who are at least several years beyond the Ph.D. The award allows these Visiting Scholars to pursue their research and writing at the Foundation for a period of up to 10 months.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The award allows these Visiting Scholars to pursue their research and writing at the Foundation for periods of up to 10 months.

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ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowships
American Council of Learned Societies

September 24, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The ACLS Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

In order to encourage humanistic research in area studies, special funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and ACLS has been set aside for ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowships to be designated among the successful applicants to the central ACLS Fellowship competition. Scholars pursuing research and writing on the societies and cultures of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union will be eligible for these special fellowships.

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Individual Residential Fellowship: First-time Fellows
Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences

October 8, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Center offers a residential postdoctoral fellowship program for scientists and scholars from this country and abroad. CASBS fellowships have been awarded to scholars working in a diverse range of disciplines. Fields of Research include: Anthropology, Art, Biology, Classics, Communication, Comparative Literature, Computer Science, Economics, Education, Geography, History, Law, Linguistics, Medicine, Musicology, Neurobiology, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Political Science, Psychiatry, Psychology, Social Work, Sociology, and Statistics. In addition to scholars working in fields of the behavioral and social sciences, scholars in the natural sciences, the humanities, the arts, the professions, and public life are considered for fellowships when their work has human behavioral and social dimensions that may complement and broaden the work of their cohort.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The mission involves a conscious effort to advance the careers of several groups that have often been overlooked in academia: younger scholars, minorities, women, international scholars, and scholars whose home universities are not research oriented. The sponsor seeks outstanding scholars and scientists through their application and selection process. The procedures aim to achieve a diverse group of Fellows in each Center class because the sponsor believes that a diverse class of Fellows benefits the group as a whole. While here, in a community of inspiring equals, Fellows support and mentor each other and form networks and habits of collaboration that last a lifetime. Fellows return to their posts with bold new theories that persistently change the way they and others think about what we know and what we can do to help solve the critical problems of contemporary society.

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Academic Research Grant Program
Borchard Foundation Center on Law and Aging

October 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Borchard Foundation Center on Law & Aging provides up to 4 grants of $20,000 each year to further scholarship about new or improved public policies, laws and/or programs that will enhance the quality of life for the elderly. Each grant recipient is required to publish an article on the subject of their research in a top flight journal.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Borchard Foundation Center on Law & Aging recognizes the need for further research and scholarship about new or improved public policies, laws and/or programs that will enhance the quality of life for the elderly (including those who are poor or otherwise isolated by lack of education, language, culture, disability, or other barriers).

The Foundation expects grantees to meet the objectives of the grant program through individual or collaborative research projects that: analyze and recommend changes in one or more important existing public policies, laws, and/or programs relating to the elderly; or anticipate the need for and recommend new public policies, laws, and/or programs for the elderly necessitated by changes in the number and demographics of the country's and the world's elderly populations, by advances in science and technology, by changes in the health care system, or by other developments.

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Graduate Research Fellowship Program
Welder (Rob & Bessie) Wildlife Foundation

October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation's graduate research fellowship program is designed to promote the education of exceptionally qualified students and provide research information to manage wildlife populations.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation will entertain research proposals in the following areas of study: animal behavior, biology, botany, conservation education, ecology, genetics, mammalogy, ornithology, parasitology, range science, veterinary pathology, and wildlife and fisheries sciences.

ELIGIBILITY: 

Fellowships are awarded directly to properly accredited U.S. colleges or universities for bona fide graduate students who are approved candidates for M.S. or Ph.D. degrees after project proposals have been submitted to and approved by the Foundation. Academic institutions are responsible for the competitive selection and supervision of fellowship recipients, subject to Foundation approval.

Studies are limited to the continental United States. Students must have a GPA of 3.0/4.0 and a combined verbal and analytical GRE score of 1100 or above. This award is directed to graduate study at the M.S. and Ph.D. levels only.

Other things being equal, proposals will be ranked in the following order of descending priority: 1. studies already in progress which need to be extended into or through the coming year; 2. new studies which would be initiated on the Foundation Refuge or within the south Texas region; and 3. proposals having to do with problems or species in which we have a special interest because of its relationship to our area or on which we have done some work previously. After consideration of the above three criteria and if funds remain, we then take into consideration projects originating elsewhere within the continental U.S. and those making the greatest contribution to wildlife management in general.

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Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship
Scoville (Herbert) Peace Fellowship

October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship Program invites college graduates to apply for full-time, six-to-nine month fellowships in Washington, DC. Outstanding individuals will be selected to work with nonprofit, public-interest organizations addressing peace and security issues. Applications are especially encouraged from candidates with a strong interest in these issues who have prior experience with public-interest activism or advocacy.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Scoville Fellows will choose to work with one of the twenty-eight organizations participating in the program. With the assistance of the program director, Fellows will select a placement which best matches their interests and the needs of the host organization. Participating organizations provide office space and support, supervision and guidance for Fellows' work. With the exception of Congressional lobbying, Fellows may undertake a variety of activities, including research, writing, and organizing that support the goals of their host organization.

Issue areas covered by the Scoville Fellowship include: arms control/disarmament, including nuclear test ban, ballistic missile proliferation/defense, conventional arms transfers, weapons proliferation-nuclear, biological and chemical; conflict prevention/resolution; defense budget; dismantling chemical and nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union; environmental and energy security, including the nexus of climate change and energy use, conflict, and resource scarcity; environmental impact/cleanup of nuclear weapons production complex; export controls; international security; regional/ethnic conflicts, including East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East; and the United Nations, including UN Peacekeeping.

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National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship Program
National Academy of Education

October 3, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Dissertation Fellowship Program seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $25,000 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

This highly competitive program aims to identify the most talented researchers conducting dissertation research related to education. Basic selection criteria are as follows: Importance of the research question to education; Quality of the research approach and feasibility of the work plan; and Applicant's future potential as a researcher and interest in educational research. Fellowships are not intended to finance data collection or the completion of doctoral coursework, but rather to support the final analysis of the research topic and the writing of the dissertation. For this reason, all applicants must document that they will have completed all pre-dissertation requirements by June 1, 2015 and must provide a clear and specific plan for completing the dissertation within a one or two-year time frame. Applicants should have a demonstrated record of research experience in education. Proposed project must be an education research project. NAEd/Spencer funds studies that examine the efficacy of curriculum and teaching methods; however, the initial development of curriculum or instructional programs are not funded. Applications will be judged on the applicant's past research record, career trajectory in education research, and the quality of the project described in the application.

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Wilson Center Fellowship
The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Through an international competition, the Center offers 9-month residential fellowships. Fellows conduct research and write in their areas of expertise, while interacting with policymakers in Washington and Wilson Center staff.  The Center accepts non-advocacy, policy-relevant, fellowship proposals that address key policy challenges facing the United States and the world.  

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars welcomes outstanding and award winning scholars, practitioners, journalists and public intellectuals to take part in its non-partisan dialogue. Each year, the Center hosts around 160 scholars who conduct independent research on national and/or international issues addressing key public policy challenges. Through its scholars, the Center enriches crucial policy debates and provides a platform for scholars in the tradition of President Wilson to bring the worlds of policy and ideas together. In addition to its flagship international Fellowship program, the Center also hosts scholars selected through its individual programs.

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Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships
Wilson (Woodrow) National Fellowship Foundation

November 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of ethical or religious values in all fields of the humanities and social sciences, and particularly to help Ph.D. candidates in these fields complete their dissertation work in a timely manner.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature.

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Higher Education Research Experience at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for Students
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

Applications are always open but for best results apply February 1 for summer, June 1 for fall, and October 1 for winter/spring.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education provides opportunities to students to participate in a broad range of science and engineering activities related to basic sciences, energy and the environment. Weekly stipends vary with academic level. Appointment durations vary with academic level. Full-time or part-time appointments are available.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Eligible disciplines include: computer science; earth, environmental, and marine sciences; engineering; life, health, and medical sciences; mathematics; physical sciences.

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Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Visiting Scientist Program
Smithsonian Institution

Rolling submission deadline

SYNOPSIS: 

The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory has a Visiting Scientist Program to expand the scholarly exchange in atomic and molecular physics; infrared, optical, radio, and X-ray astronomy; planetary sciences; geophysics; solar and stellar physics; and theoretical astrophysics.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory has a Visiting Scientist and Visiting Student Program to expand scholarly exchange in atomic and molecular physics; infrared, optical, radio, and X-ray astronomy; planetary sciences; geophysics; solar and stellar physics; and theoretical astrophysics. Visits can vary from a few days to several weeks or months and, in some cases, last up to a year. This program annually attracts many international and national visitors.

 

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Centennial Fellowships
American Mathematical Society

December 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The AMS Centennial Research Fellowship Program makes awards annually to outstanding mathematicians to help further their careers in research. From 1997-2001, the fellowship program was aimed at recent PhDs. Recently, the AMS Council approved changes in the rules for the fellowships. The eligibility rules are as follows. The primary selection criterion for the Centennial Fellowship is the excellence of the candidate's research.

  • Preference will be given to candidates who have not had extensive fellowship support in the past.

  • Recipients may not hold the Centennial Fellowship concurrently with another major research award such as a Sloan fellowship, NSF Postdoctoral fellowship, or CAREER award.

  • Under normal circumstances, the fellowship cannot be deferred.

  • A recipient of the fellowship shall have held his or her doctoral degree for at least three years and not more than twelve years at the inception of the award (that is, received between September 1, 2003 and September 1, 2012).

  • Applications will be accepted from those currently holding a tenured, tenure track, post-doctoral, or comparable (at the discretion of the selection committee) position at an institution in North America.

For any program, fellowship, prize or award that has a maximum period of eligibility after receipt of the doctoral degree, the selection committee may use discretion in making exceptions to the limit on eligibility for candidates whose careers have been interrupted for reasons such as family or health. The stipend for fellowships awarded for 2015-2016 is US$87,000, with an additional expense allowance of about US$8,700. Acceptance of the fellowship cannot be postponed.
The number of fellowships to be awarded is small and depends on the amount of money contributed to the program.  The Society will supplement contributions as needed to ensure that at least one fellowship is awarded for the 2015-2016 academic year.  A list of previous fellowship winners can be found on the Prizes and Awards page.

Applications should include a cogent plan indicating how the fellowship will be used. The plan should include travel to at least one other institution and should demonstrate that the fellowship will be used for more than reduction of teaching at the candidate's home institution. The selection committee will consider the plan in addition to the quality of the candidate's research and will try to award the fellowship to those for whom the award would make a real difference in the development of their research careers. Work in all areas of mathematics, including interdisciplinary work, is eligible.

 

 

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Native American Graduate Archaeology Scholarship
Society for American Archaeology

December 16, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Native American Scholarships Fund is an endowment established to foster a sense of shared purpose and positive interaction between archaeologists and Native Americans. Scholarships are open to all Native peoples from anywhere in the Americas, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Indigenous Pacific Islanders.

Since 1998, the SAA has used the endowment income to award the annual Arthur C. Parker Scholarship in support of archaeological training for Native Americans who are students or employees of tribal, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian cultural preservation programs. National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships for Archaeological Training for Native Americans and Native Hawaiians are also awarded through the Native American Scholarships Committee. In 2009, the SAA added two new awards in support of undergraduate and graduate archaeology education.

Support for these scholarships comes in several ways: through individual donations, an annual silent auction at the SAA meetings, book royalties, and grants. For questions about the applications process or to make a donation, please contact the Committee Chair.

The following competitive scholarships are currently offered:

SAA Arthur C. Parker Scholarship or NSF Scholarship for Archaeological Training

To support archaeological training or a research program for Native American students or employees of tribal cultural preservation programs (up to $5,000).

SAA Native American Undergraduate Archaeology Scholarship

To support undergraduate studies for Native American students, including but not limited to tuition, travel, food, housing, books, supplies, equipment, and child care (up to $5,000).

SAA Native American Graduate Archaeology Scholarship

To support graduate studies for Native American students, including but not limited to tuition, travel, food, housing, books, supplies, equipment, and child care (up to $10,000).

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Yerby Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
Harvard School of Public Health

December 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This initiative is geared toward expanding the diversity of those entering academic public health. The program creates a bridge between academic training in health-related disciplines and entry-level faculty positions at institutions throughout the United States. The goal of the program is to advance the intellectual and professional development of each Yerby fellow. Under the guidance of a senior HSPH faculty member with compatible interests, fellows develop their research agendas, gain experience in publishing papers in peer-reviewed journals and obtaining grant support, participate in a variety of professional development workshops, and increase their teaching expertise.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of the program is to advance the intellectual and professional development of each Yerby fellow. Under the guidance of a senior HSPH faculty member with compatible interests, fellows develop their research agendas, gain experience in publishing papers in peer-reviewed journals and obtaining grant support, participate in a variety of professional development workshops, and increase their teaching expertise.

Fellowship training is available throughout the broad range of the school's activities--laboratory sciences, population sciences, and social and policy sciences. Fellows have a home within one of the school's nine academic departments: Biostatistics; Environmental Health; Epidemiology; Genetics and Complex Diseases; Global Health Population; Health Policy and Management; Immunology and Infectious Diseases; Nutrition; and Social and Behavioral Sciences.

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Career Development Grants
American Association of University Women Educational Foundation

December 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Career Development Grants support women who hold a bachelor's degree and are preparing to advance their careers, change careers, or re-enter the work force.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Career Development Grants support women who hold a bachelor's degree and are preparing to advance their careers, change careers, or re-enter the work force. Primary consideration is given to women of color and women pursuing their first advanced degree or credentials in nontraditional fields. Funds are available for tuition, fees, books, supplies, local transportation, and dependent care.

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Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Deadlines vary depending on disciplinary category (see announcement)

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) is to help ensure the vitality and diversity of the scientific and engineering workforce of the United States. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in science and engineering. The GRFP provides three years of support for the graduate education of individuals who have demonstrated their potential for significant achievements in science and engineering.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) awards Fellowships for graduate study leading to research-based master's and doctoral degrees in science and engineering. The Fields of Study listed in the Appendix are used to place applications in the most appropriate review panel and to track the disciplinary progress of Fellows and their career outcomes. Applicants may select "other" if their Field of Study is not represented in the list.

NSF Graduate Research Fellowships are awarded to individuals in the early stages of their graduate study. All applicants are expected to have adequate preparation to begin graduate-level study and research by summer or fall of 2015. This is nearly always demonstrated by a bachelor's degree in a science or engineering field earned prior to fall 2015. In addition, Fellowship awardees must be enrolled in a university, college, or non-profit academic institution of higher education accredited in, and having a campus located in, the United States that offers graduate degrees in eligible science and engineering fields by fall 2015. Confirmation of acceptance in a program which grants a graduate degree in an eligible science or engineering field is required at the time of Fellowship acceptance, by May 1, 2015. Upon acceptance of an NSF GRFP Fellowship, Fellows must certify that they meet all of the eligibility requirements as described in this Program Solicitation. All Fellows from the date of Acceptance through Completion or Termination of the Fellowship must be affiliated with a graduate degree-granting institution accredited in, and having a campus located in, the United States.

While applicants accepting the Fellowship must be affiliated with an institution having a campus located in the United States, NSF encourages United States graduate students to establish collaborative relationships with international researchers and institutions. GRFP offers the Graduate Research Opportunities Worldwide (GROW) initiative to enable Fellows to take advantage of expertise, facilities, data, and field sites located abroad; to develop an international network of collaborators early in their career; to address problems of a global nature that require international cooperation; and to be prepared upon joining the United States science and engineering workforce to collaborate successfully in international teams.

GRFP supports individuals proposing a comprehensive holistic plan for graduate education that takes into account individual interests and competencies. Thus, an applicant must provide a detailed profile of her or his relevant educational and research experiences and plans for graduate education in such a way as to demonstrate potential for significant achievements in science and engineering.

Prospective applicants are advised that submission of an application implies a commitment to the pursuit of graduate study in a research-based program in science or engineering. Acceptance of a Fellowship award is an explicit agreement that the Fellow will be duly enrolled in a graduate degree program consistent with the field of study indicated in their application by the beginning of the following academic year.

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AHRQ Grants for Health Services Research Dissertation Program (R36)
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality/DHHS

Deadlines are: May 1, August 1, November 1, and February 1

SYNOPSIS: 

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) announces the continuation of AHRQ Health Services Research Dissertation Grant Program that provides support to individuals who are conducting research undertaken as part of an accredited academic program to qualify for a research doctorate degree. This FOA utilizes the dissertation research grant mechanism (R36).

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Applications for dissertation research grants must be responsive to AHRQ's mission, which is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans. The research sponsored and conducted by the Agency develops and presents scientific evidence regarding all aspects of health care. It addresses issues of organization, delivery, financing, utilization, patient and provider behavior, outcomes, effectiveness and cost. It evaluates both clinical services and the system in which these services are provided. These scientific results improve the evidence base to enable better decisions about health care, including such areas as disease prevention, appropriate use of medical technologies, improving diagnosis and treatment in cost-effective ways, long-term care, and reducing racial and ethnic disparities. AHRQ has identified strategic goals as priority research areas. Research applications must address one of these areas. Applicants are strongly encouraged to focus on topical areas unique to AHRQ, demonstrating how expected results can be used or made available for use to enhance healthcare quality. Results should be directly relevant to customers, such as providers and practitioners, administrators, payers, consumers, policymakers, and insurers. The strategic research goals are:

Safety/quality - Reduce the risk of harm from health care services by promoting the delivery of appropriate care that achieves the best quality outcomes;

Efficiency - Achieve wider access to effective health care services and reduce health care costs;

Effectiveness - Assure that providers and consumers/patients use beneficial and timely health care information to make informed decision choices.

AHRQ has specific research portfolio areas of interest which include comparative effectiveness/patient-centered outcomes, health information technology (health IT), value, patient safety, prevention and care management, and healthcare innovations. Candidates are required to address health services research issues critical to AHRQ priority populations, including: individuals living in inner city and rural (including frontier) areas; low-income and minority groups; women, children, the elderly; and individuals with special health care needs, including those with disabilities and those who need chronic or end-of-life health care. Candidates must conduct dissertation projects which focus on health care delivery in the United States. AHRQ will not accept international health care research projects.

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Sabbatical & Research Fellowships
National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center

Rolling submission deadline

SYNOPSIS: 

Sabbatical & Research Fellowships are awarded to established scholars who will be in residence at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) or the Resources for the Future facility for 2-12 months to undertake activities that will advance socio-environmental synthesis research. Applicants propose synthesis activities consistent with the mission of SESYNC and are also expected to participate in collaborative Center activities as part of their efforts while in residence. SESYNC provides a stipend based on time in residence (not to exceed 50% of the fellow's home institution salary) and a small housing allowance (up to $1000/month). Sabbatical Fellows are considered Visiting Scientists at the University of Maryland and therefore are not eligible for benefits under the USM system; benefits would continue through the fellow's home institution.

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Upcoming Deadlines

Undergraduate & Graduate Accounts in Commons & "Individual Development Plans (IDPs)"
Starting in October 2014, Commons User IDs will be required for these students. NIH will not accept RPPRs or PHS 2590s that do not have this information. Also, IDPs should be included for graduate students and postdocs.

Since August 15, 2013, the functionality to create accounts for students has been available.  However, as part of the NIH effort to improve data on the biomedical workforce (BMW), undergraduate and graduate students who participate in NIH-supported projects for at least one person-month of full-time work will eventually be required to have an eRA Commons account for reporting purposes.

Back in November of 2013, both the PHS 2590 Non-Competing Continuation Progress Report and Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) started checking to see if graduate and undergraduate students' Commons User IDs were included in the report.  They aren't quite mandatory at this point.  You will get a warning from the electronically submitted RPPR for students listed on the report, but who do not have a Commons name.

For more information on Commons User IDs for students, read the August 2, 2013, Guide Notice and the Extramural Nexus article. As Dr. Rockey points out in her Nexus article, it will be critical for all students to create their personal profile in Commons as this information will eventually "reduce burden in the long run by pre-populating some reporting fields and forms."  For more information on the Personal Profile, you can watch the Personal Profile Overview video.

NIH Encourages Institutions to Develop Individual
Development Plans for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Researchers

The purpose of this Guide Notice is to announce that NIH encourages institutions to assist graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to achieve their career goals within the biomedical research workforce through the use of Individual Development Plans (IDPs).  Institutions are encouraged to report on this in all progress reports submitted on/after October 1, 2014, using the Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-13-093.html

 

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PCORI Fall Funding Cycle - New Topics: LOI's due in less than two weeks!
PCORI

LOI due September 5, 2014
Full submission due November 4, 2014

Letters of Intent for Latest PCORI Funding Opportunities Due Sept. 5  

There are less than two weeks remaining to submit required Letters of Intent (LOIs) for the five open PCORI Funding Announcements (PFAs) under our broad National Priorities for Research. LOIs are due by 5 p.m. ET on Friday, Sept. 5. LOIs are competitive, meaning they will be reviewed for responsiveness and programmatic fit and only those research teams whose proposals meet the criteria will be invited to submit a full application no later than Sept. 19.

SYNOPSIS: 

PCORI released a number of new Funding Announcements (PFAs) today offering up to $76 million in support for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research proposals. Required Letters of Intent (LOIs) are due by 5 p.m. ET Friday, Sept. 5. A number of refinements were made in the PFA process this round based on feedback from previous applicants. One key change: all LOIs are now "competitive," meaning they'll be screened for responsiveness and programmatic fit and only research teams whose proposals meet this test will be invited to submit a full application.  

OPEN FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options: PCORI is seeking applications for comparative effectiveness research designed to provide information that would inform critical decisions that face patients and caregivers, clinicians, policy makers, and health care system leaders. These decisions must be consequential and be occurring now in the absence of sound evidence about the comparative effectiveness of alternative approaches. There must be substantial potential that patients/caregivers will benefit from the new knowledge in ways that are important to them. The premise of this research is that the new knowledge will inform critical choices by patients and stakeholders in health care. This knowledge will provide insight about the comparative benefits and harms of the options and provide information about outcomes that are important to patients.

LOI due: September 5, 2014 

Full submission due: November 4, 2014 

2. Improving Healthcare Systems: PCORI is seeking applications to study the comparative effectiveness of alternate features of healthcare systems (e.g., innovative technologies, personnel deployments, incentives, service designs) designed to optimize the quality, outcomes, and/or efficiency of care for the patients they serve. Healthcare systems include private and public health insurance plans; physician groups; hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities; academic medical centers; integrated delivery systems; community-based and safety-net clinics; federal, state, and municipal providers; and other entities organized to deliver, arrange, purchase, or coordinate healthcare services. PCORI seeks studies that will provide information of value to patients, their caregivers, and clinicians, as well as to healthcare leaders, regarding which features of systems lead to better patient-centered outcomes.

LOI due: September 5, 2014 

Full submission due: November 4, 2014 

3. Communication and Dissemination Research: PCORI seeks to fund projects that address critical knowledge gaps in the communication and dissemination process--both the communication and dissemination of research results to patients, their caregivers, and clinicians, as well as the communication between patients, caregivers, and clinicians in the service of enabling patients and caregivers to make the best possible decisions in choosing among available options for care and treatment.

LOI due: September 5, 2014 

Full submission due: November 4, 2014 

4. Addressing Disparities: In this PCORI Funding Announcement (PFA), we seek to fund comparative effectiveness research (CER) studies that evaluate and compare new and/or enhanced interventions to reduce or eliminate disparities in health and health care. Studies in the Addressing Disparities program should focus on overcoming barriers that may disproportionately affect the outcomes of specific groups of patients, or identify best practices for sharing results and information about patient-centered research across patient groups.

LOI due: September 5, 2014 

Full submission due: November 4, 2014 

5. Improving Methods for Conducting Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: In this PCORI Funding Announcement (PFA), we seek projects to address gaps in methodological research relevant to conducting patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR). Results of these projects will inform future iterations of PCORI's Methodology Report. The improvement of existing methods will benefit all stakeholders, including researchers planning investigations, policy makers weighing the value of healthcare interventions, and patients, clinicians, and caregivers facing healthcare decisions.

LOI due: September 5, 2014 

Full submission due: November 4, 2014 

OTHER INFORMATION: 

Please visit the program link for additional funding opportunities and information. 

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Large Pragmatic Studies to Evaluate Patient-Centered Outcomes - Winter 2015 Cycle
PCORI

LOI due October 1, 2014
Full submission due February 3, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) seeks to fund pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs), large simple trials (LSTs), or large-scale observational studies that compare two or more alternatives for addressing prevention, diagnosis, treatment, or management of a disease or symptom; improving health care system-level approaches to managing care; or eliminating health or healthcare disparities.

Proposed studies must address critical clinical choices faced by patients, their caregivers, clinicians, and/or delivery systems. They must involve broadly representative patient populations and be large enough to provide precise estimates of hypothesized effectiveness differences and to support evaluation of potential differences in treatment effectiveness in patient subgroups.

For this solicitation, PCORI is requiring that relevant patient organizations, professional organizations, and/or payer or purchaser organizations be included as partners and active participants in the study. PCORI expects that most awards will be made for study designs that use randomization, either of individual participants or clusters, to avoid confounding bias. However, we recognize that exceptional opportunities may arise, by virtue of natural experiments and/or the existence of large registries, to address pragmatic questions using observational designs. Please note that this funding program does not support applications to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis, systematic reviews (with or without meta-analysis), development, and/or evaluations of shared decision-making or decision support tools.

This announcement is a collaborative effort of PCORI's Clinical Effectiveness Research, Improving Healthcare Systems, and Addressing Disparities research programs. Thus, applications for pragmatic studies may fit within any of these three priority areas.

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Limited Submissions

Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program (R25)
National Institute of General Medical Sciences/NIH/DHHS

July 14, 2014
September 25, 2014

The Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program provides an opportunity to develop new, or expand existing, effective institutional programs aimed at a key juncture within higher education, namely the transition from a two-year community college program to baccalaureate degree completion in biomedical and behavioral sciences. NIGMS anticipates that carefully planned interventions at this key point of the educational pathway will increase the supply of biomedical and behavioral science graduates, a necessary step in enhancing the diversity of the NIH-funded biomedial workforce.  The long-term goal of the Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program is to enhance the pool of community college students from groups underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences who go on to research careers in these fields. The short-term goal of the program is to enhance the pool of students who transition from a two-year institution to a four-year institution, with subsequent baccalaureate degree completion. The specific objective of this program is to develop and implement an integrated plan of individual and institutional activities that will increase students' preparation and skills as they advance academically in the pursuit of the baccalaureate and subsequently more advanced degrees in biomedical and behavioral sciences.

Additional Information on Eligibility:

institutions, including the lead applicant institution. One must be an institution that offers the assocate's degree as the primary degree in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. Another institution must be a college or university granting the baccalaureate degree in biomedical and behavioral sciences. Two different scenarios are anticipated for these partnerships: a) one baccalaureate degree-granting institution as the lead applicant institution partnering with one or more associate's degree-granting institutions, or b) one ssociate's degree-granting institution as the lead applicant institution partnering with one or more baccalaureate degree-granting institutions. An eligible applicant or partner institution may participate in more than one Bridges to the Baccalaureate partnership if such multiple partnerships are strongly justified by the potential to magnify the programs' and institutions' outcomes.

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Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM (P01)
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

Internal MSU LOI Deadline: August 11, 2014
September 25, 2014

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is issued by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) to enable submission of applications that propose to conduct research that is of high-priority to NCCAM that requires synergistic collaboration between outstanding scientists, and the synthesis of multiple research approaches by multi-disciplinary research teams. The CERC mechanism is designed to support research in which the funding of three or four synergistic, highly meritorious projects as a group offers significant scientific advantages over support of the same projects as individual research grants. Each CERC must consist, throughout the duration of the award, of three or four research projects, focused on basic, mechanistic, and/or translational research questions relevant to the research priorities described in the current NCCAM Strategic Plan.

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Research Fellowships
Sloan (Alfred P.) Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due September 1 (each department may nominate three individuals)
Full submission due September 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Sloan Research Fellowships seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise. These two-year fellowships are awarded yearly to 126 researchers in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Funds from the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded directly to the fellow's institution and may be used over a two-year period for any activity supportive of the fellow's research, including equipment, technical assistance, professional travel, or trainee support. The following areas are supported: 

  • Economics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Neuroscience
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Computational Biology
  • Chemical Sciences
  • Computer Science
  • Marine and Ocean Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

Limits on Applications: Three individuals per department may be nominated. 

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2015 Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences
Pew Charitable Trust

Internal MSU Deadline and Submission Requirement: October 6, Submit a MSU Limited Submission Pre-Proposal in the MSU ePCF System (1 page White Paper required)
Deadline: November 3, 2014

The Pew scholars program supports assistant professors of outstanding promise in science relevant to the advancement of human health. The award provides $240,000 in flexible support--$60,000 per year for four years.

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Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)
Office of International and Integrative Activities / NSF

Internal MSU LOI Deadline: August 11, 2014
Preliminary Proposal Deadline Date: October 21, 2014; Full Proposals by invitation only - Deadline Date: May 15, 2015

Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) is an NSF-wide program that supports international activities across all NSF supported disciplines. The primary goal of PIRE is to support high quality projects in which advances in research and education could not occur without international collaboration. PIRE seeks to catalyze a higher level of international engagement in the U.S. science and engineering community.

International partnerships are essential to addressing critical science and engineering problems. In the global context, U.S. researchers and educators must be able to operate effectively in teams with partners from different national environments and cultural backgrounds. PIRE promotes excellence in science and engineering through international collaboration and facilitates development of a diverse, globally-engaged, U.S. science and engineering workforce.

This PIRE competition will be open to all areas of science and engineering research which are supported by the NSF.

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Amgen Foundation

Submit a MSU Limited Submission Pre-Proposal in the MSU ePCF System by October 1, 2014 (1 page White Paper required).
Receipt

The Amgen Foundation seeks to advance science education, improve quality of care and access for patients, and support resources that create sound communities where Amgen staff members live and work. The Foundation awards grants to regional, national, and Europe-based nonprofit organizations that are replicable, scalable and designed to have a lasting and meaningful effect in our communities. Grants should reflect Amgen's dedication to impacting lives in inspiring and innovative ways.

Quality of Care and Access for Patients - The Foundation funds programs dedicated to providing patients, caregivers and health care practitioners with information, education and access. The two areas given priority consideration within quality of care are: Patient Empowerment: Programs that enable patients to become active partners in their health care, make informed decisions and contribute to a wider perspective in the health care system; and Health Care Disparities/Health Inequalities: Programs that aim to close gaps and address population-specific differences in the presence of disease, health outcomes, or access to health care - from prevention to survivorship. The types of interventions the Amgen Foundation seeks to fund include strategies that aim to address problems at the root cause, help make a difference on the widest scale, and have a general benefit beyond a single institution; and programs that develop a framework that have the potential to be effective across various diseases and populations.

Science Education - The Foundation is committed to raising the value of science literacy on a national and local level. The areas given priority consideration within science education are: Teacher quality and professional development in math and science: Comprehensive programs that enhance the quality of math and science teachers entering the classroom and support teachers with meaningful professional development opportunities that have a positive impact on student achievement; and Pivotal hands-on science experience: Support programs that provide students and teachers with opportunities for hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences that significantly impact students' excitement about science and scientific careers.

Community Life - The Foundation supports programs that align with its overall mission and priority giving areas in the communities where Amgen has a presence. Currently, the Amgen Foundation makes Community Life grants in and around the following U.S. and Puerto Rico communities: Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, CA; San Francisco Bay Area, CA; Counties along the Front Range of Colorado; Greater Boston Area, Middlesex and Suffolk Counties, MA; Juncos, Puerto Rico; Rhode Island; and King and South Snohomish Counties, WA. The foundation's focus is to fund programs that enhance civic engagement by supporting science and education based initiatives, environmental programs, health and social services, as well as culture and arts in an effort to strengthen and enrich communities.

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Academic-Community Partnership Conference Series (R13)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

Internal MSU LOI Deadline: September 15, 2014
October 17, 2014

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) encourages Research Conference Grant (R13) applications to conduct health disparities-related meetings, workshops, and symposia. The purpose of the Academic-Community Partnership Conference Series is to bring together academic institutions/organizations and community organizations to identify opportunities for addressing health disparities through the use of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR). The objectives of meetings conducted as part of this award will be to: (1) establish and/or enhance academic-community partnerships; (2) identify community-driven research priorities, and (3) develop long-term collaborative CBPR research agendas. Thus, it is expected these partnerships will lead to grant applications for the support of CBPR projects designed to meet identified community needs. The areas of focus for these partnerships may include one or more of the following community-health issues: infant mortality; Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS); fibroid tumors; childhood, adolescent, and/or adult obesity; health literacy; techniques for outreach and information dissemination; pediatric and maternal HIV/AIDS prevention; and violence prevention.

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Agricultural, Forestry and Fishing Safety and Health Research (U01)
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

Internal MSU LOI due September 7, 2014
Agency LOI due September 26, 2014
Full submission due October 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) invites applications for research projects to further our understanding of the risks and conditions associated with forestry or logging related occupational diseases and injuries, to explore methods for reducing risks and for preventing or minimizing exposure to hazardous conditions in the these work environments, and to translate significant scientific findings into prevention practices and products that will effectively reduce work-related illnesses and injuries in this area. In addition, this cooperative agreement aims to enhance our knowledge about the effectiveness of existing interventions and the best ways to disseminate, diffuse, and translate proven interventions to benefit workers in the AgFF sector, in particular our ability to address the unique needs of vulnerable workers. This program will use the U01 Research Project - Cooperative Agreements award mechanism.

OBJECTIVES:

Proposals should address research objectives supported by NIOSH, which include, but are not limited to the following: the identification and investigation of the relationships between hazardous working conditions and associated occupational diseases, injuries and death; the development of more sensitive means of evaluating hazards at work sites; the development of new protective equipment and engineering control technology to reduce work-related illnesses and injuries; the development of work practices that reduce the risks of occupational hazards; the evaluation of the technical feasibility or application of a new or improved occupational safety and health procedure, method, technique, or system, including assessment of economic and other factors that influence their diffusion and successful adoption in workplaces; the evaluation of the effectiveness of existing interventions and educational materials that are tailored to address unique factors associated with worker vulnerability; the development and conduct of demonstration programs in conjunction with employers hiring vulnerable workers, to identify new, cost-effective approaches for safety training and work production; the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based programs that are culturally, linguistically, and educationally appropriate for workers and employers, including those that are tailored to address risk factors associated with worker vulnerability, including children and bystanders in the work setting; increase awareness and promote expanded application of best practices, materials, technologies, and policies, including the development of public awareness and social marketing campaigns to address high priority agriculture, forestry, and fishing safety and health issues; and the evaluation and investigation of the best methods to influence the behaviors of agricultural workers, loggers and commercial fishermen, including assessments of barriers, motivators, and ideal strategies. Methods should account for social, economic, cultural, and other factors affecting the adoption of best practices among workers and employers.

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NSF Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections
Directorate for Biological Sciences - Emerging Frontiers and Directorate for Geosciences

Internal MSU LOI due September 22, 2014
Full submission due October 17, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This program seeks to enhance and expand the national resource of digital data documenting existing vouchered biological and paleontological collections and to advance scientific knowledge by improving access to digitized information (including images) residing in vouchered scientific collections across the United States. The information associated with various collections of organisms, such as geographic, paleogeographic and stratigraphic distribution, environmental habitat data, phenology, information about associated organisms, collector field notes, and tissues and molecular data extracted from the specimens, is a rich resource providing the baseline from which to further biodiversity research and provide critical information about existing gaps in our knowledge of life on earth. The national resource is structured at three levels: a central coordinating organization, a series of thematic networks based on an important research theme, and the physical collections. The national resource builds upon a sizable existing national investment in curation of the physical objects in scientific collections and contributes vitally to scientific research and technology interests in the United States. It will become an invaluable tool in understanding contemporary biological issues and challenges.

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MUREP Institutional Research Opportunity (MIRO)
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Internal MSU LOI due September 10, 2014
Agency LOI due September 22, 2014
Full submission due November 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Announcement (NRA), entitled Education Opportunities in NASA STEM (EONS) - 2014, solicits education opportunities in support of NASA's Office of Education (OE) under the Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) for fiscals year 2014. NASA may elect to support some of the proposals submitted under this NRA through the use of non-MUREP funds if such funds are available from other NASA or federal sources.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The purpose of MUREP is to increase NASA's responsiveness to Federal mandates related to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU), Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) institutions and Other Minority Universities (OMU). Currently, MUREP activities address Presidential Executive Orders No. 13532 on HBCUs, No. 13592 on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, No. 13555 on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans and No. 13515
on Increasing Participation of Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in Federal Programs. The MUREP program team at NASA is responsible for developing agency-wide policies, procedures, and guidelines that enhance the involvement of all minority-serving education institutions in NASA's mission through MUREP-related activities. Activities supported by MUREP provide underrepresented and underserved students majoring in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) discipline and faculty at Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) access to NASA research and education opportunities. Students and faculty supported by MUREP are provided opportunities to engage in NASA-related research and mission-specific technology development. MUREP projects are also designed to address the national challenges of attracting and retaining underrepresented and underserved undergraduate and graduate students in STEM.

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IUSE / Professional Formation of Engineers: Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (RED)
Directorate for Engineering and Education

Internal MSU LOI due September 30, 2014
Agency LOI due October 28, 2014
Full submission due November 26, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The NSF Engineering (ENG) Directorate is launching a multi-year initiative, theProfessional Formation of Engineers, to create and support an innovative and inclusive engineering profession for the 21st Century. Professional Formation of Engineers (PFE) refers to the formal and informal processes and value systems by which people become engineers. It also includes the ethical responsibility of practicing engineers to sustain and grow the profession. The engineering profession must be responsive to national priorities, grand challenges, and dynamic workforce needs; it must be equally open and accessible to all.

In FY 2015 the PFE initiative in ENG is launching a pilot program aligned with the IUSE framework: Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (herein referred to as RED), in partnership with the Directorates for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) and Education and Human Resources (EHR). This funding opportunity enables engineering departments to lead the nation by successfully achieving significant sustainable changes necessary to overcome long-standing issues in their undergraduate programs and educate inclusive communities of engineering students prepared to solve 21st century challenges. Computer science departments, whether administratively located in or outside an engineering program, are included in RED, as they share the same challenges as traditional engineering departments. (Note: "Engineering departments" in this solicitation will refer to engineering and computer science departments.)

Even as demographic and regional socio-economic factors affect departments in unique ways, there are certain tenets of sustainable change that are common across institutions. For instance, the development and engagement of the entire faculty within a department are paramount to the process, and they must be incentivized. Departmental cultural barriers to inclusion of students and faculty from different backgrounds must be identified and addressed. Finally, coherent technical and professional threads must be developed and woven across the four years, especially (1) in the core technical courses of the middle two years, (2) in internship opportunities in the private and public sectors, and (3) in research opportunities with faculty. These and other threads aim to ensure that students develop deep knowledge in their discipline more effectively and meaningfully, while at the same time, aim to build their capacities for 21st Century and "T-shaped" professional skills, including design, leadership, communication, understanding historical and contemporary social contexts, lifelong learning, creativity, entrepreneurship, and teamwork. It is hoped that, over time, the awardees of this program will create knowledge concerning sustainable change in engineering and computer science education that can be scaled and adopted nationally across a wide variety of academic institutions.

Note: Because it addresses undergraduate engineering education, the Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (RED) funding opportunity is offered in alignment with the NSF-wide undergraduate STEM education initiative, Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE). More information about IUSE can be found in the Introduction of this solicitation.

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Obama-Singh 21st Century Knowledge Initiative (OSI)
United States - India Educational Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due October 1, 2014
Full submission must be postmarked by November 3, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The United States-India Educational Foundation (USIEF) announces an open competition for the support of projects through the Obama - Singh 21st Century Knowledge Initiative (OSI). Accredited U.S. post-secondary educational institutions meeting the provisions described in Internal Revenue Code section 26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3) may submit proposals to support the program's goals of encouraging mutual understanding, facilitating educational reform, fostering economic development, and engaging civil society through academic cooperation with Indian post secondary educational institutions.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Exchange activities may include but are not limited to curriculum design, research collaboration, team teaching, focused series of exchanges, seminars, among other activities. Activities should be designed to develop expertise, advance scholarship and teaching, and promote long-term ties between partner institutions. Proposals in the following fields are eligible: Energy, Climate Change & Environmental Studies; Education & Educational Reform; Public Health; Sustainable Development & Community Development; and, International Relations & Strategic Studies.

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Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I Solicitation (SBIR): December Submission
Directorate for Engineering (Industrial Innovation and Partnerships)

Internal MSU LOI due October 1, 2014
Full submission due December 2, 2014

*TechLink, a Montana State University organization dedicated to development, transfer, and commercialization of technology is available to assist investigators with their SBIR/STTR plans. Please contact staff listed on the TechLink website: http://techlinkcenter.org/home. Supporting grants for proposal submission may be available.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program stimulates technological innovation in the private sector by strengthening the role of small business concerns in meeting Federal research and development needs, increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results, and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The SBIR program solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission. The program is governed by Public Law 112-81 (SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011). SBIR policy is provided by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through the SBA Policy Directive. A main purpose of the legislation is to stimulate technological innovation and increase private sector commercialization. The NSF SBIR program is therefore in a unique position to meet both the goals of NSF and the purpose of the SBIR legislation by transforming scientific discovery into both social and economic benefit, and by emphasizing private sector commercialization.

Accordingly, NSF has formulated broad solicitation topics for SBIR that conform to the high-technology investment sector's interests. The topics are detailed on the SBIR/STTR topics homepage.

Note: The submission of the same project idea to both this SBIR Phase I solicitation and the concurrent STTR Phase I solicitation is strongly discouraged.

More information about the NSF SBIR Program can be found on the Program Homepage.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

By increasing the incentive and opportunity for small firms to undertake cutting-edge, high-risk, high-quality scientific, engineering, or science and engineering education research, the NSF SBIR program seeks to transform scientific discovery into both social and economic benefit by emphasizing private sector commercialization.

The fundamental mission of NSF is to promote discoveries and to advance education across the frontiers of knowledge in science and engineering. Consistent with that mission, the NSF SBIR Program encourages and supports a wide range of proposals. These proposals are reviewed under NSF's merit review criteria, which cover both the quality of research (intellectual or technical merit) and its potential impact on society (broader/commercial impacts). The following broad solicitation topics for SBIR conform to the high-technology investment sector's interests. The topics, listed below, are detailed on the SBIR/STTR topics homepage:

  • Educational Technologies and Applications (EA)
  • Information and Communication Technologies (IC)
  • Semiconductors (S) and Photonic (PH) Devices and Materials
  • Electronic Hardware, Robotics and Wireless Technologies (EW)
  • Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology (MN)
  • Advanced Materials and Instrumentation (MI)
  • Chemical and Environmental Technologies (CT)
  • Biological Technologies (BT)
  • Smart Health (SH) and Biomedical (BM) Technologies

Certain innovative technologies with high commercial potential may not appear to fit under any of the nine current solicitation topics or their associated subtopics. In that case, you may seek advice from the relevant Program Director (as detailed on the topic pages), or you may submit the proposal under the topic and subtopic that is the closest match. The SBIR/STTR Program Directors ensure that proposals are appropriately grouped into panels for review by experts in the field, and the review process is facilitated by a Program Director. The topics and subtopics help facilitate the merit review process but are not used as a consideration in making award decisions.

Successful proposers will conduct Research and Development (R&D) on projects that:

  • Provide evidence of a commercially viable product, process, device, or system, and/or
  • Meet an important social or economic need.

Projects should have the following:

  • High potential commercial payback, and
  • A high degree of technical risk.

For more in-depth program information please reference the following web site: SBIR Homepage.

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Blavatnik National Award for Young Scientists
Blavatnik Family Foundation

Internal LOI due September 1, 2014
Agency LOI due September 20, 2014
Full submission due December 9, 2014

The Blavatnik National Awards honor America's most innovative young faculty-rank scientists and engineers.

This new national faculty competition of the Blavatnik Awards will reward excellence by young faculty members in three disciplinary categories. Every year, one nominee in each category will be named a Blavatnik Laureate and awarded $250,000 in unrestricted funds:

  • Blavatnik National Award for Young Scientists in Life Sciences 
  • Blavatnik National Award for Young Scientists in Physical Sciences & Engineering 
  • Blavatnik National  Award for Young Scientists in Chemistry  

The nomination period will be from September 30th, 2014 to November 25th, 2014.  Letters of support must be submitted by December 9th, 2014. Interested PI's must work with their department heads to fulfill the application requirements. 

 

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Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (2015 - 2019) (NHERI)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Internal MSU LOI due October 8, 2014
Agency LOI due on November 6, 2014
Full submission due on December 3, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This solicitation will establish operations of the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) for 2015 - 2019. NHERI is the next generation of National Science Foundation (NSF) support for a natural hazards engineering research large facility, replacing the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). NEES was established by NSF as a distributed, multi-user, national research infrastructure for earthquake engineering through a facility construction phase during 2000 - 2004, followed by operations of this infrastructure to support research, innovation, and education activities from October 2004 through September 2014.

During 2015 - 2019, NHERI will be a distributed, multi-user, national facility to provide the natural hazards engineering community with access to research infrastructure (earthquake and wind engineering experimental facilities, cyberinfrastructure, computational modeling and simulation tools, and research data), coupled with education and community outreach activities. NHERI will enable research and educational advances that can contribute knowledge and innovation for the nation's civil infrastructure and communities to prevent natural hazard events from becoming societal disasters.

NHERI will consist of the following components, established through up to ten individual awards:

  • Network Coordination Office (one award),
  • Cyberinfrastructure (one award),
  • Computational Modeling and Simulation Center (one award), and
  • Experimental Facilities for earthquake engineering and wind engineering research (up to seven awards, including one award for a Post-Disaster, Rapid Response Research Facility).

Up to ten cooperative agreements are anticipated to commence in 2015, each with a five-year award duration. Awardees will not conduct research under their awards. The primary research enabled by NHERI will be conducted by investigators supported through separate NSF awards. The Awardees and the natural hazards engineering community will work together, through Governance and Awardee activities, to establish a shared vision for NHERI, set natural hazards engineering research and education agendas and priorities, and make NHERI a value-added and productive research infrastructure.

LIMIT ON NUMBER OF PROPOSALS: 

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 2

An academic institution may submit up to two proposals as the lead institution, but may not submit more than one proposal as the lead institution in any one of the following four proposal categories:

  1. Network Coordination Office (NCO),
  2. Cyberinfrastructure (CI),
  3. Computational Modeling and Simulation Center (SimCenter), and
  4. Experimental Facility (EF), which includes the Post-Disaster, Rapid Response Research (RAPID) Facility.

A full proposal involving more than one organization must be submitted as a single administrative package from the lead institution; collaborative full proposals with multiple administrative packages will not be accepted and will be returned without review. If the Principal Investigator of a full proposal leaves or transfers to another institution during the review process or after an award is made, the proposal/award remains with the lead institution. Additionally, the lead institution cannot be changed after submission of the full proposal. National laboratories and private sector companies, as well as non-U.S. institutions, may participate in NHERI award activities using their own resources and cannot receive NSF support from an award made under this solicitation; however, this shall not be interpreted to prohibit purchases, services, or sales contracts/agreements with these entities. A proposal for an EF, including the RAPID Facility, must be a single academic institution proposal with all proposed facility resources owned, operated, and maintained by the academic institution and located within the United States to facilitate access by NSF-supported users.

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Career Awards at the Scientific Interface (CASI)
Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Internal MSU LOI Deadline: August 11, 2014
Pre-proposal due September 1, 2014
January 8, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

BWF's Career Awards at the Scientific Interface (CASI) provide $500,000 over five years to bridge advanced postdoctoral training and the first three years of faculty service. These awards are intended to foster the early career development of researchers who have transitioned or are transitioning from undergraduate and/or graduate work in the physical/mathematical/computational sciences or engineering into postdoctoral work in the biological sciences, and who are dedicated to pursuing a career in academic research. These awards are open to U.S. and Canadian citizens or permanent residents as well as to U.S. temporary residents.

Scientific advances such as genomics, quantitative structural biology, imaging techniques, and modeling of complex systems have created opportunities for exciting research careers at the interface between the physical/computational sciences and the biological sciences. Tackling key problems in biology will require scientists trained in areas such as chemistry, physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering.

Recognizing the vital role such cross-trained scientists will play in furthering biomedical science, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund has developed the Career Awards at the Scientific Interface. These grants are intended to foster the early career development of researchers who have transitioned or are transitioning from undergraduate and/or graduate work in the physical/mathematical/computational sciences or engineering into postdoctoral work in the biological sciences, and who are dedicated to pursuing a career in academic research.

Prior to 2010, candidates for this award were nominated by North American degree-granting institutions. Since 2010, eligible candidates for this award may self-nominate.

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Career Awards at the Scientific Interface
Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Internal MSU LOI Deadline: August 11, 2014
LOI due on September 1, 2014
Full submission due on January 8, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

BWF's Career Awards at the Scientific Interface (CASI) provide $500,000 over five years to bridge advanced postdoctoral training and the first three years of faculty service. These awards are intended to foster the early career development of researchers who have transitioned or are transitioning from undergraduate and/or graduate work in the physical/mathematical/computational sciences or engineering into postdoctoral work in the biological sciences, and who are dedicated to pursuing a career in academic research. These awards are open to U.S. and Canadian citizens or permanent residents as well as to U.S. temporary residents.

Scientific advances such as genomics, quantitative structural biology, imaging techniques, and modeling of complex systems have created opportunities for exciting research careers at the interface between the physical/computational sciences and the biological sciences. Tackling key problems in biology will require scientists trained in areas such as chemistry, physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering.

Recognizing the vital role such cross-trained scientists will play in furthering biomedical science, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund has developed the Career Awards at the Scientific Interface. These grants are intended to foster the early career development of researchers who have transitioned or are transitioning from undergraduate and/or graduate work in the physical/mathematical/computational sciences or engineering into postdoctoral work in the biological sciences, and who are dedicated to pursuing a career in academic research.

Prior to 2010, candidates for this award were nominated by North American degree-granting institutions. Since 2010, eligible candidates for this award may self-nominate.

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Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (PREM)
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences & Division of Materials Research

Internal MSU LOI due October 20, 2014
Full submission due on January 7, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The objective of PREM is to broaden participation and enhance diversity in materials research and education by stimulating the development of formal, long-term, multi-investigator, collaborative research and education partnerships between minority-serving colleges/universities and the NSF Division of Materials Research (DMR)-supported centers and/or facilities.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The objective of PREM is to enhance the diversity of the workplace in materials research and education by stimulating the development of formal, long-term, research and education collaborations between minority-serving colleges and universities and DMR-supported centers and facilities.

PREM awards are expected to achieve significant increases in the number and quality of interactions between faculty and students at minority-serving colleges/universities and participants from the DMR-supported centers and facilities. They should result in increasing the number of graduate materials-related degrees for underrepresented minorities and in networking and dissemination of new knowledge. NSF's commitment to broadening participation is embedded in its Strategic Plan. The report "A Framework for Action" outlines the approach (seehttp://www.nsf.gov/od/broadeningparticipation/bp.jsp)

Funded activities might include, but are not limited to, the development of collaborative and mutually beneficial materials research and education projects, support for graduate and undergraduate students, and exchanges of faculty and students. High school students and teachers may also participate. Of special interest to DMR are activities based on research and education connections between the participants and designed to increase the recruitment, retention and degree attainment by members of underrepresented groups in materials research. The participation of 2-year and 4-year Associate degree-granting institutions in partnership with eligible institutions may be considered for this goal (see Section IV for specific eligibility requirements). While PREM awards engage scientists in fundamental materials research, activities that encourage entrepreneurship are also of special interest to NSF, as are those that offer an international experience. Proposers are encouraged to contact NSF program staff listed in Section VIII to discuss the appropriateness of the planned activities, and check eligibility requirements.

To date, successful PREMs have a strong overlap in research focus with the partner institution, and fully integrate the partner into the research and education activities of the PREM. In addition, successful PREMs have a well-defined management structure, with active internal and external advisory committees.

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Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) (R25)
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

Internal MSU LOI due December 1, 2014
Full submission due January 25, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) invites applications from research-intensive institutions that propose to develop recent baccalaureate science graduates from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences so that they have the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue PhD or MD-PhD degrees in these fields. The program provides support for well-designed courses for skills development and extensive research experiences aimed at preparing individuals from diverse backgrounds to complete doctoral degrees. This program will use the NIH Research Education (R25) grant mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The objective of the Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) is to prepare individuals from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences who have recently obtained their baccalaureate degrees for successful completion of PhD or MD-PhD training programs. An additional objective is to increase the diversity of awardee institutions' PhD and/or MD-PhD programs. For the purposes of this funding opportunity, recent baccalaureate graduates are those who have graduated from an accredited U.S. college or university no more than 36 months prior to applying to a PREP and are not currently enrolled in a degree program. In order to increase their acceptance into rigorous graduate programs, PREP participants will receive extensive research training and academic preparation through a one- to two-year apprenticeship, to further develop their scholarly potential and improve their research skills. NIGMS expects that this program will lead to a steady supply of exceptional PhD and MD-PhD students from underrepresented groups.

PREPs should generate carefully designed, individualized student development plans (IDPs) that are compatible with the participants' curricular needs and experience, combined with research projects mentored by faculty members who have active and extramurally funded research programs. The development plans will typically be designed within the context of a one-year apprenticeship to provide the necessary skills to prepare the participants for rigorous doctoral training programs. Participants should not be appointed for less than a year. NIGMS recognizes that each participant has individual needs and that a one-year program may not be sufficient for some to fully prepare to be competitive for graduate school. A second-year apprenticeship is allowable at the discretion of the PREP Program Director/Principal Investigator if within the awarded costs of a particular program. This does not require NIGMS pre-approval, but should be used selectively for those participants who would benefit from a second year in the program. The second-year apprenticeship must enhance participants' competitiveness to enter a rigorous doctoral program and not simply allow participants more time to decide if they wish to obtain a graduate degree, to explore other career options, or to provide job opportunities. This program will not support individuals earning Master's degrees. Applications may request between five and ten postbaccalaureate positions for each year of the grant (i.e., up to 50 participants for a five-year grant period), for individuals to engage in courses for skills development and mentored research studies.

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NINDS Neuroscience Development for Advancing the Careers of a Diverse Research Workforce (R25)
National Institutes of Health/NINDS

Internal MSU LOI due October 1, 2014
Agency LOI due 30 days before full submission
Full submission due January 25, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of the FOA is to invite applications for mentoring and professional activities to advance the careers and neuroscience development of diverse neuroscience researchers.  The goal of the NINDS Neuroscience Development for Advancing the Careers of a Diverse Research Workforce (NDACDRW) is to support mission relevant development and/or implementation of programs to: (1) increase the pool of Ph.D.-level research scientists from diverse backgrounds underrepresented  in biomedical research who are neuroscience researchers- participation is limited to graduate, post-doctoral and/or junior-faculty career levels only; and (2) facilitate career advancement/transition of the participants to the next step of their neuroscience careers. 

NINDS support for R25 program relies equally on scientific merit and programmatic considerations. Consequently, we recommend that potential applicants contact program officials at NINDS before preparing an application. NINDS will not support projects if they do not fulfill current programmatic priorities at NINDS.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: 

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications from applicant organizations that propose creative and innovative mentoring and professional development activities in the mission area(s) of the NINDS to increase diversity of the research workforce.

This NINDS Diversity R25 is a flexible and specialized program designed to foster the development of diverse neuroscience researchers at the local, regional and national program level. The overall goal of NINDS's individual and institutional research training programs is to ensure that highly trained scientists will be available in adequate numbers and in appropriate scientific areas to reduce the burden of neurological disease.

The NIH expects efforts to diversify the workforce to lead to the recruitment of the most talented researchers from all groups; to improve the quality of the educational and training environment; to balance and broaden the perspective in setting research priorities; to improve the ability to recruit subjects from diverse backgrounds into clinical research protocols; and to improve the Nation's capacity to address and eliminate health disparities.

There is a large loss of talented researchers from diverse backgrounds during the transition from graduate to postdoctoral training to junior faculty positions.  Evidence from several reports demonstrate that an intervention designed to facilitate successful transitions along this pathway would benefit the research community and scientific teaching environment, and would provide needed role models for underrepresented students (Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America's Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads- National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine 2011Bridges to Independence: Fostering the Independence of New Investigators in Biomedical Research, and Advancing the Nations Health Needs: NIH Research Training Programs). 

While the term "diversity" can encompass many personal attributes and characteristics, for this NINDS Diversity R25 program, diversity includes individuals currently underrepresented in neuroscience research on a national basis (for example see surveys conducted by the Society for Neuroscience Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs ), including: individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups or individuals with disabilities (see also http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/).  Eligibility related to the NIH defineddisadvantaged background would be difficult to justify for individuals beyond the level of high school and undergraduate, and thus will be very difficult to justify for the career stages eligible under this announcement.  

Due to the current NIH activities to increase recruitment and retention of diverse students at the undergraduate level (http://commonfund.nih.gov/diversity/Initiatives.aspx ), this new NINDS Diversity R25 does not include programs that target undergraduates or any career stage below graduate students.  The NINDS Neuroscience Development for Advancing the Careers of a Diverse Research Workforce (R25) initiative will focus on factors that have been shown to effect retention of diverse graduate, post-doctoral and junior faculty in neuroscience research such as mentoring, scientific networks and professional development ( http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Training/Reportshttp://acd.od.nih.gov/dbr.htm ).  The program seeks to support intervention activities that include, but are not limited to, development of grant writing skills, fostering publishing, and enhancing laboratory management for early stage faculty engaged in neuroscience research.

The NINDS expects applicant institutions to propose programs that will lead to an improvement in the professional development, mentoring and/or technical expertise of individuals who are nationally underrepresented in neuroscience research. Investigators with creative, innovative ideas for new programs are encouraged to discuss these with NINDS program officials. Examples of programs that are of potential interest to the NINDS include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Programs that target Participants from Diverse Backgrounds:   Activities designed to increase the pool and success of participants from underrepresented backgrounds including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty.  Institute priority will be given to pipeline programs that target the advancement and retention of researchers from diverse backgrounds from either the career stages of graduate to post-doc or post-doc to junior faculty.  Programs should enhance and broaden their skills in order to contribute significantly to basic, translational and/or clinical neuroscience research through development of comprehensive strategies that support career advancement, professional development, and mentoring skills.
  • Programs that target Mentors and Institutional Officials:  The NIH realizes that quality mentorship is critical to the recruitment and retention of diverse scientists. Therefore, this FOA welcomes programs aimed at improving the caliber of mentorship. For example Workshops to educate mentors (e.g. summer course or a workshop accompanying a neuroscience related scientific meeting in which case-based scenarios may be used to educate mentors on various relevant ethical, professional and cultural issues facing students today).  Also, the program intends to support innovative mentoring network programs within neuroscience focused scientific and/or professional societies and organizations.  Mentors from all demographic backgrounds should be encouraged to participate in the proposed program.
  • Programs that target Health Disparities:  Educational/research experiences that enhance the participation and productivity of diverse investigators carrying out research on NINDS mission relevant health disparities (refer to Public Law 106-525).

Formats for these programs may also vary, e.g., short courses, a series of seminars, workshops, structured research experiences, or curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation.

The proposed program may complement other, ongoing research training and education occurring at an applicant institution, but the proposed activities must be distinct from those research training and research education programs currently receiving federal support.  The R25 is not a substitute for an institutional research training program (T32), cannot be used to support individual research activities, and cannot be used to circumvent or supplement Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) mechanisms.

Although the NINDS Diversity R25s are not typical research instruments, they do involve experiments in education and/or dissemination of research knowledge that require an evaluation plan in order to determine their effectiveness. A plan must be provided for program evaluation and/or dissemination.  As such, each application must include a plan to evaluate the activities proposed (see Section IV, Evaluation Plan).  For some types of projects, a plan for disseminating results may also be appropriate and may be required as well (see Section IV, Dissemination Plan).

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Grant Programs--Medical Research (June Cycle)
W.M. Keck Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due October 1, 2014
LOI due November 1, 2014
Full submissions due February 15, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The Research Program seeks to benefit humanity by supporting projects in two specific areas (1) medical research and (2) science and engineering, that are distinctive and novel in their approach, question the prevailing paradigm, or have the potential to break open new territory in their field. Past grants have been awarded to major universities, independent research institutions, and medical schools to support pioneering biological and physical science research and engineering, including the development of promising new technologies, instrumentation or methodologies. Historically, grants range from $500,000 to $5 million and are typically $2 million or less.

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Beckman Young Investigator Program
Beckman (Arnold and Mable) Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due August 25, 2014
LOI due September 3, 2014
Full submissions by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The Beckman Young Investigator (BYI) Program is intended to provide research support to the most promising young faculty members in the early stages of academic careers in the chemical and life sciences particularly to foster the invention of methods, instruments and materials that will open up new avenues of research in science.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Projects should show promise for contributing to significant advances in the research fields of interest to the Foundation. They should represent innovative departures in research rather than extensions or expansions of existing programs. Proposed research that cuts across traditional boundaries of scientific disciplines is encouraged. Proposals that open up new avenues of research in chemistry and the life sciences by fostering the invention of methods, instruments and materials will be given additional consideration.

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Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program
The Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

Internal MSU LOI due September 15, 2014
Full submission due February 10, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship attained within the first five years of their appointment as independent researchers, and a demonstrated commitment to education, signaling the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

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Department of Defense (DOD)

Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program (CDMRP) Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Pre-application Deadline: May 13, 2014 5 p.m., EST
Full Proposal Deadline - by invititation only

 

Applications to the Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP) are being solicited for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Defense Health Program (DHP), by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisitions Activity (USAMRAA). The BMFRP was established in FY08 to promote innovative research focused on BMF. Appropriations for the BMFRP from FY08 through FY13 totaled $20.15 million (M). The FY14 appropriation is $3.2M.

 

The vision of the BMFRP is to understand and cure BMF diseases. Toward that end, the program challenges the scientific community to design innovative research approaches based on sound scientific evidence that will advance the understanding of inherited and acquired BMF diseases to improve the health of individuals, with the ultimate goals of prevention and cure.

 

FY14 BMFRP Objective: The objective of the FY14 BMFRP is to fund scientifically meritorious research focused on BMF diseases and their long-term sequelae. Investigator-initiated research is encouraged in the areas of congenital or acquired BMF. Studies focused on BMF diseases and their progression to other malignancies such as leukemia are acceptable. However, research primarily focused on myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia, or other malignancies is discouraged. Projects including bone marrow transplantation or stem cell biology should address issues unique to BMF diseases.

 

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Department of Defense / CDMRP
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Deadlines: see program pre-announcements

The Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Defense Appropriations Act provides research funding for the peer reviewed programs managed by the Department of Defense (DOD) office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

This e-mail is to notify the research community of the recently released funding opportunities from the following programs: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP), Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP), Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP), Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP).

Detailed descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the respective Program Announcements. Each Program Announcement is available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP)

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

Therapeutic Idea Award

Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)

Concept Award

Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP)

Clinical Trial Award

Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

New Investigator Award

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Exploration Hypothesis Development Award

Idea Development Award

Pilot Clinical Trial Award

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Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ovarian Cancer Research Program (OCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Pre-Announcement / Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP): Era of Hope Scholar Award, Innovator Award and Breakthrough Award
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline: see program URL

The BCRP is providing the information in this pre-announcement to allow investigators time to plan and develop applications. FY14 BCRP Program Announcements and General Application Instructions are anticipated to be posted on Grants.gov in late March 2014. Pre-application and application deadlines will be available when the Program Announcements are released. This pre-announcement should not be construed as an obligation by the government.

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DoD Peer Reviewed Cancer Career Development Award

Deadline: September 17, 2014

The PRCRP Career Development Award supports independent, early-career investigators to conduct impactful research with the mentorship of an experienced cancer researcher (i.e., the Designated Mentor) as an opportunity to obtain the funding, guidance, and experience necessary for productive, independent careers at the forefront of cancer research. This award supports impactful research projects with an emphasis on discovery. Under this award mechanism, the early-career investigator is considered the Principal Investigator (PI), and the application should focus on the PI's research and career development. It should be clear that the proposed research is intellectually designed by the PI and not a product of the Designated Mentor. Preliminary data are not required.

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Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) New Application Receipt System (eBRAP)

Program Announcement

For FY14, CDMRP has replaced eReceipt with the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP). As in the past, application submission is a two-step process requiring both (1) pre-application submission through the eBRAP (https://eBRAP.org/) and (2) application submission through Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov/), with application status available on eBRAP.

A key feature of eBRAP is that organizational representatives and Principal Investigators (PIs) will be able to view and modify their Grants.gov application submissions, but only if their organization, Business Officials, and PIs are registered and affiliated in eBRAP.

Submission of either the pre-application to eBRAP or the application to Grants.gov does not require registering an organization and affiliating its Business Officials and PIs in eBRAP; however, the ability to view and modify the Grants.gov application in eBRAP is contingent upon this registration and affiliation process.

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Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program (PRORP)

Program Announcement

To support research focused on optimizing recovery and restoration of function for military personnel with orthopaedic injuries sustained in combat or combat-related duties.

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FY14 ACQUISITION RESEARCH PROGRAM

Deadline: September 30, 2014

The Government is interested in stimulating and supporting scholarly research in academic disciplines that bear on public policy and management in the field of government acquisition. These include economics, finance, financial management, information systems, organization theory, operations management, human resources management, risk management, and marketing, as well as the traditional acquisition areas such as contracting, program/project management, logistics, test and evaluation and systems engineering management. The ARP primarily supports scholarly research through assistance vehicles that will benefit the general public and/or private sector to a larger extent than any direct benefits that may be gained by the Department of Defense (DOD). Studies of government processes, systems, or policies should focus on expanding the body of knowledge, theory and/or research methodologies that are also relevant to processes, systems, or policies outside the DOD. The Government in this BAA is interested only in proposals that will provide unclassified and non-proprietary findings suitable for publication in open scholarly literature. Offerors bear prime responsibility for the design, management, direction, and conduct of research, and exercise judgment and original thought toward attaining the goals within broad parameters of the research areas proposed and the resources provided.

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Department of Defense Gulf War Illness Research Program - New Investigator Award
Department of Defense

LOI due September 11, 2014
Full submission due September 25, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Applications to the Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Gulf War Illness Research Program (GWIRP) are being solicited for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Defense Health Program (DHP), by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisitions Activity (USAMRAA). The GWIRP was initiated in 2006 to provide support for research of exceptional scientific merit to study the health effects of deployment to the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War on U.S. warfighters. Appropriations for the GWIRP from FY06 through FY13 totaled $69 million (M). The FY14 appropriation is $20M.

The GWIRP challenges the scientific community to design high-impact research that will improve the health and lives of veterans who have Gulf War Illness (GWI). GWI is characterized by multiple diverse symptoms that typically include chronic headache, widespread pain, cognitive difficulties, debilitating fatigue, gastrointestinal problems, respiratory symptoms, sleep problems, and other abnormalities that are not explained by established medical diagnoses or standard laboratory tests.

The population of veterans affected by GWI is a subset of the nearly 700,000 who served during the Gulf War. Specifically, these Gulf War veterans were deployed to the theatre of operations in Southwest Asia, including Iraq, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia. Studies indicate that approximately 25% to 33% (or 175,000 to 210,000) of Gulf War veterans continue to experience symptoms associated with their deployment as described above.

The GWIRP will focus its FY14 funding on innovative projects that have the potential to make a significant impact on finding treatments for GWI. While such projects may include identification of objective indicators of pathology that distinguish ill from healthy Gulf War veterans or studies to understand the underlying pathobiology of GWI, the FY14 GWIRP intends to focus on supporting research projects that exhibit clear translational potential to lead to treatments for veterans with GWI. The GWIRP encourages high-risk/high-reward research; however, all projects must demonstrate solid judgment and sound rationale.

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Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR)
Department of Defense

Last day to discuss with Technical Points of Contact: September 21, 2014
Full submission due October 22, 2014

*TechLink, a Montana State University organization dedicated to development, transfer, and commercialization of technology is available to assist investigators with their SBIR/STTR plans. Please contact staff listed on the TechLink website: http://techlinkcenter.org/home. Supporting grants for proposal submission may be available.

SYNOPSIS: 

The objectives of the Department of Defense (DoD) SBIR/STTR programs include meeting advanced Defense technology needs as specified in the DoD SBIR/STTR solicitations, increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through DoD-supported research and development (R&D), stimulating technological innovation in the private sector, and improving the return on investment from Federally-funded research for economic and social benefits to the nation. DoD will support high-quality research or R&D on advanced concepts concerning important mission-related scientific or engineering problems and opportunities that are likely to lead to new products or services that can meet important warfighter needs, as well as provide significant public benefit from promising research.

The current DoD solicitations include 22 SBIR topics from Army, Navy, DARPA and DTRA, and 13  STTR topics from DARPA, DTRA and MDA.

Other than different eligibility requirements, the major difference between the SBIR and STTR programs is that STTR contracts must involve substantial cooperative research collaboration between the small business and a single Research Institution. However, it should be noted that the SBIR program also permits substantial collaboration between the small business and other organizations, including Research Institutions. The difference is that in SBIR, the collaboration is optional, while in STTR, the collaboration is required.  Under DoD STTR, the Principal Investigator may be employed by either the small business or the Research Institution. 

An important goal of these programs is the commercialization and transition into Defense procurement programs of DoD-supported research or R&D. TechLink, as a Department of Defense Partnership Intermediary, can help in understanding and facilitating DoD collaborative R&D and follow-on funding opportunities.

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Research Participation Program for the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (USAFRL)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

N/A

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL)-HQ is the Air Force's only organization wholly dedicated to leading the discovery, development, and integration of warfighting technologies for our air, space and cyberspace forces. They trace their roots to the vision of airpower pioneers who understood science as key to air supremacy. The passionate commitment of AFRL people to realize this vision has helped create the world's best air, space and cyberspace force. The Air Force Research Laboratory's Human Effectiveness Directorate is a key component of the 711th Human Performance Wing. The directorate is composed of a diverse group of scientists and engineers studying developing technologies specific to the human element of warfighting capability. We are leading the Air Force in its human-centered research, and we integrate biological and cognitive technologies to optimize and protect the Airman's capabilties to Fly, Fight, and Win in Air, Space, and Cyberspace.

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DARPA BAA-14-38 Biological Technologies

Deadline: April 30, 2015

Here are a few examples: leveraging new computational techniques from computer science, big data, and biology to enable investigation and generation of knowledge from biological data at scale; Developing radical new techniques and technologies to optimally restore and maintain the health and abilities of military service members; Discovering and leveraging novel insights from neuroscience, psychology, cognitive science and related disciplines to advance treatment and resilience in neurological health and optimize human aptitude and performance.

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National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

Deadline: September 30, 2017

NGA welcomes all innovative ideas for path-breaking research that may advance the GEOINT mission. The NGA mission is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security objectives. GEOINT is the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth. GEOINT consists of imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information. NGA offers a variety of critical GEOINT products in support of U.S. national security objectives and Federal disaster relief, including aeronautical, geodesy, hydrographic, imagery, geospatial and topographical information. The NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) is focused on innovative, far-reaching basic and applied research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics having the potential to advance the GEOINT mission. The objective of the NARP is to support innovative, high-payoff research that provides the basis for revolutionary progress in areas of science and technology affecting the needs and mission of NGA. This research also supports the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), which is the combination of technology, systems and organizations that gather, produce, distribute and consume geospatial data and information. This research is aimed at advancing GEOINT capabilities by improving analytical methods, enhancing and expanding systems capabilities, and leveraging resources for common NSG goals. The NARP also seeks to improve education in scientific, mathematics, and engineering skills necessary to advance GEOINT capabilities. It is NGA's intent to solicit fundamental research under this BAA. Fundamental research means basic and applied research in science and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly within the scientific community, as distinguished from proprietary research and from Industrial development, design, production, and product utilization, the results of which ordinarily are restricted for proprietary or national security reason. NGA seeks proposals from eligible U.S. institutions for path-breaking GEOINT research in areas of potential interest to NGA, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community (IC).

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AFRL/RXM Manufacturing Technology Open BAA
Department of the Air Force

Whitepaper request
Open until June 2019

A -- AFRL/RXM MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OPEN BAA - BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT (BAA)   SOL BAA-RQKM-2014-0020 POC P. S. Strader, Phone: (937) 713-9895 WE: FBO.gov Permalink https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLWRS/BAA-RQKM-2014-0020/listing.html E-MAIL: pamela.strader@us.af.mil pamela.strader@us.af.mil NAICS: 541712 Contract Data Requirements List (CDRLs) BAA Initial Announcement Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate is soliciting whitepapers and potentially technical and cost proposals under this announcement that supports the needs of its Manufacturing and Technology mission. Manufacturing Technologies that focus on strengthening defense manufacturing capabilities and efficiencies and transitioning capability to the factory floor are of interest. Descriptors of Manufacturing Technology interests are presented in two contexts; that of manufacturing technology competencies and that of Air Force application area needs. See BAA for more detailed description. CITE: https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=94e2504d133d6f61e67974ab3de4937d&tab=core&_cview=0 Posted 06/24/14 (W-SN03404922). (0175)

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Department of Energy (DOE)

Innovative Development in Energy-Related Applied Science (IDEAS) (DE-FOA-0001002)
Department of Energy

LOI due on September 28, 2014
Full submission due dates are TBD

SYNOPSIS: 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) provides a continuing opportunity for the rapid support of early-stage applied research to explore innovative new concepts with the potential for transformational and disruptive changes in energy technology. IDEAS awards are intended to be flexible and may take the form of analyses or exploratory research that provides the agency with information useful for the subsequent development of focused technology programs. IDEAS awards may also support research to support proof-of-concept projects for a unique technology concept, either in an area not currently supported by the agency or as a potential enhancement to an ongoing focused technology program. This announcement is purposely broad in scope to encourage the submission of the most innovative, out-of-the-box ideas in energy technology.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

ARPA-E (Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy) seeks transformative ideas that enable most efficient, economical, sustainable, and environmentally benign conversion of energy while minimizing energy destruction. The broad objective of this FOA is to identify disruptive concepts in energy-related technologies that challenge the status quo and represent a leap beyond today's technology. An innovative concept alone is not enough; the idea must also have the potential to be impactful--meaning that, if successful, it represents a fundamentally new paradigm in energy technology with the potential to make a significant impact on ARPA-E's Mission Areas. Concepts of particular interest have the potential to achieve percentage-level reductions in U.S. energy consumption, energy-related imports, or greenhouse gas emissions.

Applicants may propose any idea that addresses an ARPA-E Mission Area and falls within one or more Areas of Interest selected from the six forms of energy involved in the conversion or interaction of energy. The six forms of energy are Mechanical, Thermal, Chemical, Electrical, Radiant, and Nuclear energy.

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High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasma Science
Office of Science/Department of Energy

LOIs due August 1, 2014
Full proposals due October 1, 2014 (by invitation)

SYNOPSIS: 

The Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program of the Office of Science (SC) and the Defense Program (DP) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), both of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), jointly announce their interests in receiving grant applications for new awards for research in the SC-NNSA Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP). All individuals or groups planning to submit applications for new funding in Fiscal Year 2015 should submit in response to this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA). Principal Investigators who currently have awards through the joint HEDLP program should not apply.

OBJECTIVES: 


This FOA seeks grant applications that address the recommendations of the 2003 report Frontiers in High-Energy-Density Physics: The X Games of Contemporary Science, the intentions of the 2007 Report of the Interagency Task Force on High-Energy-Density physics, the recommendations of the 2009 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee report on Advancing the Science of High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, and the research needs identified by the Report of the 2009 Workshop on Basic Research Needs for High-Energy-Density Laboratory Physics. Proposed research efforts can include experimental, theoretical, and/or computational science. Applications integrating experiments, theory, and simulation are encouraged. Grant applications are sought in the following subfields and cross-cutting areas of HED laboratory plasmas.

The specific areas of interest are: 1. High-Energy-Density Hydrodynamics 2. Radiation-Dominated Dynamics and Material Properties 3. Magnetized High-Energy-Density Plasma Physics 4. Nonlinear Optics of Plasmas and Laser-Plasma Interactions 5. Relativistic HED Plasmas and Intense Beam Physics 6. Warm Dense Matter; 7. High-Z, Multiply Ionized HED Atomic Physics; 8. Diagnostics for HED Laboratory Plasmas.

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Office of Science Financial Assistance Program (DE-FOA-0000768)
Department of Energy/Office of Science

September 30, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Office of Science of the Department of Energy hereby announces its continuing interest in receiving grant applications for support of work in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics. On September 3, 1992, DOE published in the Federal Register the Office of Energy Research
Financial Assistance Program (now called the Office of Science Financial Assistance Program), 10 CFR 605, as a Final Rule, which contained a solicitation for this program. Information about submission of applications, eligibility, limitations, evaluation and selection processes and other policies and procedures are specified in 10 CFR 605. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), DE-FOA-0000995, is our annual, broad, open solicitation that covers all of the research areas in the Office of Science and is open throughout
the Fiscal Year. This FOA will remain open until September 30, 2014, 11:59 PM Eastern Time, or until it is
succeeded by another issuance, whichever occurs first. This annual FOA DE-FOA-0000995 succeeds FOA DE-FOA-0000768, which was published September 30, 2012.

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Atmospheric System Research Program (DE-FOA-0001174)
Office of Science/Department of Energy

Pre-applications due on September 5, 2014
Final applications due on November 7, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Under this program, the sponsor is interested in applications for observational, data analysis, and/or modeling studies that use data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) or ASR programs to improve understanding and model representation of cloud microphysical, convective, aerosol, and radiative transfer processes.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of the ASR program is to improve the treatment of clouds, aerosols, and radiative transfer processes in atmospheric models, that in turn are combined with ocean, terrestrial, and ice sheet models to make projections of climate change.

Requests for research support under this funding opportunity must address one of the following research topics:

1. Cloud microphysical processes: Conduct studies using ARM or other CESD-funded data to improve understanding and model representation of cloud microphysical processes that are relevant for reducing uncertainties in cloud feedback estimates from global climate models. Specific processes of interest include drizzle and precipitation formation and development, factors controlling microphysical and radiative properties of ice and snow particles, sensitivity of cloud properties to aerosol perturbations, and interactions between microphysics and dynamics. Studies that use advanced capabilities of ARM remote sensors such as polarization or Doppler spectra to address these topics are encouraged.

2. Convective processes: Conduct studies using ARM or other CESD-funded data to improve understanding and model representation of convective processes that are relevant for reducing uncertainties in the precipitation and radiative impacts of convective systems in cloud-resolving, regional, and/or global climate models. Specific topics of interest include land-atmosphere interactions that impact convective initiation or development, processes controlling convective organization and properties (including entrainment, cold pool development, anvil outflow, and interactions with large-scale dynamics), and impacts of aerosol processes on properties of convective systems.

3. Aerosol processes: Conduct studies using ARM and/or other CESD-funded data to improve understanding and model representation of aerosol processes that are relevant for reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates from global climate models. Specific topics of interest include generation, chemical transformation, and removal mechanisms for secondary aerosols; and aerosol processes relevant to arctic and tropical domains. NOTE: Because the ASR program recently made significant investments in studies of new particle formation and aerosol optical properties, applications whose primary focus is on these topics (new particle formation and aerosol optical properties) are not encouraged for this announcement.

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Environmental System Science (DE-FOA-0001172)
Office of Science/Department of Energy

LOI due on September 3, 2014
Full submission due on December 2, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the Office of Science (SC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hereby announces its interest in receiving research applications for environmental system science. The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystems and subsurface processes appropriate for advancing Earth system model capabilities, thereby improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the scientific foundation needed to inform DOE's energy decisions. Two types of applications may be proposed in this program. Traditional, "full" applications may request support for three years, which addresses a research need within scope of the research objectives indicated in this opportunity. In addition to full applications, BER also encourages the submission of smaller, more focused and innovative exploratory research that would be perceived as "high-risk" applications which may have the potential for future high impact on terrestrial ecosystem research.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The funding opportunity will consider applications that focus on measurements, experiments, modeling or synthesis to provide improved quantitative and predictive understanding of terrestrial ecosystems that, in turn, influence atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and thereby affect the greenhouse gas forcing of climate. The emphasis of this FOA is to understand non-managed terrestrial ecosystems in the context of a changing climate.

While the program supports a broad spectrum of fundamental research in terrestrial ecosystem and subsurface science with a view towards improved climate predictability and will consider research applications within this scope, this FOA in particular encourages applications in the following specific science areas:

Science Area 1 - Belowground Processes: The role of belowground processes and mechanisms across scales (e.g., microbial process including soil carbon transformation/stability, root dynamics, mycorrhizal interactions, and plant mediated (e.g. root exudates, priming, hydrological, biogeochemical transformations) associated with a changing climate.

Science Area 2 - Critical Ecosystems: New or improved understanding of carbonrelevant biogeochemical pathways, fluxes and ecosystem function with particular emphasis on Arctic tundra and tropical ecosystems.

Science Area 3 - Terrestrial-Aquatic Interfaces: New or improved understanding of critical carbon processes at the terrestrial-aquatic interface which have the potential for direct feedbacks to the climate system (e.g., soil carbon transformation, methane biogeochemistry).

Science Area 4 - Synthesis: Synthesis activities that draw broad insights into, and improve our understanding of, terrestrial ecosystems and their role in forcing climate change will be considered. These lower cost activities should leverage existing models, sites and datasets.

HOW TO APPLY: The FOA is listed in the FedConnect database. Please enter "DE-FOA-0001172" to see the full announcement. 

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Early Career Research Program (DE-FOA-0001170)
Department of Energy/Office of Science

Pre-applications due September 11, 2014
Full submission due November 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor invites grant applications for support under the Early Career Research Program in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Biological and Environmental Research (BER); Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES); High Energy Physics (HEP), and Nuclear Physics (NP).

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this program is to support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the areas supported by the DOE Office of Science.

I. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)-- Proposed research may include one or more of the areas listed below. Research areas of interest include: (a) Applied Mathematics; and (b) Computer Science. II. Biological and Environmental Research (BER)--BER is seeking Biological Systems Science research in the following areas: (a) Systems Biology Enabled Research on the Role of Microbial Communities in Carbon; and (b) Land-Atmosphere Interactions. III. Basic Energy Sciences (BES)--(a) Materials Chemistry; (b) Biomolecular Materials; (c) Synthesis and Processing Science; (d) Experimental Condensed Matter Physics; (e) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics; (f) Physical Behavior of Materials; (g) Mechanical Behavior and Radiation Effects; (h) X-ray Scattering; (i) Neutron Scattering; (j) Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies; (k) Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (AMOS); (l) Gas Phase Chemical Physics (GPCP); (m) Computation and Theoretical Chemistry; (n) Condensed Phase and Interfacial Molecular Science (CPIMS); (o) Catalysis Science; (p) Separations and Analysis; (q) Heavy Element Chemistry (HEC); (r) Geosciences Research; (s) Solar Photochemistry; (t) Photosynthetic Systems; (u) Physical Biosciences; (v) BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers and Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Research; (w) BES Accelerator and Detector Research; (x) BES X-ray Instrumentation and Technique Development; (y) Neutron Scattering Instrumentation and Technique Development. IV. Fusion Energy Sciences (FES)--(a) Magnetic Fusion Energy Science Experimental Research; (b) Magnetic Fusion Energy Science Theory and Simulation; (c) High-Energy-Density Plasma Science; (d) General Plasma Science Experiment and Theory; (e) Materials Science and Enabling Technologies for Fusion. V. High Energy Physics (HEP)--(a) Experimental Research at the Energy Frontier in High Energy Physics; (b) Experimental Research at the Intensity Frontier in High Energy Physics; (c) Experimental Research at the Cosmic Frontier in High Energy Physics; (d) Theoretical Research in High Energy Physics; (e) Accelerator Science and Technology Research & Development in High Energy Physics; (f) Detector Research and Development in High Energy Physics. VI. Nuclear Physics (NP)--(a) Medium Energy Nuclear Physics; (b) Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics; (c) Low Energy Nuclear Physics; (d) Nuclear Theory; (e) Nuclear Data and Nuclear Theory Computing; (f) Accelerator Research and Development for Current and Future Nuclear Physics Facilities; (g) Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications.

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NSF/DOE Partnership on Advanced Frontiers in Renewable Hydrogen Fuel Production Via Solar Water Splitting Technologies 2014-2016
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

LOIs due October 6, 2014
Full Proposals due December 11, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Directorate for Engineering at the National Science Foundation (NSF) has established a partnership with the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in order to address critical fundamental and applied research challenges associated with advanced technologies for the production of hydrogen fuel via solar water splitting processes. The goal of the partnership is to leverage the complementary missions of applied research, development and demonstration (DOE) and use-inspired fundamental research and education (NSF) to address issues of national importance that impact the sustainable production of fuels using renewable resources. The Directorate for Engineering seeks proposals with transformative ideas that meet the detailed requirements delineated in this solicitation.

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Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) (DE-FOA-0001164)
Department of Energy

LOI due September 2, 2014
Full submission due October 14, 2014

*TechLink, a Montana State University organization dedicated to development, transfer, and commercialization of technology is available to assist investigators with their SBIR/STTR plans. Please contact staff listed on the TechLink website: http://techlinkcenter.org/home.

SYNOPSIS: 

The objectives of the SBIR/STTR programs include increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through DOE-supported research and development (R&D), stimulating technological innovation in the private sector, and improving the return on investment from Federally-funded research for economic and social benefits to the nation. DOE will support high-quality research or R&D on advanced concepts concerning important mission-related scientific or engineering problems and opportunities that are likely to lead to significant public benefit from promising research.

Other than different eligibility requirements (see Part III - Eligibility Information), the major difference between the SBIR and STTR programs is that STTR grants must involve substantial cooperative research collaboration between the small business and a single Research Institution (see definitions in
Appendices/Reference Material at the end of this FOA). However, it should be noted that the SBIR program also permits substantial collaboration between the small business and other organizations, including
Research Institutions. The difference is that in SBIR, the collaboration is optional, while in STTR, the collaboration is required and must be cooperative in nature.

An important goal of these programs is the commercialization of DOE-supported research or R&D. Following the start of Phase I, DOE encourages its awardees to begin thinking about and seeking commitments from private sector or Federal non-SBIR/STTR funding sources in anticipation of Phases II and III. The commitments should be obtained prior to the Phase II grant application submission. The commitment for Phase III may be made contingent on the DOE-supported research or R&D meeting some specific technical objectives in Phase II, which, if met, would justify funding to pursue further development for commercial purposes in Phase III. For Phase I applicants, more details will be provided in the Phase II FOA. For Fast-Track applicants, please refer to Part IV, Section C. 2. Fast-Track Applicant.

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Visiting Scientist Program, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, InnoVision Basic and Applied Research Division
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

Receipt

SYNOPSIS: 

The NGA Visiting Scientist Program solicits applications from current students, postdoctoral researchers and faculty members for full-time residency appointments to conduct research into the use of process models and tools to support NGA's GEOINT analysis. Visiting Scientists exploit and analyze imagery, intelligence, and geospatial information to describe, assess, and characterize physical features and a wide range of geographically referenced activities on the Earth.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Available disciplines include: geography, statistics, economics, geospatial information science, physics, mathematics, chemistry or a closely related field. Appointments will be at various NGA locations in the Washington, DC metropolitan area and St. Louis, MO.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION: 

Submissions are accepted on a continuing basis. Applicants should apply at least 8 months before their desired start date.

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Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs)
National Energy Technology Laboratory/Department of Energy

Rolling submission deadline

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides support for partnering opportunities with the private sector and academia to develop and commercialize new energy and environmental technologies.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The sponsor provides support for partnering opportunities with those in the private sector and academia, to develop and commercialize new energy and environmental technologies, through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs).

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Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Air Pollution Monitoring for Communities
Environmental Protection Agency

October 7, 2014 Please see the announcement, including Section IV, for additional submission information.

This RFA encourages collaboration among universities; non-profit organizations;
state, tribal, and local agencies; and communities to propose and conduct air
pollution monitoring studies relevant to community needs. This RFA supports the
research, development, deployment and/or demonstration of air pollution
monitoring networks to engage and inform communities of their exposure to air
pollution, providing them with scientific and technical tools traditionally
used by universities and regulatory agencies. This RFA focuses not on
regulatory monitoring, but rather on the information low-cost air pollution
sensors can provide for communities. Specifically, this RFA explores how useful
scientific data can be gathered and used by communities, whether low-cost portable
air pollution sensors' data are reliable if compared to sophisticated or
state-of-the-art monitoring technology (such as those that employ federal
reference methods), and whether communities become more engaged in and with
their environmental surroundings through such technical efforts.

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Foundations

Education Reform - Shape Public Policy
Walton Family Foundation, Inc

LOI's accepted in an ongoing basis
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS:

The Walton Family Foundation seeks to build the capacity of organizations to help enact, strengthen and protect programs that empower parents to choose high-performing schools. The idea being that when all families are empowered to choose from among several quality school options, all schools will be fully motivated to provide the best possible education. Better school performance leads, in turn, to higher student achievement, lower dropout rates and greater numbers of students entering and completing college.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's Shape Public Policy initiative, focuses on advocacy groups promoting: Public charter school choice; Private school choice; District reforms, particularly open enrollment and district school choice; and, Cross-sector parental choice, parents are empowered to choose across school sectors. The need to continue improving the public policy environment is central to this education reform strategy.

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Grants Program
National Endowment for Financial Education

LOI due on December 2, 2014
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The NEFE grants program seeks innovative research that can make a profound contribution to the field of financial literacy. Inquiries are encouraged from disciplines in fields as diverse as: behavior, economics, neuroscience, sociology, psychology, marketing, finance, education, change theory, and decision sciences and others.

NEFE seeks projects whose outcomes can improve the public's ability to achieve personal and household financial well-being. Of particular interest are pro-active research projects initiated from one of a broad spectrum of scholarly disciplines whose findings may cultivate critical thinking in the financial literacy community. Also of interest are development projects that put research recommendations into action. Project outcomes must be capable of achieving traction and measurable impact with audiences such as financial education intermediaries, researchers, practitioners, decision makers, and others who can achieve effective outreach to a target population with an unmet financial literacy need or to the general public.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Project outcomes should be actionable in the field of financial literacy, directly relevant to the financial well-being of the public, and able to be applied broadly. Funding requests are assessed within the parameters of the following three key grant themes:

1. Understand Financial Behavior: A fundamental element in all projects is the necessity to address optimal financial behaviors. Projects should include outcomes relevant to understanding or improving financial behaviors of specific segments of the American public or the public in general. NEFE encourages inquiry within the physical, social, and psychological sciences to facilitate the public's ability to improve personal financial well-being. Findings must be presented in a manner that engages educators, policy makers, segments of the public, and/or individuals to adopt policies, practices, attitudes, and skills that result in positive public and personal outcomes.

2. Advance Innovative Thinking: NEFE encourages projects that spawn rigorous, proactive research initiated from a broad spectrum of scholarly disciplines where potential findings indicate strong possibilities to advance critical thinking, cultivate vigorous debate, challenge the status quo, and/or illuminate trends likely to affect the personal financial well-being of the American public.

3. Assure Significance to Society: Projects should provide evidence that outcomes are likely to produce practical benefit for primary stakeholders such as financial education intermediaries, researchers, practitioners, decision makers, and/or entities who can achieve effective educational outreach to a population segment with an unmet financial literacy need or the public in general. Consideration is paid to research that pertains to solutions with traction and scale sufficient to make a measurable difference in financial responsibility, stability, and/or well-being.

Research findings are expected to result in actionable recommendations or make a profound and credible contribution to the financial literacy body of knowledge.

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Grants Program
Dell (Susan & Michael) Foundation

There is no deadline for grant applications.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation provides grants focus on education, health and family economic stability -- the factors essential to ensuring that underprivileged children escape poverty to become healthy, productive adults.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The sponsor focuses on urban education, childhood health, and family economic stability.

Urban Education: Education-related grants make up about two-thirds of the sponsor's global giving. The sponsor focuses on improving student performance, ensuring consistent quality of education and increasing access to schools.

Childhood Health: The sponsor's global health portfolio improves access to quality healthcare services, promotes healthy nutrition and lifestyle behaviors among families and children, and fosters world-class applied research.

Family Economic Stability: The sponsor's economic stability portfolio gives families opportunities to improve their socioeconomic status and break the cycle of poverty so their children have a chance at stable, productive lives.

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Grants Program - Human Rights and Social Justice
Blaustein (Morton K and Jane) Foundation

Letters of intent and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of this program is to advance fundamental human rights both in the United States and abroad.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of this program is to advance fundamental human rights both in the United States and abroad. Areas of interest include: Equal justice for US citizens, as well as immigrants and asylum seekers in the United States, through legal strategies, advocacy and policy reform; Responses to urgent human rights crises created by natural disasters, civil strife, or war; and Social justice initiatives particularly around impoverished women and children, and vulnerable youth.

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Learning & Leadership Grants
NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis. Next deadline is October 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides support to public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences; or Grants to groups fund collegial study.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Grants support public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences, such as summer institutes or action research; or Grants to groups fund collegial study, including study groups, action research, lesson study, or mentoring experiences for faculty or staff new to an assignment.

All professional development must improve practice, curriculum, and student achievement. Decisions regarding the content of the professional growth activities must be based upon an assessment of student work undertaken with colleagues, and must be integrated into the institutional planning process. Recipients are expected to exercise professional leadership by sharing their new learning with their colleagues.

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Public Understanding of Science, Technology & Economics
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

The Foundation makes grants year-round.

SYNOPSIS: 

This program seeks to bridge the two cultures--the humanities and the sciences--through support of books, radio, film, television, theatre, and new media to reach a wide, non-specialized audience.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The program's primary aim is to build bridges between the two cultures of science and the humanities and to develop a common language so that they can better understand and speak to one another--and ultimately to grasp that they belong to a single common culture. The Foundation has established a nationwide initiative that works through programs in books, theater, film, television, radio, and new media to commission, develop, produce, and distribute new work and new initiatives that focus on science and technology for the lay public.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES:

Interested grantseekers with a relevant project idea should e-mail a one page letter of inquiry to Program Director Doron Weber.

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Grants To Individuals
Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts

September 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts supports innovative, thought-provoking investigations in architecture; architectural history, theory, and criticism; design; engineering; landscape architecture; urban planning; urban studies; visual arts; and related fields of inquiry. Its interest also extends to work being done in the fine arts, humanities, and sciences that expands the boundaries of thinking about architecture and space. In an effort to bridge communities and different fields of knowledge, the sponsor supports a wide range of practitioners (such as architects, scholars, critics, writers, artists, curators, and educators).

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts makes project-based grants to individuals to foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society. Its priorities are to: Provide opportunities to create, develop, and communicate a project about architecture and the designed environment that will contribute to the individual's creative, intellectual, and professional growth at crucial or potentially transformative stages in his career; Support efforts to take positions, develop new forms of expression, and engage debate; Help individuals communicate their work in the public realm and reach new and wider audiences; Support new voices by giving priority to first-time applicants. Overall, the sponsor is most interested in opportunities which enable it to provide critical support at key points in the development of a project or career.

Given its priorities, the sponsor believes projects of the greatest potential should fulfill the following criteria:

Originality: the project demonstrates an innovative, challenging idea; critical, independent thinking; advanced scholarship; a new or experimental approach.

Potential for impact: the project makes a meaningful contribution to discourse and/or to the field; expands knowledge; is a catalyst for future inquiry; raises awareness of an understudied issue; promotes diversity in subject matter, participants, and audience.

Feasibility: the project has clear and realistic goals, timeframe, work plan, and budget/

Capacity: applicant possesses strong qualifications and/or knowledge; demonstrates ability to carry out the project successfully; has access to necessary resources outside of the grant request.

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Foundation Research Grants
Society for Human Resource Management

October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor funds original rigorous empirical research projects that advance the HR profession.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The SHRM Foundation funds original rigorous empirical research projects that advance the HR profession.

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Future of Nursing Scholars: 2015 Call for Proposals
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

October 1, 2014, 3:00 P.M. EST

SYNOPSIS: 

The Future of Nursing Scholars program aims to develop the next generation of PhD-prepared nurse leaders who are committed to long-term leadership careers that advance science and discovery, strengthen nursing education, and bring transformational change to nursing and health care.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Future of Nursing Scholars program is part of the Foundation's Human Capital Portfolio, which aims to ensure that the nation has a diverse, well-trained workforce to advance a culture of health across this country, in which good health flourishes across all demographics, where being healthy and staying that way are esteemed social values, and where everyone has access to affordable, quality health care. Building a well-prepared cadre of faculty, researchers, and leaders is key to meeting these goals.

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Ford Foundation

Receipt

The Ford Foundation is committed to achieving lasting change that transforms people's lives. Through grant making, the sponsor supports innovative thinkers, leaders and organizations that are working to reduce poverty and injustice and to promote democratic values, free expression and human achievement. When making grants, they think about long-term strategies, knowing that lasting social change requires decades of effort. And because their mission is broad and resources are limited, the sponsor carefully targets their support so it can be used most effectively and leverage the greatest amount of impact.

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Mellon (Andrew W.) Foundation Grant Program

Proposals by Invitation

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports grantees within four defined program areas: higher education and scholarship; scholarly communications and information technology; art history, conservation, and museums; and performing arts.

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Stewardson Keefe LeBrun Travel Grant
Center For Architecture Foundation

November 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of the Stewardson Keefe LeBrun Travel Grant is to further the personal and professional development of an architect in early or mid-career through travel.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The purpose of this grant is to further the personal and professional development of an architect in early or mid-career through travel. Travel plans should be focused on a selected topic of interest to the individual, rather than a part of a larger humanitarian or institutional endeavor. If appropriate, the winner may be asked to present at the Center for Architecture upon return.

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Annual Grant Cycle
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

November 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

AFSP offers Suicide Research Grants in six categories: 

  1. Distinguished Investigator Grants (up to $100,000 over 2 years): Grants awarded to investigators at the level of associate professor or higher with an established record of research and publication on suicide. 
  2. Standard Research Grants (up to $90,000 over 2 years): Grants awarded to individual investigators at any level.
  3. Linked Standard Research Grants (up to $225,000 over 2 years): Grants awarded to investigators at any level performing research involving three or more unique sites with each site contributing unique expertise, as well as data collection.
  4. Young Investigator Grants (up to $85,000 over 2 years): Grants awarded to investigators at or below the level of assistant professor. These grants must allocate $10,000 ($5,000 per year) of their award for an established suicide researcher to mentor the Young Investigator. AFSP is available to assist you in identifying a suitable mentor. 
  5. Postdoctoral Research Fellowships (up to $104,000 over 2 years): Grants awarded to investigators who have received a Ph.D., M.D., or other doctoral degree within the preceding six years and have had no more than three years of fellowship support. Fellows receive a stipend of $46,000 per year and an institutional allowance of $6,000 per year. 
  6. Pilot Grants (up to $30,000 over one or two years): Awarded to investigators at any level, these grants provide seed funding for new projects that have the potential to lead to larger investigations. These grants typically entail feasibility studies rather than hypothesis-driven research. 

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National Afterschool Matters Edmund A. Stanley, Jr. Research Grants
Bowne (Robert) Foundation, Inc.

November 13, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor invites applications for the National Afterschool Matters Edmund A. Stanley, Jr. Research Grants. Two grants in the amount of $25,000 each will be awarded to support either: original empirical research in or about community-based youth programs during the non-school hours; or research syntheses or policy analyses of youth programs.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The grant has the following goals: generate and disseminate research about organizations serving youth during the out-of-school hours; build a network of scholars studying organizations serving youth during the out-of-school hours; and contribute to basic knowledge and the improvement of practice and policy in the area of youth programs during the out-of-school hours.

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Grand Challenges Explorations
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

November 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is now inviting applications to Grand Challenges Explorations, which has awarded over 1070 grants in over 58 countries to date.

Grand Challenges Explorations seeks innovative global health and development solutions. Applicants can be at any experience level; in any discipline; and from any organization, including universities, government laboratories, research institutions, non-profit organizations as well as for-profit companies.

Two-page proposals are being accepted online from September 4, 2014 until November 12, 2014 on the following topics:

-    Surveillance Tools, Diagnostics and an Artificial Diet to Support New Approaches to Vector Control.
-    New Approaches for Addressing Outdoor/Residual Malaria Transmission
-    New Ways to Reduce Pneumonia Fatalities through Timely, Effective Treatment of Children
-    Enable Universal Acceptance of Mobile Money Payments to Create an Economic Ecosystem that Will Help Lift the Poorest Out of Poverty
-    Explore New Ways to Measure Brain Development and Gestational Age
-    New Ways of Working Together: Integrating Community-Based Interventions

Initial grants will be US $100,000 each, and projects showing promise will have the opportunity to receive additional funding of up to US $1 million. Full descriptions of the new topics and application instructions are available at: www.grandchallenges.org/explorations.

We look forward to receiving innovative ideas from around the world and from all disciplines. If you have a great idea, please apply. If you know someone who may have a great idea, please forward this message.

Please also note our Global Health Innovation Group on LinkedIn. Developed in collaboration with Grand Challenges Canada, this group offers a platform to connect and communicate with innovators from around the world. Anyone with a LinkedIn account can join and make use of this forum.

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Small Grants Program in Behavioral Economics
Sage (Russell) Foundation

Receipt

The Russell Sage Behavioral Economics Roundtable offers small grants to support high quality research in behavioral economics and to encourage young investigators to enter this developing field. There are no limitations on the disciplinary background of the principal investigator, and the proposed research may address any economic topic. Interdisciplinary efforts are welcome. Appropriate projects will demonstrate explicit use of psychological concepts in the motivation of the design and the preparation of the results.

Deadlines
Please note that there is no deadline for the small grants programs; applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

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Initiative on Philosophy in Education Policy and Practice
Spencer Foundation

Receipt

SYNOPSIS: 

The Spencer Foundation will make awards of up to $40,000 for research projects in Philosophy as it relates to educational policy and practice.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Applicants are encouraged to understand educational policy and practice in broad terms, including issues that directly relate to K-12 schools and higher education institutions, but also concerning policies that influence children's growth and development in the family and in other areas of social life including children's upbringings, educational issues in family life and in the workplace, the educational effects of welfare policy. The Foundation also encourages diverse kinds of philosophical research ranging from the highly abstract to the highly applied. Proposals might concern any of the following topics: the proper content of moral education and of the rights of parents to constrain it; the place of religion in schools; justice and efficiency in the allocation of public funds across schools and school districts; the content of the curriculum; assessment of competing conceptions of equality in educational resources and outcomes; the commercialization of schools and childhoods generally; the obligations to students with special educational needs; the proper content of sex education in particular and "education for living" more generally (concerning, eg, parenting, financial self-management, etc) and the extent to which it is right for schools to defer to parental preferences regarding these matters; the moral rights of school students to privacy, to freedom of expression, to freedom of association, etc.; the rights and obligations of teachers with respect to abusive or violent children; and the distribution and content of higher education.

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Preterm Birth Initiative (Interdisciplinary Opportunity)
Burroughs Wellcome Fund

December 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Preterm Birth Initiative was created to increase the understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying parturition and spontaneous preterm birth and will provide up to $600,000 over a four-year period ($150,000 per year).  The initiative is designed to stimulate both creative individual scientists and multi-investigator teams to approach the problem of preterm birth using creative basic and translation science methods.  Postdoctoral fellows nearing their transition to independent investigator status through senior established investigators are encouraged to apply.  Molecular and computational approaches such genetics/genomics, immunology, microbiology, evolutionary biology, mathematics, engineering, and other basic sciences hold enormous potential for new insights independently or in conjunction with more traditional areas of parturition research such as maternal fetal medicine, obstetrics, and pediatrics. The formation of new connections between reproductive scientists and investigators who are involved in other areas will give preterm birth research a fresh and unique look, and stimulate a new workface to tackle this challenge.

Despite medical and technological advances, the rate of preterm births in the United States remains higher today than 20 years ago.  Approximately 12 percent of births in the U.S. are considered preterm, which is defined as birth occurring prior to 37 weeks of gestation. Many health and social problems can be attributed to preterm delivery including cerebral palsy, respiratory distress syndrome, chronic lung disease, seizures, learning difficulty, hearing loss, behavioral problems, and others. Preterm birth is currently the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in children. However, for a medical problem that has such grave health and social consequences little is known about its causes.

Up to five (5) research grants will be awarded in this award cycle.

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Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Awards
The Simons Foundation

LOI due October 15, 2014
Full submission due January 15, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

Microbes inhabit and sustain all habitats on Earth. In the oceans, microbes capture solar energy, catalyze biogeochemical transformations of important elements, produce and consume greenhouse gases, and provide the base of the food web. The purpose of these awards is to help launch the careers of outstanding investigators who use quantitative approaches to advance our understanding of marine microbial ecology and evolution. Investigators will focus directly on marine microbes or on fundamental problems that are highly relevant to understanding marine microbial ecosystems.

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Research in Sustainable Solid Waste Management
Environmental Research & Education Foundation (EREF)

January 8, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The sustainability movement has reached the business models of nearly every industry in the United States, and many companies have set aggressive sustainability goals that include how their waste stream is managed. Dozens of municipalities and states have launched similarly aggressive initiatives. The EREF Board of Directors has set an initiative to ensure research funded reflects EREF's long-term strategic research plan to
address all areas of integrated solid waste management, with a strong focus towards research that increased sustainable solid waste management practices. While landfills continue to play an important role in integrated waste management, and will receive the majority of MSW in the near future in the U.S. (and in the majority of other countries), it has been recognized that a sustainable future requires consideration of other end-of-life
technologies for discarded materials. Thus, sustainability, as it relates to solid waste management is a focus on utilizing waste as a resource. The desired outcomes of research funded by this RFP are to:

(a) facilitate the development of new and existing technologies/practices prior to the
landfilling option,

(b) develop robust data that will provide guidance regarding how product
manufacturing is shaping the downstream disposal of wastes (e.g. product
disposability/biodegradability, reduced packaging), and

(c) evaluate 'next generation' technologies for processing or converting discarded
materials into energy or beneficial products.

(d) advance knowledge of issues related to landfills that advance sustainable solid
waste management practices, mitigate risk, or protect environmental and public
welfare.

EREF is an IRS 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and is one of the largest sources of funding for solid waste research in the U.S. EREF is not affiliated with any other entity or group and governed by a duly elected Board of Directors. The Board of Directors is the decision-making body that has responsibility for establishing policies that define program interests and fundamental objectives to be served by the Foundation.

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Targeted Grants in the Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems
The Simons Foundation

LOI due September 30, 2014
Full submission due January 31, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The program is intended to foster a culture of theory-experiment collaboration similar to that prevailing in the physical sciences by supporting the development of mathematical models that explain classes of experimental results and suggest new directions for experiment, as well as research aimed at testing theoretical ideas and expanding their reach.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The program aims to support research in the life sciences that breaks new conceptual or theoretical ground and relates closely to experiment, for example, by introducing new and experimentally testable concepts or by developing models that can explain data and motivate new classes of experiments. Successful proposals will typically involve both new theoretical approaches and a direct interaction with biological experiment. A broad spectrum of research areas will be considered, ranging from cellular-level issues of organization, regulation, signaling and dynamics through morphogenesis to the properties of organisms and ecology, as well as neuroscience and evolution; however, preference will be given to areas in which modeling approaches are less established, and, for this reason, bioinformatics and genomics will fall outside the scope of the program.

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Research Grants
Whitehall Foundation, Inc.

LOI due October 1, 2014
Full submission due February 15, 2015

SYNOPSIS:

The sponsor will provide awards ranging from $30,000 to $75,000 annually for scholarly research in the life sciences. Consideration is given to applicants of all ages.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation is currently interested in basic research in neurobiology, defined as follows: Invertebrate and vertebrate (excluding clinical) neurobiology, specifically investigations of neural mechanisms involved in sensory, motor, and other complex functions of the whole organism as these relate to behavior. The overall goal should be to better understand behavioral output or brain mechanisms of behavior.

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Research Grant
Gerber Foundation

LOI due December 1, 2014
Full submission due February 15, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The Gerber Foundation's mission focuses on the nutrition, care and development of infants and young children. Therefore, grant-making interests are focused on health and/or nutrition-related research having a significant impact on issues facing infants and young children from the first year before birth to age 3.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The Gerber Foundation's mission focuses on the nutrition, care and development of infants and young children. Therefore, grant-making interests are focused on health and/or nutrition-related research having a significant impact on issues facing infants and young children from the first year before birth to age 3. The Foundation is particularly interested in fresh approaches to solving newborn or pediatric problems or emerging issues with a predictable time frame to clinical application. Projects should be focused on issues faced by care providers that, when implemented, will improve the health, nutrition and/or developmental outcomes for infants and young children. Competitive requests will be focused in a way to achieve measurable outcomes that could result in systemic practice changes within a reasonable period of time. The Foundation gives priority to projects of national or regional impact.

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Transatlantic Networks of Excellence
Fondation Leducq

LOI due September 5, 2014, 11:59 pm Paris time
February 2015 upon notification of LOI approval

Fondation Leducq announces a call for applications for the 2014-2015 Transatlantic Networks of Excellence Program. Under this program the Fondation Leducq awards grants of up to U.S. $6,000,000 over five years for internationally collaborative research in cardiovascular and neuro-vascular disease. As of 2014, the foundation has supported 43 networks, representing more than 390 investigators at 128 institutions in 18 countries. For the 2014-2015 application cycle, Fondation Leducq will use a web-based application system hosted by Altum proposalCENTRAL. Information about the application process and details about important dates in the 2014-2015 application cycle can be found on our website at flcq.org under Transatlantic Networks of ExcellenceDue date for letters of intent is Friday, September 5, 2014, 11:59 pm Paris time.

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Simons Collaborations in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences
Simons Foundation

LOI due October 31, 2014
Full submission due March 31, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The Simons Foundation invites applications for the Simons Collaborations in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences (MPS) program. The aim of the Simons Collaborations in MPS program is to stimulate progress on fundamental scientific questions of major importance in the broad area of mathematics, theoretical physics, and theoretical computer science. A Simons Collaboration in MPS should address a mathematical or theoretical topic of fundamental scientific importance, where a significant new development creates a novel area for exploration or provides a new direction for progress in an established field. The foundation expects to make up to two awards in 2015.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

A Simons Collaboration in MPS should address a mathematical or theoretical topic of fundamental scientific importance, where a significant new development creates a novel area for exploration or provides a new direction for progress in an established field. The questions addressed by the Simons Collaboration may be concrete or conceptual, but there should be little doubt that answering these would constitute a major scientific milestone. The project should have clearly defined initial activities and goals by which progress and its success can be measured. The support from the foundation should be seen as critical for the objectives of the project.

The project should involve outstanding researchers with a range of career stages. Excellence of the scientific leadership is one of the main criteria in the selection process. The project should be organized and managed in a manner engendering a high level of collaboration.

A Simons Collaboration will be led by a Collaboration Director, who is expected to determine the scientific agenda, to coordinate the scientific activities, and to organize Collaboration meetings as appropriate, including a one-day annual conference at the foundation. The Director will be the main point-of-contact for the foundation and will be responsible for coordinating all administrative deliverables. Principal Investigators (PIs) are expected to perform research that advances the goals of the Collaboration. Proposals should specify a core group of founding PIs. Additional PIs may be added at later stages, as the Collaboration evolves.

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Innovation in Regulatory Science
Burroughs Wellcome Fund

LOI due November 18, 2014
Full submission due April 1, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

BWF's Innovation in Regulatory Science Awards provide up to $500,000 over five years to academic investigators developing new methodologies or innovative approaches in regulatory science that will ultimately inform the regulatory decisions the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and others make.

These awards are open to U.S. and Canadian citizens or permanent residents who have a faculty or adjunct faculty appointment at a North American degree-granting institution.  Awards are made to degree-granting institutions in the U.S. or Canada on behalf of the awardee. 

The application process consists of two phases: a preproposal followed by a full proposal invitation.  Preproposal applicants selected by the Advisory Committee deemed to meet the goals of this initiative will be invited to submit full proposals.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Burroughs Wellcome Fund identified Innovation in Regulatory Science as an important, underfunded area. This initiative is designed to provide financial support to stimulate research efforts in this area.

The process of translating biomedical discoveries into new therapies has become increasingly complex in light of evolving science and technology, and requires that the science of regulation keep up with the advances in biomedical science and technology. For example, existing animal models of human disease are often poor predictors of efficacy of new therapeutic approaches in humans. As new technologies produce new types of preclinical models, innovation is needed in the evaluation of these models to justify movement into clinical studies. Over the last decade, numerous reports [1] have documented the importance of this area of research to the future of the biomedical enterprise, however it remains inadequately supported.

Regulatory science has been defined as the "development and use of new tools, standards, and approaches to more efficiently develop products and to more effectively evaluate product safety, efficacy, and quality". [2] It is has become the centerpiece of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) strategy for fostering innovation, and the academic and foundation communities have been called to take an active role in building this emerging field.

This initiative of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund is focused on providing support for academic researchers developing new methodologies or innovative approaches in regulatory science that will ultimately inform the regulatory decisions FDA and others make.  This would necessarily draw upon the talents of individuals trained in mathematics, computer science, applied physics, medicine, engineering, toxicology, epidemiology, biostatistics, and systems pharmacology, to name a few.

[1] FDA Science and Mission at Risk: Report of the Subcommittee on Science and Technology, FDA Science Board, 2007; Innovation or Stagnation: Challenge and Opportunity on the Critical Path to New Medical Products, Food and Drug Administration 2004; Building a National Framework for the Establishment of Regulatory Science for Drug Development, Institute of Medicine Workshop Report; Advancing Regulatory Science at the FDA, 2011.

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Clinical Neuroscience Research Grant Program
Dana (Charles A.) Foundation, Inc.

Rolling submission deadline

SYNOPSIS: 

Translational researchers may apply for support to test promising therapies from animal model research in a small number of patients with devastating, currently untreatable, brain diseases. Also supported are studies to develop ethical guidelines for clinical brain research, and prognostic data based on treatment outcomes in patients with severe brain injuries or disorders.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Clinical Neuroscience Research program focuses on patient research. Funded researchers set up "controlled clinical studies" in a small number of patients with a specific brain disease, based on promising animal studies suggesting that a specific therapy either treated the condition or prevented it from getting worse. In these controlled clinical studies, the new therapy is tested in some of the patients while the other patients continue to receive currently available treatment. Through this process, clinical researchers determine whether the tested new therapy shows initial promise beyond currently available treatment.

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Human Rights and International Justice Grants
MacArthur Foundation

The program receives and considers submissions on a rolling basis throughout the year.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Human Rights and International Justice Program seeks to strengthen human rights protections, advance government accountability, and improve the reach and quality of justice. Grantmaking aims to defend freedom of expression and enhance criminal justice globally, with a special focus on Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The sponsor's new strategy is as follows: increasing threats to freedom of speech and association, ranging from intensified attacks on frontline human rights defenders to the rise of national laws that restrict the ability for civil society to operate; assertive citizen movements calling for greater government accountability and demanding more protection of basic rights; growing demands for localizing accountability for atrocity crimes and expanding access to justice; and rapid advancement in communications media that is altering the way human rights advocates monitor violations, collect and manage data, and communicate with colleagues and the public.

Grantmaking takes account of these trends through a strategy that is framed by two pillars: defending freedom of expression and enhancing criminal justice. There is an emphasis on accountability as essential to securing human rights and a focus on leveraging technology to advance the work. 

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National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)

RFP--National Lab Opportunity
National Aeronautics & Space Administration

December 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is operating a share of the United States accommodations on the International Space Station (ISS) as a national laboratory in accordance with Section 507 of the NASA Authorization Act of 2005 (P.L.109-155) and seekS to increase the utilization of the ISS by other federal entities andthe private sector. To facilitate and increase such utilization of the ISS, NASA isproviding access to the ISS for the conduct of basic and applied research, technology development and industrial processing (collectively, R&D) to U.S. federal, state and local government entities, and to U.S. private entities (including, but not limited to, commercial firms, non-profit entities, and academic institutions) as part of the national laboratory. In preparation for the ISS post-assembly phase and during the post-assembly completephase, NASA is seeking proposals from domestic entities other than U.S. federal government agencies for the conduct of R&D activities on the ISS as a national laboratory. NASA anticipates using its authority to enter into Space Act Agreements to support national laboratory activities, including providing necessary access to NASA facilities, personnel and technical information, however, there will be no provision of funds in connection with this opportunity. Respondents will be responsible for financing their own activities. Participation in this National Lab Opportunity will be contingent upon selection by NASA and negotiation of an appropriate Agreement between NASA and the proposer. Proposed activities should involve R&D, including, but not limited to: life sciences, sensors, communication equipment, engineering testbeds, spacecraft design and testing, or education and should demonstrate potential benefit to the public, such as development of future products and services contributing to U.S. industrial capacity and economic growth or improving STEM education. 

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ROSES 2014: Astrophysics Research and Analysis (APRA)
National Aeronautics & Space Administration

Deadline: January 23, 2015

The Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program (APRA) program solicits basic research proposals for investigations that are relevant to NASA's programs in astronomy and astrophysics and includes research over the entire range of photons, gravitational waves, and particle astrophysics. Awards may be for up to four years' duration (up to five years for suborbital investigations), but shorter-term proposals are typical; four-year or five-year proposals must be well justified. Proposals for suborbital investigations are particularly encouraged.

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ROSES 2014: Strategic Astrophysics Technology
National Aeronautics & Space Administration

Deadline: January 23, 2015

Over the next decade and beyond, NASA's Astrophysics Division expects to undertake space flight missions that will explore the nature of the universe at its largest scales, its earliest moments, and its most extreme conditions; missions that will study how galaxies and stars formed and evolved to shape the universe we see today; and missions that will search out and characterize the planets and planetary systems orbiting other stars. As compelling as these future missions will be, implementing them presents many daunting technological challenges. To overcome these challenges and pave the way to ever more ambitious missions, NASA's Astrophysics Division has established the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to support the maturation of key technologies to the point at which they are feasible for implementation in space flight missions.

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National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)

NEH Research: Art Works Grant Program FY 2015
National Endowment for the Arts

October 21, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

The NEA's Office of Research & Analysis will make awards to support research that investigates the value and/or impact of the arts, either as individual components within the U.S. arts ecology or as they interact with each other and/or with other domains of American life.

"Value"-oriented research measures or otherwise clarifies one or more factors, characteristics, and conditions of the U.S. arts ecosystem as illustrated above. Examples may include but are not limited to descriptive studies of arts participation and arts learners, artists and art workers, arts organizations and arts industries, and arts funders and arts volunteers. Such research also may examine the underlying conditions and vehicles for arts participation. For instance, it can examine how training and education affects arts creation, arts audiences, or other aspects of arts engagement.

Separately, research on "impact" investigates direct and indirect pathways of arts participation on individual health and well-being; individual cognitive capacity, learning, and creativity; community livability; and economic prosperity. Research also could examine the effects of arts participation on broader-level outcomes, such as new forms of self-expression, new outlets for creative activity, and the overall creative and expressive capacity of U.S. society.

Examples of previously funded research can be found by using the NEA "Grant Search" engine or by clicking the "Research: Art Works Grants Final Papers" link on the Research: Art Works web page.

Priority will be given to applications that present theory-driven research questions and methodologies that will yield important information about the value and/or impact of the arts on individuals and communities. Competitive applications will take into account any extant research that serves as a basis for a theoretical framework, and helps to motivate the proposed project.

By providing financial support to deserving projects, the NEA anticipates that this program will spur growth in the number of people experienced in and knowledgeable about arts-related research in the U.S. To date, some of the most compelling research about the arts has originated in non-arts specialties: cognitive neuroscience, for example, with its discoveries about the arts' role in shaping learning-related outcomes and how the brain works; labor economics, with its lessons about the arts' impact on national and local productivity; urban planning work that seeks to understand the arts as a marker of community vitality; and psychological studies that posit the arts' relationship to health and well-being across the lifespan.  In this spirit, the NEA encourages applications from diverse research fields (e.g., psychology, education, economics, sociology, medicine and health, communications, and urban and regional planning) in addition to projects that address a diverse array of topics concerning the value and/or impact of the arts.

Funds will be given for projects that involve analyses of primary and/or secondary data. Primary data collection is an allowable activity under these grants, as long as a proposed project also includes analysis of that data. The NEA will not fund projects that focus exclusively on data acquisition. Projects may include, but are not limited to, primary and/or secondary data analyses; psychological studies that take place in clinical or non-clinical settings; third-party evaluations of an arts program's effectiveness and impact; and statistically-driven meta-analyses of existing research so as to provide a fresh understanding of the value and/or impact of the arts. The NEA also is interested in translational research that moves scientific evidence toward the development, testing, and standardization of new arts-related programs, practices, models, or tools that can be used easily by other practitioners and researchers.

 

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National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

Humanities Montana Regular & Major Grants
Humanities Montana

November 20, 2014 and December 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

We encourage proposals that stimulate statewide dialogue on humanities topics, foster discussion between humanities scholars and the public, strengthen cooperative relationships among communities and cultural organizations (museums, libraries, schools, tribal organizations, etc.), and enrich civic discourse among the state's diverse cultures and across its geographical distances.

Humanities Montana only awards regular and major grants to organizations, not individuals. Eligible sponsoring organizations are listed in the grant guidelines.

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Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
National Endowment for the Humanities

December 3, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections. Libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country face an enormous challenge: to preserve collections that facilitate research, strengthen teaching, and provide opportunities for life-long learning in the humanities. Ensuring the preservation of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art, and historical objects requires institutions to implement measures that slow deterioration and prevent catastrophic loss. This work is best accomplished through preventive conservation, which encompasses managing relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in collection spaces; providing protective storage enclosures and systems for collections; and safeguarding collections from theft and from natural and man-made disasters. As museums, libraries, archives, and other collecting institutions strive to be effective stewards of humanities collections, they must find ways to implement preventive conservation measures that are sustainable. This program therefore helps cultural repositories plan and implement preservation strategies that pragmatically balance effectiveness, cost, and environmental impact. Sustainable approaches to preservation can contribute to an institution¿s financial health, reduce its use of fossil fuels, and benefit its green initiatives, while ensuring that collections are well cared for and available for use in humanities programming, education, and research.

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National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Advanced Neural Prosthetics Research and Development (U01)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent Deadline: One month prior to application due date
Full Proposal Deadline: Standard Dates apply, by 5 p.m. local time

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications to pursue translational and pilot clinical studies for neural prosthetics. The program will utilize the cooperative agreement mechanism to enable support for milestone-driven projects for the development and demonstration of clinically-useful neural prosthetic devices. Activities supported in this program include implementation of clinical prototype devices, preclinical safety and efficacy testing, design verification and validation activities, pursuit of regulatory approval for clinical study, and proof-of-concept or pilot clinical studies.

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AHRQ Health Services Research Projects (R01)
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality/DHHS

Standard Due Dates

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) invites applications for discrete, specified health services research projects. The projects will be performed by the named investigator and study team. The R01 research plan proposed by the applicant institution/organization must be related to the mission and portfolio priority research interests of AHRQ. This FOA will use the AHRQ Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

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Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS (DP2)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Avenir means future in French, and this award looks toward the future by supporting early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field. NIDA has developed two Avenir Award Programs, one for HIV/AIDS research and the other for genetics or epigenetics studies. The Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS will support creative individuals who wish to pursue innovative research at the nexus of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. The Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS will support research approaches for substance using populations with or at risk for HIV/AIDS that may lead to improved preventive interventions, improved therapies and/or long term retention in care, and ultimately, eradication of HIV.

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement and Management in Pain Research (R21)(R01)(R03)
National Institutes of Health

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute insult is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators.

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-119.html (R21)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/PA-files/PA-13-118.html (RO1)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/PA-files/PA-13-117.html (R03)


mHealth Tools to Promote Effective Patient - "Provider Communication, Adherence to Treatment and Self Management of Chronic Diseases In Underserved Populations (R01)

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate research utilizing Mobile Health (mHealth) tools aimed at the improvement of effective patient-provider communication, adherence to treatment and self-management of chronic diseases in underserved populations. With the rapid expansion of cellular networks and substantial advancements in Smartphone technologies, it is now possible - and affordable - to transmit patient data digitally from remote areas to specialists in urban areas, receive real-time feedback, and capture that consultation in a database. mHealth tools, therefore, may facilitate more timely and effective patient-provider communication through education communication around goal setting, treatment reminders, feedback on patient progress and may improve health outcomes. This announcement encourages the development, testing and comparative effective analysis of interventions utilizing mHealth technologies in underserved populations. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) (R03) and (R21) award mechanisms.

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-330.html (R01)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-331.html (R03)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-332.html (R21)


NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS and Drug Use Research (DP1)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

The NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research supports individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose high-impact research that will open new areas of HIV/AIDS research and/or lead to new avenues for prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The term avant-garde is used to describe highly innovative approaches that have the potential to be transformative. The proposed research should reflect approaches and ideas that are substantially different from those already being pursued by the investigator or others. The NIDA Avant-Garde award supports innovative, basic research that may lead to improved preventive interventions or therapies; creative, new strategies to prevent disease transmission; novel approaches to improve disease outcomes; and creative approaches to eradicating HIV or improving the lives of those living with HIV.

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NIDA Avenir Award Program for Genetics or Epigenetics of Substance Abuse (DP2)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Avenir means future in French, and this award looks toward the future by supporting early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field. NIDA has developed two Avenir Award Programs, one for HIV/AIDS research and the other for genetics or epigenetics studies.

The Genetic Avenir Award program supports early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies that open new areas of research for the genetics or epigenetics of addiction. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field of genetics or epigenetics of substance abuse.

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NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (DP2) SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
National Institutes of Health

Special Announcement $1.5M DP2 Award
See Program Annoucement

The NIH Director's New Innovator (DP2) Award initiative supports a small number of early stage investigators of exceptional creativity who propose bold and highly innovative new research approaches that have the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important problems in biomedical and behavioral research. The New Innovator Award initiative complements ongoing efforts by NIH and its Institutes and Centers to fund early stage investigators through R01 grants, which continue to be the major sources of NIH support for early stage investigators. The NIH Director's New Innovator Award initiative is a component of the High Risk - High Reward Research Program of the NIH Common Fund.

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NIH Director's Pioneer Award (DP1) SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
National Institutes of Health

Special Announcement $2.5M DPI Award
See Program Announcement

The NIH Pioneer Award initiative complements NIH's traditional, investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering and possibly transforming approaches to addressing major biomedical or behavioral challenges that have the potential to produce an unusually high impact on a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research. To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect substantially different scientific directions from those already being pursued in the investigator's research program or elsewhere.

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NINDS Requirements for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Development and Resource Sharing

The purpose of this Notice is to alert the research community to the current NINDS best practices guidelines for development and distribution of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) through the NINDS Repository, also known as the NINDS Human Genetics Resource Center. The iPSC lines available through the NINDS Repository were primarily developed through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and collaborations with government (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)) and non-government organizations (the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association, the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, CHDI, the Hereditary Disease Foundation, the Huntington's Disease Society of America, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, and the Parkinson's Disease Foundation).

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Program Announcements

  • Advancing Research in      Voice Disorders (R21), (R01)
         (PA-14-235) , (PA-14-236)
         National Institute on Deafness and Other      Communication Disorders
         Application      Receipt/Submission Date(s): Multiple      dates, see announcement.  

  • NIOSH Support for      Conferences and Scientific Meetings (U13)
         (PAR-14-229) 
         National Institute for Occupational Safety and      Health
         Application      Receipt/Submission Date(s): Multiple      dates, see announcement.

Program Notices

  • Notice of Clarification      Regarding the Additional Educational Information Required for PA-14-147,      148, and 149 "Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award      (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31, F31 - Div, and F32)"
         (NOT-OD-14-094)  (NOT-OD-14-095) (NOT-OD-14-096) National      Institutes of Health

  • Notice of NEI      Participation in Administrative Supplements for Research on Dietary      Supplements (Admin Supp)
         (NOT-EY-14-001)
         National Eye Institute

  • Notice of Clarification      and Correction to PAR-14-207 "Center for Inherited Disease Research      (CIDR) High Throughput Sequencing and Genotyping Resource Access      (X01)"
         (NOT-HG-14-028)
         National Human Genome Research Institute

  • Notice of NHLBI      Participation in PAR-14-201 "Administrative Supplements for Research      on Dietary Supplements (Admin Supp)"
         (NOT-HL-14-224)
         National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Notice to Correct      NOT-NS-13-040 "Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity      Announcement for the NINDS Exploratory Grant Program in Parkinson's      Disease Research (P20)" 
         (NOT-NS-14-033)
         National Institute of Neurological Disorders and      Stroke

Request for Applications

  • Nutrition Obesity      Research Centers (NORCs) (P30) 
         (RFA-DK-14-002)
         National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and      Kidney Diseases
         Application Receipt Date(s): November 25, 2014 and June 18, 2015

  • Development of an      Integrated Mathematical Model for Comparative Characterization of Complex      Molecules (U01)
         (RFA-FD-14-082)
         Food and Drug Administration
         Application Receipt Date(s): June 30, 2014

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Etiology, Diagnosis, Pathophysiology, and Treatment (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent Deadline: May 16, 2014, September 24, 2014
Application Deadline: See Program Annoucement

The sponsors invite applications that propose to examine the etiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), sometimes referred to as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), in diverse groups and across the lifespan. Applications that address gaps in the understanding of the environmental and biological risk factors, the determinants of heterogeneity among patient populations, the common mechanisms influencing the multiple body systems that are affected in ME/CFS are encouraged. The NIH is particularly interested in funding interdisciplinary research that will enhance our knowledge of the disease process and provide evidence based solutions to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of all persons with ME/CFS. This interdisciplinary research may include the building of scientific teams to study and develop biomarkers, innovative treatment modalities, and/or the modifiable risk and protective processes specifically targeted by preventive and/or treatment interventions. This program will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

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Renewal of Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence [COBRE] (P20)

Deadline: September 25, 2014

The goals of the Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) program are (1) to strengthen an institution's biomedical research infrastructure through the establishment of a thematic multi-disciplinary center and (2) to enhance the ability of investigators to compete independently for NIH individual research grants or other external peer-reviewed support. COBRE support consists of three sequential five-year phases. Phase I focuses on developing research infrastructure and providing junior investigators with formal mentoring and research project funding to help them acquire preliminary data and successfully compete for independent research grant support. Phase II, which is the focus of this FOA, is intended to strengthen the center through further improvements in research infrastructure and to continue development and support of a critical mass of investigators with shared scientific interests. It is therefore expected that progress will have been made toward establishing centers that can compete independently for external peer-reviewed center or program project grant support. In some instances centers may be more effectively maintained by the centers' investigators competing for individual investigator-initiated research support. Phase III provides support for maintaining COBRE research cores developed during phases I and II.

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Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG) (R01)
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering/NIH/DHHS

September 7, 2014 (AIDS-related); October 5, 2014 (other)

The sponsors invite applications for collaborations between the life and physical sciences that: 1) apply a multidisciplinary bioengineering approach to the solution of a biomedical problem; and 2) integrate, optimize, validate, translate or otherwise accelerate the adoption of promising tools, methods and techniques for a specific research or clinical problem in basic, translational, or clinical science and practice. An application may propose design-directed, developmental, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven research and is appropriate for small teams applying an integrative approach that can increase our understanding of and solve problems in biological, clinical or translational science.  This program will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement and Management in Pain Research (R01)

Deadlines: September 7, 2014; October 5, 2014

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute injury is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism. 

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement and Management in Pain Research (R03)

Deadlines: May 7, 2014; June 5, 2014; September 7, 2014; October 5, 2014

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute insult is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators. This program will use the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism. 

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement and Management in Pain Research (R21)

Deadlines: May 7, 2014; June 5, 2014; September 7, 2014; October 5, 2014

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute insult is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators. This program will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism. 

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Obesity Policy Evaluation Research (R01)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease

October 5, 2014

The sponsors invite applications that propose to evaluate large scale policy or programs that are expected to influence obesity related behaviors (e.g., dietary intake, physical activity, or sedentary behavior) and/or weight outcomes in an effort to prevent or reduce obesity. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism. Obesity is a major contributor to many serious health conditions that increase morbidity and mortality and reduce quality of life. The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has dramatically increased in the past four decades. Nationally there is an imperative to take action at local, state and federal levels, especially related to obesity in children. While helping people achieve and maintain a healthy weight is a critical public health goal, relatively little is known about the effectiveness of large scale policies and programs that could help achieve this goal at the population level, or any differential effects on sub-populations. As noted in the 2010 Institute Of Medicine (IOM) report, Bridging the Evidence Gap in Obesity Prevention: A Framework to Inform Decision Making (http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/Bridging-the-Evidence-Gap-in-Obesity-Prevention-A-Framework-to-Inform-Decision-Making.aspx), rigorous scientific evaluation of these policies and programs can help build an evidence base to better inform policy public health approaches to prevent excess weight gain and/or improve weight management.

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Research On Ethical Issues In Human Subjects Research (R01)
National Cancer Institute/NIH/DHHS

September 7, 2014 (AIDS-related); October 5, 2014 (other)

The sponsors invite applications that propose to study high priority bioethical challenges and issues associated with the types of biomedical, social, and behavioral research supported by the participating NIH Institutes/Centers.  The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) joins this FOA as part of its efforts to promote research on the behavioral and social aspects of health and illness.  However, only participating ICs will provide direct grant support under this FOA.  This program will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

This FOA seeks applications for research projects that propose to analyze and address ethical challenges and issues related to the conduct and output of biomedical, clinical, social and behavioral research within the NIH mission.  The results of projects funded under this program announcement should enhance the ethical conduct and social value of research within the NIH mission, optimize the protection of human research participants, ensure research burdens and benefits are equitably distributed across populations, and contribute to policy development regarding the implementation and oversight of new research discoveries and methods.  Proposals to conduct empirical research as well as those that propose to develop new theoretical and conceptual ethical frameworks will be considered.  Interdisciplinary and collaborative projects utilizing multiple approaches are strongly encouraged. 

Applications should address bioethical challenges and ethical issues relevant to the research mission area(s) of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs).  The participating ICs have identified specific bioethics topics below as the highest priority for consideration.  These are organized into seven categories: 1) ethical considerations of new and emerging technologies; 2) research study design issues; 3) issues associated with therapeutic misconception and the interface between treatment and research; 4) research involving vulnerable populations and urgent situations; 5) research with existing specimens, data, and health information; 6) dissemination and translation of research findings; and 7) oversight of research. 

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NIMH Career Transition Award for Tenure-Track and Tenured Intramural Investigators (K22)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

October 9, 2014

The intent of the NIMH Career Transition (K22) Program is to assist investigators in the NIMH Division of Intramural Research Programs (DIRP) in achieving their research career goals. The specific goals of this program are to: 1) support tenure-track and tenured scientists conducting research in the NIMH DIRP who aim to transition to independent research positions in the extramural community where they intend to continue already successful biomedical research careers as independent scientists; and 2) foster the further career advancement of these independent scientists and enable them to expand their potential to contribute significantly to mental health-related research.

Each application to the NIMH Career Transition (K22) Program must reflect the individual needs of the Candidate (PD/PI). Phase 1 of the award will be sponsored by the NIMH DIRP while Phase 2 will be sponsored by the domestic, extramural institution to which the Candidate will transition. The application will be submitted for peer review of the scientific and technical merit while the Candidate is a tenured or tenure-track investigator in the NIMH DIRP. The outcome of this review will be the primary determinant of whether the application will be supported. However, it is the Phase 2 application that will be awarded. Phase 2 of the NIMH Career Transition (K22) award will provide up to three years of support to conduct research as an independent scientist at a domestic, extramural institution/organization to which the Candidate has been recruited, been offered  and has accepted an independent research position. The institution sponsoring the Phase 2 award must demonstrate a commitment to provide the environment, resources, and at least 6 person-months (equivalent to 50% full-time professional effort) of protected time during the Phase 2 award period for the Candidate to conduct the proposed research. This commitment will enable the Candidate to maintain and develop further an independent research program and to prepare a competitive application for research grant support (R01) during the K22 award period.

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Academic Career Award (Parent K07)
National Institutes of Health/DHHS

Standard dates apply. The next deadline is October 12, 2014

The purpose of the NIH Academic Career Award (K07) is to provide support to increase the pool of individuals with academic and research expertise to become academic researchers and to enhance the educational or research capacity at the grantee sponsoring grantee institution. The Academic Career Award supports K07 Development awards for more junior level candidates and K07 Leadership awards for more senior individuals with acknowledged scientific expertise and leadership skills. Prospective candidates are encouraged to contact the relevant NIH staff for IC-specific programmatic and budgetary information: Table of IC-Specific Information, Requirements and Staff Contacts.

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Administrative Supplements for Research on Dietary Supplements (Admin Supp)

Application Receipt/Submission Date(s): October 15, 2014

The mission of the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) is to strengthen knowledge and understanding of dietary supplements by evaluating scientific information, stimulating and supporting research, disseminating research results, and educating the public to foster an enhanced quality of life and health for the U.S. population.

Dietary supplements can have an impact on the prevention of disease and on the maintenance of health. In the US, these ingredients are usually defined as including plant extracts, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and hormonal products that are available without prescription and are consumed in addition to the regular diet. Although vitamin and mineral supplements have been available for decades, their health effects have been the subject of detailed scientific research only within the last 15-20 years. It is important to expand this research to include the health effects of other bioactive factors consumed as dietary supplements to promote health and prevent disease.

Considerable research on the effects of botanical and herbal dietary supplements has been conducted in Asia and Europe where plant products have a long tradition of use. The overwhelming majority of these supplements, however, have not been studied using modern scientific techniques. Nor have they been extensively studied in population groups that may be at risk for chronic diseases.

For many reasons, therefore, it is important to enhance research efforts to determine the benefits and risks of dietary supplements.

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Development of Novel Therapeutics for Select Pathogens (R21/R33)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Letter of intent due September 19, 2014
Full application due October 20, 2014

Rising resistance to anti-infective agents in healthcare and community settings is an increasing contributor to morbidity, mortality and rising healthcare costs. In addition to antimicrobial stewardship, vaccinations and hospital/community hygiene measures, there is a critical need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat antimicrobial-resistant infections. This initiative seeks to stimulate innovation in the discovery and early development of novel therapies for the treatment of infections caused by drug resistant gram-negative bacteria or subtypes of influenza A, including currently drug-resistant strains.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will provide support for discovery and translational research aimed at making use of new or unexploited drug target(s), proof-of-concept studies, lead-to-candidate development and/or progression of a candidate compound towards IND submission. Only applications targeting drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria or Influenza A sub-types will be supported under this FOA.

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NIGMS National Centers for Systems Biology (P50)
National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Open 30 days prior to the application due date
September 23, 2014, October 23, 2014

The purpose of this funding opportunity (FOA) is to promote the use of Systems Biology approaches for studying complex biological phenomena, where these phenomena are relevant to the NIGMS mission. The Centers of Excellence program is intended to facilitate pioneering research, research training, and outreach programs in this area and therefore stimulate the field as a whole. The NIGMS mission includes research portfolios in the areas of bioinformatics and computational biology, molecular and cell biology, biophysics, genetics and developmental biology, biological chemistry, pharmacology, anesthesiology, basic social and behavioral sciences, and human physiology in the areas of shock, trauma, burn, wound healing, inflammation, and multi-organ system failure (http://www.nigms.nih.gov/About/). NIGMS does not support research focused on diseases or organ systems that are the domain of other Institutes and Centers within the NIH (http://www.nih.gov). The modeling of emergence of infectious diseases, a systems-related area, is the subject of another NIGMS program (http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Initiatives/MIDAS).

Successful Centers will be characterized by unique, exceptional contributions to existing areas of systems biology research, and/or by extension of systems approaches into emerging areas of opportunity.

Examples of NIGMS mission areas that are relevant to systems biology include, but are not limited to, the following:

--Development of multi-scale modeling approaches to understanding basic physiological processes;

--Quantitative and systems pharmacology approaches to understanding drug action where the focus is on understanding the context which controls and responds to the drug target;

--Fundamental mechanisms of cellular processes, such as transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, apoptosis, cell differentiation, cell division, cell migration, intracellular transport, membrane and organelle biogenesis, energy generation and utilization, host-symbiont interactions, intercellular communications, etc;

--Genetic variation as contributing to the understanding of complex phenotypes and their evolutionary and environmental context;

--Pattern formation and other developmental processes in model systems, e.g., Drosophila and C. elegans, as well as the role of stem cells in organ and tissue development;

--Organ-system networks involved in multi-organ failure in shock, trauma, and burn injury, and inflammatory processes;

--Computational modeling of complex systems of behavior such as, e.g., altruism, dynamic social networks, or migration, that are relevant to basic biomedical sciences; research on relationship between behavior and human health and complex diseases;

--Design and construction of synthetic biological systems to better understand the underlying organizational principles of biological networks, and to obtain new features and utilities relevant to biomedicine.

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Multi-Site Clinical Trials for the Pulmonary Trials Cooperative (PTC) (U01)
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

LOI due September 20, 2014
Full submission due October 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

There is an urgent need for development of new treatments and for testing of existing clinical management strategies in adult populations with chronic pulmonary diseases and obstructive sleep apnea. To facilitate efficient conduct of both inpatient and outpatient studies in "real world" settings, the NHLBI is establishing a novel structure: the Pulmonary Trials Cooperative (PTC). The PTC will carry out multiple clinical studies in a variety of chronic pulmonary conditions, including but not limited to interstitial lung disease (ILD), pulmonary hypertension (PH), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis, and obstructive sleep apnea.  Asthma, and acute lung injury and critical care, are specifically excluded to avoid overlap with current programs.  By studying multiple chronic pulmonary conditions in a single large program, the PTC will enable studies across a wide range of pulmonary diseases; encourage studies of patients with comorbid or intermediate conditions; involve a wide range of institutions, from major medical centers to community-based providers, in the recruitment, retention and follow-up of research subjects; and increase the efficiency of subject recruitment at individual sites by strongly encouraging the use of local medical information systems for the identification of potential research subjects.

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) solicits applications (U01) for Protocol Leadership Groups (PLGs) to develop protocols and support the Lead Investigators in the conduct and analyses of these trials. Multiple PLGs will cooperate with a single Network Management Core (NEMO), which will have primary responsibility for organizing and operating the PTC. A companion FOA (RFA-HL-15-016) requests applications for the NEMO.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Each awarded PLG will be expected to finalize the design of a single, simple, pragmatic clinical trial (Phase 2 or Phase 3); to provide a Lead Investigator for oversight of the study during implementation; and to perform all aspects of centralized protocol data management, including support for screening and randomization, electronic transfer and collection of individual data in a central database, error checking and data quality control, and study analysis.  In addition to the Lead Investigator, PLGs teams must include an investigator with expertise in statistical design and analysis as required to produce a complete protocol and manage the data collected. To this end, multiple PD/PI applications are encouraged.  The PLGs are expected to cooperate with the NEMO and a network of 20-40 Clinical Centers assembled by the NEMO. The NEMO will coordinate Clinical Center activities and disperse protocol funds to support trial operations. Other than focusing on adult chronic pulmonary diseases or obstructive sleep apnea, no constraints are imposed on PTC trials with regard to interventions, subject characteristics, or sample size, except those implicit in the 4-year project period and the budgetary restrictions. The exact number depending overall on the nature and extent of the investigations proposed and the availability of funds.  

PLGs will have primary responsibility for developing study forms and implementing a data management system for the specific protocol they propose.  PLGs will also process, tabulate and report, in accordance with NHLBI policies, adverse events (AEs), provide quality control for the trial they propose, and analyze study data and draft the main study manuscript. If biospecimen collection is proposed as part of the trial, this should be appropriately justified in the PLG application, but responsibility for maintaining a biospecimen repository will reside with NEMO.

The PI(s) of each PLG will serve on an operations committee (OC) with primary responsibility for implementation, oversight, continuing evaluation, and reporting of PTC studies.  The OC will also include the PI(s) of NEMO, rotating representatives of the Clinical Centers, one program official from the NHLBI, and a Chair appointed by the NHLBI (see RFA-HL-15-016). The PI(s) of each PLG awarded will vote only on general issues and on matters regarding their own protocol.  A DSMB will also be established in accordance with NHLBI policies (see http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/funding/policies/dsmpolicy.htm) to act as an independent advisory group to the NHLBI Director on issues of human subject safety and privacy, study integrity, and study progress.

 

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Outstanding Investigator Award (R35)
National Institutes of Health/NCI

LOI due September 20, 2014
Full submission due October 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites grant applications for the Outstanding Investigator Award (R35) in any area of cancer research.

The objective of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA) is to provide long-term support to experienced investigators with outstanding records of cancer research productivity who propose to conduct exceptional research. The OIA is intended to allow investigators the opportunity to take greater risks, be more adventurous in their lines of inquiry, or take the time to develop new techniques. The OIA would allow an Institution to submit an application nominating an established Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) for a 7-year grant.

It is expected that the OIA would provide extended funding stability and encourage investigators to embark on projects of unusual potential in cancer research. The research projects should break new ground or extend previous discoveries toward new directions or applications that may lead to a breakthrough that will advance biomedical, behavioral, or clinical cancer research.

 

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Social and Behavioral Research on the Elderly in Disasters (R03)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 16, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsors invite applications that propose to conduct research in the behavioral and social sciences on the consequences of natural and man-made disasters for the health and well-being of the elderly, with an ultimate goal of preventing or mitigating harmful consequences. Disasters include weather-related events, earthquakes, tsunamis, large-scale attacks on civilian populations, technological catastrophes, and pandemics. This program will use the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The sponsors seeks to stimulate research in the behavioral and social sciences on the consequences of natural and man-made disasters for the health and well-being of the elderly, with an ultimate goal of preventing and mitigating harmful consequences. Recent disasters have served as reminders that older people can be both more vulnerable and in some ways more resilient than younger people. Research in the social and behavioral sciences can be useful both for the practical work of helping future efforts to prepare for or mitigate disasters and for the scientific understanding of aging, health, and well-being. Disasters include severe weather-related events, including heat waves; earthquakes; tsunamis; large-scale attacks on civilian populations; technological catastrophes; and influenza pandemics. The health outcomes of greatest interest include mortality, disability, severe distress and clinically significant morbidity (as opposed to mild or transient symptoms), and economic hardship sufficient to harm health. This FOA relates to the NIA mission to improve the health and well-being of older Americans through research and the NINR mission to prevent disease and disability. Research and translation efforts can help inform planning by drawing on lessons from disasters of multiple types and locations.

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Testing Interventions for Health-Enhancing Physical Activity (R01)
Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives (NIH)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to fund highly innovative and promising research that tests multi-level intervention programs of 1 to 2 years in length that are designed to increase health-enhancing physical activity: 1) in persons or groups that can benefit from such activity; and 2) that could be made scalable and sustainable for broad use across the nation.  This FOA provides support for up to 5 years for research planning, intervention delivery, and follow-up activities. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

This FOA seeks studies that test multi-level interventions to increase physical activity levels based on well-established theory and existing data. Interventions to be tested should have an expanded focus beyond the individual level, or beyond the environmental level, to include two or more levels, such as individuals, families, social groups, institutional/organizational environments, worksite, healthcare systems, or community environments. Investigators are encouraged to incorporate both individual and environmental interventions that take into account motivational, cognitive and emotional components along with environments that facilitate and sustain change.  Multi-level interventions are thought to hold promise in enabling individuals to successfully change and maintain their physical activity-related health behaviors.  Investigators may propose other levels, but whatever levels are selected should be well-justified.

Interventions tested in more "real-world" settings that have the potential to be scalable, packaged for broad use, or informative for policy are encouraged. Packaging for broad use applies to interventions that have developed and tested: toolkits that provide implementation guidance, procedures and strategies, including recruitment tools, intervention design, recruitment of partners; analytical tools; appropriate measures of physical activity for the intervention and diverse population groups and settings; and supporting information so that others can replicate the study and potentially implement the program.

Given the relatively large cost in mounting community interventions, an assessment on resources spent on intervention development and maintenance is desired.  Data on costs of implementing and sustaining the intervention is encouraged, but complete cost-effectiveness analyses are beyond the scope of this announcement.  Costs can include actual costs for intervention development, implementation and, to a lesser degree, maintenance.  An example is the packaging of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)-funded Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention program for use in YMCAs across the country. Another example is National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) studies that tested interventions delivered in health care settings that have potential implications to inform reimbursement policy.  Potential for incorporation into community programs and through policy change also can enhance the likelihood of sustainability.

Due to funding limitations on the duration (5 years) of a R01 at NIH, it is expected that investigators who have done preliminary developmental work, including pilot studies or work with different population groups or single level interventions, would be more successful in responding to this FOA.  Preliminary developmental work on physical activity interventions should include needs assessments in population groups of interest and pilot testing interventions for feasibility and tailoring. Prior work may also include utilizing systems science to develop new intervention models based on analyzing key upstream influences. The use of fractional factorial designed studies that have identified promising intervention components, or previous studies testing adaptive interventions that changed during the course of the study, are also encouraged where appropriate.   Further, prior work demonstrating effectiveness at one level (individual or environmental) could be combined with work at another level to create multi-level intervention programs.

Studies in any age group and special population, including populations at high risk for sedentary behavior, are appropriate for this announcement. Sustainability for the purpose of this announcement is defined as one to two years post-intervention.  For example, an intervention targeting a population at risk for developing osteoporosis may include bone strengthening exercises, or an intervention targeting children at risk for obesity or diabetes may include increased physical education time during school hours. Populations of interest include, but are not limited to: 

- Healthy but sedentary or inactive individuals

- Persons or groups at high risk for a particular disease or condition that can be improved by physical activity

- Persons with an existing disease or condition (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, clinical depression, or diabetes) whose outcomes could be improved by physical activity

- Children and adults of diverse socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups with low activity levels

- Persons with physical, developmental, or intellectual disabilities who may need special approaches for activity promotion

- Inactive or sedentary elderly individuals or groups

- Minority and underserved populations at higher risk for conditions associated with inactivity

- Other groups, if justified by the investigator

Comparison of male and female populations or subjects on the desired outcome is highly desired. Of particular interest are research activities which increase the understanding of sex and gender differences and factors in health and disease, to support implementation of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research, available at http://orwh.od.nih.gov/research/strategicplan/index.asp.

Settings for the interventions can include healthcare settings, worksites, households, schools, green space, parks and recreation centers, other community organizations and settings, or entire communities.  Because this FOA seeks multi-level interventions that have the potential to be scalable and sustainable, the use of multiple settings for intervention implementation or support may be considered. Illustrative examples of studies testing multi-level interventions with two or more levels can be found in existing systematic reviews.

To date, the available body of research includes numerous studies with methodological issues and systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration and the Community Preventive Services Task Force have resulted in conflicting findings. Thus, investigators should propose the strongest study design that can evaluate the effects of the intervention program with high internal validity, taking into account external validity and generalizability. In general, this would be a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. Most studies proposed in response to this announcement will probably need randomization at the group level (Group Randomized Trial, or GRT) to match the level of intervention and to minimize or prevent contamination of the comparison group.  In some cases, a randomized design may not be possible or feasible, or would raise ethical concerns that are difficult to address. In such instances, investigators could propose and justify alternative, high-quality study designs. Such designs include, but are not limited to, quasi-experimental designs such as multiple baseline or time series, regression discontinuity, pre-to-post intervention with external comparison, natural experiments, or others (

Given the strong evidence that physical activity is associated with many health benefits, the primary outcome being sought is a measure of physical activity and/or change in physical activity over the duration of the 1-2 year intervention period in the direction of achieving the health-enhancing physical activity goals for the targeted population or patient subgroup, as identified in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.  Therefore, the intervention and any comparison/control group should use appropriate and well-justified physical activity measures to enable proper comparisons that are also feasible in real world settings.  Measurement of intervention processes and impacts also is encouraged to enable assessment of intervention fidelity and whether hypothesized mediators were affected. Measurement of secondary outcomes such as social outcomes and possible co-benefits of physical activity participation (e.g., effects on behavioral, cognitive, or psychosocial outcomes; effects on substance abuse, tobacco use, mental health, or cardiovascular disease risk factors) or adverse outcomes (e.g., injuries) may also be included.

It is anticipated that each award will support multidisciplinary project teams composed of scientists with expertise to enable all the specific aims to be addressed. A range of disciplines is likely to be needed; for example, teams may include public health, clinical, behavioral, and social scientists, statisticians, exercise physiologists, and others. 

 

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Health Promotion Among Racial and Ethnic Minority Males (R01) & (R21)
National Institute of Nursing Research/NIH/DHHS

Earliest submission date of October 5, 2014

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) invite applications that propose to stimulate and expand research in the health of minority men. Specifically, this initiative is intended to: 1) enhance our understanding of the numerous factors (e.g., sociodemographic, community, societal, personal) influencing the health promoting behaviors of racial and ethnic minority males and their subpopulations across the life cycle, and 2) encourage applications focusing on the development and testing of culturally and linguistically appropriate health-promoting interventions designed to reduce health disparities among racially and ethnically diverse males and their subpopulations age 21 and older. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism. Standard dates apply, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization.

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mHealth Tools for Individuals with Chronic Conditions to Promote Effective Patient-Provider Communication, Adherence to Treatment and Self-Management (R01)
National Institute of Nursing Research/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization.

The purpose of this initiative is to stimulate research utilizing Mobile Health (mHealth) tools aimed at the improvement of effective patient-provider communication, adherence to treatment and self-management of chronic diseases in underserved populations. With the rapid expansion of cellular networks and substantial advancements in Smartphone technologies, it is now possible - and affordable - to transmit patient data digitally from remote areas to specialists in urban areas, receive real-time feedback, and capture that consultation in a database. These mHealth tools, therefore, may facilitate more timely and effective patient-provider communication through education communication around goal setting, treatment reminders, feedback on patient progress and may improve health outcomes. This announcement encourages the development, testing and comparative effective analysis of interventions utilizing mHealth technologies. There is also an interest in studying mHealth technologies in underserved populations. 

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Research to Characterize and Reduce Stigma to Improve Health (R01) (R21) & (R03)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

Vary by mechanism

NIH invites applications to characterize the role of stigma in health, life course development, and aging, both in the U.S. and globally, and to test interventions to prevent or reduce the impact of stigma at the individual, community, health care system, and policy levels.  The goal of this FOA is to promote research addressing the health-related aspects of stigma, including the etiology and perpetuation of stigma; its impact on physical and mental health, well-being, life course development, and aging; its influence on health behaviors and on use, access to, and quality of received healthcare services; its contribution to health disparities affecting vulnerable demographic groups; and intervention strategies to reduce health-related stigma and/or the negative health and life course developmental impacts of stigma.  This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism. Standard dates apply, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization.

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Exploratory Grant Award to Promote Workforce Diversity in Basic Cancer Research (R21)
National Cancer Institute/NIH/DHHS

November 20, 2014

The Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD) and the Division of Cancer Biology (DCB) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), invite applications by investigators from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in basic and biomedical cancer research. The NIH recognizes a unique and compelling need to promote diversity in the NIH-funded research workforce. The purpose of this FOA is to improve the diversity of the NCI-funded research workforce by supporting and recruiting eligible investigators from groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and social sciences including individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and individuals from socially, culturally, economically, or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds that have recently and demonstrably inhibited their ability to pursue a career in health-related research. This funding opportunity will also provide a bridge to investigators that have completed their research training and may need extra time to develop a research project grant application. This program will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.

The purpose of this FOA is to close the gap that currently exists between new investigators and NCI R01-funded investigators and to ensure that individuals from underrepresented backgrounds who have entered the research pipeline remain in the pipeline. This initiative will also provide a bridge to investigators that have completed their training and may need extra time to develop a research project grant (e.g., R01) application. This FOA seeks to enhance funding opportunities for all investigators including investigators supported by the Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) such as the Career Development Awards, Diversity Supplements and those investigators participating as co-leaders on research projects in the Comprehensive Partnership program to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CPRCHD) formerly Minority Serving Institution (MSI)/Cancer Center Partnership (MI/CCP) program, and any eligible investigators interested in developing innovative studies in basic cancer biology.

Research applications should focus on basic cancer research and cancer health disparities, consistent with the research interests of both the Division of Cancer Biology (DCB, http://dcb.nci.nih.gov/), and the Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD, http://crchd.cancer.gov/). The DCB supports research in the areas of cancer cell biology, cancer etiology, cancer immunology, and hematology, DNA and chromosome aberrations, structural biology, and the tumor microenvironment.

The CRCHD supports cancer health disparity research that is focused on basic, hypothesis-driven studies that explicitly address the unequal burden of cancer amongst racial/ethnic minorities or other underserved populations across the cancer continuum (prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship).

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Developing Interventions for Health-Enhancing Physical Activity (R21/R33)
Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives, Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)

November 4, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This FOA encourages innovative research to improve our understanding of how to increase and maintain health-enhancing physical activity to make meaningful and lasting change, with an emphasis on multi-level interventions that have the potential to be scalable, implementable, and sustained in real-world settings. Interventions to be tested should seek to increase participants' progression toward achieving the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans as appropriate to the participants' health, abilities, and conditions. The intent of this announcement is to address physical activity as it relates to conditions other than obesity or energy balance, such as cardiorespiratory fitness, reduced rates of cancer, bone health, mental health, or substance abuse. The interventions to be tested can include diverse strategies delivered at multiple levels to promote health-enhancing physical activity as a primary outcome. Studies across the lifespan that address a wide range of population groups are sought (e.g., racial and ethnic minorities, children, elderly populations, persons with medical conditions, and persons with disabilities).  Investigators are encouraged to refine interventions and make use of innovative partnerships within and across sectors (e.g., partnerships with community organizations, faith-based organizations, businesses, government, and/or healthcare providers). For studies that are ready to implement, test, and evaluate scalable interventions, please see the companion Research Project Grant (R01) PAR-14-315.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

This FOA seeks studies that develop multi-level interventions to increase physical activity levels based on well-established theory and existing data. Interventions to be developed should have an expanded focus beyond the individual level, or beyond the environmental level, to include two or more levels, such as individuals, families, social groups, institutional/organizational environments, worksite, healthcare systems, or community environments. Investigators are encouraged to incorporate both personal and environmental interventions that take into account motivational, cognitive and emotional components along with environments that facilitate and sustain change.  Investigators may propose other levels, but whatever levels are selected should be well-justified.

Interventions developed for more "real-world" settings that have the potential to be scalable, packaged for broad use, or informative for policy are encouraged. Packaging for broad use applies to interventions that have developed and tested: toolkits that provide implementation guidance, procedures and strategies, including recruitment tools, intervention design, recruitment of partners; analytical tools; appropriate measures of physical activity for the intervention and diverse population groups and settings; and supporting information so that others can replicate the study and potentially implement the program.

Due to the phased nature of this R21/R33 award, applications should propose to conduct formative assessments and pilot studies in the R21 phase with possible transition to expanded research support in the R33 phase. Such planning activities and feasibility studies can include studies utilizing systems science to develop new intervention models based on analyzing key upstream influences, fractional factorial designs that identify promising intervention components, studies testing adaptive interventions that change during the course of the study, or other innovative and state-of-the art approaches to developmental work. Novel approaches based on clinical experience that are well-justified will also be considered. 

Studies in any age group and special population, including populations at high risk for sedentary behavior, are appropriate to this announcement. Sustainability for the purpose of this announcement is defined as one to two years post-intervention.  For example, an intervention targeting a population at risk for developing osteoporosis may include bone strengthening exercises, or an intervention targeting children at risk for obesity or diabetes may include increased physical education time during school hours. Populations of interest include, but are not limited to: 

- Healthy but sedentary or inactive individuals

- Persons or groups at high risk for a particular disease or condition that can be improved by physical activity

- Persons with an existing disease or condition (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, clinical depression, or diabetes) whose outcomes could be improved by physical activity

- Children and adults of diverse socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups with low activity levels

- Persons with physical, developmental, or intellectual disabilities who may need special approaches for activity promotion

- Inactive or sedentary elderly individuals or groups

- Minority and underserved populations at higher risk for conditions associated with inactivity

- Other groups, if justified by the investigator

Comparison of male and female populations or subjects on the desired outcome is highly desired. Of particular interest are research activities which increase the understanding of sex and gender differences and factors in health and disease, to support implementation of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research, available at http://orwh.od.nih.gov/research/strategicplan/index.asp.

Settings for the interventions can include healthcare settings, worksites, households, schools, green space, parks and recreation centers, other community organizations and settings, or entire communities.  Because this solicitation seeks multi-level interventions that have the potential to be scalable and sustainable, the use of multiple settings for intervention implementation or support may be considered. Illustrative examples of studies testing multi-level interventions with two or more levels can be found in existing systematic reviews.

To date, the available body of research includes numerous studies with methodological issues and systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration and the Community Preventive Services Task Force have resulted in conflicting findings. Investigators should propose the strongest study design that can evaluate the effects of the intervention program with high internal validity, taking into account external validity and generalizability. Investigators should pay close attention to the quality of measurement of physical activity, ensuring that the measures are reliable and sensitive to change at the population level.   In general, this would be a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. Most of studies proposed in response to this announcement will probably need randomization at the group level (Group Randomized Trial, or GRT) to match the level of intervention and to minimize or prevent contamination of the comparison group.  In some cases, a randomized design may not be possible or feasible, or would raise ethical concerns that are difficult to address. In such instances, investigators could propose and justify alternative, high-quality study designs. Such designs include, but are not limited to, quasi-experimental designs such as multiple baseline or time series, regression discontinuity, pre-to-post intervention with external comparison, natural experiments, or others. 

Given the strong evidence that physical activity is associated with many health benefits, the primary outcome being sought is a measure of physical activity and/or change in physical activity over the duration of the 1-2 year intervention period in the direction of achieving the health-enhancing physical activity goals for the targeted population or patient subgroup, as identified in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.  Therefore, the intervention and any comparison/control group should use appropriate and well-justified physical activity measures to enable proper comparisons that are also feasible in real world settings.  Measurement of intervention processes and impacts also are encouraged to enable assessment of intervention fidelity and whether hypothesized mediators were affected. Measurement of secondary outcomes such as social outcomes and possible co-benefits of physical activity participation (e.g., effects on behavioral, cognitive, or psychosocial outcomes; effects on substance abuse, tobacco use, or cardiovascular disease risk factors) or adverse outcomes (e.g., injuries) may also be included. Given the relatively large cost in mounting community interventions, an assessment on resources spent on intervention development and maintenance is desired. 

It is anticipated that each award will support multidisciplinary project teams composed of scientists with expertise to enable all the specific aims to be addressed. A range of disciplines is likely to be needed; for example, teams may include public health, clinical, behavioral, and social scientists, statisticians, exercise physiologists, and others. 

 

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Enhancing Cross-National Research within the Health and Retirement Study Family of Studies (R01)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)

LOI due October 7, 2014
Full submission due November 7, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of this announcement is to enhance comparability among a specific group of measures in the US Health and Retirement Study and the family of comparable longitudinal aging studies around the world. For the purposes of this FOA, the specific measures are cognition and dementia assessment; personality and non-cognitive-character-skills; social isolation and loneliness; physical activity; and life histories. Enhancing the comparability of these measures will support cross-national behavioral and social research in aging in areas that are of a high priority to the Division of Behavioral and Social Research at National Institute on Aging. Responsive applications will propose activities such as pilot studies; calibration to gold standard measures; or methods to increase item, measure, or construct comparability. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

NIA has received input from experts on measures that could support important cross-national research in aging. The 2013 National Advisory Council on Aging (NACA) Review of the NIA Division of Behavioral and Social Research included a subcommittee "International Research on Aging" that has discussed specific recommendations on areas for enhancement for the HRS family of studies, and further input on the development of comparable measures is provided from other subcommittees (http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/announcements/2014/03/naca-evaluation-bsr-report-2013). This announcement calls for applications to develop comparable measures in the HRS-family of studies in the following areas that were recommended by experts to NIA.  Responsive applications will propose activities to produce comparable measures in one or more of the following areas:

  • Cognition and dementia assessment - Although there have been substantial efforts at NIH to develop reliable toolbox-like measures (e.g., PROMIS for patient-reported outcomes and the NIH Toolbox for cognition) as well as recommendations for the use of off-the-shelf phenotypic measures (e.g., PhenX), there has been less work to date on creating crosswalks between these measures. Further, it has not generally been determined which instruments are most appropriate for time-limited surveys, especially in international contexts. This need is particularly acute for measures of cognition, where even state-of-the-art instruments may not operate appropriately in developing countries where rates of literacy and levels of educational attainment are much lower. Responsive applications will propose activities that develop new comparable measures or methods that make existing cognition measures in the HRS family more comparable (e.g. the addition of proxy interviews, changes in the administration of items, or methods to adjust existing items). Dementia assessment items in the HRS family of nationally representative studies (high and low income) will facilitate the examination of international trends over time and achieve national objectives regarding measurement of prevalence.
  • Personality and non-cognitive-character-skills - Among the most robust of findings linking childhood to patterns of aging are the replicated associations between a variety of assessments of personality early in the life course (especially conscientiousness) and patterns of aging many decades later. This research has been aided by a wide consensus on characterizing personality traits through convenient self-report assessments that perform effectively across a broad range of cultures and nationalities. Comparable measures of individual variation in personality and other non-cognitive-character-skills (e.g. self-control) across diverse cultural contexts would advance understanding of their links to aging-relevant real-world outcomes.
  • Social isolation and loneliness - Social relationships have long been known to contribute to health outcomes in later life. A recent meta-analysis of over 140 studies showed that lack of good social relationships poses a mortality risk equivalent to smoking. In addition, measures of both objective social isolation and the subjective experience of loneliness have been linked to mortality in population-based longitudinal studies of aging.  Inclusion of measures appropriate for these constructs could help clarify when and how these factors are linked to health and how those links vary by cultural context.
  • Physical activity - new technologies for data collection may overcome some current challenges to comparability. For example, the use of actigraphy for measurement of physical activity and sleep could not only enhance data comparability but could also reduce respondent burden. Comparable measures of time use and well-being across diverse settings could facilitate research on successful aging and help explain international health disparities. Actigraphy can provide objective measurements of activity that can supplement and validate self-reported data.
  • Life histories - Research has shown that many social and health outcomes important at the population level depend on early life experiences. Further, evidence has shown that retrospective life histories (asking elders about early life health and environmental factors) can capture these experiences and support cross-national assessment of their impact in different cultural and economic environments.

Though harmonization projects on any of the areas listed above are responsive to the RFA, additional funds have been set-aside to support projects focusing on cognition/dementia assessment (see Section II Award Information/Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards below.).

The HRS family of studies refers to the nationally representative, longitudinal, population based samples of older populations made available to the public for research purposes with content designed to be comparable to the US Health and Retirement Study.  Specifically, responsive applications will propose activities to develop comparable data within the following studies:

Responsive applications will propose activities that make comparable measures within the HRS family of studies identified above. Activities may include pilot studies to design and test/validate measures or determine the impact of adding measures to studies with regard to attrition/response rates; the development of methods to enhance comparability of items; or any other activity that can be justified as enhancing comparability of items relevant to this FOA among the HRS family of studies. 

 

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Gut-Microbiome-Brain Interactions and Mental Health (R21/R33)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

LOI due October 25, 2014
Full submission due November 25, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research grant applications from institutions/organizations to investigate mechanisms by which the gut microbiome modulates the development and function of brain circuits that subserve behavioral functions of direct relevance to the mission of the NIMH.  Because initial colonization of the gut by microbiota occurs early in life and may influence the subsequent development and modifiability of the central nervous system, developmental studies are of interest. Applicants may propose to use wild-type, gnotobiotic, and/or specific pathogen-free model organisms. With this FOA, the NIMH encourages investigator teams to initiate hypothesis-driven research in this cross-cutting research area and to identify promising mechanistic leads for future basic and translational research that will advance the mission of the NIMH. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The FOA encourages exploratory development followed by hypothesis-driven research that will investigate mechanisms by which the gut microbiota influences pre- and postnatal neurodevelopment as well as genes, signaling cascades, synaptic plasticity, and brain circuits related to behavioral domains directly relevant to the mission of NIMH (see NIMH Strategic Plan and Strategic Research Priorities ). Such efforts are expected to increase our knowledge of microbiome-brain interactions, enhance our mechanistic understanding of the brain and behavior, and inform our understanding of the etiology of psychiatric disorders.

Although the gut microbiome includes viruses, protozoa, archaea, and fungi, it is dominated by bacteria.  For this reason, this FOA is limited to applications that propose to investigate the bacterial component of the gut microbiota.

Applicants may propose to use wild-type, gnotobiotic, and/or specific pathogen-free model organisms.

Specific Areas of Research Interest

Examples of research topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Cellular, molecular and physiological studies to identify mechanisms by which the gut microbiota modulates neural circuits that subserve specific domains of function such as working memory, emotion regulation, social processes, and higher-level executive functions.
  • Mechanistic studies of the role of the microbiome-gut-brain axis in pre- and postnatal brain development.
  • Mechanistic studies mapping developmental trajectories of the effects of the gut microbiota on neural systems with the goal to identify aberrant developmental patterns in neural circuits that subserve specific domains of function such as higher-order cognitive and emotional processes.
  • Studies of sex differences in effects of the gut microbiota on the modifiability of neural and circuit function across the lifespan.
  • Studies examining the mechanisms by which perturbation of the maternal gut microbiota alters prenatal brain development and subsequent brain function and behavior.
  • Studies examining the mechanisms by which perturbations (e.g., via the maternal vaginal microbiota) of the offspring's gut microbiota affect brain function and behavior.

Responsive applications will include hypothesis-driven, mechanistic studies that focus on pathways of communication from the bacterial component of the gut microbiota to the brain with outcome measures aimed at defining the neural (molecular, cellular, and/or circuit-level) functions that underlie complex behaviors related to mood, cognition, and social function.

Because such studies may require several areas of expertise, applicants are encouraged to include multiple PDs/PIs or collaborators on the application.

 

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Improving Health through Rehabilitation Robotic Technology (R43/R44)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

October 13, 2014
November 13, 2014

*For assistance with SBIR opportunities, MSU's Techlink has generously offered their support. Please contact Ray Friesenhahn at rayf@montana.edu or 994-7726. 

SYNOPSIS: 

The NIH encourages research on robotic technology development to enhance health, lengthen life and reduce disability. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to encourage the translation of rehabilitation robotic technology to assist health care providers and individuals in need of rehabilitation.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: 

The NIH is collaborating on a multi-agency funding opportunity, the National Robotics Initiative (NRI) led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (NOT-EB-13-005) whose goal is to accelerate the development and use of robots in the United States.  However, the joint solicitation does not directly address technology transfer and applied research.  Therefore, this initiative encourages development of affordable and accessible rehabilitation robotic technologies.  Medicine and health care could benefit from rapid translation and adoption of these advances in robotic technology to meet the need for personalized health care through effective and safe interventions and therapies.

Specific Areas of Research Interests

This funding opportunity announcement would support Phase I and/or Phase II SBIR projects to translate state of the art robotic technology in a broad range of environments and user populations.  This initiative encourages development of affordable and accessible rehabilitation robotic technology that utilizes rehabilitation robots to facilitate functional independence, improve quality of life, assist with behavior therapy, provide personalized care in the clinic and/or at home and promote wellness/health in persons with disabilities across the lifespan.  Assistive rehabilitation robotic software and/or hardware system development of interest include, but are not limited to those that:

  • Reduce the secondary health effects that follow reduced mobility such as obesity, joint contracture, etc.
  • Establish optimal patient specific rehabilitation, such as programs designed to establish timing intensity and duration of interventions,
  • Support of life-long cognitive, social, and physical disorders requiring on-going behavioral therapy,
  • Provide personalized care for special needs populations, and
  • Increase wellness/ health promotion and maintenance.

The NIH is still interested in supporting robotic advancements for surgical health interventions and robotic exoskeletons; however, these topics are not responsive to this solicitation.   

 

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RFA-NS-14-006--High Impact Neuroscience Research Resource Grants (R24)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH/DHHS

LOI due September 20, 2014
Application Due October 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for high impact efforts to make resources available to neuroscience researchers. Projects should engage in one or more of the following activities: propagation of cutting edge reagents or techniques, dissemination of resources to new user groups, or innovative approaches to increase the scale/efficiency of resource production and delivery. Applications focused on technology or software development are not responsive to this FOA, as the focus is on dissemination or provision of resources. Use of existing technologies to develop new reagents or genetic lines of clear value may be appropriate. Projects should address compelling needs of broad communities of neuroscience researchers or should offer unique services that otherwise would be unavailable. Projects must support the NINDS mission. This FOA will utilize the NIH R24 Resource-Related Research Projects award mechanism.

OBJECTIVES: 

Research project grants such as the R01 provide funding for development of new technologies and resources. However, funding opportunities for making resources available to the research community are more limited, even though such activities can be critical for research progress. The goal of this FOA is to address this need by supporting innovative and high impact projects to make resources, tools and techniques available to neuroscience researchers.

Projects responsive to this FOA should engage one or more of the following types of activities:

1) Propagation of newly developed, cutting edge reagents or techniques that are not widely available or easily obtained;

2) Broadening the impact of important existing resources by bringing them to new user groups for whom access would not otherwise be available;

3) Innovative approaches to increase the scale and efficiency of existing valuable resources.

The following categories of resources may be appropriate for this FOA, provided that the proposed resource concords with the types of high impact activities described above: Animal models, Animal Surgery, Behavioral Testing, Specialized Cell Culture, Histochemistry, Specialized Imaging or Microscopy, Pathology, Physiology, and Statistical/Computational Analysis. Projects must be specifically targeted to neuroscience research. Resources and techniques that are general to biomedical sciences are not responsive to this FOA, unless there is a specific unmet neuroscience research need.

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Serious STEM Games for Pre-College and Informal Science Education Audiences (STTR) (R41/R42)
Office of Research Infrastructure Programs/NIH/DHHS

November 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) invites applications for Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications from small business concerns (SBCs) to develop serious Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) games with a focus on biology that addresses health and medicine questions for: (1) pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12) students and pre- and in-service teachers ("Teachers") or (2) Informal Science Education (ISE) audiences. Serious games are defined as the use of gaming technology to train, educate, and encourage behavioral changes in a virtual world format where progressive learning, feedback on success and user control are combined into an interactive and engaging experience. It is anticipated that this SBIR FOA will facilitate the translation of new or existing health and medicine-based, P-12 STEM curricula and museum exhibits into educational games that will provide a hands-on, inquiry-based and learning-by-doing experience for students, Teachers and the community. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The objective of this FOA is to make STTR funding available to P-12 and ISE educators so that they may translate their classroom or science museum STEM curricula into serious STEM games ("STEM Games") with a biomedical focus that will complement Teacher professional development and improve student achievement, career aspirations and community health literacy. The science education research objective of this FOA is the development of new STEM gaming resources that will advance our understanding of how STEM-based gaming can improve student learning. It is anticipated that increasing underserved and minority student achievement in STEM fields through gaming will encourage these students to pursue health-related careers that will benefit their communities and increase their economic and social opportunities.

Types of applications submitted to this FOA may vary with the target audience, scientific content, educational purpose and method of delivery. STEM Games may include, but are not limited to: game-based curricula; attitudes changes towards learning; new skills development; teamwork and group activities; public participation in scientific research (citizen science) projects and behavioral changes in lifestyle and health. STEM Games designed to increase the diversity of students (i.e., American Indian, Alaskan Native, Pacific Islanders, African American, Hispanic, female, disabled, or otherwise underrepresented) considering careers in basic, behavioral or clinical research are especially encouraged. STEM Games may be designed for use in classroom or out-of-classroom settings, e.g., as supplements to existing classroom curricula, for after school science clubs, libraries, hospital waiting rooms and science museums. STEM Games may target children in group settings or individually, with or without adult or Teacher participation or supervision. The proposed project may use any gaming technology and platform.

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Mechanisms Mediating Osteoarthritis in Aging (R01)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The National Institute on Aging and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases invite applications intended to encourage and accelerate the characterization of new or underutilized models and the testing of hypotheses that will lead to an improved understanding of the mechanisms mediating osteoarthritic progression. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

This FOA invites applications on research employing genetically defined and modified mouse models, other animal models such as dogs and monkeys or archived human joint tissues to explore the biological mechanisms underlying osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a significant problem in the elderly population, and a major contributor to mobility limitations that are endemic in this population and, therefore, is an important element in the research missions of NIA and NIAMS. Inflammatory processes are evident in advanced stages of osteoarthritis, and are likely to be major contributors to the chronic pain that is the most common symptom of the condition. However, for the purpose of this announcement, osteoarthritis is distinguished from other joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, in which inflammation arising from autoimmunity is the primary cause of tissue damage. The root causes of joint degeneration in osteoarthritis remain unclear.

Research efforts in the past have focused primarily on the more advanced stages of osteoarthritis, but relatively little is understood about the initial changes triggering disease etiology and early progression. Increasing knowledge of molecular mechanisms in cartilage and bone biology, along with availability of genetically manipulated mice, and the possibility of studies in other mammalian models of osteoarthritis have yielded new concepts and novel animal models that may be relevant to osteoarthritis in humans. Other models, where joint degeneration is studied, such as dogs and monkeys as well as archived human joint tissues may be useful in these studies. This FOA is intended to encourage and accelerate the characterization of new or underutilized models and the testing of hypotheses that will lead to an improved understanding of the mechanisms mediating osteoarthritic progression.

This program will support research exploring the biological mechanisms underlying non-inflammatory joint degeneration. Research supported by this initiative will identify specific genes, proteins, and biochemical pathways that contribute to the onset of joint degeneration. Information to be gained will include the timing and anatomical location of events that lead to joint degeneration, the functional characterization of proteins identified as causal factors, and the definition of pathways by which particular gene products contribute to joint degeneration. Objectives include: the characterization of new models; the development and testing of hypotheses that arise from the properties of new and existing models; the definition of functional roles for specific molecular entities identified as contributing to joint degeneration.

Other Information: See program opportunity for details on R21 and other mechanisms. 

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Cancer Prevention, Control, Behavioral Sciences, and Population Sciences Career Development Award (K07)
National Cancer Institute/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Cancer Institute (NCI) invites applications for the Cancer Prevention, Control, Behavioral Sciences, and Population Sciences Career Development Award. The award is intended to support the career development of junior investigators with research or health professional doctoral degrees who want to become cancer-focused academic researchers in cancer prevention, cancer control, or the behavioral or population sciences. This FOA will utilize the NIH Academic Career Award (K07) mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The objective of the Cancer Prevention, Control, Behavioral Sciences, and Population Sciences Career Development Award (K07) is to provide salary and research support for a sustained period of "protected time" (3-5 years) to junior investigators who are interested in developing academic and research expertise in cancer prevention, cancer control, or the behavioral or population sciences as related to cancer. Research, teaching, and leadership skills are to be learned during the tenure of the award. The expectation is that, through this sustained period of research career development and training under the guidance of an experienced mentor in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences, awardees will launch fully independent research careers and become competitive for new research project grant (e.g., R01) funding. Applications in basic cancer prevention sciences must include a plan to translate the results of the project into cancer prevention research using human subjects within the period of the K07 award.

For the purpose of this funding opportunity, cancer control research is defined as "basic and applied research in the behavioral sciences that independently or in combination with biomedical approaches reduces cancer risk, incidence, morbidity, and mortality across the lifespan and over the entire process of carcinogenesis from primary behavioral prevention in youth, to screening, treatment, and survivorship".

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Pain in Aging (R01)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. October 5, 2014 is next deadline.

SYNOPSIS: 

NIH, NIAAA, NIDA and NCCAM invite applications from institutions/organizations that propose to study pain from an aging perspective, including studies of older populations, studies of age differences and age-related changes in pain processes and experiences, and studies of pain treatment and management in older adults. This FOA particularly encourages studies on 1) mechanisms and predictors of pain experience in aging, 2) development and evaluation of pain assessment tools for older adults or older model organisms, and 3) development and evaluation of pain management strategies in older adults, with particular attention to the challenges associated with treating pain in patients with multiple morbidities. Studies may address a variety of approaches and outcomes including biological (i.e., genetic, molecular, neurobiological), clinical, behavioral, psychological, and social factors. Both animal models (especially aged animals) and human subjects are appropriate for this FOA. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This FOA encourages a broad range of applications examining the mechanisms and processes by which factors at all levels of analysis (from molecular to social/institutional) impact the experience, representation, processing, management, and treatment of pain in older adults. Both basic and translational research is encouraged under this FOA. Applications at a single level of analysis are welcomed (e.g. studies of neural circuitry for pain processing in aging), as are studies examining processes across levels of analysis. Studies focused on normal age differences and age-related changes in pain processes, as well as on age-related diseases or disorders, including pain in older adults with comorbid conditions or with Alzheimer's disease or other age-related dementias, are strongly encouraged. New pain assessment methods and management approaches targeting older adults are also encouraged. Both human and animal model studies are appropriate. This FOA encompasses the range of scientific approaches, including genetic, molecular, imaging, physiological, clinical, behavioral, social, psychological, comparative effectiveness research (CER), and epidemiological (including cross-national comparative) approaches.

An association between chronic pain conditions and alcohol dependence has been suggested in numerous studies with episodes of alcohol abuse antedating chronic pain in some and alcohol dependence emerging after the onset of chronic pain in others. However, the interaction between alcohol use and pain in older people has not been investigated. While acute alcohol may be analgesic, the long-term alcohol use in chronic pain conditions in older population may worsen pain and exacerbate associated anxiety and depressive-like conditions. The effects of chronic use of alcohol on neuroimmune systems may play a crucial role in determining the pain sensitivity and treatment outcome in elderly. NIAAA is interested in receiving applications addressing neuronal and glial mechanisms related to alcohol and chronic pain in older populations.

Other Information: See program opportunity for details on R21 and other mechanisms. 

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Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) Exploratory/Developmental Projects in Translational Research (R21)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH/DHHS

LOI (Optional) December 30, 2014
January 30, 2015

The sponsors invite applications for exploratory/developmental translational research on therapeutics for reducing mortality and morbidity caused by acute exposures to chemical threat agents. Chemical threats include chemical warfare nerve agents such as sarin and VX, toxic industrial chemicals such as cyanide and phosgene, and toxic agricultural chemicals such as parathion and sodium fluoroacetate. Projects supported by this FOA are expected to generate preliminary preclinical, screening and efficacy data that would enable the development of competitive applications for more extensive support from the NIH CounterACT program (see www.ninds.nih.gov/counteract for a description) and other related translational research programs.  This program will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.

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Home and Family Based Approaches for the Prevention or Management of Overweight or Obesity in Early Childhood (R01)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases/NIH/DHHS

October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsors invite applications from institutions/organizations that propose randomized clinical trials testing novel home- or family-based interventions for the prevention or management of overweight in infancy and early childhood. Tested interventions can use behavioral (including dietary and physical activity), environmental, or other relevant approaches. Applications should focus on infants and young children (to age six years) and emphasize the role of home environment and the influence of family/extended family members and parents (including guardians/substantial care-providers) within the child's home environment. The direct goal of this initiative is to fund research that will advance knowledge for innovative approaches to the prevention or management of overweight in children less than 6 years of age, with potential for future translation to applications either in the home or linked to a community setting. Research should consider the familial mechanisms of behavior such as the role of families in the initiation, support, and reinforcement of fundamental food and beverage consumption, physical activity practices, and sedentary behaviors. In addition it is of interest to elucidate various underlying behavioral determinants that are crucial to initiate or sustain changes in behaviors that impact energy balance. Research designs may include linkages with other settings (e.g., daycare, pre-school, or other community venues) or other care providers (e.g., health care providers or teachers) but must include infants or children less than age six years as the primary study participant along with parents, and/or other family members residing with the child. The overarching goal is to identify interventions that influence parent and child behaviors that contribute to inappropriate weight gain, and thereby improve subsequent health status in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood for which overweight is a known risk factor. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

This FOA requests innovative applications for randomized controlled trials to test novel approaches for the prevention or management of overweight in infants and children (up to six years of age at the time of enrollment) in the context of the home environment, including parental/family involvement. Prevention and management are generally guided by levels of age-appropriate weight status based on the 2000 CDC weight-for-length or BMI-for-age growth charts for boys or girls. Primary prevention is the prevention of inappropriate weight gain in children currently at a healthy weight (BMI or weight-for-length below the eighty-fifth percentile). Secondary prevention is the prevention of inappropriate weight gain in youths currently at risk of overweight (BMI greater than or equal to the eighty-fifth percentile to less than the ninety-fifth percentile). Tertiary prevention in children already overweight (BMI greater than or equal to the ninety-fifth percentile) includes the prevention of further weight gain (i.e., weight maintenance) or the prevention of weight regain among those who have lost weight. Secondary and tertiary prevention are consistent with interventions for the management of overweight. Behavioral intervention approaches that include weight loss in overweight children are considered a part of overweight management and therefore, would be appropriate for this FOA. An Expert Committee has recommended that for primary care practice, in general weight maintenance should be the goal for children ages 2-5 years unless the BMI is greater than 21 kg/m2, in which case weight loss of up to 1 lb/mo may be acceptable; weight goals to improve BMI percentile in children less than 2 years of age were indicated as not applicable (Barlow, 2007). Intervention strategies for prevention or management must be assessed by the child's weight status as the primary outcome measure, based on the 2000 CDC BMI-for-age or weight-for-length growth charts for boys and girls (percentiles or corresponding z-scores). For this FOA, the home or primary physical residence of the child is the target site for intervention research that focuses on the role and mechanism of the parents, family, and/or the home environment in the initiation, support, and reinforcement of fundamental food and beverage consumption, physical activity practices, and sedentary behaviors, or other behavioral determinants associated with these practices. However, the "research" intervention (e.g. delivery of information) might occur elsewhere. "Parents" may be the biological or adoptive parent(s), legal guardian(s), or persons otherwise acting in the role as primary caregiver(s) of the child.

This initiative is predicated on the belief that within the home environment, parents of infants and young children can be taught to recognize children's weight status and can serve as highly influential role models for dietary and physical activity behaviors, as gatekeepers for foods and beverages that are brought into the home environment, and as regulators of portion size, of foods eaten away from home, and of screen time (e.g., television viewing, computer use, video games, etc.), free play time, and other sedentary and physical activity behaviors. Parents have the ability to influence the development of fundamental eating, physical activity, and other influential behaviors at an early age for their children and they have the ability to provide or withhold reinforcement for these behaviors. Additionally it is likely important that the rest of the family follows the principles of a healthy lifestyle so they can serve as capable teachers, facilitators, and role models. This FOA encourages creative ways to explore the potential of parents and other caregivers including in-home day-care providers and older siblings in the home, as conduits to reach children with appropriate energy balance messages and behaviors, modify the physical environment of the home to make it more conducive to energy balance, or otherwise have a positive impact on appropriate weight gain of young children through various mediating behavioral factors.

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Immune and Inflammatory Mechanisms in Alzheimer's Disease (R01)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)

LOI due on December 29, 2014
Full submission due January 29, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of this FOA is to establish the role of the brain innate immune system, the systemic immune system, and the crosstalk and changes with age between the two in the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease.  An interdisciplinary and integrative research approach to identify the cell networks and meditators of the brain and systemic immune and inflammatory systems is expected to give greater insight into the etiological mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease.  

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of this FOA is to establish the immune and inflammatory mechanisms contributing to or mediating the development and progression of AD.  A comprehensive and integrative characterization of the brain innate immune system, its crosstalk with the systemic immune system, and its changes with age will help define the mechanisms underlying the shift from normal aging to pathological processes in the etiology of AD.  Such characterization should include studies on the genetic, epigenetic, molecular and cellular underpinnings of the physiological immune and inflammatory responses in AD. Development of cell or functional markers of, and tools to manipulate or track peripheral and CNS immune cells would help establish the role of distinct immune cells in AD. The contribution of aging processes in the brain (e.g. microglial senescence) and in peripheral immune/inflammatory networks (e.g. chronic low level inflammation) in the initiation and/or progression of AD should be considered.   Applicants to this FOA must emphasize the multidisciplinary and integrative research approaches taken to identify the cell networks, mediators and pathways of the brain and systemic immune and inflammatory systems that influence the development and progression of AD.

Areas of research interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Characterize in a systematic, integrative way the cell networks - monocytes, macrophages, microglia, astrocytes, neurons - and signaling factors that regulate brain immune/inflammatory function across the spectrum of AD.
  • Identify genetic, epigenetic and molecular pathways, including function of AD risk gene loci, mediating immune/inflammatory networks in AD.  Are pathway changes drivers of disease or in response to AD pathophysiology? 
  • Compare, in a limited manner, immune/inflammatory processes in AD with other age-related neurodegenerative diseases to identify AD-specific mechanisms.
  • Establish the crosstalk between systemic and brain immune systems - cells, intercellular activators and mediators, effector functions - in AD. Consider when and where crosstalk occurs.
  • Define the contribution of age-associated chronic inflammation, immune cell senescence, and/or immune system deficits as comorbidity factors in AD
  • Link peripheral immune cells or factors with brain pathology in AD to identify potential biomarkers and new drug targets for AD

 

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Implications of the Economic Downturn for Health, Wealth, and Work at Older Ages (R01)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

The sponsor invites applications for research on the implications of exogenous shocks, such as those produced by the recent economic downturn, for health, economic circumstances, and planning throughout the life-cycle. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:  

Evidence suggests that exposure to social, health, or economic "shocks" can have both short and long-term effects on well-being. The variety of shocks for which this appears to be the case -individual-specific (e.g., health, layoff, divorce, death) or more broadly-based (e.g., economic downturns, high unemployment rates, natural disasters, war) - suggests that adverse events can have profound effects on decision-making throughout the life-course, particularly with respect to retirement and health outcomes in later life. The recent economic downturn has drawn attention to possible long-term effects of a global economic shock (rapid and unanticipated loss of employment as well as housing and financial wealth) on individuals' perceptions, planning, behavior, and outcomes with respect to their health, well-being, and retirement decisions. Interest in this subject is heightened in light of the budgetary challenges facing Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. The potential long-term effects of the economic downturn on health, family, savings and employment choices are as yet unknown. Research is encouraged that explores the ways in which individuals have been affected by the recent financial crisis or comparable elements of past economic downturns. Beyond individual effects, the financial crisis has resulted in changes in living arrangements and household composition that may have long-term implications. The following topics are examples of relevant research areas only; applications are not limited to these areas: savings; consumption; wealth; labor force participation; health, cognition, and decision-making; caregiving arrangements; intergenerational transfers and households; risk, insurance and risk management; public finance implications; effects of recent policy changes; and international comparisons.

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Improvement of Animal Models for Stem Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine (R01)
Office of Research Infrastructure Programs/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsors invite applications aimed at characterizing animal stem cells and improving existing, and creating new, animal models for human disease conditions. The intent of this initiative is to facilitate the use of stem cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine. The initiative focuses on the following areas: 1) comparative analysis of animal and human stem cells to provide information for selection of the most predictive and informative model systems; 2) development of new technologies for stem cell characterization and transplantation; and 3) improvement of animal disease models for stem cell-based therapeutic applications. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The research activities specific to each of the participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) are discussed below. While the objectives of the application must be in accord with the specific interests of the ICs listed below, applications submitted for funding consideration by ORIP may be of a more general nature and should involve activities that are relevant to the interests of two or more of any of the categorical NIH Institutes and Centers. Specific interests of the sponsoring Institutes and Centers are as follows:

Projects supported by ORIP under this FOA are intended to improve existing and create new animal models for regenerative medicine. Preference will be given to investigations that examine general principles involved in developing the most informative animal models for regenerative medicine, rather than focusing on a specific disease. However, investigations involving specific diseases can be used as proof of principle. In all cases, for funding consideration by ORIP, the potential results of investigations should be applicable to the interests of two or more of any of the categorical NIH ICs. Furthermore, investigations of a disease that predominantly relates to the interests of one NIH IC and peripherally relates to the interests of other NIH ICs are not appropriate for ORIP funding. The ultimate objective of these efforts should be to provide essential preclinical knowledge that can help inform future clinical investigations.

(NHLBI) is interested in the above listed research topics as applied to the following mission areas of the Institute: i) stem cell engineering and regeneration of complex heart, vascular, lung, and blood systems; ii) stem cell correction of either congenital or acquired heart, lung and blood defects, iii) stem cell regeneration/reconstruction of heart, lung, and blood tissue; and iv) optimization of the host's microenvironment to improve the survival and function of transplanted HUMAN heart, vascular, lung, and blood tissues, including but not limited to, in vivo models that aim to overcome immunological/ex vivo manipulation/tumorigenic safety concerns associated with FDA regulatory requirements. Preference will be given to in vivo models developed using NHLBI resources (e.g., Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT), Science Moving towArds Research Translation and Therapy (SMARTT), Gene Therapy Resource Program (GTRP). NHLBI has interest in the development of new in vivo models for health and disease, particularly large animal models such as sheep, pig, dog and non-human primates, to overcome the unique dynamics of heart, lung, and blood systems, which can be scientifically justified. New models should include in their research plan validation studies for the purpose of preclinical experiments that may lead to an Investigational New Drug (IND), Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) or similar regulatory approval. NHLBI does not have interest in applications proposing mechanistic studies on mouse models.

(NIDCR) will support projects which relate to the major mission of the institute, to improve oral, dental and craniofacial health through research, research training, and the dissemination of health information.

(NIDDK) is interested in applications conducting basic and translational research that will facilitate the use of stem cell-based therapies for diseases/conditions in the NIDDK mission, including: Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, obesity, endocrine and metabolic diseases, kidney and urologic diseases, hematologic diseases, and digestive diseases (including liver disease).

(NIGMS) welcomes projects that are relevant to the Institute's mission: basic scientific research that increases understanding of life processes and lays the foundation for more applied advances in disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. NIGMS is interested in research on fundamental aspects of pluripotent stem cells, such as self-renewal, pluripotency, reprogramming, differentiation capability, and niche-stem cell interactions. Comparative studies between human and animal stem cells with respect to these properties would be appropriate, particularly those addressing mechanistic questions.

Other Information: See announcement for other mechanism (R21, R03) due dates. 

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Investigations on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (R01)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) invites applications for innovative investigations in primary immunodeficiency diseases. Of particular interest are the detection of primary immunodeficiency diseases, the identification of the molecular basis of these diseases, and the design and pre-clinical development of innovative therapies for these diseases. Clinical trials will not be supported by this FOA. Studies using samples obtained from humans and studies on animal models are encouraged. Investigators who have not received independent NIH funding in this field are encouraged to apply. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The primary objective of this FOA is to support innovative studies of primary immunodeficiency diseases with a focus on ex vivo studies with human specimens and on studies with existing or new animal models. A secondary objective is to expand the field by attracting investigators new to primary immunodeficiency diseases research. Investigators are expected to present preliminary data supporting their research plan and to demonstrate expertise in applying immunologic, genetic, biochemical and molecular biologic principles to primary immunodeficiency diseases research. Research areas supported by this FOA include, but are not limited to:

--Identifying the clinical, immunological, and molecular characteristics of primary immunodeficiency diseases, including disorders in which immunodeficiency is associated with hepatic, enteric, and other organ dysfunction;

--Identifying the molecular basis of primary immunodeficiency diseases, including disorders in which immunodeficiency results from abnormalities in hematopoietic stem cell development;

--Advancing our understanding of how a genetic variant results in immunodeficiency;

--Discovering/developing improved diagnostic/newborn screening tools for primary immunodeficiency diseases; and

--Discovering/developing animal models for primary immunodeficiency diseases, including models appropriate to test novel clinical strategies.

Other research areas supported by this FOA include studies aimed at discovering novel therapeutic approaches to primary immunodeficiency diseases.

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Aging and Neuromuscular Junctions (R01)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)

LOI due December 29, 2014
Full submission due January 29, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of this FOA is to encourage cross-disciplinary research to investigate the mechanisms underlying age-related declines in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) as a functional unit of nerve and muscle, and explore potential avenues for maintaining the NMJs during aging or reversing the age-dependent loss in function of the NMJs using model organisms. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

A key goal of the FOA is to assemble cross disciplinary research teams to investigate the age-related decline in NMJs as a functional unit of nerve and muscle, and explore potential avenues for maintaining the NMJs during aging or reversing the age dependent loss in function of the NMJs using model organisms. 

For this FOA, applications are solicited to support research on the neuromuscular junction as a functional unit of nerve and muscle and, in particular, in the context of age-related changes.  Applications proposing to study NMJs in the absence of an aging component will be deemed non-responsive to the FOA and will not proceed to review. Similarly, applications proposing clinical and/or purely descriptive work, or with a primary focus on motor neuron decline in the brain will be considered non-responsive.   Applications focused on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or other motor neuron diseases will only be considered responsive if the focus is on cross-talk between nerve and muscle at peripheral neuromuscular junctions.  Investigators are strongly encouraged to use animal models (vertebrate or invertebrates) of appropriate ages for the proposed studies.  If appropriate, applicants are encouraged to take advantage of the NIA aged rodent colonies (http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/dab/aged-rodent-colonies-handbook/available-strains).

Questions that are considered responsive to this FOA include, but are not limited to the following:

Mechanisms underlying age-related changes in NMJ:

  • What are the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the age-related changes in nerve/muscle-interdependence?;
  • Do genes or molecules involved in motor neuron degeneration affect NMJ and related muscle function in aging and if so, how?
  • Do synaptic molecules initiate or sustain deleterious changes in nerve/muscle interactions in aging and if so, how?;
  • What factors are secreted by muscles or nerves that positively or negatively affect age-related changes in the neuromuscular junction and what are the mechanisms of action?;
  • What contributes to the differential declines of different muscle groups and the associated NMJs in aging

Preventing or reversing age-related impairment in NMJ:

  • Why do repair and remodeling of the NMJ become inefficient with aging and what factors are responsible?;
  • What are the molecular mechanisms by which exercise, caloric restrictions or other interventions that delay aging change the susceptibility to neuromuscular damage?;
  • What are the systemic factors that may rejuvenate NMJs and/or delay deleterious effects to functional NMJs in aged animal model?;
  • Are there protective innate factors that prevent degeneration of NMJs and/or other associated functions in aged animal models?

Impact of age-related changes in other tissues on NMJ:

  • What role, if any, do pericytes have on NMJ "stability" during aging?;
  • Is there a link between age-related dysfunction in the NMJ and loss of function of satellite cells in the muscle?;
  • How do changes in immune/inflammatory or extracellular matrix signals contribute to age-related dysfunction in the NMJ?

Potential applicants are also strongly encouraged to consult the Scientific/Research Contacts to determine whether an intended project would be responsive to the FOA prior to the submission.  

 

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Interdisciplinary Research to Understand the Vascular Contributions to Alzheimer's Disease (R01)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

LOI due January 3, 2015
Full submission due February 3, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of this funding opportunity announcement is to support interdisciplinary research that will lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms by which vascular factors contribute to the complex etiology of Alzheimer's disease. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The development of effective biological markers and interventions to prevent or delay the onset of AD is critically dependent on gaining an in-depth understanding of how multiple etiologies and prodromal phenotypes lead to neurodegenerative changes that result in cognitive decline and dementia. The goal of this funding opportunity is to enable greater understanding of the mechanisms by which vascular factors contribute to the complex etiology and heterogeneity of Alzheimer's and related dementias.  To this end, the funding opportunity encourages cross-disciplinary, integrative and systems-based approaches focused on but not limited to:

  • Aging and disease-driven changes in the structure and function of brain microvasculature and other components of the neurovascular unit and the impact of these changes on synaptic and neuronal function.
  • Mechanisms by which AD risk and protective factors (genetic and environmental) influence brain microvascular plasticity and the integrity of the neurovascular unit across the lifespan.  Of particular interest is the role of epigenetic regulators as mediators of environmental influences on microvascular integrity.
  • Mechanistic interplay between systemic vascular and metabolic risk factors and their impact on age-related cognitive decline, AD and related dementias.
  • Determinants of region-specific microvascular vulnerability/resilience in the aging brain and critical windows of microvascular vulnerability across the lifespan.
  • Relationship between microvascular plasticity and neuronal processes critical for the maintenance of cognitive function (i.e. bioenergetics, myelin integrity, axonal transport, proteostasis, network connectivity).
  • Gender specific mechanisms mediating the impact of vascular factors on the transition between normal and pathologic aging in AD and related dementias.
  • Isoform-specific effects of ApoE on mediating the impact of AD risk and protective factors on microvasculature and on the transition between normal and pathologic aging in dementia.
  • Factors and mechanisms leading to the development of small vessel disease (infarcts,silent infarcts, cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy, disordered autoregulation and neurovascular coupling) as well as mechanisms mediating the effects of small vessel disease on neuronal and neurovascular function.
  • Mechanisms by which cerebral infarction in gray and white matter contributes to the progression of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
  • Discovery of peripheral markers of vascular risk and/or cerebrovascular disease which alone or in combination with genetic, neuroimaging and other CNS biomarkers can predict the onset of clinical symptoms, disease progression and/or responsiveness to treatment in diverse populations.

This FOA encourages collaborations among experts in physiology, systems biology, neuroimaging, metabolomics and other "omics", lipid metabolism, inflammation, epidemiology, genetics, and epigenetics,  from the fields of Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes.  Applicants are expected to leverage existing data or to generate new data in relevant human populations and integrate these with the use of animal models through the application of cutting edge research and analytical tools.  The use of animal models is encouraged but not required.  Applications relying solely on cell and animal models will be considered non-responsive and will not proceed to review.

 

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Molecular and Cellular Substrates of Complex Brain Disorders (R01)
National Institute of Mental Health/NIH/DHHS

October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor invites applications directed toward the discovery of the impact of alterations associated with complex brain disorders on the fundamental cellular and molecular substrates of neuronal function. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This FOA encourages research grant applications that seek to identify the most promising and innovative leads at the interface between cellular and molecular mechanisms and disease-associated processes, with the goal of accelerating progress in emerging areas of research relevant to complex brain disorders. Applications in response to this FOA can be fundamentally discovery based rather than hypothesis driven, and should seek to develop a better understanding of the molecular and cellular changes in neurons and their signaling mechanisms potentially associated with disease. Applications aimed at the molecules and cellular mechanisms associated with these brain disorders may include studies of perturbations in neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, bioactive lipids, neuromodulators, and neurotrophins; receptors and ion channels; second and third messenger systems; protein translation, modification, degradation; membrane biology; bioenergetics; neuron-glia communication; oxidative, immunological, and inflammatory mechanisms; and alterations in spine morphology and/or synaptic connectivity. NIAAA is interested in how ethanol perturbs cellular and molecular processes in the brain and encourages hypothesis-generating discovery based approaches. 

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Development of Mathematical Cognition and Reasoning and the Prevention of Math Learning Disabilities (R21)
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 16, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) invites applications for innovative, multidisciplinary research on the cognitive, neuroplasticity, genetic and environmental factors involved in math learning and learning disabilities. This research will advance our knowledge of the factors that contribute to the development, advancement, and impairment of mathematical cognition, including the ability to apprehend and reason about magnitude, number, temporal and spatial relationships, and concomitantly provide the evidence base to inform the design of effective (i.e., efficacious in "real world" contexts) interventions for the remediation and/or prevention of mathematical learning disabilities (MLD). This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The overall objectives of this FOA include:

1) identify the critical (necessary and sufficient) biological, cognitive, and behavioral components and dynamic developmental sequence, including sensitive periods, necessary for the normal development of mathematical cognitive abilities and reasoning in animal models, studies of comparative cognitive neurobiology, and in children and young adults (e.g., counting, arithmetic, geometry, algebra), including early and normative milestones in children;

2) identify the biological, cognitive, environmental, and behavioral factors that contribute to and/or restrict the developmental plasticity of mathematical cognitive abilities in animal models, studies of comparative cognitive neurobiology, and in children, and may be used to improve prevention, identification, and classification of children with MLD (including theoretically-grounded approaches to identification and classification).

3) develop and test well-defined, evidence-based prevention interventions for populations at high risk for mathematics learning disability such as children raised in poverty, and those with predisposing genetic or medical conditions (e.g., velocardiofacial syndrome, deafness, and iatrogenic conditions such as chemotherapy-associated math learning deficits), where the intervention's effectiveness can be shown to be both sustainable and generalizable;

4) develop and test well-defined, evidence-based remediating or treatment interventions, the effectiveness of which can be shown to be both sustainable and generalizable.

Such foundational knowledge should ultimately improve math instruction for all children, including those who struggle with math facts, concepts, application, and achievement. Promoting better math reasoning and mathematical ability in the American population is likely to have significant impacts on the health, academic and career achievement, and economic wellbeing of its citizens, as well as enable a competitive STEM workforce.

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Healthy Habits: Timing for Developing Sustainable Healthy Behaviors in Children and Adolescents (R03)
National Institute of Nursing Research/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is September 7, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsors invite applications that employ innovative research to identify mechanisms of influence and/or promote positive sustainable health behavior(s) in children and youth (birth to age 18). Positive health behaviors may include: developing healthy sleep patterns, developing effective self-regulation strategies, adaptive decision-making in risk situations, practicing proper dental hygiene, eating a balanced and nutritious diet, engaging in age-appropriate physical activity and/or participating in healthy relationships. Applications to promote positive health behavior(s) should target social and cultural factors, including, but not limited to: schools, families, communities, population, food industry, age-appropriate learning tools and games, social media, social networking, technology and mass media. Topics to be addressed in this announcement include: effective, sustainable processes for influencing young people to make healthy behavior choices; identification of the appropriate stage of influence for learning sustainable lifelong health behaviors; the role of technology and new media in promoting healthy behavior; identification of factors that support healthy behavior development in vulnerable populations, identification of barriers to healthy behaviors; and, identification of mechanisms and mediators that are common to the development of a range of habitual health behaviors. Given the many factors involved in developing sustainable health behaviors, applications from multidisciplinary teams are strongly encouraged. The ultimate goal of this FOA is to promote research that identifies and enhances processes that promote sustainable positive behavior or changes social and cultural norms that influence health and future health behaviors. This program will use the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism.

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Interventions for Health Promotion and Disease prevention in Native American Populations (R01)
National Cancer Institute/NIH/DHHS

Letters of Intent due 30 days before application due date
April 12, 2015

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications to develop, adapt, and test the effectiveness of health promotion and disease prevention interventions in Native American (NA) populations. NA populations are exposed to considerable risk factors that significantly increase their likelihood of chronic disease, substance abuse, mental illness, oral diseases, and HIV-infection. The intervention program should be culturally appropriate and promote the adoption of healthy lifestyles, improve behaviors and social conditions and/or improve environmental conditions related to chronic diseases, the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, mental illness, oral disease, or HIV-infection. The intervention program should be designed so that it could be sustained within the entire community within existing resources, and, if successful, disseminated in other Native American communities. The long-term goal of this FOA is to reduce mortality and morbidity in NA communities. For the purposes of this FOA Native Americans include the following populations: Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian. The term 'Native Hawaiian' means any individual any of whose ancestors were natives, prior to 1778, of the area which now comprises the State of Hawaii. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

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Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS) (RM1)
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

LOI due 30 days prior to due date
Full submission due May 20, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) invite applications for the Centers of Excellence in Genomic Sciences (CEGS) program. The program establishes academic Centers for advanced genome research. Each CEGS grant supports a multi-investigator, interdisciplinary team to develop innovative genomic approaches to address a particular biomedical problem. A CEGS project will address a critical issue in genomic science or genomic medicine, proposing a solution that would be a very substantial advance. Thus, the research conducted at these Centers will entail substantial risk, balanced by outstanding scientific and management plans and very high potential payoff. A CEGS will focus on the development of novel technological or computational methods for the production or analysis of comprehensive data sets, or on a particular genome-scale biomedical problem, or on other ways to develop and use genomic approaches for understanding biological systems and/or significantly furthering the application of genomic knowledge, data and methods towards clinical applications. Exploiting its outstanding scientific plan and team, each CEGS will nurture genomic science at its institution by facilitating the interaction of investigators from different disciplines, and, by providing training to new and experienced investigators, it will expand the pool of highly-qualified professional genomics scientists and engineers. This FOA will utilize the Specialized P50 Center grant mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Centers of Excellence in Genomic Sciences (CEGS) program establishes academic Centers for advanced genome research. Each CEGS grant supports a multi-investigator, interdisciplinary team to develop innovative genomic approaches to address a particular biomedical problem. A CEGS project will address a critical issue in genomic science or genomic medicine, proposing a solution that would be a very substantial advance. Thus, the research conducted at these Centers will entail substantial risk, balanced by outstanding scientific and management plans and very high potential payoff. A CEGS will focus on the development of novel technological or computational methods for the production or analysis of comprehensive data sets, or on a particular genome-scale biomedical problem, or on other ways to develop and use genomic approaches for understanding biological systems and/or significantly furthering the application of genomic knowledge, data and methods towards clinical applications. Exploiting its outstanding scientific plan and team, each CEGS will nurture genomic science at its institution by facilitating the interaction of investigators from different disciplines, and by providing training to new investigators it will expand the pool of professional genomics scientists and engineers.

CEGS will develop new approaches that will foster the integration of genomics with biomedical research. It will investigate novel ways to apply existing genomic-scale, comprehensive technologies to study a biological problem, or develop new concepts, methods, technologies, or ways to analyze data, that will advance the state of the art in applying genomic approaches to biomedical studies. It must be tightly focused on a single biomedical problem or on an approach to solving biomedical problems, using genomic concepts and methods.

The research plan for a CEGS must encompass a very high level of innovation. The product of CEGS research is expected to dramatically enhance the biomedical research community's capabilities for conducting comprehensive, cost-effective, high-throughput biomedical studies related to the DNA sequence and sequence products of organisms, with particular focus on human biology and disease. A CEGS grant application is expected to describe a specific and substantive "product" - e.g., a concept, method, technology or way to analyze data - that can be identified as having been the outcome of CEGS funding. NHGRI and NIMH will consider funding such an effort up to a maximum of ten years, but as the goal of the program is to stimulate rapid progress in genomics, it is expected that the "product" or its precursors (e.g., publications, methods, data) will become available to the community throughout the duration of the grant; thus active and early sharing of data and resources is a central tenet of the program. In achieving that product, a CEGS has the obligation to take on challenging aspects of a problem, including ones that have slowed progress in the chosen area of research. Other investigators might solve some of the problems on which a CEGS project has set its sights; a CEGS should be sufficiently nimble as to be able to adopt those solutions, so that CEGS resources can continually be applied toward tackling the unsolved challenges. If the product is likely to be generated by other projects over the same timeframe as the proposed CEGS, it is generally not appropriate for a CEGS. If a problem is well recognized in the field and multiple laboratories are engaged in solving it, then the project probably doesn't meet the innovation standard required for a CEGS, though very specific and novel ways to solve the problem may be considered.

Proposing to change the way genomic science will be done in the future entails a substantial level of risk because the research will, by definition, not be incremental. To balance this risk, the application must present a well-developed scientific and management plan to achieve a high pay-off result. Collaborations to develop genomic approaches require proficiency in several disciplines; a CEGS application should engage the expertise of a multi-disciplinary team, drawing from specialists in a wide range of fields such as biology, genetics, clinical medicine, physical sciences, mathematics, computer science, and engineering, as appropriate for the project. The various activities of the program must be synergistic and interdependent, not simply related; each activity must produce results that are required for progress by the other activities. Applications that employ state-of-the-art science that fill in knowledge but do not break substantially new ground are not appropriate for this FOA.

The unifying theme for this program will be that the Centers will address important biological problems in a comprehensive manner and on a "genomic scale." In this context, the term "genomics" is not limited to studies directly related to DNA sequence, but instead encompasses global, comprehensive, high-throughput, cost-effective approaches to studying biological systems, including for example DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and regulatory and biochemical pathways and networks. Some projects may result in new analyses of existing data sets, while others may result in technologies and methods that provide the ability to collect, analyze, and present effectively new types of genomic data sets. The genomic approaches and technologies that are proposed to be developed under CEGS support should be applicable to a wide variety of cell types or organisms, and should be usable in a global, high-throughput, cost-effective manner. Methods and concepts that are applicable only to a particular genetic locus, disease, or organ system will not be supported under this program. Model systems, such as a limited number of gene families, regulatory networks, or pathways, may be used to develop the genomic approach, as long as the approach is scalable and broadly applicable. The grant application must clearly justify how the model study will be expandable beyond the particular model(s) used in the developmental research, to ultimately support global analyses. For example, if a particular pathway is being modeled, the application must explain how the modeling algorithms will be extended to other pathways. To the extent that cost-effective, global approaches can be developed and also applied within the context of the CEGS budget, such application of the new approach is acceptable. However, the budget limits under this FOA may preclude both developing and globally applying the genomic approach that is the subject of the research.

Each CEGS application is required to include an education and outreach activity that leverages the strengths of the Center and its investigators to further educate interdisciplinary scientists, including students and faculty, who will bring creativity to studying biomedical problems through a genomic approach. To maximize the impact of these Centers, they should integrate the education of new investigators and perform outreach to broaden the expertise of established investigators. This might, for example, include plans for investigators who are already accomplished in other fields of research and engineering to acquire expertise in genomics. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, at a minimum, should participate in the research; however, such participation alone will be considered insufficient to meet the educational and outreach goals of the CEGS program. Applicants are expected to develop creative approaches, complementing the standard training vehicles used by academic institutions (e.g., training grants, fellowships, research education programs, seminar programs, course work) and, in addition, more novel avenues. This education and outreach program should take advantage of unique aspects of the research program, the combination of participating investigators' talents, and other unique institutional resources that underpin the CEGS, to offer innovative, substantive opportunities for pre-doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows, and other investigators to develop expertise in genomics.

NIMH is especially interested in novel genomic approaches that have high potential for accelerating our understanding of the genetic basis of the nervous system and mental disorders. Thus, these systems may provide appropriate models for developing the genomic approach, as described above, and similarly, CEGS project outcomes are generally expected to advance these goals because of their broad applicability.

For CEGS research projects that raise substantial ethical, legal, or social concerns (e.g., the study of sequence variation in specific populations), the Center may include research that focuses on analysis of such concerns as they relate to the particular research proposed. Each CEGS application is required to include an education and outreach activity that leverages the strengths of the Center and its investigators to train interdisciplinary scientists, including students and faculty, who will bring creativity to studying biomedical problems through a genomic approach.

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Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of Genomic Research Regular Research Program (R01)
National Institutes of Health/NHGRI and others

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014 and February 5, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites Research Project Grant (R01) applications that propose to study the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of human genome research.  Applications should propose well-integrated studies using either single or mixed methods.  Proposed methods may include, but are not limited to, data-generating qualitative or quantitative approaches, legal, economic or normative analyses, or other analytical or conceptual research methodologies.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Continuing advances in genomic technology are transforming the way genomic research is conducted.  These advances, coupled with rapid declines in the cost of sequencing, are also beginning to transform the practice of medicine.  As the amount of genomic data generated continues to grow, an increasing array of broader societal implications will also be raised.  The purpose of this FOA is to encourage research applications that identify, analyze, and address the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of these advances in genomic research, health care and technology for individuals, families, communities and society more broadly. 

To address the broad scope and reach of genomics in society, applications are invited from investigators representing a wide range of disciplines, including but not limited to the social, behavioral and communication sciences, ethics, philosophy, history, economics, and epidemiology as well as the basic, clinical and computational sciences.  Applications may propose well-integrated single or multi-disciplinary studies using either single or mixed methods.  Proposed methods may program-specific instructions noted in include, but are not limited to, data-generating qualitative or quantitative approaches, legal, economic and normative analyses, or other analytical or conceptual research methodologies.  

For small projects, especially those involving single investigators, applicants may wish to consider the ELSI R03 FOA, which provides a total of up to $50,000 in direct costs per year for two years.  For projects that are primarily exploratory in nature, or designed to generate pilot data in preparation for a larger study, applicants should consider the ELSI R21 FOA, which provides a total of up to $275,000 in direct costs over two years.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact Scientific/Research staff prior to developing an application.

 

 

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Silvio O. Conte Centers for Basic or Translational Mental Health Research (P50)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

30 days prior to due date
May 25, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) invites applications for Silvio O. Conte Centers for Basic or Translational Mental Health Research. The institute seeks teams of researchers working at different levels of analysis and employing integrative, novel, and creative experimental approaches to address high-risk, high-impact questions with the primary objective of: (a) advancing the state of the science in brain and behavior research that will ultimately provide the foundation for understanding mental disorders; (b) supporting the integration and translation of basic and clinical neuroscience research on severe mental illnesses; and/or (c) advancing our understanding of the neurobehavioral developmental mechanisms and trajectories of psychopathology that begin in childhood and adolescence. The Conte Centers program is intended to support interdisciplinary basic and/or translational research demonstrating an extraordinary level of synergy, integration, and potential for advancing the state of the field. This program is intended only for projects that could not be achieved using other, more standard grant mechanisms. The Conte Centers program also provides an opportunity to establish interdisciplinary basic and/or translational research experiences for individuals in training. This FOA will utilize the NIH Specialized Centers (P50) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The purpose of these Centers is to support interdisciplinary teams of researchers engaged in integrative, novel, and creative experimental approaches to address high-risk, high-impact scientific questions that will significantly advance the state of the science in brain and behavioral research that will ultimately provide the foundation for understanding mental disorders and/or transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses, as well as developing data and other research resources that are available to the scientific community to further advance research in this field. Conte Centers exemplify a collaborative, cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research program conducted at multiple levels of analysis spanning genes to circuits to behavior to disease in model systems and humans, from the prenatal period through adulthood. Successful centers address a well-defined and unified scientific question (hypothesis) or problem. Areas of interest span the full range of basic neuroscience, basic behavioral science and genetics, and the translational integration of neuroscience. They also include testing in humans to identify the etiology, pathogenesis, developmental progression, potential biomarkers and/or the mechanistic substrates of potential interventions with a view towards the eventual prevention or cure of mental disorders across the lifespan. Proposed Centers should be directed towards a well-defined and unified scientific question or problem and, in some instances, may include discovery-based as well as technology development components in support of the primary scientific question. The Conte Centers program is intended to support research that demonstrates an extraordinary level of synergy, integration, and potential impact on our understanding of basic brain mechanisms and/or the pathophysiology, progression, and treatment of mental disorders. The program is intended only for projects that could not be achieved using other, more standard grant mechanisms. Support is provided both for individual research projects and for cores that are critical for the integration across Center components. Centers must be characterized by an interdisciplinary framework guiding highly integrated programs of cutting-edge research, and provide plans for rapid, widespread sharing of the resulting data, methods, and resources to accelerate basic or translational research relevant to mental disorders. A strong vision of how the Center will advance the field beyond the goals of the individual projects is essential for successful applications.

Conte Center applications should integrate research projects at multiple levels of analysis, but it is not necessary for an individual Conte Center to include both basic and translational components. A Conte Center may comprise basic research projects only, both basic and translational research projects, or translational research projects only. Conte Centers may include exploratory or high risk projects that add value to the Center and increase the potential for fundamentally important new discoveries towards understanding brain mechanisms directing the development and expression of behaviors including pathophysiology across the lifespan. Exploratory component projects using patient populations to test biomarkers or interventions developed/identified elsewhere within the Conte Center may be included in a Conte Center application if they conform fully with NIMH policies for clinical trials. Conte Centers may include technology development as a component, but not as the main focus, of the Center. When technology development is an integral part of the scientific goals, it should be proposed as a project. When technology development is part of a standard service provided to support Center projects, it should be proposed as a Research Support Core. Research Support Cores provide research support functions, including administrative, animal, analytical, data management, diagnostic, recruitment, informatics, etc. Conte Centers should comprise three or more research projects and one (administrative) or more cores. Newer groups are encouraged to form smaller, shorter duration feasibility centers to establish workability and collaborations. Centers may comprise projects and cores at a single institution or at multiple institutions. Collaborations between highly active laboratories using state-of-the-art methods are encouraged, even if this means that the investigators are geographically distributed. Plans for the synergistic integration of projects and cores within a Center, whether at a single institution or geographically distributed, should be clearly described.

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Rapid Assessment Post-Impact of Disaster (R03)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Within six weeks of the identified disaster - opportunity expires October 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) provides support for a rapid funding mechanism for research n the aftermath of disasters and mass casualty events. RAPID grants described in this FOA may be used to facilitate initial research for investigators who intend to follow up with a full research application, using the preliminary time sensitive data from a RAPID grant as the basis for their subsequent application. This program will use the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to provide an expedited funding mechanism for research in the aftermath of disasters The regular grant submission, review, and funding process is lengthy, such that it requires investigators who would conduct such studies to wait eight months or more after the submission of the application to obtain the research funds, during which time important scientific opportunities may be lost. An emergency event of potential significance for mental health may occur with little or no warning (e.g., hurricanes, earthquakes, bombings, terrorist attacks, or industrial accidents) and therefore modified procedures are required to expedite the funding consideration of research applications focused on obtaining time sensitive data in the wake of such events. Applications for research support may include, but are not limited to, a substantive emphasis in any one or more of the following areas:

--Early assessment of dimensions of psychological, biological, and behavioral reactions to injury, loss of life, contaminated facilities, loss of social and economic resources and other stressors to lay the foundation for translational research on trauma related mental disorders.

--Research on the mechanisms underlying impaired functioning.

--Research on the settings in which survivors present for care, including the impact of co-locating mental health services into non-traditional mental health settings (e.g., shelters, churches, community centers, work settings, health clinics, schools, etc) on access, referral, acceptability, use and outcome of services

--Research to identify optimal screening approaches for identifying those at greatest risk for adverse outcomes in culturally diverse localities/settings

--Research to identify factors that promote or impede effective health provider training in screening, assessment, referral and treatment.

--Research on the recruitment, training, deployment, and supervision of "psychiatric extenders" such as the Medical Reserve Corps to provide emotional support, screening and referral for acute anxiety disorders, major depression, suicidality, and serious mental illness.

--Research on the organization, delivery and outcome (intended and unintended) of individual and public-health level interventions by mental health and non-mental health providers.

--Research on prevention/intervention and treatment to reduce the risk of psychopathology, symptom severity, and disability.

--Research on minimizing exacerbation and/or recurrence and improving access to care for survivors with pre-existing serious conditions.

--Research on technology enabled registries of services/resources (e.g., in-patient behavioral health, pharmacies, antipsychotic medications, community mental health providers, web-based and other self-care resources, telephone-based therapy, etc) for use by personnel who screen survivors.

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Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team Science in NIDDK Research Areas (R24)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

November 13, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) invites applications that assemble an interdisciplinary, collaborative team of creative, independent, and funded investigators to address a complex and important problem relevant to the mission of NIDDK. The team should be able to provide an integrative plan of working together to effectively address the complex challenge at hand. The team science approach encouraged by this FOA could be used to generate a research resource, which may include discovery-based or hypothesis-generative approaches, to advance the relevant area of biomedical research. This FOA will use the NIH Research Resource Grant Mechanism (R24).

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

In this FOA, the R24 is will be used to provide a mechanism by which interdisciplinary expertise is brought together to focus on a single complex problem in biomedical research relevant to the mission of NIDDK. The purpose of this FOA is to provide support for interdisciplinary research teams focused on innovative approaches to answer a single critically important research question or problem relevant to the mission of NIDDK. An R24 project is expected to support discovery or hypothesis-generating research or to develop unique resources or technologies that are needed to move a particular field forward. Collectively, the team should bring together the necessary, and appropriate, expertise to answer one complex problem, or challenge. Formation of the team of investigators should result in a greater contribution to meeting the challenge than would occur if each team member worked individually, and submission of a multi-PD/PI application is encouraged if it facilitates the team aspect of the approach. R24s can support basic, translational, or clinical science. Teams may also support integrated basic and clinical studies with the intent of accelerating translation of basic science to the clinic. NIDDK expects investigators forming collaborative teams to be funded and productive investigators who now wish to integrate their interests and efforts to facilitate a synergistic approach to the challenge not possible through other grants mechanisms. Support for resource development, generation, or utilization can be included to enhance the catalytic and transformative nature of the proposed studies. However, individual projects and cores are not allowed.

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NIH NIAID Indo-U.S. Vaccine Action Program (VAP) Small Research Grant Program (R03) PA-13-179
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Standard R03 small grant deadlines: June 16, Oct. 16; Standard AIDS-related deadlines: May 7, Sept. 7, Jan. 7; Expiration date: May 8, 2016

Applications are encouraged from organizations/institutions that propose to conduct vaccine-related research through U.S.-Indo collaborations on the following: dengue, influenza (including avian influenza), malaria, enteric diseases, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Basic, translational, clinical, or epidemiological vaccine research may be proposed. 

Only U.S. and India Organizations are eligible to apply. 

Eligibility: faculty with PI eligibility and CE faculty (with an approved CE Faculty PI waiver)

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NIH NIAID International Research in Infectious Diseases, including AIDS (R01) (PAR-14-080)

Application Receipt/Submission Date(s): May 22, 2014; May 22, 2015; May 20, 2016 AIDS Date: August 22, 2014; August 21, 2015; August 19, 2016

Eligibility:  This FOA will accept applications from organizations/institutions in eligible foreign countries that propose research related to infectious diseases that are of interest/importance to that country. 

Collaborative projects involving investigators and institutions from international sites and the U.S. are particularly encouraged; however, a U.S. partner is not required. 

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National Science Foundation (NSF)

Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies (Cyberlearning)

Deadline: Various, see program announcement

The purpose of the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program is to integrate opportunities offered by emerging technologies with advances in what is known about how people learn to advance three interconnected thrusts:

  • Innovation: inventing and improving next-generation genres (types) of learning technologies, identifying new means of using technology for fostering and assessing learning, and proposing new ways of integrating learning technologies with each other and into learning environments to foster and assess learning;

  • Advancing understanding of how people learn in technology-rich learning environments: enhancing understanding of how people learn and how to better foster and assess learning, especially in technology-rich learning environments that offer new opportunities for learning and through data collection and computational modeling of learners and groups of learners that can be done only in such environments; and

  • Promoting broad use and transferability of new genres: extracting lessons from experiences with these technologies that can inform design and use of new genres across disciplines, populations, and learning environments; advancing understanding of how to foster learning through effective use these new technologies and the environments they are integrated into. 

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Dear Colleague Letter - Support for Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure and Research during FY 2015-FY 2019
NSF - Advance Notice

90 Days after publication date

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) is to inform the natural hazards engineering research community of two forthcoming program solicitations anticipated to be issued by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Engineering, Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, between April and June 2014, for the following: (1) operations of natural hazards engineering research infrastructure for FY 2015-FY 2019 and (2) research on multi-hazard resilient and sustainable civil infrastructure. NSF does not intend to provide additional information beyond this DCL until the program solicitations and any accompanying Frequently Asked Questions are issued, as those will be the official issuances for these competitions and take precedence over the information in this DCL. The anticipated due dates for full proposals submitted to these solicitations will be 90 days following the publication date.

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Dear Colleague Letter: BRAIN EAGERs to Enable Innovation Neurotechnologies to Reveal the Functional and Emergent Properties of Neural Circuits Underlying Behavior and Cognition

Deadline: This notice does not constitute a solicitation; therefore, no award of any kind will result from this notice.

This Dear Colleague Letter is aimed at identifying opportunities to leverage and synthesize technological and conceptual innovation across disciplines and scales to accelerate progress toward an integrated understanding of neural circuits in behavior and cognition, or more simply "catching circuits in action". The neuroscience research community and specialists in other areas including, but not limited to genetics, physiology, synthetic biology, engineering, physics, mathematics, statistics, behavior and cognition are encouraged to work across disciplines to develop new approaches and neurotechnology focused at understanding the properties of circuits that underlie behavior and/or cognition in any organism. Projects that take advantage of existing DBI investments in informatics, computing and other infrastructure, such as the Neuroscience Gateway, in novel ways are also eligible.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP): Supplemental Funding to Current SBIR/STTR Phase II Awards

Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP) supplements to Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program Phase II grants are intended to assist the small businesses in their technology commercialization efforts. Specifically, this supplemental funding is aimed at enabling the grantee to secure the services of a third-party service provider that will assist with one or more of the following commercialization activities:

  1. the identification and development of customers for the NSF-funded technology;
  2. providing advice on financing strategy and fundraising from private sector;
  3. establishing strategic partnerships with relevant stakeholders; and/or
  4. the evaluation and protection of intellectual property.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Joint NSF/NOAA Agreement regarding the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and related AGS

Deadline: Not Specified

This letter announces opportunities in FY2014 and FY2015 to support the translation of research supported by the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) to operations at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). AGS will provide support to enable the AGS research community to transition the basic research in which they are engaged to use in national operational activities at NCEP. This opportunity would support extended visits by AGS-supported investigators and research groups, including students and post-doctoral researchers to NOAA's NCEP. Support would be awarded in the form of a supplement to an existing NSF award. This opportunity provides AGS PIs an opportunity to advance their NSF-supported research by working closely with environmental scientists at NOAA's NCEP and having access to a wealth of real-time and archived datasets and computational facilities.

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Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program Directorate for Biological Sciences/NSF

Deadlines: July 21, 2014 (CISE) (BIO) (EHR) July 22, 2014 (ENG) July 23, 2014 (GEO) (MPS) (SBE)

CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

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Recompetition of the Management of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

Deadline: TBD

Deadline:  This notice does not constitute a solicitation; therefore, no award of any kind will result from this notice. Although the competition is still in the planning stage, NSF anticipates that a program solicitation will be issued in the second quarter of calendar year 2014.

Consistent with the National Science Board Resolution on Competition and Recompetition of NSF Awards (NSB-08-12), NSF will carry out a competition for the next cooperative agreement to manage and operate the IceCube Neutrino Observatory through an open, merit-based external peer-review process. The Division of Polar Programs (PLR) of the Directorate for Geosciences and the Division of Physics of the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences are currently preparing the program solicitation. This solicitation is expected to lead to the award of a five- to ten-year cooperative agreement for the management and operation of ICNO following the end of the current cooperative agreement on September 30, 2015.

This letter provides general information regarding the upcoming competition and invites potential proposing organizations to contact NSF representatives to identify information they believe is needed for proposal preparation.

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Combustion, Fire, and Plasma Systems

Deadline: August 15 to September 17, 2014

Areas of interest include: Basic Combustion Science: Laminar and turbulent combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels in premixed, non-premixed, partially premixed, and homogeneous modes over a broad range of temperatures, pressures and length scales. Development of models and diagnostic tools; Combustion Science related to Climate-change: Such as: (i) increasing efficiency and reducing pollutants, (ii) production and use of renewable fuels, (iii) oxy-fuel combustion for carbon sequestration, (iv) chemical looping combustion, etc; Fire Prevention: Improved scientific understanding of building and forest fires to prevent their spread, inhibit their growth, and cause their suppression; and Plasma systems: Plasma science relevant to combustion, plasma science needed for industrial applications, plasma-processing science relevant to material synthesis and nanomaterials.

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NSF PD 14-1491 Biotechnology, Biochemical, and Biomass Engineering

Deadline: Sept. 17, 2014

Topics of particular interest, but not limited to: Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology; Quantitative systems biotechnology; Tissue engineering and stem cell culture technologies; Protein engineering/protein design; Development of novel "omics" tools for biotechnology applications

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NSF PD 14-5342 General & Age-Related Disabilities Engineering (GARDE)

Deadline: Sept. 17, 2014

Areas of particular recent interest are disability-related research in neuroscience/neuroengineering and rehabilitation robotics. 

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NSF PD 14-5345 Biomedical Engineering

Deadline: Sept. 17, 2014

Themes: Neural engineering: (brain science, computational neuroscience, brain-computer interface, neurotech, cognitive engineering) Cellular biomechanics: (motion, deformation, and forces in biological systems; how mechanical forces alter cell growth, differentiation, movement, signal transduction, transport, cell adhesion, cell cytoskeleton dynamics, cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions; genetically engineered stem cell differentiation with long-term impact in tissue repair and regenerative medicine)

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NSF PD 14-7236 Biophotonics

Deadline: Sept. 17, 2014

Biophotonics is aimed at exploring the research frontiers in photonics principles, engineering and technology that are relevant for critical problems in fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology. Fundamental science and engineering research and innovation in photonics is required to lay the foundations for new technologies beyond those that are mature and ready for application in medical diagnostics and therapies. 

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NSF PD 14-7909 Nano-Biosensing
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

November 5, 2014

The Nano-Biosensing Program supports fundamental research in engineering areas related to: novel biorecognition elements; multifunctional nanomaterials and interfaces for biosensing applications; fundamental studies of bio-macromolecules confinement and orientation at the micro- and nano-interfaces for biosensing applications; and nano-biosensors for basic biology applications (e.g. protein-protein interactions, cellular signaling and cross talk, etc.).

The Interfacial Processing and Thermodynamics Program and the Nano-Biosensing Program may jointly support novel projects related to surface functionalization at the molecular level.

Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas may be considered.  However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

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Science of Science and Innovation Policy Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (SciSIP-DDRIG)
Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences/NSF

September 22, 2014

The Science of Science & Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program supports research designed to advance the scientific basis of science and innovation policy. Research funded by the program thus develops, improves and expands models, analytical tools, data and metrics that can be applied in the science policy decision making process. For example, research proposals may develop behavioral and analytical conceptualizations, frameworks or models that have applications across a broad array of SciSIP challenges, including the relationship between broader participation and innovation or creativity. Proposals may also develop methodologies to analyze science and technology data, and to convey the information to a variety of audiences. Researchers are also encouraged to create or improve science and engineering data, metrics and indicators reflecting current discovery, particularly proposals that demonstrate the viability of collecting and analyzing data on knowledge generation and innovation in organizations.

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Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Research Initiation Initiative (CRII)

Deadline: September 24, 2014

With the goal of encouraging research independence immediately upon obtaining one's first academic position after receipt of the PhD, the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) will award grants to initiate the course of one's independent research. Understanding the critical role of establishing that independence early in one's career, it is expected that funds will be used to support untenured faculty or research scientists (or equivalent) in their first two years in an academic position after the PhD. One may not yet have received any other grants in the Principal Investigator (PI) role from any institution or agency, including from the CAREER program or any other award post-PhD. Serving as co-PI, Senior Personnel, Post-doctoral Fellow, or other Fellow does not count against this eligibility rule. It is expected that these funds will allow the new CISE Research Initiation Initiative PI to support one or more graduate students for up to two years.

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Chemical Catalysis (CC)
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

September 30, 2014

The Chemical Catalysis Program supports experimental and theoretical research directed towards the fundamental understanding of the chemistry of catalytic processes at the molecular level.  The Program accepts proposals on catalytic approaches, which facilitate, direct, and accelerate efficient chemical transformations.  This includes the design and synthesis of catalytic species on the molecular, supramolecular, and nanometer scales as well as studies of the dynamics of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic processes.  Processes of interest include (but are not limited to): polymerization catalysis, single site catalysis, and biologically-inspired catalysis.  Applications of modeling, theory, and simulation to catalytic processes are also relevant.  Fundamental studies of energy-related catalytic processes, CO2 conversion, electrocatalysis (such as in water splitting and fuel cells), and photocatalysis (such as in solar energy conversion) are welcome in the program.

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Chemical Synthesis (CS)
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

September 30, 2014

The Chemical Synthesis program focuses on the development of new, efficient synthetic methodologies and on the synthesis of complex and/or challenging molecules.  Typical synthetic targets involve novel structures, structures displaying unique properties, or structures providing pathways to discover and elucidate new phenomena.  Examples of supported research areas include the development of innovative reagents, catalysts for synthetic transformations, discovery of new synthetic methods, target-oriented synthesis, green synthesis, and synthesis of novel organic, organometallic, and inorganic structures.  Research in this program will generate fundamental knowledge of chemical synthesis that enables the development of new avenues of basic chemical research and transformative technologies.

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Dear Colleague Letter - Stimulating Innovation in STEM Education

September 30, 2014

To challenge NSF researchers to think beyond their research results and toward broader adoption of STEM education and learning innovations, NSF's Innovation Corps Teams Program (I-Corps Teams - a description of which can be found in the I-Corps Teams solicitation) will encourage proposals that  take discoveries and promising practices from education research and development and promote opportunities for widespread adoption, adaptation, and utilization.  I-Corps for Learning (I-Corps L) Teams will receive support - in the form of  mentoring and funding - to accelerate innovation in learning that can be  successfully scaled, in a sustainable manner.

Getting the best evidence-based practices out to potential adopters where those practices can benefit large numbers of students or learners, rather than just in a few classrooms or informal learning organizations, requires an entrepreneurial approach. There are a number of analogous elements between trying to bring product discoveries to market and getting learning innovations into broad practice that NSF can leverage to help promote widespread use of  promising educational learning practices. Through I-Corps L, the tools of  science can benefit education researchers by helping them to identify approaches that are effective in STEM teaching and learning.

To be eligible to pursue funding, applicants must have received a prior award from NSF (in a STEM education field relevant to the proposed innovation) that is currently active or that has been active within five years from the date of the  proposal submission. Consideration will be given to projects that address K-12,  undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral research, as well as learning in informal science education environments. The lineage of the prior award extends to the PI, Co-PIs, Senior Personnel, Postdoctoral Researchers, Professional Staff or  others who were supported under the award. Proposers will identify a project team that minimally consists of:

  1. The principal investigator (who received the prior award);
  2. An entrepreneurial lead (who is committed to investigate the  landscape surrounding the innovation); and
  3. A mentor (who understands the evidence concerning promise, e.g.,  from an institutional education-focused center or commercial background that  will help inform the efforts).

Investigators who submit to the I-Corps Team Program in response to this DCL are asked to include in their title "I-Corps L."

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Dear Colleague Letter - Announcement of Change to the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems Unsolicited Proposal Submission Window to October 1 through November 5, 2014
Directorate for Engineering (ENG)

N/A

The Directorate for Engineering (ENG), Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET) has changed the unsolicited proposal submission window for all 17 programs to one single submission window, October 1 through November 5, 2014, by 5 pm submitter's local time. The window changes are effective immediately and will continue annually, with future deadline dates (TBD) in either October or November.

The new window dates do not apply to proposals sent to the Division in response to Foundation-wide solicitations with their own target or deadline dates, such as Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) and Major Research Instrumentation.

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Geography and Spatial Sciences Program (GSS)
Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences

September 4, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

As specified in the Geography and Spatial Sciences Program strategic plan, the goals of the NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences (GSS) Program are:

  • To promote scientific research in geography and the spatial sciences that advances theory and basic understanding and that addresses the challenges facing society.
  • To promote the integration of geographers and spatial scientists in interdisciplinary research.
  • To promote education and training of geographers and spatial scientists in order to enhance the capabilities of current and future generations of researchers.
  • To promote the development and use of scientific methods and tools for geographic research.

The Geography and Spatial Sciences Program sponsors research on the geographic distributions and interactions of human, physical, and biotic systems on Earth. Investigators are encouraged to propose plans for research about the nature, causes, and consequences of human activity and natural environmental processes across a range of scales. Projects on a variety of topics qualify for support if they offer promise of contributing to scholarship by enhancing geographical knowledge, concepts, theories, methods, and their application to societal problems and concerns.

GSS provides support through a number of different funding mechanisms:

  • Regular research awards
  • Doctoral dissertation research improvement (DDRI) awards
  • Faculty early-career development (CAREER) awards
  • Awards for conferences, workshops, group-travel support, and community-development or community-serving activities
  • Research coordination network (RCN) awards
  • Rapid-response research (RAPID) awards
  • Early-concept grants for exploratory research (EAGER) and other special kinds of award mechanisms established by NSF may be supported in rare and unusual cases. (GSS strives to be open to ideas and approaches in early stages of development and emphasizes the potential longer-term significance of new lines of inquiry as part of its merit evaluation of all proposals.)

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Mechanics of Materials (MOM)
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

Deadline: Full Proposal Window: September 1, 2014 - October 1, 2014

The Mechanics of Materials program supports fundamental research on the behavior of solid materials and respective devices under external actions. A diverse and interdisciplinary spectrum of research is supported with emphasis placed on fundamental understanding that i) advances theory, experimental, and/or computational methods in Mechanics of Materials, and/or ii) uses contemporary Mechanics of Materials methods to address modern challenges in material and device mechanics and physics. Proposed research can focus on existing or emerging material systems across time and length scales.  

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NSB seeks nominations for 2015 honorary awards
Nominations for Vannevar Bush and Public Service Awards due Oct. 1

October 1, 2014

Each year, the National Science Board (NSB) honors leaders with remarkable contributions and public service in science and engineering through its Vannevar Bush and Public Service Awards. Nominations for the 2015 honorary awards are now open until Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014.

NSB's Vannevar Bush Award is named after the gifted visionary and dynamic public servant who was behind the creation of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award honors life-long leaders who have made exceptional contributions toward the welfare of humankind and the nation through public service activities in science, technology, and public policy.

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Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research- Technology Translation (PFI: AIR-TT)
Directorate for Engineering Industrial Innovation and Partnerships

Letter of Intent Due Date (required): September 02, 2014
Full Proposal Deadline: October 02, 2014

The NSF Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) is an umbrella for two complementary subprograms, Accelerating Innovation Research (AIR) and Building Innovation Capacity (BIC). Overall, the PFI program offers opportunities to connect new knowledge to societal benefit through translational research efforts and/or partnerships that encourage, enhance and accelerate innovation and entrepreneurship. The subject of this solicitation is PFI: AIR-Technology Translation (PFI: AIR-TT). The PFI: AIR-TT solicitation serves as an early opportunity to move previously NSF-funded research results with promising commercial potential along the path toward commercialization. Projects are supported to demonstrate proof-of-concept, prototype, or scale-up while engaging faculty and students in entrepreneurial/innovative thinking.

WEBINAR: A webinar will be held within 6 weeks of the release date of this solicitation to answer any questions about this solicitation. Details will be posted on the IIP website (http://www.nsf.gov/eng/iip/pfi/air-tt.jsp) as they become available.

Who May Serve as PI:

The proposal may have no more than four co-PIs.

Lineage Requirement: The Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-PI must have had an NSF research award that ended no more than 6-years prior to this solicitation's due date, or be a current NSF research award recipient. The proposed proof-of-concept or prototype/ scale-up must be derived from the results and/or discoveries of this underlying NSF research award. Note: a proposal describing sole lineage to any of the following programs will be returned without review: Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), Research Experiences for Teachers (RET), the Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP), Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI), PFI: AIR-TT, PFI: AIR-RA, I-Corps, and SBIR/STTR.

The PI must be a faculty member at a U.S. academic institution at the time of the award.

In addition to the PI, there must be at least one co-PI, Senior Personnel or Other Professional with explicit business experience (for example, someone from the technology transfer office, the business school, a local/regional development office, or a business entity). This person must have an active role that is explicitly described along with the specification of a time commitment on the project.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization:

None Specified

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or Co-PI:1

No person may participate as the PI or Co-PI for more than one proposal submitted to this PFI: AIR-TT solicitation. In other words, a PI or Co-PI may submit to only one of the two available submission windows for this solicitation. In addition, it is not acceptable for the same, or essentially the same, proposal to be submitted more than once to this solicitation, regardless of who serves as the PI or Co-PI.

 

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Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL)
Data, Infrastructure and Computational methods

October 06, 2014

This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and
advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the
imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used
languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to
build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program
supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the
development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork
and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and
archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons,
grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of
one- to three-year senior research grants as well as fellowships for up to
twelve months and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants for up to 24
months.

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Advanced Technological Education (ATE)--Centers
Directorate for Education and Human Resources/NSF

October 9, 2014

With an emphasis on two-year colleges, the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program focuses on the education of technicians for the high-technology fields that drive our nation's economy. The program involves partnerships between academic institutions and industry to promote improvement in the education of science and engineering technicians at the undergraduate and secondary school levels. The ATE program supports curriculum development; professional development of college faculty and secondary school teachers; career pathways to two-year colleges from secondary schools and from two-year colleges to four-year institutions; and other activities. Another goal is articulation between two-year and four-year programs for K-12 prospective STEM teachers that focus on technological education. The program invites research proposals that advance the knowledge base related to technician education.

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Advanced Technological Education (ATE)--Projects & Targeted Research on Technician Education
Directorate for Education and Human Resources/NSF

October 9, 2014

With an emphasis on two-year colleges, the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program focuses on the education of technicians for the high-technology fields that drive our nation's economy. The program involves partnerships between academic institutions and industry to promote improvement in the education of science and engineering technicians at the undergraduate and secondary school levels. The ATE program supports curriculum development; professional development of college faculty and secondary school teachers; career pathways to two-year colleges from secondary schools and from two-year colleges to four-year institutions; and other activities. Another goal is articulation between two-year and four-year programs for K-12 prospective STEM teachers that focus on technological education. The program invites research proposals that advance the knowledge base related to technician education.

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CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI)
Directorate for Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering/NSF

October 7, 2014

The CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) program drives discovery and learning in the core CISE disciplines of the three participating CISE divisions by supporting the creation and enhancement of world-class computing research infrastructure. This infrastructure will enable CISE researchers to advance the frontiers of CISE research. Further, through the CRI program CISE seeks to ensure that individuals from a diverse range of academic institutions, including minority-serving and predominantly undergraduate institutions, have access to such infrastructure.

The CRI program supports two classes of awards:

  • Institutional Infrastructure (II) awards support the creation of new (II-New) CISE research infrastructure or the enhancement (II-EN) of existing CISE research infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities at the awardee and collaborating institutions.
  • Community Infrastructure (CI) awards support the planning (CI-P) for new CISE community research infrastructure, the creation of new (CI-New) CISE research infrastructure or the enhancement (CI-EN) of existing CISE infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities for broad-based communities of CISE researchers that extend well beyond the awardee institutions. Each CI award may support the operation of such infrastructure, ensuring that the awardee institution(s) is (are) well-positioned to provide a high quality of service to CISE community researchers expected to use the infrastructure to realize their research goals.

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NSF 13-543 Smart and Connected Health

Exploratory Proposal Deadline: October 10, 2014
Integrative Proposal Deadline: December 10, 2014

The goal of the Smart and Connected Health (SCH) Program is to accelerate the development and use of innovative approaches that would support the much needed transformation of healthcare from reactive and hospital-centered to preventive, proactive, evidence-based, person-centered and focused on well-being rather than disease. Approaches that partner technology-based solutions with biobehavioral health research are supported by multiple agencies of the federal government including the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this program is to develop next generation health care solutions and encourage existing and new research communities to focus on breakthrough ideas in a variety of areas of value to health, such as sensor technology, networking, information and machine learning technology, decision support systems, modeling of behavioral and cognitive processes, as well as system and process modeling. Effective solutions must satisfy a multitude of constraints arising from clinical/medical needs, social interactions, cognitive limitations, barriers to behavioral change, heterogeneity of data, semantic mismatch and limitations of current cyberphysical systems. Such solutions demand multidisciplinary teams ready to address technical, behavioral and clinical issues ranging from fundamental science to clinical practice.

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Innovation Corps Teams Program (I-Corps Teams)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Submission Window: July 1 through September 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon fundamental research to guide the output of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products and processes that benefit society.

In order to jumpstart a national innovation ecosystem, NSF has established the NSF Innovation Corps Teams Program (NSF I-Corps Teams). The NSF I-Corps Teams purpose is to identify NSF-funded researchers who will receive additional support - in the form of mentoring and funding - to accelerate innovation that can attract subsequent third-party funding.

The purpose of the NSF I-Corps Teams grant is to give the project team access to resources to help determine the readiness to transition technology developed by previously-funded or currently-funded NSF projects. The outcomes of I-Corps Teams projects will be threefold: 1) a clear go or no go decision regarding viability of products and services, 2) should the decision be to move the effort forward, a transition plan for those projects to move forward, and 3) a technology demonstration for potential partners. 

 

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Research Training Groups in the Mathematical Sciences (RTG)
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences

October 14, 2014

The long-range goal of the Research Training Groups in the Mathematical Sciences
(RTG) program is to strengthen the nation's scientific competitiveness by
increasing the number of well-prepared U.S. citizens, nationals, and permanent
residents who pursue careers in the mathematical sciences. The RTG program
supports efforts to improve research training by involving undergraduate
students, graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and faculty members in
structured research groups centered on a common research theme. Research groups
supported by RTG must include vertically-integrated activities that span the
entire spectrum of educational levels from undergraduates through postdoctoral
associates.

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Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowships (MSPRF)
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences

October 15, 2014

The purpose of the Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowships
(MSPRF) is to support future leaders in mathematics and statistics by
facilitating their participation in postdoctoral research environments that will
have maximal impact on their future scientific development. There are two
options for awardees: Research Fellowship and Research Instructorship. Awards
will support research in areas of mathematics and statistics, including
applications to other disciplines.

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Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI)
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences

October 21, 2014

The Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI) Program supports research centers
focused on major, long-term fundamental chemical research challenges. CCIs that
address these challenges will produce transformative research, lead to
innovation, and attract broad scientific and public interest. CCIs are agile
structures that can respond rapidly to emerging opportunities and make full use
of cyberinfrastructure to enhance collaborations. CCIs may partner with
researchers from industry, government laboratories and international
organizations. CCIs integrate research, innovation, education, and informal
science communication and include a plan to broaden participation of
underrepresented groups.

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Division of Physics: Investigator-Initiated Research Projects (PHY)
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

October 22, 2014

The Division of Physics (PHY) supports physics research and education in the nation's colleges and universities across a broad range of physics disciplines that span scales of space and time from the largest to the smallest and the oldest to the youngest. The Division is comprised of disciplinary programs covering experimental and theoretical research in the following major subfields of physics: Accelerator Science; Atomic, Molecular, Optical and Plasma Physics; Computational Physics; Elementary Particle Physics; Gravitational Physics; Nuclear Physics; Particle Astrophysics; Physics of Living Systems; Quantum Information Science; Education and Interdisciplinary Research.

This solicitation invites research proposals in the following areas: Accelerator Science; Experimental Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics; Experimental Elementary Particle Physics; Experimental Gravitational Physics; Experimental Nuclear Physics; Particle Astrophysics; Physics at the Information Frontier; Physics of Living Systems; Theoretical Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics; Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics; Theoretical Nuclear Physics; Theoretical Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; and Theoretical Gravitational Physics.

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NSF 13-605 Catalyzing New International Collaborations (CNIC)

Deadlines: April 22, July 22, October 22, 2014

The Catalyzing New International Collaboration (CNIC) program is designed to promote professional development of US Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) researchers and to advance their research through international engagement.

Support of international activities is an integral part of NSF's mission to sustain and strengthen the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) capabilities. NSF recognizes the importance of enabling US researchers and educators at every career level to advance their work through international collaboration and of helping to ensure that future generations of US scientists and engineers gain professional experience beyond the nation's borders early in their careers.

Awards from the International Science and Engineering Section of the Office of International and Integrative Activities (OIIA/ISE) contribute to NSF's mission by supporting research and education activities that present unique opportunities and offer potentially high benefits through collaboration with scientists, engineers, and STEM educators abroad. NSF will consider proposals from US institutions for collaborative work with any country that is not explicitly proscribed by the Department of State. Activities can be in any field of science and engineering research and education supported by NSF.

This program offers support for the initial phase of international collaborations with clear expectations that the next phase will be submission by the US investigators of follow-on proposals to NSF core programs for continued funding of the research initiated with CNIC awards.

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Intel Partnership on Cyber-Physical Systems Security and Privacy (CPS-Security)
NSF Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering & Intel Labs University Collaboration Office

Preliminary Proposal Due Date (optional): July 29, 2014
Full Proposal Due: October 28, 2014

The goal of this partnership between NSF and Intel is to foster novel,
transformative, multidisciplinary approaches that ensure the security of
current and emerging cyber-physical systems, taking into consideration the
unique challenges present in this environment relative to other domains with
cybersecurity concerns. These challenges arise from the non-reversible nature
of the interactions of CPS with the physical world; the scale of deployment;
the federated nature of several infrastructures; the deep embedding and long
projected lifetimes of CPS components; the interaction of CPS with users at
different scales, degrees of control, and expertise levels; the economic and
policy constraints under which such systems must often operate; and sensing and
collection of information related to a large spectrum of everyday human
activities. Historically, reliance on subtle assumptions at interface
boundaries between hardware components, between hardware and software
components, and between software components, as well as between a system and
its operators and maintainers, has been a source of vulnerability and can be
especially troublesome in these critical systems.

Specifically, this solicitation aims to foster a research community committed to advancing
research and education at the confluence of cybersecurity, privacy, and
cyber-physical systems, and to transitioning its findings into engineering
practice. To achieve these goals, NSF and Intel will together host an Ideas Lab
to identify and develop novel ideas at the intersection of cyber-physical
systems, cybersecurity, and privacy, and assist in the establishment of
research partnerships. Concepts from the Ideas Lab can be submitted in response
to this solicitation as (a) NSF/Intel Synergy projects, which must offer a
significant advance in the science, engineering, and/or technology of
protecting cyber-physical systems, taking into consideration the broader policy,
economic, and socio-technical environment in which these systems operate; or
(b) NSF Breakthrough projects, which seek to make more targeted, narrowly
focused advances in science, engineering, and/or technology of protecting
cyber-physical systems while at the same time fostering the creation and
development of a CPS security and privacy research community. Participation in
the Ideas Lab is not a prerequisite for submitting a Synergy or Breakthrough
project proposal.

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NSF 14-504 Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS) Innovative Approaches to Science and Engineering Research on Brain Function

Deadline: October 28, 2014

Computational neuroscience provides a theoretical foundation and a rich set of technical approaches for understanding complex neurobiological systems, building on the theory, methods, and findings of computer science, neuroscience, and numerous other disciplines.

Through the CRCNS program, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF), the French National Research Agency (Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR), and the United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) support collaborative activities that will advance the understanding of nervous system structure and function, mechanisms underlying nervous system disorders, and computational strategies used by the nervous system.

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Experimental Elementary Particle Physics
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

October 29, 2014

The Particle Physics program seeks to explore the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space, and time.  It asks such questions as: What are the origins of mass? Can the basic forces of nature be unified?  How did the universe begin? How will it evolve in the future?  What are dark matter and dark energy? Are there extra dimensions of space-time?  Formerly separate questions in cosmology (the universe on the largest scales) and quantum phenomena (the universe on the smallest scales) become connected through our understanding that the early universe can be explored through the techniques of particle physics.

At the NSF, particle physics is supported by four programs within the Division of Physics: (1) the Theory program, which includes fundamental research on the forces of nature and the early history of the universe as well as support for the experimental program by providing guidance and analysis for high energy experiments; (2) the Elementary Particle Physics (EPP) program, which supports particle physics at accelerators; (3) the Particle Astrophysics (PA) program, which supports non-accelerator experiments; and (4) the new Accelerator Science program which supports research at universities into the educational and discovery potential of basic accelerator physics.

EPP also supports advances in detector development and new methods of utilizing distributed computing in support of collaborative research, for example, grid development, both nationally and internationally. The program also engages K-12 educators, who participate in experiments with university scientists, staff and students. Source: Grants.gov (06/23/14). (cas)

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Experimental Gravitational Physics
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

October 29, 2014

The Experimental Gravitational Physics program supports research that includes tests on the inverse distance square law of gravitational attraction, Lorentz invariance and Equivalence Principle as well as the direct detection of gravitational waves. This program oversees the management of the construction, commissioning, and operation of the Laser Interferometer Gravity Wave Observatory (LIGO), and provides support for LIGO users and other experimental investigations in gravitational physics and related areas. This includes tasks that range from instrument science, data analysis and detector characterization to source population calculations and the connection between the gravitational waves and the electromagnetic and neutrino signatures of astrophysical events.

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Particle Astrophysics (PA)
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

October 29, 2014

The Particle Astrophysics program supports university research in many areas of particle astrophysics, including the study of ultra-high energy particles reaching Earth from beyond our atmosphere, experiments or research and development projects for underground facilities and non-accelerator-based experiments studying the properties of neutrinos.

Currently supported activities include: ultra-high energy cosmic-ray, gamma-ray and neutrino studies; the study of solar, underground and reactor neutrino physics; neutrino mass measurements; searches for the direct and indirect detection of Dark Matter; searches for neutrino-less double beta decay; and studies of Cosmology and Dark Energy. Source: Grants.gov (06/23/14). (cas)

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Dear Colleague Letter - Optics and Photonics
Directorates for Engineering (ENG), Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS), & Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE).

N/A

Through  this Dear Colleague Letter, NSF encourages innovative research proposals on optics and photonics that are relevant to one or more Divisions in the Directorates for Engineering (ENG), Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS), or Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). Topics of particular interest for Fiscal Year  2015 are (a) the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale that encompass materials, devices, and systems, such as but not limited to low-loss metamaterials, plasmonics, and quantum phenomena that could impact computation, communication, and sub-wavelength resolution detection/imaging; and (b) novel terabit/second and above communication systems, especially those integrating devices and systems that advance the state of the art in networking, high-performance  computing, and computer architecture.

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Dear Colleague Letter: FY 2015 Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials (SusChEM) Funding Opportunity
NSF-wide Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES)

Proposals in response to this initiative should be submitted to the existing program of interest in the participating divisions within the existing submission window (deadline) of the program. The proposal title must begin with 'SusChEM:'.

In fiscal year (FY) 2013, NSF started an initiative to encourage and foster research in Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials (SusChEM), partially in response to the mandate of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. The SusChEM initiative addresses the interrelated challenges of sustainable supply, engineering, production, and use of chemicals and materials.

Examples of fundamental research topics of interest in SusChEM include the replacement of rare, expensive, and/or toxic chemicals/materials with earth-abundant, inexpensive, and benign chemicals/materials; recycling of chemicals/materials that cannot be replaced; development of non-petroleum based sources of important raw materials; chemicals/materials for food and/or water sustainability; the elimination of waste products and enhancement in efficiencies of chemical reactions and processes; discovery of new separation science that will facilitate recycling and production of valuable chemicals/materials; and development and characterization of low cost, sustainable and scalable-manufactured materials with improved properties.

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Mathematical Sciences Infrastructure Program
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

Full Proposal Accepted Anytime

The Infrastructure Program provides support for activities that differ from the research projects supported by the disciplinary programs of the Division of Mathematical Sciences. These include working research sessions, such as conferences, symposia, colloquia, and special years, as well as training programs, such as grants for broadening education in the mathematical sciences or increasing the number of individuals in disciplines that are based in the mathematical sciences.

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Alan T. Waterman Award
The National Science Foundation

October 24, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Alan T. Waterman Award is the highest honor awarded by the National Science Foundation. Since 1975, when Congress established the award to honor the agency's first director, the annual award has been bestowed upon individuals who have demonstrated exceptional individual achievement in scientific or engineering research of sufficient quality to place them at the forefront of their peers. The annual award recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by the National Science Foundation. In addition to a medal, the awardee receives a grant of $1,000,000 over a five year period for scientific research
or advanced study in the mathematical, physical, biological, engineering, social or other sciences at the institution of the recipient's choice. 

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Biomaterials (BMAT)
Division of Materials Research

October 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Biomaterials program supports fundamental materials research related to (1) biological materials, (2) biomimetic, bioinspired, and bioenabled materials, (3) synthetic materials intended for applications in contact with biological systems, and (4) the processes through which nature produces biological materials.  Projects are typically interdisciplinary and may encompass scales from the nanoscopic to the bulk.  They may involve characterization, design, preparation, and modification; studies of structure-property relationships and interfacial behavior; and combinations of experiment, theory, and/or simulation. The emphasis is on novel materials design and development and discovery of new phenomena.

Projects involving in vitro demonstration of biological compatibility and efficacy are appropriate, but the program can support only limited in vivo studies. Tissue engineering and drug/gene delivery projects must have a specific focus on fundamental materials development and characterization. Studies of the mechanical behavior of hard and soft biological materials and tissues and projects in molecular biophysics may be more appropriate for one or more of the NSF programs listed below under Related Programs. Projects with an emphasis on device design and fabrication are generally more appropriate for a program in the NSF Engineering Directorate.

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Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE: EHR)
Directorate for Education & Human Resources Division of Undergraduate Education

October 22, 2014 and October 24, 2014 depending on focus

A well-prepared, innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is crucial to the Nation's health and economy. Indeed, recent policy actions and reports have drawn attention to the opportunities and challenges inherent in increasing the number of highly qualified STEM graduates, including STEM teachers. Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. Both of these priorities depend on the nature and quality of the undergraduate education experience. In addressing these STEM challenges and priorities, the National Science Foundation invests in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understanding STEM learning; to designing, testing, and studying instruction and curricular change; to wide dissemination and implementation of best practices; and to broadening participation of individuals and institutions in STEM fields. The goals of these investments include: increasing the number and diversity of STEM students, preparing students well to participate in science for tomorrow, and improving students' STEM learning outcomes.

The Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) program invites proposals that address immediate challenges and opportunities that are facing undergraduate STEM education, as well as those that anticipate new structures (e.g. organizational changes, new methods for certification or credentialing, course re-conception, cyberlearning, etc.) and new functions of the undergraduate learning and teaching enterprise. The IUSE program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and (ii) Design and Development. These tracks will entertain research studies in all areas. In addition, IUSE also offers support for a variety of focused innovative projects that seek to identify future opportunities and challenges facing the undergraduate STEM education enterprise.

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Biomedical Engineering (BME)
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

November 5, 2014

The goal of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) program is to provide opportunities to develop novel ideas into discovery-level and transformative projects that integrate engineering and life sciences in solving biomedical problems that serve humanity in the long-term.  BME projects must be at the interface of engineering and life sciences, and advance both engineering and life sciences.  The projects should focus on high impact transformative methods and technologies. Projects should include methods, models and enabling tools of understanding and controlling living systems; fundamental improvements in deriving information from cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; new approaches to the design of structures and materials for eventual medical use in the long-term; and novel methods for reducing health care costs through new technologies.

The projects should emphasize the advancement of fundamental engineering knowledge, possibly leading to the development of new methods and technologies in the long-term; and highlight the multi-disciplinary nature of the research, integrating engineering and life sciences. The long-term impact of the projects can be related to fundamental understanding of cell and tissue function, disease diagnosis and/or treatment, improved health care delivery, or product development. The BME program does not support clinical studies, or proposals having as their central theme drug design and delivery or the development of biomedical devices that do not include a living biological component.  Furthermore, although research on biomaterials or on cellular biomechanics may constitute a part of the proposed studies, such research cannot be the central theme or key focus area of the proposed work.

The BME program supports fundamental and transformative research in the following BME themes: Molecular, cellular and tissue approaches for advanced biomanufacturing: Three-dimensional structures of biomolecules, cells, scaffolds/matrices by bioprinting or other technologies for fundamental studies on cells, disease modeling and drug testing, and for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications; fundamental studies of cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions, self-assembly, stereochemistry/chirality; systems integration between biological components and electromechanical assemblies; stem cell engineering and biomanufacturing, cell reprogramming technologies; and Neural engineering and human brain mapping: Technologies and tools to interrogate and monitor neuron activity at high spatiotemporal resolution; new theories and computational models to integrate neuroscience data across different scales and levels; new experimental methodologies and computational approaches to investigate human brain structure and function, especially at the sub-cellular, cellular, and tissue levels, and to repair and renew deteriorated, damaged, or diseased neurons and neural circuits.

 

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Biotechnology, Biochemical Engineering Program (BBBE)
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

November 5, 2014

The Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering (BBE) program supports fundamental engineering research that advances the understanding of cellular and biomolecular processes (in vivo, in vitro, and/or ex vivo) and eventually leads to the development of enabling technology for advanced manufacturing and/or applications in support of the biopharmaceutical, biotechnology, and bioenergy industries, or with applications in health or the environment.  A quantitative treatment of biological and engineering problems of biological processes is considered vital to successful research projects in the BBE program.

Fundamental to many research projects in this area is the understanding of how biomolecules, cells and cell populations interact in their environment, and how those molecular level interactions lead to changes in structure, function, phenotype, and/or behavior.  The program encourages highly innovative and potentially transformative engineering research leading to novel bioprocessing and manufacturing approaches, and proposals that address emerging research areas and technologies that effectively integrate knowledge and practices from different disciplines while incorporating ongoing research into educational activities.

Major areas of interest in the program include: metabolic engineering and synthetic biology; quantitative systems biotechnology; tissue engineering and stem cell culture technologies; protein engineering & design; single cell dynamics and modeling; and development of novel "omics" tools for biotechnology applications.

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Catalysis and Biocatalysis
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

November 5, 2014

The goal of the Catalysis and Biocatalysis program is to drive innovation in the production of the myriad of goods and services that are derived from catalyst-driven reactions.  Research in this program encompasses a blend of fundamental, engineering research drivers that are interdisciplinary in nature.  Studies should focus on the catalysis of one or more use-inspired chemical reactions with products including fuels, energy, feedstocks, fine chemicals, bulk chemicals and specialized materials.  While proposals will be accepted in any of the above areas, an emphasis will be placed on proposals addressing the significant existing challenges in producing products for the service of mankind.

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Process and Reaction Engineering
Directorate for Engineering/NSF

November 5, 2014

The goal of the Process and Reaction Engineering (PRE) program is to advance fundamental engineering research on the rates and mechanisms of important classes of catalyzed and uncatalyzed chemical reactions as they relate to the design, production, and application of catalysts, chemical processes, biochemical processes, and specialized materials that have important impacts on society.  The program seeks to advance electrochemical and photochemical processes of engineering significance or with commercial potential, design and optimization of complex chemical and biochemical processes, dynamic modeling and control of process systems and individual process units, reactive processing of polymers/ceramics/thin films, and interactions between chemical reactions and transport processes in reactive systems, for the integration of this information into the design of complex chemical and biochemical reactors.

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Dear Colleague Letter: US-China Collaborative Research in Environmental Sustainability
NSF Engineering Directorate (ENG) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)

Application Window: October 1 - November 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The NSF Engineering Directorate (ENG) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) Department of Engineering and Material Sciences (DEMS) are partnering to encourage joint research by U.S. - China teams collaborating on fundamental research that addresses critical environmental sustainability challenges.

The U.S. and China have the two largest economies on Earth and also have important engineering, technology, business and trade relationships with each other. Both nations face significant environmental sustainability challenges, for example in water and energy, urban sustainability, and manufacturing. Fundamental research is needed to provide the foundational knowledge for addressing these challenges.

This call is for research proposals from joint U.S. - China teams in two environmental sustainability topic areas:

  • Topic 1. Combustion Related to Sustainable Energy
  • Topic 2. Sustainable Manufacturing

Every proposal must include the participation of researchers from at least one U.S. institution and at least one China institution. Proposals that do not comply with this requirement will be returned without review. Each U.S. - China team is to submit the same proposal, in English, to each of NSF and NSFC. NSF will fund the U.S. researchers of winning teams (up to a total of $500K for 4 years for each winning proposal), while NSFC will fund the China researchers of winning teams (up to a total of 3 million yuan for 4 years for each winning proposal). In total, no more than 3 joint NSF-NSFC project grants are expected to be funded. A critical evaluation factor for such a proposal will be the extent to which the proposal articulates a compelling rationale for why the proposed research project is significantly better than a comparable research project that could be pursued by a U.S. team working without such a collaboration. Another evaluation factor will concern the quality of collaboration and leveraging by the joint team compared to the U.S. and China researchers working separately. This rationale is to be presented in the Project Description section of the proposal. Each proposal must include a management plan that clearly specifies the role of team researchers from both the U.S. and China, and the mechanisms through which close collaboration will be assured. The management plan is not to exceed 3 pages and is to be included in the supplementary document file of the electronic submission.

Cyberinfrastructure proposals are outside the scope of this call.

Topic 1. Combustion Related to Sustainable Energy

In both the U.S. and China, over 80 percent of energy usage is derived through combustion. Combustion processes provide the energy for electricity generation (e.g., from coal and natural gas), transportation (e.g., internal combustion engines in cars and trucks), building space and hot water heating, and industrial processes. Combustion results not only in useful energy conversion, but also pollution. One example of pollution from combustion is soot, in particular particulates of size 2.5 microns or smaller that cause smog that not only obscures vision, but also can result in respiratory distress and serious health problems. Combustion also generates greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2) that drive global warming and climate change. Fundamental research is needed to decrease the adverse environmental impacts of combustion processes.

Examples of fundamental research needs in the area of Topic 1 include but are not limited to:

  • Increased knowledge of fundamental mechanisms related to combustion carbon (CO2) capture technologies, such as oxy-fuel combustion processes and chemical looping
  • increased knowledge of fundamental mechanisms for gasification (coal, biomass, coal/biomass mixtures)
  • Increased understanding of fundamental combustion reaction mechanisms for pollutant emissions (e.g., particulates, NOx), with efforts focused on reduction of such emissions from combustion systems (e.g., coal, internal combustion engines)
  • Increasing combustion efficiency is outside the scope of this call for proposals. Also, separation proposals related to combustion (e.g., for gases, such as CO2 and O2, and for removal of particulates by such separation processes as filtration) are not within the scope of this call. For U.S. researchers, such separations proposals should be redirected to the Chemical and Biological Separations program (CBS) of the CBET Division of NSF.

Topic 2. Sustainable Manufacturing

Manufacturing is vital for the economies of both the U.S. and China. At the same time, manufacturing operations consume huge quantities of resources (materials, water, energy) and result in pollution of air, water, and land. For example, in the U.S. the industrial sector is the origin of one fifth of the nation's annual greenhouse gas emissions (EPA,http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/usinventoryreport.html), while in China the ratio is over one half ("The second national communication on climate change of the People's Republic of China," China National Development and Reform Commission, November 2012, http://unfccc.int/essential_background/library/items/3599.php?rec=j&priref=7666#beg).

Fundamental research is needed to provide a sound scientific and engineering basis for reducing emissions and improving efficiencies of resource consumption. Ultimately, means for efficient recycle, reuse, remanufacture, and closed-loop production processes will be required.

Examples of fundamental research needs for Topic 2 include but are not limited to:

  • Systems-based approaches incorporating multidisciplinary frameworks (engineering, environmental, economic, social) for the creation of solutions for complex sustainable manufacturing challenges
  • Development of theoretical foundations for efficiency improvement approaches that span both mechanical and chemical manufacturing operations
  • Basic research on digital manufacturing approaches for advancing sustainable manufacturing

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NSF 14-500 National Robotics Initiative (NRI)

Full proposal deadline: Nov. 13, 2014

The program guidelines provide targeted areas for each agency. For example, the NIH encourages robotics research and technology development to enhance health, lengthen life and reduce illness and disability. The robotic applications promoted in this solicitation are for non-operative settings. Applicants are encouraged to utilize the resources provided by NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Program for conducting proposed research.

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Advancing Informal STEM Learning/ Directorate for Education and Human Resources

Deadline: July 10, 2014, November 14, 2014

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and develop understandings of deeper learning by participants. The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pathways, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Conferences, Symposia, and Workshops, and (6) Science Learning Proposals.

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Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences: Investigator-initiated research projects (MCB)
Directorate for Biological Sciences/NSF

November 17, 2014

MCB is soliciting proposals for hypothesis-driven and discovery research and related activities in four core clusters: Molecular Biophysics; Cellular Dynamics and Function; Genetic Mechanisms; and Systems and Synthetic Biology.

MCB gives high priority to research projects that use theory, methods, and technologies from physical sciences, mathematics, computational sciences, and engineering to address major biological questions. Research supported by MCB uses a range of experimental approaches--including in vivo, in vitro and in silico strategies--and a broad spectrum of model and non-model organisms, especially microbes and plants. Typical research supported by MCB integrates theory and experimentation. Projects that address the emerging areas of multi-scale integration, molecular and cellular evolution, quantitative prediction of phenome from genomic information, and development of methods and resources are particularly welcome. Highest funding priority is given to applications that have outstanding intellectual merit and strong broader impacts. Proposals that include research motivated by relevance to human health or address the molecular basis of human diseases and treatment are not appropriate for the Division and will be returned without review.

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NSF 13-577 Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases

Deadline: Nov. 19, 2014

Co-sponsors: NSF-NIH-USDA-U.K BBSRC 

The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases program supports research on the ecological, evolutionary, and socio-ecological principles and processes that influence the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. The central theme of submitted projects must be quantitative or computational understanding of pathogen transmission dynamics. The intent is discovery of principles of infectious disease transmission and testing mathematical or computational models that elucidate infectious disease systems. 

Amount of funding: the maximum total (for all years) award size is $2.5 million, including indirect costs, and the maximum award duration is five years. US-UK Collaborative Projects can request additional funding for the UK component of the project. The minimum award size is $1.0 million total project costs for all years, or $750 thousand for the US component of US-UK Collaborative Projects. The maximum award size for RCN proposals is $500,000 as per the RCN solicitation.

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Interdisciplinary Research in Hazards and Disasters (Hazards SEES)
Directorate for Geosciences/NSF

LOI (required) Due: September 26, 2014
Full Proposals Due: November 28, 2014

Hazards SEES is a program involving multiple NSF Directorates and Offices (CISE, ENG, GEO, MPS, OIIA, and SBE) that seeks to: advance understanding of the fundamental processes associated with specific natural hazards and technological hazards linked to natural phenomena, and their interactions; better understand the causes, interdependences, impacts, and cumulative effects of these hazards on individuals, the natural and built environment, and society as a whole; and improve capabilities for forecasting or predicting hazards, mitigating their effects, and enhancing the capacity to respond to and recover from resultant disasters. The overarching goal of Hazards SEES is to catalyze well-integrated interdisciplinary research efforts in hazards-related science and engineering in order to reduce the impact of hazards, enhance the safety of society, and contribute to sustainability.

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Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH)
Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences, Biological Sciences, and Geosciences

November 18, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) Program supports interdisciplinary research that examines human and natural system processes and the complex interactions among human and natural systems at diverse scales. Research projects to be supported by CNH must include analyses of four different components: (1) the dynamics of a natural system; (2) the dynamics of a human system; (3) the processes through which the natural system affects the human system; and (4) the processes through which the human system affects the natural system. CNH also supports research coordination networks (CNH-RCNs) designed to facilitate activities that promote future research by broad research communities that will include all four components necessary for CNH funding.

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Thermal Transport Processes
National Science Foundation/Directorate for Engineering

October 1, 2014 - November 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Thermal Transport Processes (TTP) program supports engineering research aimed at gaining a basic understanding of the thermal transport phenomena at nano/micro and macro scales. Core application areas of interest include:

  • Cooling and heating of components, devices and equipment.
  • Thermal processes in energy conversion & storage, power generation, and propulsion. 
  • Thermal transport in the synthesis and processing of materials including advanced manufacturing. Note that proposals that focus primarily on issues pertaining to materials, synthesis and/or processing are not of interest to the TTP program, and  should be directed to the Materials Engineering and Processing (MEP) program in CMMI/ENG or DMR/MPS as appropriate. 
  • Thermal phenomena in biological systems.  Only two topics are of interest in this area: cryopreservation and the role of heat transfer and thermal management in the treatment of cancer cells. 

The program supports transformational research in transport processes that are driven by thermal gradients, and manipulation of these processes to achieve engineering goals. Mass transport or system-design oriented efforts are not of interest to this program. Of specific interest is research that explores active and passive control of the dynamics of thermal processes, and simulations and diagnostics that bridge and model information across multiple-scales. Priority is given to insightful investigations of fundamental problems with clearly defined economic, environmental and societal impacts.

Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas can be considered.  However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

Proposals at the interface of computational/mathematical sciences and thermal transport are encouraged, but should be submitted to the Computation and Data Enabled Science & Engineering (CDESE) Program.  Proposals that deal with the development and characterization of low cost, sustainable and scalable-manufactured materials with improved thermal properties are encouraged and should add "SusCHEM:" in front of the title of the proposal.

The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years.  The typical award size is around $100,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation and approval from the Program Director, will be returned without review.

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Physics at the Information Frontier (PIF)
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

December 4, 2014

Physics at the Information Frontier (PIF) includes support for data-enabled science, community research networks, and new computational infrastructure, as well as for next-generation computing. It focuses on cyber-infrastructure for the disciplines supported by the Physics Division while encouraging broader impacts on other disciplines. Disciplines within the purview of the Physics Division include: atomic, molecular, optical, plasma, elementary particle, nuclear, particle astrophysics, gravitational and biological physics. Proposals with intellectual focus in areas supported by other NSF Divisions should be submitted to those divisions directly. Proposals that cross Divisional lines are welcome, but the Physics Division encourages PIs to request a co-review by naming other divisional programs on the cover sheet. This facilitates the co-review and participation of other programs in the review process.

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Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics
Directorate for Mathematics and Physical Sciences/NSF

December 4, 2014

The program supports both formal string theory as well as string-theory-inspired model building.  Proposals in mathematical physics that are relevant for string theory and/or quantum field theory are also relevant for this program.   Predictions for upcoming experiments at the LHC involve Supersymmetric Model building, Grand Unified Theories, Extra Dimensions, String Inspired phenomenology as well as high order calculations in the Standard Model (of strong weak and electromagnetic interactions) to sort out what new physics might be discovered at the next generation of accelerators and cosmic ray and neutrino detectors. High precision simulations of QCD processes using lattice gauge theory are also a crucial ingredient for understanding present and future experiments at various collider facilities. Supported research includes contributions to broad theoretical advances as well as model building and applications to experimental programs at facilities such as RHIC and Jefferson Laboratory, and to astrophysical phenomena. This includes formulating new approaches for theoretical, computational, and experimental research that explore the fundamental laws of physics and the behavior of physical systems; formulating quantitative hypotheses; exploring and analyzing the implications of such hypotheses analytically and computationally; and, in some cases, interpreting the results of experiments. The effort also includes a considerable number of interdisciplinary grants.

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Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (EEID)
NSF, NIH, USDA, and BBSRC

November 19, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases program supports research on the ecological, evolutionary, and socio-ecological principles and processes that influence the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. The central theme of submitted projects must be quantitative or computational understanding of pathogen transmission dynamics. The intent is discovery of principles of infectious disease transmission and testing mathematical or computational models that elucidate infectious disease systems. Projects should be broad, interdisciplinary efforts that go beyond the scope of typical studies. They should focus on the determinants and interactions of transmission among humans, non-human animals, and/or plants. This includes, for example, the spread of pathogens; the influence of environmental factors such as climate; the population dynamics and genetics of reservoir species or hosts; the cultural, social, behavioral, and economic dimensions of disease transmission. Research may be on zoonotic, environmentally-borne, vector-borne, or enteric diseases of either terrestrial or freshwater systems and organisms, including diseases of animals and plants, at any scale from specific pathogens to inclusive environmental systems. Proposals for research on disease systems of public health concern to developing countries are strongly encouraged, as are disease systems of concern in agricultural systems. Investigators are encouraged to develop the appropriate multidisciplinary team, including for example, modelers, bioinformaticians, genomics researchers, social scientists, economists, epidemiologists, entomologists, parasitologists, microbiologists, bacteriologists, virologists, pathologists or veterinarians, with the goal of integrating knowledge across disciplines to enhance our ability to predict and control infectious diseases.

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Enriched Doctoral Training in the Mathematical Sciences (EDT)
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences & Division of Mathematical Sciences

November 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The long-range goal of the Enriched Doctoral Training in the Mathematical Sciences (EDT) program is to strengthen the nation's scientific competitiveness by increasing the number of well-prepared U.S. citizens, nationals, and permanent residents who pursue careers in the mathematical sciences and in other professions in which expertise in the mathematical sciences plays an increasingly important role. The EDT program will achieve this by supporting efforts to enrich research training in the mathematical sciences at the doctoral level by preparing Ph.D. students to recognize and find solutions to mathematical challenges arising in other fields and in areas outside today's academic setting. Graduate research training activities supported by EDT will prepare participants for a broader range of mathematical opportunities and career paths than has been traditional in U.S. mathematics doctoral training.

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Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR)
Industrial Innovation and Partnerships

December 2, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program stimulates technological innovation in the private sector by strengthening the role of small business concerns in meeting Federal research and development needs, increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results, and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The SBIR program solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission. The program is governed by Public Law 112-81 (SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011). SBIR policy is provided by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through the SBA Policy Directive. A main purpose of the legislation is to stimulate technological innovation and increase private sector commercialization. The NSF SBIR program is therefore in a unique position to meet both the goals of NSF and the purpose of the SBIR legislation by transforming scientific discovery into both social and economic benefit, and by emphasizing private sector commercialization.

Accordingly, NSF has formulated broad solicitation topics for SBIR that conform to the high-technology investment sector's interests. The topics are detailed on the SBIR/STTR topics homepage.

Note: The submission of the same project idea to both this SBIR Phase I solicitation and the concurrent STTR Phase I solicitation is strongly discouraged.

More information about the NSF SBIR Program can be found on the Program Homepage.

For assistance with SBIR opportunities, MSU's Techlink has generously offered their support. Please contact Ray Friesenhahn at rayf@montana.edu or 994-7726. 

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Hydrologic Sciences

December 5, 2014

The Hydrologic Sciences Program focuses on the fluxes of water in the environment that constitute the water cycle as well as the mass and energy transport function of the water cycle in the environment.  The Program supports studying processes from rainfall to runoff to infiltration and streamflow; evaporation and transpiration; as well as the flow of water in soils and aquifers and the transport of suspended, dissolved and colloidal components.  Water is seen as the mode of coupling among various components of the environment and emphasis is placed on how the coupling is enabled by the water cycle and how it functions as a process.  The Hydrologic Sciences Program retains a strong focus on linking the fluxes of water and the components carried by water across the boundaries between various interacting components of the terrestrial system and the mechanisms by which these fluxes co-organize over a variety of timescales and/or alter the fundamentals of the interacting components.  The Program is also interested in how water interacts with the solid phase, the landscape and the ecosystem as well as how such interactions and couplings are altered by land use and climate change.  Studies may address aqueous geochemistry and solid phase interactions as well as physical, chemical, and biological processes as coupled to water transport. These studies commonly involve expertise from basic sciences and mathematics, and proposals may require joint review with related programs.  The Hydrologic Sciences Program will also consider some synthesis activities.

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Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF): Core Programs
Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering

Deadlines vary depending on project size, see announcement

SYNOPSIS: 

The Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF) supports transformative research and education projects that explore the foundations of computing and communication. The Division seeks advances in computing and communication theory, algorithm design and analysis, and the architecture and design of computers and software. CCF-supported projects also investigate revolutionary computing models and technologies based on emerging scientific ideas and integrate research and education activities to prepare future generations of computer science and engineering workers. CCF supports three core programs as described below - Algorithmic Foundations (AF), Communications and Information Foundations (CIF), and Software and Hardware Foundations (SHF).

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Research on the Science and Technology Enterprise: Statistics and Surveys

Deadline: January 15, 2015

The National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES) of the National Science Foundation (NSF) is one of the thirteen principal federal statistical agencies within the United States. It is responsible for the collection, acquisition, analysis, reporting and dissemination of objective, statistical data related to the science and engineering enterprise in the United States and other nations that is relevant and useful to practitioners, researchers, policymakers and the public. NCSES uses this information to prepare a number of statistical data reports as well as analytical reports including the National Science Board's biennial report, Science and Engineering (S&E) Indicators, and Women, Minorities and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering. The Center would like to enhance its efforts to support analytic and methodological research in support of its surveys, and to engage in the education and training of researchers in the use of large-scale nationally representative datasets. NCSES welcomes efforts by the research community to use NCSES data for research on the science and technology enterprise, to develop improved survey methodologies for NCSES surveys, to create and improve indicators of S&T activities and resources, and strengthen methodologies to analyze and disseminate S&T statistical data. To that end, NCSES invites proposals for individual or multi-investigator research projects, doctoral dissertation improvement awards, workshops, experimental research, survey research and data collection and dissemination projects under its program for Research on the Science and Technology Enterprise: Statistics and Surveys.

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Geomorphology and Land Use Dynamics (GLD-SEP)
Directorate for Geosciences/NSF

January 16, 2015

The Geomorphology and Land-use Dynamics Program is part of the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR). EAR provides funding for the conduct of research concerning the solid Earth and its surface environment. EAR supports investigations of the Earth's structure, composition, evolution, and the interaction of the lithosphere with the Earth's biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. In addition, EAR provides support for instrumental and observational infrastructure, cyberinfrastructure, and innovative educational and outreach activities. Projects may employ any combination of field, laboratory, and computational studies with observational, theoretical, or experimental approaches. Support is available for research and research infrastructure through grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements awarded in response to investigator-initiated proposals from U.S. universities and other eligible organizations. EAR will consider co-funding of projects with other agencies and supports international work and collaborations.

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Decision, Risk and Management Sciences (DRMS)
Division of Social and Economic Sciences

August 18, 2014 and January 18, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The Decision, Risk and Management Sciences program supports scientific research directed at increasing the understanding and effectiveness of decision making by individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, doctoral dissertation research improvement grants (ddrigs), and workshops are funded in the areas of judgment and decision making; decision analysis and decision aids; risk analysis, perception, and communication; societal and public policy decision making; management science and organizational design. The program also supports small grants that are time-critical (Rapid Response Research - RAPID) and small grants that are high-risk and of a potentially transformative nature (EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research - EAGER). For detailed information concerning these two types of grants, please review Chapter II.D of the NSF Grant Proposal Guide.

Funded research must be grounded in theory and generalizable. Purely algorithmic management science proposals should be submitted to the Operations Research Program rather than to DRMS.

General Guidance concerning the DRMS Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (DDRIGs) funding opportunity includes the following:

  • The advisor of the doctoral student is strongly encouraged to contact one of the DRMS Program Directors by e-mail prior to the preparation of the DDRIG proposal.
  • DRMS DDRIG awards have a recommended maximum duration of 12 months.
  • The proposal title should start with "Doctoral Dissertation Research in DRMS:".
  • On the FastLane Cover Sheet, the advisor should be listed as the Principal Investigator (PI) and the doctoral dissertation student as the Co-PI.
  • DDRIG awards are designed to cover expenses such as travel, special equipment, and participation fees.
  • DRMS does not provide general stipends or cost-of-living support for DDRIG awards.
  • Your DDRIG proposal's project desciption should be essentially a research design (statement of the research problem, literature review, hypotheses, research site, data to be collected, methods of analysis, and schedule).
  • The review process for DDRIG proposals may involve only mail reviews, or it may include both mail reviews and assessment by the DRMS advisory panel.
  • Outstanding DDRIG proposals specify how the knowledge to be created advances our theoretical understanding of the subject.

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Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers
Directorate for Education and Human Resources/NSF

November 6, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The ITEST program through research and model-building activities seeks to build understandings of best practice factors, contexts and processes contributing to K-12 students' motivation and participation in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) core domains along with other STEM cognate domains (e.g., information and communications technology (ICT), computing, computer sciences, data analytics, among others) that inform education programs and workforce domains. The ITEST program funds foundational and applied research projects addressing the development, implementation, and dissemination of innovative strategies, tools, and models for engaging students to be aware of STEM and cognate careers, and to pursue formal school-based and informal out-of-school educational experiences to prepare for such careers.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

ITEST supports projects that: increase students' awareness of STEM and cognate careers; (2) motivate students to pursue the appropriate education pathways for STEM and cognate careers; and/or (3) provide students with technology-rich experiences that develop disciplinary-based knowledge and practices, and non-cognitive skills (e.g., critical thinking and communication skills) needed for entering STEM workforce sectors. ITEST projects may adopt an interdisciplinary focus on one or more STEM domains or focus on sub discipline(s) within a domain. ITEST projects must involve students, and may also include teachers. ITEST is especially interested in broadening participation of student groups from traditionally underrepresented in STEM and cognate intensive education and workforce domains. Strongly encouraged are projects that actively engage business and industry to better ensure K-12 experiences are likely to foster the skill-sets of emerging STEM and cognate careers. ITEST supports two project types: Strategies and SPrEaD (Successful Project Expansion and Dissemination) projects. Strategies projects address the creation and implementation of innovative technology-related interventions that support ITEST's objectives. SPrEaD projects support the wider and broader dissemination and examination of innovative interventions to generate evidence and understanding regarding contextual factors that operate to enhance, moderate, or constrain the desired results. All ITEST projects include activities designed to inform judgments regarding the feasibility of implementing strategies in typical delivery settings such as classrooms and out-of-school settings

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EHR Core Research

Deadline: February 3, 2015

The EHR Core Research (ECR) program establishes a mechanism in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources to provide funding in foundational research areas that are broad, essential and enduring. EHR seeks proposals that will help synthesize, build and/or expand research foundations in the following core areas: STEM learning, STEM learning environments, workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM. We invite researchers to identify and conduct research on questions or issues in order to advance the improvement of STEM learning in general, or to address specific challenges of great importance. Two types of proposals are invited: Core Research Proposals (maximum 5 years, $1.5 million) that propose to study a foundational research question/issue designed to inform the transformation of STEM learning and education and Capacity Building Proposals (maximum 3 years, $300,000) intended to support groundwork necessary for advancing research within the four core areas.

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Energy for Sustainability

Deadline: January 15 to February 19, 2015

This program supports fundamental research and education that will enable innovative processes for the sustainable production of electricity and transportation fuels. Processes for sustainable energy production must be environmentally benign, reduce greenhouse gas production, and utilize renewable resources.

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Environmental Engineering

Deadline: January 15 to February 19, 2015

The goal of this program is to encourage transformative research which applies scientific and engineering principles to minimize or avoid solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges resulting from human activity into land, air, and inland and coastal waters, while promoting resource and energy conservation and recovery. The program fosters cutting-edge scientific research for identifying, evaluating, and monitoring the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils.

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Environmental Health and Safety of Nanotechnology

Deadline: January 15 to February 19, 2015

The program emphasizes engineering principles underlying the environmental health and safety impacts of nanotechnology. Innovative methods related to clean nanomaterials production processes, waste reduction, recycling, and industrial ecology of nanotechnology are also of interest. Current areas of support include: Understanding, measuring, mitigating, and preventing adverse effects of nanotechnology on the environment and biological systems; Nanotechnology environmental health and safety impacts; Predictive methodology for the interaction of nanoparticles with the environment and with the human body, including predictive approaches for toxicity; Fate and transport of engineered nanoparticles and their by-products; and Risk assessment and management of the effect of nanomaterials in the environment.

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Fluid Dynamics

Deadline: January 15 to February 19, 2015

The Fluid Dynamics program supports fundamental research and education on mechanisms and phenomena governing fluid flow. Proposed research should contribute to basic understanding; thus enabling the better design; predictability; efficiency; and control of systems that involve fluids. Encouraged are proposals that address innovative uses of fluids in materials development; manufacturing; biotechnology; nanotechnology; clinical diagnostics and drug delivery; sensor development and integration; energy and the environment.

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Particulate and Multiphase Processes Program

Deadline: January 15 to February 19, 2015

The Particulate and Multiphase Processes program supports fundamental and applied research on phenomena governing particulate and multiphase processes, including flows of suspensions of particles, drops or bubbles, granular and granular-fluid flows, flow behavior of micro or nano-structured fluids, aerosol science and technology, and self- and directed-assembly processes involving particulates. Innovative research is sought that contributes to improving the basic understanding, design, predictability, efficiency, and control of particulate and multiphase processes with particular emphasis on: novel manufacturing techniques, multiphase systems of relevance to energy harvesting, multiphase transport in biological systems or biotechnology, and environmental sustainability.

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Division of Environmental Biology (core programs) (DEB)
Directorate for Biological Sciences & Division of Environmental Biology

LOI due January 23, 2015
Full submission due August 2, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

The Division of Environmental Biology (DEB) supports fundamental research on populations, species, communities, and ecosystems. Scientific emphases range across many evolutionary and ecological patterns and processes at all spatial and temporal scales. Areas of research include biodiversity, phylogenetic systematics, molecular evolution, life history evolution, natural selection, ecology, biogeography, ecosystem structure, function and services, conservation biology, global change, and biogeochemical cycles. Research on organismal origins, functions, relationships, interactions, and evolutionary history may incorporate field, laboratory, or collection-based approaches; observational or manipulative experiments; synthesis activities; as well as theoretical approaches involving analytical, statistical, or computational modeling.

 

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Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research: Workshop Opportunities (EPS-WO)
National Science Foundation

Rolling submission deadline

SYNOPSIS: 

The Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to fulfill the mandate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote scientific progress nationwide. The EPSCoR program is directed at those jurisdictions that have historically received lesser amounts of NSF Research and Development (R&D) funding. Thirty jurisdictions, including twenty-eight states, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U. S. Virgin Islands, currently participate in EPSCoR. Through this program, NSF establishes partnerships with government, higher education and industry that are designed to effect sustainable improvements in a jurisdiction's research infrastructure, R&D capacity, and hence, its national R&D competitiveness. The EPSCoR Office welcomes unsolicited proposals from EPSCoR jurisdictions for workshops involving the EPSCoR community. These workshops will focus on innovative ways to address multi-jurisdictional efforts on themes of regional to national importance with relevance to EPSCoR's goals/objectives and NSF's mission.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Workshops should address multi-jurisdictional efforts that need collaboration for optimal success. Speakers from non-EPSCoR institutions can be involved in the workshop, and funding for their travel expenses can be provided by the workshop award, but funding cannot go to non-EPSCoR institutions. Workshops should address major regional or national themes of relevance to EPSCoR's goals/objectives and NSF's mission. Workshops may have as their goal the development of high quality collaborations that are capable of competing for major funding from non-EPSCoR programs. Workshops should address multi/interdisciplinary perspectives common to major initiatives in science and engineering. Workshops should have appropriate representation of underrepresented groups. Workshops are not intended solely for within-jurisdiction or single institution planning activities. Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII) planning efforts by EPSCoR jurisdictional committees accomplish these types of activities. Workshops are not to be used for new RII proposal development by a single jurisdiction. However, in those cases where multiple jurisdictions have similar thematic plans and there is value in collaboration among jurisdictions on a common theme, then a workshop might be appropriate. Jurisdictions considering such collaborative projects should contact the NSF EPSCoR Office to outline their plan and to obtain advice on the suitability of a potential workshop proposal. A successful workshop proposal will demonstrate a compelling rationale, with clear goals, a committed leadership team, institutional support, leveraged resources, and strategic planning. Inclusivity of groups underrepresented in STEM must be evident at all levels, from the planning committee to the final participants. The level of inclusivity, and measures of workshop programmatic success, must be obtained through evaluation and feedback. A plan for long-term and widespread dissemination of results must also be included.

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Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC)
Directorate for Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering/NSF

Deadlines vary depending on project size, see announcement

SYNOPSIS: 

The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address Cybersecurity from a Trustworthy Computing Systems (TWC) perspective and/or a Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) perspective, or from the Secure, Trustworthy, Assured and Resilient Semiconductors and Systems (STARSS) perspective. In addition, the sponsor welcomes proposals that integrate research addressing all of these perspectives.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

With the exception of Cybersecurity Education proposals described below, any proposal submitted to this solicitation must be consistent with one of three project classes defined below. Proposals will be considered for funding within their project classes.

Small Projects are well suited to one or two investigators (PI and one co-PI or other Senior Personnel) and at least one student and/or postdoc.

Medium Projects are well-suited to one or more investigators (PI, co-PI and/or other Senior Personnel) and several students and/or postdocs. Medium project descriptions must be comprehensive and well-integrated, and should make a convincing case that the collaborative contributions of the project team will be greater than the sum of each of their individual contributions. Rationale must be provided to explain why a budget of this size is required to carry out the proposed work. Since the success of collaborative research efforts is known to depend on thoughtful coordination mechanisms that regularly bring together the various participants of the project, a separate Collaboration Plan is required for all Medium proposals with more than one investigator. Up to 2 pages are allowed for Collaboration Plans. The length of and level of detail provided in the Collaboration Plan should be commensurate with the complexity of the proposed project. Medium projects may be submitted to the Trustworthy Computing Systems (TWC) and/or the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) perspectives.

Large Projects are well suited to two or more investigators (PI, co-PI and/or other Senior Personnel), and a team of students and/or postdocs. They should be large, multi-disciplinary, multi-organizational, and/or multi-institution projects that provide high-level visibility to grand challenge research areas in cybersecurity. Project descriptions must be comprehensive and well-integrated, and should make a convincing case that the collaborative contributions of the project team will be greater than the sum of each of the individual participants' contributions. Rationale must be provided to explain why a budget of this size is required to carry out the proposed work. Since the success of collaborative research efforts is known to depend on thoughtful coordination mechanisms that regularly bring together the various participants of the project, a separate Collaboration Plan is required for all Large proposals. Large projects may be submitted to the Trustworthy Computing Systems (TWC) and/or the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) perspectives. A Large proposal should have a long-term vision, with objectives that could not be attained simply by a collection of small or medium proposals provided similar resources. Such research may or may not be multidisciplinary. A successful Large project could also be a deep, intensively focused effort on a single cybersecurity problem in a single discipline.

Proposals addressing Cybersecurity with a Trustworthy Computing Systems perspective aim to provide the basis for designing, building, and operating a cyberinfrastructure with improved resistance and resilience to attack that can be tailored to meet a wide range of technical and policy requirements, including both privacy and accountability. Within its scope, the program supports all research approaches from theoretical to experimental, including human factors aspects of systems. Theories, models, cryptography, algorithms, methods, architectures, languages, software, tools, systems and evaluation frameworks are all of interest. Of particular interest is research addressing how better to design into components and systems desired security and privacy properties, as well as principled techniques for composing security mechanisms. Methods for raising attacker costs by incorporating diversity, misdirection/confusion, and change or self-adaptation into systems, while preserving system manageability, are also relevant. Approaches and methods for securing cyber-physical systems (CPS) are also welcome, including, but not limited to, critical infrastructure such as power and water, health care, transportation, and manufacturing. Submissions relating to CPS should be specific about the threat model, in particular addressing the sophistication of expected adversaries. Research that studies the tradeoffs among trustworthy computing properties, e.g., security and usability, or accountability and privacy, as well as work that examines the tension between security and human values such as openness and transparency is also welcomed. Also, methods to assess, reason about, and predict system trustworthiness, including observable metrics, analytical methods, simulation, experimental deployment and, where possible, deployment on live testbeds for experimentation at scale are considered. Statistical, mathematical and computational methods in the area of cryptographic methods, new algorithms, risk assessments and statistical methods in cybersecurity are also welcome.

Proposals addressing the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) perspective of Cybersecurity may include research at the individual, group, organizational, market, and societal levels, identifying cybersecurity risks and exploring the feasibility of potential solutions. All research approaches, including (but not limited to) theoretical, experimental, observational, statistical, survey, and simulation-based are of interest. A variety of methods can be used in research from the SBE perspective, including field data, laboratory experiments, observational studies, simulations, and theoretical development, among others. Not all proposals that examine aspects involving people are from the SBE perspective. Proposals in which such aspects are not the primary focus of the proposal or that merely apply rather than make contributions to the SBE sciences might fit under "Trustworthy Computing Systems" as human factors research. A proposal with SBE as its primary perspective must have SBE science as its main focus and must involve theoretical or methodological contributions to the SBE sciences. Contributions to the SBE sciences include identifying generalizable theories and regularities and "pushing the boundaries" of our understanding of social, behavioral, or economic phenomena in cybersecurity and beyond. We seek research that is generalizable, identifies scope conditions, or provides an advance in SBE science methods. We seek research that holds the promise of constructing new SBE theories that would apply to a variety of domains, or new generalizations of existing theory which clarify the conditions under which such generalizations hold (scope conditions). More inductive or interpretative approaches may contribute to the SBE sciences as well, especially if they set the groundwork for generalizable research or reveal broad connections that forward SBE science understandings. SBE / SaTC proposals should clearly state and elaborate how the proposed research will contribute to SBE sciences. A proposal that involves SBE, but not as its primary perspective, must include at least an application of the SBE sciences, but need not involve a theoretical or methodological contribution. All SBE primary or non-primary proposals must, like all SaTC proposals, also contribute toward the goal of creating a secure and trustworthy cyberspace. The SBE science contribution of any SBE / SaTC proposal must be related to bringing about that goal. It is not sufficient for a proposal submitted under SBE / SaTC to have an SBE science contribution alone or one that is not related to bringing about a secure and trustworthy cyberspace. Such proposals are perhaps best submitted to a standing (core) SBE program. Strong proposals will demonstrate the capabilities of the research team to bring to bear state-of-the-art research in the human sciences. In particular, they will seek to understand, predict and explain prevention, attack and/or defense behaviors and contribute to developing strategies for remediation. Proposals that contribute to the design of incentives, markets or institutions to reduce either the likelihood of cyber attack or the negative consequences of cyber attack are especially welcome, as are proposals that examine incentives and motivations of individuals.

The STARSS perspective is a joint effort of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC). A STARSS proposal is similar to other Small proposals submitted to the TWC and/or SBE perspective except that it must include a statement of consent authorizing NSF to share the proposal and any reviews and ancillary documents with SRC. As noted previously, STARSS proposals may not include the TWC or SBE perspective, but may include a TTP Option. Trends in semiconductors and their application pose challenges to security and trustworthiness. On one hand, leading edge processors are the "brains" behind critically-important systems and infrastructure, including networking and communications, electric power grids, finance, military and aerospace systems. On the other hand, smaller embedded processors, sensors and other electronic components provide "smart" functionality and connectivity in a variety of applications, such as automotive braking and airbag systems, personal healthcare, industrial controls, and the rapidly growing list of other connected devices often referred to as the Internet of Things. The wide range of devices and applications and the exponential growth in the number of connected "things" has made security and trustworthiness a prime concern. Design and manufacture of today's complex semiconductor circuits and systems requires many steps and involves the work of hundreds of engineers, typically distributed across multiple locations and organizations worldwide. Moreover, today's semiconductor chip is likely to include design modules or blocks (also referred to as intellectual property, or IP, blocks) from multiple sources. Detailed specifications are converted into schematic and then physical designs that may include billions of transistors. Many processes have been developed, and considerable resources are invested along the design and manufacture path to verify, test and validate that the product performs as intended. However, to date, these processes do not provide confidence about whether the chip is altered such that it provides unauthorized access or control. Such undesirable behavior can be due to a weakness in the design that results in an unintentional side channel or due to maliciously inserted functionality or "Trojan" hardware.

Proposals for Small, Medium or Large projects may include a Transition to Practice (TTP) option. Proposed activities under the TTP option MUST NOT be described in the project description, and instead MUST be described in a supplementary document of no more than five pages. The objective of the TTP program is to support the proposed research activities and ideas whose outcomes at the end of the award are capable of being implemented, applied, experimentally useable, or deployed in an operational environment. The TTP option supplementary document should specifically describe how the successful research results will be further developed and experimentally deployed in organizations or industries, including in networks and end systems.

On occasion, the results of SaTC funded research lead to widespread changes in our understanding of the fundamentals of cybersecurity that can, in turn, lead to fundamentally new ways to motivate and educate students about cybersecurity. Proposals submitted to this perspective leverage successful results from previous and current basic research in cybersecurity and research on student learning, both in terms of intellectual merit and broader impact, to address the challenge of expanding existing educational opportunities and resources in cybersecurity.

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NSF 13-570 Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences

Deadlines: September 15, 2014 and September 15, 2015

The Division of Mathematical Sciences in the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health plan to support research in mathematics and statistics on questions in the biological and biomedical sciences. Both agencies recognize the need and urgency for promoting research at the interface between the mathematical sciences and the life sciences. This competition is designed to encourage new collaborations, as well as to support existing ones.

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NSF 14-504 Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (CRCNS)
Innovative Approaches to Science and Engineering Research on Brain Function

Deadlines: Oct. 28, 2014, Oct. 29, 2015

Co-sponsors: 

-NSF Directorates of : Computer & Information Science & Engineering, Biological Sciences, Social, Behavioral and Economic Scienes, Mathematical & Physical Sciences, Engineering, International and Integrative Services; -NIH NINDS, NIMH, NIDA, NEI, NIDCD, NIBIB, NAAA, NICHD, NCCAM; Federal MInistry of Education and Research Germany; French National Research Agency; United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation

Two classes of proposals will be considered in response to this solicitation: Research Proposals describing collaborative research projects, and Data Sharing Proposals to enable sharing of data and other resources.

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Energy for Sustainability
Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems

November 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of the Energy for Sustainability program is to support fundamental engineering research and education that will enable innovative processes for the sustainable production of electricity and transportation fuels. Processes for sustainable energy production must be environmentally benign, reduce greenhouse gas production, and utilize renewable resources. 

Current topics of interest in sustainable energy technologies are:

  • Biomass Conversion, Biofuels & Bioenergy: Fundamental research on innovative approaches that lead to the intensification of biofuel and bioenergy processes is an emphasis area of this program. Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to: biological, thermochemical, or thermocatalytic routes for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to advanced biofuels beyond cellulosic ethanol; microbial fuel cells for direct production of electricity from renewable carbon sources; hydrogen production from autotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms; hydrocarbons and lipids from phototrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms.  Proposals that focus primarily on chemical reactor analysis related to biomass conversion should be submitted to Process and Reaction Engineering (CBET 1403), and proposals related to the combustion of biomass should be sent to Combustion and Fire Systems (CBET 1407).  Proposals that focus on the fundamentals of catalysis or biocatalysis should be submitted to Catalysis and Biocatalysis (CBET 1401).
  • Photovoltaic Solar Energy: Fundamental research on innovative processes for the fabrication and theory-based characterization of future PV devices is an emphasis area of this program. Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to: nano-enabled PV devices containing nanostructured semiconductors, plasmonic materials, photonic structures, or conducting polymers; earth-abundant and environmentally benign materials for photovoltaic devices; photocatalytic or photoelectrochemical processes for the splitting of water into H2gas, or for the reduction of CO2 to liquid or gaseous fuels.  Proposals that focus on the fundamentals of photocatalysis should be submitted to Catalysis and Biocatalysis (CBET 1401). The generation of thermal energy by solar radiation is not an area supported by this program, but may be considered by Thermal Transport Processes (CBET 1406).
  • Advanced Batteries for Transportation and Renewable Energy Storage: Radically new battery systems or breakthroughs based on existing systems can move the US more rapidly toward a more sustainable transportation future. The focus is on high-energy density and high-power density batteries suitable for transportation and renewable energy storage applications.  Advanced systems such as lithium-air, sodium-ion, as well as lithium-ion electrochemical energy storage are appropriate. Work on commercially available systems such as lead-acid and nickel-metal hydride batteries will not be considered by this program.  Fuel-cell related proposals should be directed to other CBET programs, depending on emphasis:  electrocatalysis (Catalysis and Biocatalysis, CBET 1401); membranes (Chemical and Biological Separations, CBET 1417); systems (Process and Reaction Engineering, CBET 1403).
  • Wind Energy: This program no longer supports wind, wave, tidal, or hydrokinetic energy research.  The proposer is encouraged to contact the program director for suggestions on a possible program home for proposal submission.

NOTE: For proposals involving any aspect of chemistry, including but not limited to biochemistry or physical chemistry, consider making proposal submissions to this program (7644) with the Proposal Title as: 'SusChEM: Name of Your Proposal'.  For more information on SusChEM-related proposals visit this link.  The same applies for proposals involving sustainable engineering.

The duration of unsolicited awards is typically three years.  The typical award size for the program is $100,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas can be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review or transferred to another program.

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Dear Colleague Letter: FY 2015 Clean Energy Technologies Funding Opportunities
Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO), Engineering (ENG), Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS)

Deadlines vary per directorate

SYNOPSIS: 

Dear Colleagues:

It is critical to provide sustainable and economical energy systems on a scale sufficient to power all of society's needs. The development of clean energy technologies is an important step in that direction as it addresses the interrelated challenges of producing safe and responsible energy sources while reducing our dependence on foreign oil and minimizing the impact on the environment.

All of the Divisions in the following Directorates are participating in clean energy technology research and education through ongoing funding opportunities: Biological Sciences (BIO)Engineering (ENG), and Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS).

For BIO: fundamental research topics of interest in clean energy technology include, but are not limited to: systems and synthetic biology to streamline and scale the metabolic and energetic potential of living organisms such as microbes, fungi, algae and plants to produce non-petroleum based sources of important chemicals/materials, feedstocks and fuels. Investigations to assess the impact of fuel and/or bio-renewable chemical production on genome stability, fitness, and phenotype of the production organisms are of interest, as are studies to assess the potential environmental impacts of these technologies.

For ENG and MPS: examples of fundamental research topics of interest in clean energy technologies include, but are not limited to: hydrogen generation and storage; biological, chemical, and catalytic conversion of renewable carbon sources (such as biomass, methane, and carbon dioxide); the development of methods and materials that increase energy efficiency, such as the replacement of stoichiometric with catalytic processes; energy storage, transmission, or distribution (e.g. smart grid); power-electronic and energy-conversion devices; fuel cells; solar energy capture and conversion (including biological and bio-inspired processes for the conversion of sunlight to fuels, electricity, or thermal energy); wind/wave/tidal energy; nuclear energy; studies of energy efficiency and use; and carbon dioxide sequestration and storage.

Within these general guidelines, the Directorates encourage the submission of proposals in the areas of clean energy research. Proposals should be submitted to the NSF program appropriate to the disciplinary area of the proposed research in accordance with the submission window and conditions of that program.

Proposals are welcome from either single or multiple investigators. Interdisciplinary proposals that involve principal investigators traditionally supported by different participating divisions are encouraged. Please follow the guidelines and program descriptions located on the NSF website.

Proposals may be submitted in combination with other solicitations. For example, if there are strong collaborations with industry, the Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) solicitation can be used in conjunction with this effort. Similarly, proposals may be submitted in combination with the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) or the Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) solicitation. Other NSF funding mechanisms such as Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) and Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) may also be appropriate. Principal investigators are urged to consult with the cognizant program officers for additional guidance.

To see examples of awards made in this area visit the NSF Award Abstracts Database and perform a key word search. Alternatively, please visit the webpages of the disciplinary programs of interest in the participating divisions.

We are excited by the opportunities in the clean energy technologies area and encourage our communities to contribute to our sustainable and secure energy future.

Fleming Crim
Assistant Director
Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences

Pramod Khargoneker
Assistant Director
Directorate for Engineering

John Wingfield
Assistant Director
Directorate for Biological Sciences

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U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative: Foundational Program -- Exploratory Research
National Institute of Food and Agriculture/Department of Agriculture

Letter of Intent Required
Deadline: September 29, 2014

The purpose of AFRI is to support research, education, and extension work by awarding grants that address key problems of national, regional, and multi-state importance in sustaining all components of food and agriculture, including conventional, sustainable and organic food production, farm efficiency and profitability, ranching, renewable energy, forestry (both urban and agroforestry), aquaculture, rural communities and entrepreneurship, human nutrition, food safety, physical and social sciences, home economics and rural human ecology, biotechnology, and conventional breeding. Through this support, AFRI advances knowledge in both fundamental and applied sciences important to agriculture. It also allows AFRI to support education and extension activities that deliver science-based knowledge to people, allowing them to make informed practical decisions. This AFRI RFA is announcing funding opportunities for fundamental Research, applied Research, and Integrated Research, Education, and/or Extension Projects.

The Exploratory Program Area addresses the following priorities of the 2008 Farm Bill: A. Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; B. Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; C. Food Safety, Nutrition and Health; D. Renewable Energy, Natural Resources, and Environment; E. Agriculture, Systems and Technology; and F. Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities This program area priority (program) provides support for research projects that develop proof of concept for untested novel ideas. This includes "high risk - high impact" work that will lead to a significant change in US agriculture. This program area priority focuses on: new and emerging innovative ideas; application of new knowledge or approaches; tools required to have a paradigm shift in the field; and/or rapid response to natural disasters and similar unanticipated events.

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Agriculture and Food Research Initiative: Foundational Program (Exploratory)
National Institute of Food and Agriculture

September 30, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

This new program area encourages continuous development of innovative ideas that will position US Agriculture at the global forefront. These developments will lead to quantum leaps in the agricultural fields. They will address the challenges that have never been addressed before in the areas of food security, climate change, environmental quality and natural resources, nutrition, obesity, food safety, strong families and vibrant communities, and thriving youth. The Exploratory Program Area addresses the following priorities of the 2008 Farm Bill: A. Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; B. Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; C. Food Safety, Nutrition and Health; D. Renewable Energy, Natural Resources, and Environment; E. Agriculture, Systems and Technology; and F. Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities. 

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School Wellness Policy Cooperative Agreement
USDA Food and Nutrition Service

LOI due September 15, 2014 (optional)
October 6, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

USDA FNS hereby announces the availability of funds and opportunities to conduct comprehensive school wellness policy surveillance at multiple levels, including state- and school district-levels. The funds will support public or private, non-governmental research institutions (such as accredited institutions of higher education and/or non-profit organizations) to enter into a cooperative agreement with USDA FNS for school wellness policy surveillance, research, and reporting that complement other national existing school wellness policy surveillance systems and assist the USDA in fulfilling its Congressional monitoring and surveillance mandate, as delineated in the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act (HHFKA). The purpose of this announcement, therefore, is to describe the new opportunity and solicit proposals to support these aims. For additional information visit: http://www.fns.usda.gov/school-wellness-policy-cooperative-agreement. 

 

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Professional Development Program Grant - Type 2.
Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education

October 29, 2014

Professional Development Program Grants are designed to educate agricultural professionals about sustainable agriculture so that they, in turn, can help educate and train farmers and ranchers. Funded PDP grants must help achieve this long-term outcome: Cooperative Extension, Natural Resource Conservation Service and other agricultural professionals are conversant in sustainable agriculture principles and systems. They have ready access to resources that can help producers make informed decisions about adopting sustainable approaches with greater certainty and less risk.

Projects must improve the ability of agricultural professionals to conduct educational programs and activities in sustainable agriculture principles and systems and to respond to inquiries on the subject from farmers, ranchers and the public. Approaches can include: workshops; conferences; development of materials; demonstrations; web-based courses; tours. Multi-faceted proposals are encouraged. Projects using multiple techniques or methods are preferred, as are efforts whose results can be applied to wide and diverse audiences. Subject matter can include any sustainable agriculture endeavor, including animal agriculture, agronomic or horticultural crop production or the effects of sustainable practices on quality of life for producers or rural communities.

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Small Business Innovation Research Program: Phase I
USDA - NIFA

October 2, 2014

*Please see eligibility requirements. Applicants must quality as a small business concern for R/R&D purposes at the time of award. This opportunity is appropriate for those working with small businesses in some capacity. TechLink, a Montana State University organization dedicated to development, transfer, and commercialization of technology is available to assist investigators with their SBIR/STTR plans. Please contact staff listed on the TechLink website: http://techlinkcenter.org/home.

SYNOPSIS: 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) invites science-based small business firms to submit research applications under this program solicitation entitled "Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) - Phase I, Fiscal Year 2015." Firms with strong scientific research capabilities in any of the topic areas described in section 8.0 are encouraged to participate. USDA will support high-quality research or research and development (R/R&D) applications containing advanced concepts related to important scientific problems and opportunities that could lead to significant public benefit.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Objectives of the SBIR program include stimulating technological innovation in the private sector, strengthening the role of small businesses in meeting Federal research and development needs, increasing private sector commercialization of innovations derived from USDA-supported research and development efforts, and fostering and encouraging participation by women-owned and socially and economically disadvantaged small business firms in technological innovation.

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Family Support Programs Evaluation Plan Development and Implementation
National Institute of Food and Agriculture/Department of Agriculture

August 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

NIFA requests applications for the Family Support Programs Evaluation Competitive Grant Program for fiscal year (FY) 14 to assess and implement evaluations plans for DoD family support programs. The amount available for support of this program in FY 2014 is approximately $1,350,000.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

NIFA is seeking applications from institutions that can demonstrate their ability to effectively assess and implement program evaluation plans for Family Support Programs across various Department of Defense (DoD) Services. Project objectives include:

a) Develop a program evaluation plan for one of the Navy's financial education programs which includes a logic model, an assessment of the current program to determine if the program has standardized, documented activities and program delivery processes which can be evaluated, and a program evaluation plan with specific plan options, data collection methods and instruments once the program is determined as ready for evaluation.

b) Implement previously established program evaluation plans with detailed evaluation procedures using an existing logic model and identified data collection measures AND develop feasible and sustainable program evaluation and internal program monitoring procedures for the following programs:

--Air Force First Duty Station Training;

--Army Financial Management for First Term Soldiers;

--Marine Corps Emergency Preparedness Program;

--Marine Corps Mobilization and Deployment Reintegration: Strong Marine Couples.

c) Provide the Military Services with expert advice and technical support throughout the implementation process; collect program evaluation data; analyze evaluation data through appropriate methods and submit a report summarizing the findings and outlining study procedures.

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Miscellaneous Programs and Announcements

American Heart Association: New Topics and Open Science Policies
American Heart Association

Will be announced mid-September

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS/NEW TOPICS: 

Network Topic Announcement

The Strategically Focused Research Network will focus on Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease.

The AHA is interested in the science community exploring all aspects of disparities in cardiovascular disease, which can assist the AHA in reaching its 2020 Goals and overall mission of building healthier lives free of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

A Network is comprised of three to four institutions, or Centers, working on three projects each that are focused on one strategic area.

To that end, the AHA pursues research from the basic, clinical and population sciences. This RFA will require that each submission have an overall application from the Center Director, as well as three proposals from project Principal Investigators in this specific area:

  • One proposal addressing basic science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
  • One proposal addressing clinical science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
  • One proposal addressing population science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease 
A Center application can comprise projects from more than one institution. The sponsoring institution will be determined by where the Center Director is located and will be charged with oversight and financial responsibilities of the Center as a whole. Applications should convey how these different areas of science will be integrated, both in their scientific discoveries and through joint team communication and integration. 

Institutions are limited to one Center application per location, however individuals at said institution who are not participating in said institution's Center application, may indeed participate in another Center's application.

Offered by:
 AHA National Research Program 

More information will be announced with specific deadlines. For now, use this high level timeline as a guide:  
  • March 2014 - Topics announced to the community via AHA Research Website with timelines
  • Jan/Feb 2015 - Applications for Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease SFRN due
  • June 2015 -  Awardees for Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease SFRN Announced
Please come back and visit this page in mid-September for the full Request for Applications for the Strategically Focused Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Research Network.
 

POLICY UPDATES: 

AHA OPEN SCIENCE POLICIES ARE NOW IN EFFECT
New AHA Open Science policies will go into effect with applications due in July 2014 and new awards beginning January 2015. 

AHA's public access policy
The AHA requires that all journal articles resulting from AHA funding should be made freely available in PubMed Central within 12 months of publication.

AHA's open data policy
The AHA requires grant applicants to include a data sharing plan as part of the application process. Any data that is needed for independent verification of research results must be made freely and publically available within 12 months of the end of the funding period (and any no-cost extension).

Specific early career awards are currently exempt from this requirement (Undergraduate Fellowships, Medical Student Research Fellowships, Predoctoral Fellowships, Mentor/AHA Mentee Awards, Postdoctoral Fellowships, and Mentored Clinical & Population Research Awards).

View more information about AHA Open Science policies and answers to Frequently Asked Questions.  

 

 

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Autism Speaks: Suzanne and Bob Wright Trailblazer Award

Letter of intent Deadline: accepted anytime

The Trailblazer Award mechanism supports highly novel "out of the box" autism-relevant research that open new avenues to understanding the causes, diagnosis, subtyping, prevention, treatments, and cure of autism spectrum disorders. The Trailblazer Award mechanism is designed to fund small investigator-initiated high risk/high impact projects that are potentially transformative, paradigm shifting, and/or will overcome significant roadblocks in autism research within a 12 month period.

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Charitable Giving Program
Community Works

Ongoing

The charitable programs are among the ways that NorthWestern Energy participates as an active participant in the communities where they do business. Donations will generally be made to those non-profit groups that have the greatest opportunity for positively affecting the communities served by NorthWestern Energy and are focused in one of the following categories: 

- Education: Education remains a primary focus of the company. Donations to education will primarily be made through university system foundations, scholarship programs, and employee matching gifts. Donations will also be made in support of local colleges, and special primary and secondary education programs in the fields of math, science and youth leadership. 

- Health and Human Services: Donations will be considered for organizations serving human needs such as the United Way, youth homes and special community health and safety needs. Donations will generally not be made to national health organizations or for medical equipment or research funds. 

- Civic & Community: Donations will be considered for civic improvment, special events, and youth and senior citizen organizations. 

- Culture & The Arts: Donations will be considered for local museums, libraries, cultural centers, and the performing arts. 

- Resource Conservation: Donations will be considered in the areas of habitat preservation, and fish and wildlife protection. 

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Department of Defense / CDMRP
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Deadlines: see program pre-announcements

The Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Defense Appropriations Act provides research funding for the peer reviewed programs managed by the Department of Defense (DOD) office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

This e-mail is to notify the research community of the recently released funding opportunities from the following programs: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP), Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP), Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP), Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP).

Detailed descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the respective Program Announcements. Each Program Announcement is available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP)

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

Therapeutic Idea Award

Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)

Concept Award

Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP)

Clinical Trial Award

Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

New Investigator Award

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Exploration Hypothesis Development Award

Idea Development Award

Pilot Clinical Trial Award

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Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ovarian Cancer Research Program (OCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ecological Services Program Fiscal Year 2014 Recovery Implementation Fund
Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Program

July 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

The FWS Endangered Species Program provides Federal financial assistance on a competitive basis to States, other Federal agencies, landowners, educators, non-profit organizations, researchers, and other partners to secure information about endangered, threatened or candidate species, to aid in the recovery of these species, to avert listing of species pursuant to the Endangered Species Act, and to help conserve the ecosystems upon which these species depend. The FWS and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), which is part of the Department of Commerce's NOAA Fisheries office, share Endangered Species Act responsibilities for several species such as sea turtles. Projects for NMFS-managed species are not included in this funding opportunity.

OBJECTIVES: 

This Recovery Implementation funding opportunity is intended for projects that will contribute to the recovery of FWS-managed endangered and threatened species in the United States, and is limited to projects carrying out actions described in a species approved recovery plan, in the implementation schedule of a species approved recovery plan, actions recommended in a completed 5-year status review of the species or in a spotlight species action plan, or projects documenting species response to climate change. For example: securing scientific information about endangered or threatened species, implementing restoration actions that will lead to delisting of a species, help prevent extinction of a species, or aid in the recovery of a species. Projects that address species response to climate change will receive additional consideration.

Special Instructions: Applicants must contact their regional FWS office to coordinate the letter of intent and application. 

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Media Grantmaking
MacArthur Foundation

Deadline: No fixed deadlines

MacArthur's goal in media grantmaking is to provide the public with high-quality, professionally-produced documentary films, deep and analytical journalism, and well-produced news and public affairs programming. In a media environment characterized by proliferating information sources of varying degrees of reliability, the Foundation seeks to support serious, fact-based journalism for television, radio and the web, the type of original reporting that is likely to be blogged about, linked to, tweeted, and otherwise circulated throughout the Internet. Programs supported by the Foundation inform and educate their viewers about important and under-reported topics, provide balance and accurate information, encourage global conversations, and use technology to tell stories in engaging and interactive ways.

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Michelson Grants in Reproductive Biology
Found Animals Foundation

Deadline: Letters of intent are accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis and, if approved, researchers are invited to submit grant proposals for a March, July, or November deadline

Funding for promising proposals in pursuit of non-surgical sterilization products or technologies for use in dogs and cats. The foundation encourages scientists from any and all fields to compete for the Michelson Grants, including but not limited to researchers in disciplines such as biology, biotechnology,cell biology, endocrinology, gene silencing, immunology, materials science, nanotechnology, neuroscience, pharmacology, reproductive biology, theriogenology, and more.

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Michelson Prize in Reproductive Biology

Deadline: none specific

The $25 million Michelson Prize will be offered to the first entity to provide Found Animals Foundation with a single dose, safe and effective non-surgical sterilant for male and female cats and dogs.

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Pioneering Ideas Unsolicited Proposals
Johnson (Robert Wood) Foundation

Deadline: There are no specific submission deadlines for unsolicited proposals

The Pioneer Portfolio is uniquely suited to invest in innovation at many different stages. The sponsor seeks to: Identify and explore new issues and approaches; Accelerate progress on issues and approaches that have significant potential to create breakthroughs in health and health care; and Support projects that use original, unconventional, or cross-sectoral approaches to create transformative change.

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Priority Grantmaking Program
United States Institute of Peace

Deadline is on a rolling basis

The Grant Initiative will focus on the following regions:

Afghanistan--Grantmaking in Afghanistan will support projects designed to promote public understanding of peaceful alternatives to the violent resolution of conflict, the rule of law, transitional justice, and to improve local capacities for dialogue and peacebuilding.

Pakistan--Grantmaking in Pakistan will strengthen civil society capacities for conflict prevention and promote greater understanding of issues related to identity, tolerance, diversity, and sectarian extremism in Pakistan through education, training, research, and the media.

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Promoting International Arts Engagement
Clark (Robert Sterling) Foundation

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's aim is to strengthen cultural organizations of the highest artistic quality by enabling them to participate in the global marketplace. The Foundation hopes that the Promoting International Arts Engagement program will help leverage new support in this area and introduce American culture to communities around the world, as well as bring diverse world cultures to American audiences.

While the Foundation considers support for projects that bring international artists to the U.S., preference is given to projects that send American arts abroad. While there are no restrictions on countries or regions, the Foundation is more inclined to support activities that involve underserved or underrepresented parts of the world. Favor is given to projects having lasting impact and value, including international tours that lead to new engagements, programs that broaden audiences and attract new sources of income, documentation of work that is disseminated widely, and arts engagement activities that benefit the community.

The objectives of Promoting International Arts Engagement are to: strengthen performing and visual arts organizations by helping to make possible international touring and collaborations that offer broad audience outreach and build lasting partnerships; provide presenting organizations with the opportunity to showcase important international artists from underrepresented regions, and introduce audiences to new artistic perspectives from world cultures; assist organizations that organize significant exchanges or forums bringing together U.S. artists and their international counterparts to inform the creative process; and sustain arts service organizations that advance global arts engagement, through new Internet technologies, program documentation and dissemination, translations, and technical assistance for artists, among other activities. 

Other Information: The Foundation receives and reviews proposals year-round.  The Board of Directors meets four times per year: January, April, July, and October to review submissions. 

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Proposal Deadline: Open

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports investigator-initiated research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include: examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

This call for proposals is intended to stimulate projects that: examine significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and explore or test major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

Grants will be awarded in two categories: Small grants for projects requiring $100,000 or less and projected to take up to 12 months or less; and Large grants for projects requiring more than $100,000 and/or projected to take longer than 12 months. 

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Saudi American Educational and Cultural Initiative Grant
Department of State

June 30, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

Saudi-American Educational and Cultural Initiative Grants support innovative forms of collaboration between Saudi and U.S. non-governmental and community organizations, universities, entrepreneurs, cultural organizations and qualified individuals to expand the diversity of activities in the U.S.-Saudi partnership and develop the next generation of leaders, especially among youth, young professionals and women, to promote mutual understanding and respect through long-term partnership and cooperation between our two countries. The Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is now accepting proposals from Saudi and U.S. non-governmental and community organizations, universities, entrepreneurs, cultural organizations or qualified individuals who propose to work together to develop or expand educational, professional and cultural exchange activities and promote dialogue and partnership between the people of the United States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The Embassy is especially interested in identifying and supporting U.S-Saudi partnerships that include a focus on the development of exchanges, projects and partnerships between U.S. and Saudi youth or women; or that involve the development of professional linkages in business, healthcare or media, including social media; or that build on Saudi efforts to modernize and build a knowledge-based economy; or that expand Saudi-U.S. educational partnerships; or that are submitted by or involve alumni of exchange programs sponsored by the U.S. or Saudi governments. Projects may include, but are not limited to:

& Academic and professional lectures, seminars and speaker programs;

& Artistic and cultural workshops, joint performances and exhibitions;

& Cultural heritage conservation and preservation projects;

& Cultural, professional and academic exchanges and projects;

& Professional development workshops and training.

Requests for funding provided by the U.S. Embassy should be at least $3000 and not more than $25,000; the most competitive proposals will include significant funding from other sources as cost-share in the project budget. Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis from qualified U.S. or Saudi individuals and organizations. Proposals must include a letter of support from the proposed U.S. or Saudi partner, whether a qualified individual or organization. The proposal or letter of support from the Saudi partner must confirm the ability and willingness of the Saudi partner to sponsor the visa(s) for the U.S. partner, if necessary, and to assume responsibility for all travel and logistics within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The U.S. Embassy in Saudi Arabia is not able to assist with visas or travel arrangements funded through the grant. Proposals will be evaluated for funding by an Embassy committee on a monthly basis. The committee will identify projects with outstanding educational, artistic, or cultural merits for funding. In deciding which projects to support, the committee will give consideration to the full range and diversity of American and Saudi educational and cultural traditions and seek to target geographically and demographically diverse audiences. Projects that involve direct, in-depth professional interaction, with the potential for sustained collaboration and that show evidence of professional accomplishment and innovation will receive priority. The proposals will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

& The proposal demonstrates that the Saudi and U.S. individuals and/or organizations have sufficient expertise, skills and capacity to implement the project.

& The project will make a substantive contribution to the expanding types of partnerships between Saudi and U.S. individuals, organizations and institutions.

& The individuals and/or organizations demonstrate that they have a clear understanding of the topic or issue that the project is aiming to address.

& The individuals and/or organizations have identified appropriate beneficiaries or target groups to maximize project outputs and outcomes and the project has a clear focus and manageable scope.

& The project idea and approach is innovative yet proposed project activities are concrete and detailed and supported by a work plan.

& The project budget is well-organized, detailed and reasonable. There are no budget lines labeled "miscellaneous expenses." The budget demonstrates that the individual or organization has devoted time to plan for and assess actual expenses associated with the project instead of providing rough estimates. No grant funds are proposed for the purchase of food, drink, or entertainment.

& The proposal clearly articulates how the partners will assess and measure performance throughout the project implementation phase using quantitative and qualitative assessment tools.

& The proposal describes clearly the approach that will be used to ensure the sustainability of the project or partnership. The following types of projects are not eligible for funding:

& Requests by organizations and individuals who are neither Saudi nor American;

& those relating to partisan political activity;

& humanitarian or charitable activities;

& conferences and individual trips abroad;

& trade activities;

& fund-raising campaigns;

& commercial projects;

& scientific research;

& projects aiming only at primary institutional development of the organization; or

& projects that duplicate existing projects.

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Simons Foundation for Autism Research Initiative (SFARI)

Deadline: Accepted on a rolling basis

Explorer Awards are intended to provide resources to support exploratory experiments that will strengthen hypotheses and lead to the formulation of competitive applications for subsequent larger-scale funding by SFARI or other organizations. Innovative, high-risk/high-impact proposals are encouraged. We especially encourage applications from investigators who are new to the field of autism, but who have expertise that could be brought to bear on this complex disorder.

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Statistical Consulting Services - Assistance with study design and statistical analysis
MSU

Available Fall 2014

In Fall 2014 formal statistical consulting services will be available to all researchers on campus.  This includes assistance in study design, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.  The inaugural statistical consultant will serve as the director of statistical consulting services on campus and help guide the future direction and growth of the service.  This position is funded for the first five years through an NIH-INBRE grant.

We encourage researchers to think about the future availability of this service as they are preparing research proposals.  Many funding agencies highly value demonstrated collaboration with statistical consultants in research design, data analysis, and dissemination of results.   The success of the service will depend on demonstrated need and use of its resources.  Therefore, we encourage researchers who anticipate using the service to assist in their research to consider including a budget item for MSU Statistical Consulting Services in their proposals.  A great place to start is with proposals submitted under the recent call from the VPR due May 9.  If you have questions about what to include please contact Megan Higgs (higgs@math.montana.edu) or any other Statistics faculty member (http://www.math.montana.edu/faculty/index.html#statistics).

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Sustainable Development Program
Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc.

Ongoing

SYNOPSIS: 

The Sustainable Development program advances global stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. Human activity is causing global warming, rapid loss of biodiversity, and accelerating degradation of Earth's life support systems. With the recognition that the impact of unchecked climate change threatens all other conservation efforts, the program focuses its grantmaking on advancing solutions to climate change.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Human activity is causing climate change, rapid loss of biodiversity, and accelerating degradation of Earth's life support systems. These developments threaten the livelihoods, health, and security of people in all nations and cultures as well as the well-being of the greater community of life. The RBF's sustainable development grantmaking endeavors to address these challenges by supporting development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The program supports global stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. The Fund encourages government, business, and civil society to work collaboratively on climate change, to acknowledge the moral and ethical consequences of inaction, and to make it an integral part of all development planning and activity. Recognizing the global nature of many environmental problems, the Fund also promotes international cooperation in addressing these challenges.

The Sustainable Development program maintains a significant focus on the United States in light of its disproportionate impact on the global economy, politics, and the environment. The program's work is also advanced in collaboration with the Fund's "pivotal place" programs--New York City, Southern China, and the Western Balkans--and with the Democratic Practice program's Global Governance portfolio. Pivotal place programs support work in specific countries or regions to build the knowledge, policies, organizational capacity, and leadership needed to advance sustainable development in locally appropriate ways. The Fund's Global Governance portfolio supports broad participation in forging the international agreements and institutional arrangements needed to encourage investment in sustainable development. Fund staff work to ensure that global developments inform work in specific places and that locally grounded efforts generate lessons and innovations needed for global impact.

With the recognition that the impact of unchecked climate change threatens all other conservation efforts, the Sustainable Development program focuses its U.S. grantmaking on building a green economy at the federal, state, and local levels.

Grant Inquiries are accepted throughout the year.

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Toyota Motor North America, Inc. (TMA)

Deadline: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis

Nationally, Toyota focuses in three areas: environment, safety and education. National programs in these areas must have a broad reach by impacting several major U.S. cities, communities or groups.

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Grant Program
RGK Foundation

Letters of intent can be submitted any time before September 19, 2014

RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community, and Health/Medicine. The Foundation's current interests in the area of Health/Medicine include programs that promote the health and well-being of children, programs that promote access to health services.

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American Council of Learned Societies

September 24, 2014

The Fellowship Program invites research applications in all disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences. The Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing. An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate's current academic year salary. Tenure of the fellowship may begin no earlier than July 1, 2015 and no later than February 1, 2016.

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Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars
American Council of Learned Societies

September 26, 2014

ACLS invites applications for Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars, owing to the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The fellowships are named for Frederick Burkhardt, President Emeritus of ACLS, whose decades of work on The Correspondence of Charles Darwin
constitute a signal example of dedication to a demanding and ambitious scholarly enterprise. These fellowships support long-term, unusually ambitious projects in the humanities and related social sciences. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

ACLS will award up to nine Burkhardt Fellowships, depending on the availability of funds, in this competition year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $75,000.  This year's successful applicants may take up the fellowship in 2014-2015 or in either of the succeeding two academic years, but candidates must commit themselves firmly to their preferred year and residential center on their completed applications. (msw)

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Advancing Research in Basic Science and Mathematics
Simons Foundation

September 30, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Simons Foundation Division for Mathematics and the Physical Sciences invites applications for the Simons Fellows Programs in both Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. The Fellows Programs provide funds to faculty for up to a semester long research leave from classroom teaching and administrative obligations. Such leaves can increase creativity and provide intellectual stimulation. The goal of the Simons Fellows Program is to make it easier to take such leaves, or to extend sabbatical leaves by an extra half year.

The Simons Foundation also offers grant opportunities in:

-The mathematical modeling of living systems 

-Collaborations in Mathematics and the Physical Sciences 

Please visit the Simons Foundation website for additional information. 

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Cooperative Landscape Conservation and Adaptive Science
Office of the Science Advisor

September 30, 2014

The USFWS uses a science-based, adaptive framework for setting and achieving cross-program conservation objectives that strategically address the problems fish and wildlife will face in the future.  This framework, called Strategic Habitat Conservation, is based on the principles of adaptive management and uses population and habitat data, ecological models, and focused monitoring and assessment efforts to develop and implement strategies that result in measurable fish and wildlife population outcomes.  In addition, by leveraging resources and strategically targeting science to inform conservation decisions and actions, Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) are being established to create a network of partners working in unison to ensure the sustainability of America's land, water, wildlife and cultural resources.

Financial assistance will be awarded for science projects and LCC-prioritized biological planning, conservation design and adaptive management projects to include:  research; inventory design and implementation; monitoring; goal and priority setting associated with efficient and effective conservation; development of implementation strategies; and projects supporting all other FWS organizational efforts, including planning, establishment maintenance, and general business operations.

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Dairy Australia

The round for submitting Preliminary Applications for projects opens August 1 and will close September 30 each year. Those applicants that are successful at the preliminary stage will be invited to submit a Full Application.
September 30, 2014

Dairy Australia accepts applications for R&D projects from individuals and organisations worldwide. Applications are judged on the perceived benefits to the Australian dairy industry and potential for success. They will consider funding applications that address one or more of their Core Objectives (as set out in the Dairy Australia Strategic Plan): increase farm productivity; maintain and develop high margin markets, channels and products; and, promote and protect the unique benefits of dairy. Ideally the duration of projects is 1-3 years.  Extended projects may be considered in exceptional circumstances.

Dairy Australia invests in and co-ordinates industry research in three areas:

Farm - ie feed, animal genetics, resource management;

Manufacturing - ie research in biosciences, processing, health and nutrition; and,

Technical issues - ie risk analysis, control measures for contaminants.

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EU - U.S. Doctoral & Post-Doctoral Education and Training Opportunities
European Commission

Please see individual program solicitation.

1. Horizon 2020 Program (general information): http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en

2. Marie Skłodowska -Curie Actions (MSCA): http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/h2020-section/marie-skłodowska-curie-actions

There are 4 schemes under the MSCA: Innovative Training Networks (ITN), Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE), Individual Fellowship (IF) and Co-funding of Regional, National and International (COFUND) programs.

The descriptions and conditions are provided in the MSCA Work Program 2014-2015: http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/wp/2014_2015/main/h2020-wp1415-msca_en.pdf

 Next calls for proposals (solicitations):

- Innovative Training Networks (ITN):  2 Sept 2014 (deadline - 13 Jan 2015)

- Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE): 6 Jan 2015 (deadline - 20 Apr 2015)

- Individual Fellowships (IF): 12 Mar 2015 (deadline - 10 Sept 2015)

- COFUND: 14 Apr 2015(deadline - 1 Oct 2015)

There is a current IF open call with a deadline of 11 Sept 2014: http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/newsroom/548/503 and a COFUND call with a deadline of 2 Oct 2014:http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/opportunities/h2020/calls/h2020-msca-cofund-2014.html

 

3. European Research Council (ERC) grants

ERC grants fund the best research ideas submitted by individual Principle Investigators of any nationality.

Introductory video: Step by step to ERC grants

General info: http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/h2020-section/european-research-council

 

Also, outside the Horizon 2020 Program, the EU supports international undergraduate exchanges within the ERASMUS program:  http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/index_en.htm

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Archiving and Preservation Projects - Preservation Implementation Grants & Planning, Assessment and/or Consultation Grants
GRAMMY Foundation

LOI Deadline: October 1, 2014

Preservation Implementation Grants are available to help individuals and large organizations enhance their ability to preserve their collections that embody the recorded sound heritage of the Americas. Large organizations are defined as organizations with annual budgets of $500,000 or more and/or are located within an institution that includes a library or museum or other division in which archiving, preservation, cataloguing and other related experts are accessible to the project.

The goal of the Preservation Implementation grant is to fund projects where the project materials have been identified and are in possession of the applicant, where preliminary assessment and planning has occurred, and where the applicant has addressed and/or is ready to implement the following: Prioritization of materials (based on uniqueness, historical significance, and at-risk status); Inventory and cataloging of the materials; Stabilized, climate-controlled storage of materials; Address ownership or rights issues; Identification of qualified staff and/or vendors; Planned preservation methodology; Identification of long-term storage; and Broad dissemination plan.

Preservation Assistance Grants are available to help individuals and small to mid-sized organizations enhance their ability to preserve their collections that embody the recorded sound heritage of the Americas. Small to mid-sized organizations are defined as organizations with annual budgets of less than $500,000 and limited or no organizational access to "in-house" experts. The goal of a Preservation Assistance grant is to fund the planning, assessment and preparation of recorded sound collections to be archived and preserved. Applicants must describe how they will draw on the knowledge and expertise of their staff and/or outside consultants whose preservation skills are related to the type of collection and nature of activities that are the focus of the project.

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Research in Art Education Grants
National Art Education Association

October 1, 2014

The sponsor invites proposals to support research in art education that advances knowledge in the field of art education and that promulgate the goals outlined in Creating a Visual Arts Research Agenda Toward the 21st Century. Grants are awarded to art educators to pursue a broad range of research topics that are aligned with the 2011-2014 NAEA Strategic Goals: advocacy, learning, research and knowledge, and organizational vibrancy. NAEF encourages the submissions of proposals that conduct research that supports the impact and importance of arts education in student learning and provides hard data to support the findings of the research.

Eligible applicants are welcome to submit proposals in all areas of research. In addition, as part of NAEF's collaboration with the NAEA Research Commission, NAEF encourages submissions of the following proposals:

Proposals that support the creation of communities of learners, including both researchers and practitioners, working together to explore a research question and/or project. These proposals should include a community of learners working to explore a research subject and put forward a research methodology that includes a mix of researchers and practitioners to support this goal. Either the researcher(s) or practitioner(s) can be the lead applicant. In this context, description of researchers and practitioners: Researcher--arts educators currently not working directly with learners in the pre-K through 12 classroom, museum or community setting conducting research to study, gather information, or conduct inquiry into ideas related to the status or improvement of arts education; Practitioner--arts educator predominantly working with learners in the pre-K through 12 classroom, museum, or community setting.

Proposals that support the identification of best practice and research that leads to further understanding of the impact and importance of arts education to student learning in and through the visual arts in a variety of settings, with an interest in research that provides quantitative data to support its findings.

These priorities do not preclude other submissions meeting the eligibility of the current Research Guidelines. NAEA and/ or NAEF retains first rights to publish and disseminate results of the research.

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Scientific Research Projects
GRAMMY Foundation

LOI Deadline: October 1, 2014

The GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants to organizations and individuals to support research on the impact of music on the human condition. Examples might include the study of the effects of music on mood, cognition and healing, as well as the medical and occupational well-being of music professionals and the creative process underlying music. Priority is given to projects with strong methodological design as well those addressing an important research question.

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Career Development Program - Scholar
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

LOI due September 8, 2014
Full submission due October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society provides funding to investigator, allowing them to devote themselves to original investigation in the field of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Awards are for $110,000 per year for five years.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Recipients are highly qualified investigators who have shown a capacity for independent, sustained original investigation in the field of leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. One should hold an independent faculty-level or equivalent positions and have obtained substantial support for their research from a national agency.

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Mentored Research Scholar Grants
American Cancer Society, Inc.

October 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

Mentored Research Scholar Grants in Applied and Clinical Research provide support for mentored research and training to full-time junior faculty, typically within the initial four years of their first independent appointment. The goal is for these beginning investigators to become independent researchers as either clinician scientists or cancer control and prevention researchers.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Mentored Research Scholar Grants in Applied and Clinical Research provide support for mentored research and training to full-time junior faculty, typically within the initial four years of their first independent appointment.

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Research Awards
Google

Deadline: October 15, 2014

The intent of the Google Research Awards is to support cutting-edge research in Computer Science, Engineering, and related fields. We ask applicants to categorize their proposals into one of the following broad research areas of interest to Google:

  • Computational neuroscience
  • Economics and market algorithms
  • Geo/maps
  • Human-computer interaction
  • Information retrieval, extraction, and organization (including semantic graphs)
  • Machine learning and data mining
  • Machine perception
  • Machine translation
  • Mobile
  • Natural language processing
  • Networking
  • Online education at scale
  • Physical interactions with devices
  • Policy and standards
  • Privacy
  • Robotics
  • Security
  • Social networks
  • Software engineering and programming languages
  • Speech
  • Structured data and database management
  • Systems (hardware and software)

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Research Programme on Mental Health (PSYKISKHELSE) - Collaborative Projects With Research Groups in the US
The Research Council of Norway

October 15, 2014 13:00 CET (Oct 14, 2014 5 p.m. MST)

There is a need to intensify Norwegian research on mental health. Knowledge about causal relationships, prevention and treatment is lacking in several areas. The primary objective of the PSYKISKHELSE programme is to generate knowledge that is relevant to promoting the mental health of the population. Research activities will be concentrated in three specific thematic priority areas during this programme period.

These thematic priority areas are: research on the mental health of children and adolescents; research on transcultural factors and mental health; and treatment research, including research on comorbid substance abuse and mental health disorders. In each of these areas, it will be important to promote a cross-disciplinary approach and national and international cooperation. Projects included in the programme's portfolio must adequately incorporate gender perspectives and employ a user perspective with emphasis on patients' and relatives' own knowledge and experience.

Funding under the programme will primarily be channelled via researcher-initiated projects, but the programme board may also decide to initiate projects in specific areas where a need for research has been identified. Conferences and other dissemination activities within the scope of the programme will also be organised.

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Research Scholar Grant in the Role of Healthcare and Insurance in Improving Outcomes in Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment
American Cancer Society, Inc

October 15, 2014

This RFA is a call for research that evaluates the impact of the many changes now occurring in the health care system with a particular focus on cancer prevention, control, and treatment. Efforts focusing on improving access to care may also impact inequities that contribute to health disparities. New health public policy initiatives, for example the new federal and state marketplaces that have expanded insurance coverage, as well as Medicaid expansion in some states, create natural experiments ripe for evaluation. Research to be funded by this RFA should focus on the changes in national, state, and/or local policy and the response to these changes by health care systems, insurers, payers, communities, practices, and patients.

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Support for Advanced Scientific Research
Eppley Foundation for Research, Inc.

LOI Deadline: September 15, 2014
Full Proposal: October 15, 2014 (by invitation)

Eppley Foundation funds projects in medicine, life sciences and the physical sciences. Particular areas of interest include innovative medical investigations and applications, endangered animals and ecosystems, and climate change.

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Comparative Health System Performance in Accelerating PCOR Dissemination (U19)
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

LOI Deadline: September 5, 2014
October 17, 2014

As part of AHRQ's PCOR dissemination efforts, this AHRQ Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications for Centers of Excellence to identify, classify, track, and compare healthcare delivery systems ranging from integrated delivery systems to Accountable Care Organizations across the U.S. to help improve the speed of adoption and diffusion of CER-recommended practices through systems.

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Western SARE Competitive Grants Professional Development Program
Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education

October 29, 2014 (12:00 pm, noon MDT)

SYNOPSIS: 

Professional Development Program (PDP) Grants are aimed at helping Cooperative Extension Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service and other agricultural professionals in the Western Region increase their understanding and proficiency in sustainable agriculture. PDP projects should: increase agricultural professionals' sustainable agriculture knowledge, skills and action; and, have outreach plans that demonstrate how the project will effectively deliver this knowledge.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Professional Development Program Grants are designed to educate agricultural professionals about sustainable agriculture so that they, in turn, can help educate and train farmers and ranchers. Funded PDP grants must help achieve this long-term outcome: Cooperative Extension, Natural Resource Conservation Service and other agricultural professionals are conversant in sustainable agriculture principles and systems. They have ready access to resources that can help producers make informed decisions about adopting sustainable approaches with greater certainty and less risk.

Projects must improve the ability of agricultural professionals to conduct educational programs and activities in sustainable agriculture principles and systems and to respond to inquiries on the subject from farmers, ranchers and the public. Approaches can include: workshops; conferences; development of materials; demonstrations; web-based courses; tours. Multi-faceted proposals are encouraged. Projects using multiple techniques or methods are preferred, as are efforts whose results can be applied to wide and diverse audiences. Subject matter can include any sustainable agriculture endeavor, including animal agriculture, agronomic or horticultural crop production or the effects of sustainable practices on quality of life for producers or rural communities.

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CFF/NIH-unfunded Grant Award
CFF-Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Application Deadline: On-going basis until October 31, 2014

In an effort to assure that all meritorious CF-related research is supported, CFF has developed the CFF/NIH-unfunded Award mechanism to provide funding. The objective of this award is to support excellent CF-related research projects that have been submitted to and approved by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), but cannot be supported by available NIH funds.

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Henry Belin du Pont Research Grants
Hagley Museum & Library

October 31, 2014

These research grants enable scholars to pursue advanced research and study in the library, archival, pictorial, and artifact collections of the Hagley Museum and Library.

These grants are intended to support serious scholarly work that makes use of Hagley's research collections and expands on prior scholarship. Application materials should explain the research project's focus, methodology, engagement with existing scholarship, and the intended product, as well as Hagley collection(s) to be used during the proposed grant residency.

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Sarcoma Research Grants
Shriver (Liddy) Sarcoma Initiative

N/A

The Initiative funds "basic research seed grants" in sarcoma research. The Initiative anticipates that results from these "demonstration" or "starter" grants will provide results that will allow the researcher to apply for funding for a larger study. The Initiative is interested in a wide range of research. Some examples are: understanding the molecular biology of sarcomas; exploring "molecular targets" for new sarcoma therapies; studying chromosomal translocations, the oncogenes they generate, and their role in sarcoma development; translational studies; studying vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and mTOR inhibitors; studying the use of nanotechnology in the diagnosis and treatment of sarcomas; understanding the basis of radiation-induced sarcoma; modeling of the process of metastases; exploring the differences in the development of sarcomas in children, adolescents, young adults and adults; and Research directed at the early detection and diagnosis of sarcoma. Other areas of research will be considered.

Grants can be used for the development of models, conducting experiments, development of sarcoma tissue registries, and similar activities involved in support of research into the causes, origins, development, molecular biology, diagnosis, and treatment of sarcoma. The Initiative does not fund clinical trials, but funds basic research that might lead to other research studies or to clinical trials. While not funding clinical trials, proposals that undertake studies with patients undergoing treatment on an investigational study are acceptable.

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SCI Large Grant Program
Safari Club International Foundation

October 31, 2014

Large grants may cover the following categories of support:

Wildlife Management - Wildlife management refers to the active implementation of techniques or equipment to manage wildlife populations and/or their habitats. Management projects may include: population surveys, monitoring projects and species inventories; wildlife population and habitat enhancement; habitat quality assessments and mapping; habitat and/or population management demonstration projects; and, reintroduction of populations where they once occurred.

Research - Research projects should be credible projects carried out by qualified individuals with specific objectives. These objectives should enhance our abilities to sustain habitat and populations of all wildlife. Research topics may include: population surveys, monitoring projects and species inventories; species habitat associations, habitat quality and habitat modeling; behavior and ecology of a species; development and testing of techniques; studies of hunters and their interactions with wildlife and with each other; and, genetics, diseases, and parasites.

Regional Interests - The following material summarizes the type of research and sustainable-use management that SCI Foundation is focused on in different regions of the world. This list is meant to serve as a guide, but applicants should not avoid applying solely based on the following materials. Projects of merit that do not fall under the below categories may also be considered. In all areas of the world, SCI Foundation seeks to assist governments and non-government organizations in wildlife management planning, capacity building and related activities to optimize the sustainable use of wildlife resources.

-Africa: predator population surveys and management; research projects on hunted, traded, and endangered species of international importance; human-wildlife conflict; capacity building; and, promote the benefits of hunting to wildlife conservation and rural communities through the principles of sustainable use.

-Asia: field research to support wildlife management and conservation of significant Eurasian species.

-North America: Ppedator-prey research and management projects that take into account the conservation of game species; and, habitat and species enhancement projects in major North American ecosystems.

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Wildlife Without Borders - Mexico
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service/Department of the Interior

October 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Mexican Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) are soliciting proposals under the Wildlife Without Borders - Mexico Program for projects that address Mexico's capacity building for biodiversity conservation. The Program Goal is to build human and institutional capacity for biodiversity conservation and management in Mexico through training. Of interest are projects that provide direct and significant training to Mexican personnel in terms of the number of individuals trained, the strategic or innovative nature of the training, and the impact of the training on the conservation of biodiversity.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The Program Objectives are: To address the training needs of Mexican natural resources managers for managing and conserving biodiversity; To provide local communities access to training that links sound management practices in priority biodiversity areas with the creation of sustainable economic opportunities; and To involve key stakeholder groups to address biodiversity conservation challenges to enable the delivery and implementation of effective conservation actions.

To be considered, projects must fall into at least one of the following three strategic categories: (1) Managing for Excellence: Training in biodiversity and natural resource conservation and management for Mexican Government personnel, including policy-makers, federal, state, and municipal-level resource managers, and reserve guards. This includes, but is not limited to, short-term (2-3 weeks) on-the-job courses certified by an educational institution (Diplomados), workshops, and exchanges of personnel; (2) Stewards of the Land: Training in biodiversity and natural resources conservation and management for resource owners and/or direct users, including local communities, rural peasant farmer (campesino) organizations, and indigenous peoples. This includes training provided through on-the-ground practices, workshops, exchanges of personnel, and other delivery mechanisms appropriate to the training needs of these target groups; and (3) Voices for Nature: Training in environmental education and/or public outreach for targeted society stakeholder groups, including teachers, school children, journalists, tourists, legislators, non-governmental organizations, and private sector organizations or businesses. This includes, but is not limited to, workshops, educational programs, and production of educational and training materials. Applicant organizations should be proposing work to be conducted in Mexico. If work is to be conducted in the United States, the proposal must show a clear connection to capacity building for biodiversity conservation in Mexico to be eligible for funding. To the extent that it provides clear, direct support for the program objectives above, proposed work may also relate to climate change adaptation, mitigation and education.

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Doctoral New Investigator (DNI) Grants
American Chemical Society

October 17, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The ACS Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF) Doctoral New Investigator (DNI) grants provide start-up funding for scientists and engineers in the United States who are within the first three years of their first academic appointment at the level of Assistant Professor or the equivalent. Applicants may have limited or no preliminary results for a research project they wish to pursue, with the intention of using the preliminary results obtained to seek continuation funding from other agencies. The DNI grants are to be used to illustrate proof of principle or concept, to test a hypothesis, or to demonstrate feasibility of an approach.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The DNI Grant Program is designed as a source of funds for young investigators who are developing their own independent research projects. The new investigator must demonstrate to the PRF Program Managers, Advisory Board members, and to the scientific or engineering community of reviewers that the project is an original research direction and is independent of their graduate or post-graduate studies. Proposals deemed not "original research" will be denied without external review, or may be rejected by the PRF Advisory Board.

All proposals will undergo a compliance check for the following required elements: Completeness and correctness of the application; Fundamental nature of the research topic; Relevance to petroleum or fossil fuels; and Extent to which the proposed research differs from prior graduate and postdoctoral research.

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Research Associateship Programs -- Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
National Research Council

November 1, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The mission of the NRC Research Associateship Programs (RAP) is to promote excellence in scientific and technological research conducted by the U. S. government through the administration of programs offering graduate, postdoctoral, and senior level research opportunities at sponsoring federal laboratories and affiliated institutions.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The objectives of the Research Associateship Programs are: to provide postdoctoral and senior scientists and engineers of unusual promise and ability opportunities for research on problems, largely of their own choice that are compatible with the interests of the sponsoring laboratories; and to, thereby, contribute to the overall efforts of the laboratories. For recent doctoral graduates, the Research Associateship Programs provide an opportunity for concentrated research in association with selected members of the permanent professional laboratory staff. For established scientists and engineers, the Research Associateship Programs afford an opportunity for research without the interruptions and distracting assignments of permanent career positions.

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US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF)
Binational Science Foundation

November 13, 2014 (Regular Grant Program)

1. The BSF is increasing its cooperation with the NSF (and indirectly in some programs also with the NIH and USDA), and it may be worthwhile for you to follow on our website (www.bsf.org.il) the RFPs for these programs. In most of these programs submission is to the NSF by the U.S. applicant alone (although the application describes the role and budget of the Israeli PI) and to the BSF by both PIs. Processing is done at the NSF, and if awarded a grant, the US PI receives a regular NSF grant, while the Israeli receives a special, larger than traditional, BSF grant. Disciplines in which such joint programs are currently being developed include: Biology, Computer Science*, Oceanography, Physics, Economics, and Neurosciences. 

2. Deadline for the various regular BSF programs:

Regular Grant program (Physical Sciences, Exact Sciences, Social Sciences, Ecology)- Nov. 13, 2014

Prof. Rahamimoff travel Grant Program for young Scientists (PhD students). Dec. 3, 2014**

Transformative Science - New RFP will be issued in early 2015. 

*  The NSF will publish in late 2014 a special solicitation that will be open only for those US scientists that will be PIs on a 2014 regular BSF submission in Computer Science, for additional travel money for the US PI and his group.

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Career Awards at the Scientific Interface
Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Pre-proposal due Sept. 1, 2014, 4 p.m. EST
Full proposal due January 8, 2014, 4 p.m. EST

Candidates are expected to draw from their training in a scientific field other than biology to propose innovative approaches to answer important questions in the biological sciences. Examples of approaches include, but are not limited to, physical measurement of biological phenomena, computer simulation of complex processes in physiological systems, mathematical modeling of self-organizing behavior, building probabilistic tools for medical diagnosis, developing novel imaging tools or biosensors, developing or applying nanotechnology to manipulate cellular systems, predicting cellular responses to topological clues and mechanical forces, and developing a new conceptual understanding of the complexity of living organisms. Proposals that include experimental validation of theoretical models are particularly encouraged. Candidates must hold a Ph.D. degree in one of the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, statistics, or engineering.

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2015 Preservation Technology and Training Grants
Department of the Interior/National Park Service

November 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

The Preservation Technology and Training (PTT) Grants program provides funding for innovative research that develops new technologies or adapts existing technologies to preserve cultural resources. Grant recipients undertake innovative research and produce technical reports which respond to national needs in the field of historic preservation. 

Disciplines

NCPTT funds projects within several overlapping disciplinary areas. These include:

  • Archeology
  • Architecture
  • Collections Management
  • Engineering
  • Historic Landscapes
  • Materials Conservation

Focus

In order to focus research efforts, NCPTT requests innovative proposals that advance the application of science and technology to historic preservation in the following areas:

  • Planning for and responding to Climate Change and the impacts of natural and manmade disasters on cultural resources;
  • 3D documentation and visualization techniques for historic sites, landscapes, buildings and objects;
  • Mobile application development for cultural resource detection, documentation, management, etc.;
  • Development and testing of protective coatings for cultural materials.

The maximum grant award amount is $40,000, but proposals for lesser amounts are encouraged. 

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FY 2014 Regional Innovation Strategies Program
Economic Development Administration (EDA) and U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)

November 3, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

EDA is committed to helping foster connected, innovation-centric economic sectors which support commercialization and
entrepreneurship as described in the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. Working with regions across the country to develop regional innovation strategies, including regional innovation clusters, is also a Strategic Goal of the DOC's FY 2014-2018 Strategic Plan and a keystone of the Secretary's commitment to building globally competitive regions. As part of this strategy, funding is available for capacity-building activities that include Proof of Concept Centers and Commercialization Centers as well as scaling of existing commercialization programs and centers; feasibility studies for the creation and expansion of facilities such as science and research parks; and supporting opportunities to close the funding gap for early-stage companies. To that end, EDA's existing and highly successful i6 Challenge is being joined by additional grant opportunities to create the Regional Innovation Strategies (RIS) Program. Under this program, EDA is soliciting applications for three separate competitions:

1. 2014 i6 Challenge;
2. Science and Research Park Development Grants; and
3. Cluster Grants for Seed Capital Funds.

Applicants may, but are not required to, submit proposals for more than one competition
under the RIS Program.

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North American Wetlands Conservation Act - Small Grants
Department of the Interior/Fish and Wildlife Service

November 7, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The Small Grants Program is a competitive, matching grants program that supports public-private partnerships carrying out projects in the United States that further the goals of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (Act). These projects must involve long-term protection, restoration, and/or enhancement of wetlands and associated uplands habitats for the benefit of all wetlands-associated migratory birds.

This program supports the same type of projects and adheres to the same selection criteria and administrative guidelines as the U.S. Standard Grants Program. However, project activities are usually smaller in scope and involve fewer project dollars. Grant requests may not exceed $75,000, and funding priority is given to grantees or partners new to the Act's Grants Program.

The North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Council) created the Small Grants Program in 1996 to encourage new grantees and partners to carry out smaller-scale, long-term wetlands conservation projects that may otherwise not be able to compete in the U.S. Standard Grants Program. The Small Grants Program has also become an important catalyst in developing a pool of new grantees and/or partners for the Standard Grants Program. In recent years, the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission (Commission) has approved $3 million in funding for the Small Grants Program annually.

Each year, the Commission approves the total amount of funding to be distributed to projects under the Small Grants Program in the following fiscal year. Applicants submit project proposals to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Division of Bird Habitat Conservation (Division) for the program's one funding cycle per year. After a preliminary review by Division staff, Joint Venture Coordinators, and Council staff, eligible proposals are presented to the Council for further review and ranking. The Council, which has been delegated final approval authority by the Commission, then selects the slate of projects to be funded and informs the Commission on its decision. The Division is responsible for administering the grants for the approved projects.

For FY 2014 is authorized up to $5 million contingent on quality and number of proposals received and funding avaible.

From September 1996 through March 2014, some 1,440 partners in 665 projects have received more than $37.2 million in grants. They have contributed another $144.3 million in matching funds to affect 300,000 acres of habitat.

Contact the Joint Venture Coordinator in your project area for assistance with developing a project proposal, for information about how proposals are ranked, and/or for guidance on Endangered Species Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and National Historic Preservation Act compliance requirements.

For general program information, contact the Small Grants Program Coordinator, Rodecia Mcknight (rodecia_mcknight@fws.gov), (703) 358-2266.

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Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records
The National Historical Publications and Records Commission

Submission draft due October 1, 2014
Full submission due on December 4, 2014

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: 

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks projects that explore ways to improve digital literacy and encourage citizen engagement with historical records. The Literacy and Engagement grant program offers support for projects that will result in archives reaching audiences through digital literacy programs and workshops, new tools and applications, and citizen engagement in archival processes.

The NHPRC is looking to fund pilot projects in areas that:

  1. Develop partnerships among archives, historical records repositories, educational, and community-based institutions to provide educational opportunities for people, particularly students, to develop their digital literacy skills when they find, evaluate, and use primary source documents online. In addition, projects may seek to increase individual understanding of technology operations and concepts so that they can engage in effective personal digital archiving or other types of digital archives curriculum development.

  2. Create or develop new online tools and applications, including mobile apps, to enhance public understanding and access to historical records.

  3. Enlist "citizen archivists" in projects to accelerate digitization and online public access to historical records. This may include, but is not limited to, improving crowdsourcing efforts for identifying, tagging, transcribing, annotating, or otherwise enhancing digitized historical records.

The NHPRC is looking for projects to experiment with new techniques and methods in these three areas that will provide models for other organizations and that people and institutions can adopt for free.

For a comprehensive list of the Commission's limitations on funding, please see What We Do and Do Not Fund. Applications that consist entirely of ineligible activities will not be considered.

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Research Participation Program for the U.S. Army Research Institute for Environmental Medicine (USARIEM)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

Receipt year round

USARIEM is an internationally recognized center of excellence for Warfighter performance science and its useful applications. The institute functions as a world-class laboratory for environmental medicine, physiology, performance and nutrition research. It features integrated cellular, tissue, & human research programs. Opportunities exist in the areas of Performance Optimization, Preventive Medicine & Planning, Materiel Development, Monitoring Strategies and Predictive Algorithms, and Health Hazard Assessment.

Areas of interest include life, health, and medical sciences; mathematics; computer science; physical sciences; social and behavioral sciences; engineering; biological sciences, chemistry, entomology, environmental/civil/mechanical engineering, environmental sciences, industrial hygiene, medical sciences, physical sciences, and toxicology.

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DRL Internet Freedom Annual Program Statement
Department of State

LOI due on December 5, 2014
Full submissions accepted upon invitation

SYNOPSIS: 

The Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL) announces the availability of funding for programs that support Internet freedom. DRL's goal is to promote fundamental freedoms, human rights, and the free flow of information online through integrated support for anti-censorship and secure communications technology, advocacy, digital safety, and research. DRL invites organizations interested in potential funding to submit statements of interest (SOI) outlining program concepts that reflect this goal.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Statements of interest should address one or more of the following potential program themes related to supporting the free flow of information and digital activists:

1) Technology Expanding Open and Uncensored Access to Information and Communications: Development and support of web and mobile anti-censorship technologies that expand open access to information and communications. Projects may include but are not limited to:

-- Development of new technologies for defeating censorship, for maintaining availability of information, and for alternative network infrastructures.

-- Improvements to proven technologies including deployment, expansion, adaptation, and/or localization of proven anti-censorship technologies; and improvement of usability and user interfaces to enable broader populations of users to adopt anti-censorship tools.

-- Content redistribution that uses new methods to reintroduce content behind firewalls or similar services.

Areas of Focus for 2014:

a) Improved usability for Internet freedom tools

b) Security auditing for DRL-funded programs

c) Scalable and sustainable next-generation anti-censorship technologies that move beyond traditional "cat-and-mouse" techniques

2) Secure Communication Technology: Development and support of web and mobile technologies that enhance the privacy and security of digital communications. Projects may include but are not limited to:

-- Development of new technologies for secure communications, privacy protection, or anonymization; hardened software and secure operating systems that are less susceptible to intrusion or infection; and secure online services, such as email and website hosting with robust defenses against hacking and other attacks.

-- Improvements to proven technologies including the deployment, expansion, adaptation, and/or localization of proven security tools; and improvement of usability and user interfaces to enable broader populations of users to adopt secure communications tools.

-- Re-usable libraries or platforms that provide the underlying software that may be used by communication and access tools. This includes tools to disguise encrypted communications as ordinary traffic without compromising security.

Areas of Focus for 2014:

a) Usability and security audits for secure communication tools

b) Platform-level technologies that have the potential to scale because they enhance security for many other tools

c) Resistance against state-sponsored malware or DDoS attacks

3) Digital Safety: Delivery of support, training and information that contributes to greater digital safety for users in Internet repressive societies and/or at-risk populations. Projects may include but are not limited to:

-- Digital safety skills development for high-risk activists through trainings, local mentorship, leadership development, peer learning and guided practice approaches.

-- Emergency support for urgent cases and special needs of targeted individuals or groups.

-- Resource development and information dissemination to targeted communities to raise awareness of digital threats, encourage best practices and respond to sudden challenges to Internet freedom.

Areas of Focus for 2014:

a) Focus on at-risk populations that have less access to traditional power structures.

b) Programs that foster enhanced coordination and partnerships with tool developers to improve feedback and structural changes to tools to make them more broadly accessible and usable.

c) Coordination with other digital security professionals and trainers in region/country.

4) Policy and Advocacy: National, regional, and/or international policy and advocacy efforts that aim to mitigate negative trends toward Internet repression and to promote Internet freedom at a structural level. Projects may include but are not limited to:

-- Civil society capacity building programs targeted to non-U.S. based organizations focused on Internet freedom advocacy.

-- Broad-based coalition building to expand networks, increase awareness, and support policies that protect and promote Internet freedom.

-- Enhanced coordination with business communities and other national, regional or international Internet freedom advocacy stakeholders.

5) Research and Evaluation: Efforts should emphasize applied research that can inform and benefit Internet freedom efforts globally. Research should address technological and political developments affecting Internet freedom. Projects may include but are not limited to:

-- Real-time monitoring and analysis of both technical and policy threats to internet freedom, including network interference and disruptions.

-- Targeted research to ensure that global stakeholders are better informed about key threats to and opportunities for Internet freedom.

-- Evaluations to assess the effectiveness of Internet freedom efforts, including the use, security and/or effectiveness of digital security tools, the impact of digital safety trainings, or policy advocacy efforts.

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PAGES - Support for Workshops and Educational Meetings
International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP)

January 5, 2015

To obtain support, organizers must be able to demonstrate that the themes and objectives of their workshop or eduational meeting (e.g., summer school) relate to PAGES Science Plan. There are 4 types of workshop proposals under this scheme: proposal for a workshop being organized by an official PAGES Working Group; proposal for an Educational nature (Educational Meeting); proposal for Fast-Track funding; and general workshop proposals (Open Call Meeting) within the scope of PAGES science.

PAGES scope of interest includes the physical climate system, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem processes, biodiversity, and human dimensions, on different time scales--Pleistocene, Holocene, last millennium and the recent past.

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2015-2016 Awards and Grants Program
American Lung Association

Lung Cancer Discovery LOI due October 1, 2014
Full submissions are due December 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

We invite qualified scientists in all areas of lung health including risk factor research to submit an application for the 2015-2016 grant cycle and join us in our mission to save lives by improving lung health and preventing all lung diseases.

The goals of the Awards and Grants Program are to:

  1. foster laboratory, patient-centered and social-behavioral research designed to prevent and relieve the suffering associated with all lung diseases and corresponding risk factors
  2. fund researchers at important crossroads of their careers to gain long-term commitment to lung disease research

The American Lung Association recently launched its Lung Force Campaign, which will unite women to stand together against  lung cancer and for lung health. Consistent with this campaign's direction and emphasis we are particularly interested in proposals related to early detection, treatment and cures for lung cancer.

Learn more about the Terms and Conditions governing our Awards and Grants Program.

Program Descriptions can be accessed by clicking on grant title. Guidelines to assist in preparing an application are available as a downloadable PDF.

**Please read both of these documents before starting an application. Applicants not in compliance with requirements may be administratively withdrawn**

I. TRAINING AWARDS

  • Lung Health Dissertation Grant (1 grant available): $21,000/yr.
    Pre-doctoral support for nurses or students with an academic career focused on the various disciplines of social science.
  • Senior Research Training Fellowship (8-10 grants available): $32,500/yr.
    Post-doctoral support for 1st and 2nd year PhD fellows and 3rd and 4th year MD fellows in the basic sciences.

II. INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATOR AWARDS

  • Biomedical Research Grant (10-12 grants available): $40,000/yr.
    Provides seed monies for junior investigators researching the mechanisms of lung disease and general lung biology.
  • Clinical Patient Care Research Grant (1-2 grants available): $40,000/yr.
    Provides seed monies for junior investigators working on traditional clinical studies examining methods of improving patient care and/or treatment for lung disease.
  • Dalsemer Research Grant (1 grant available): $40,000/yr.
    Provide seed monies for junior investigators researching interstitial lung disease.
  • Lung Cancer Discovery Award (5 grants available): $100,000/yr.
    Supports investigators, at any level of research experience, focused on the early detection and treatments for lung cancer. Letter of Intent is due October 1, 2014.
  • Social-Behavioral Research Grant (1-2 grants available): $40,000/yr.
    Provides seed monies for junior investigators working on epidemiological, behavioral or economic studies examining risk factors affecting lung health.

Additional opportunities may be become available at a later time.

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Research Grant Program
Glaucoma Foundation

Deadline: March 1, 2015

The Glaucoma Foundation offers grants to researchers striving to improve the lives of glaucoma patients through novel innovations and scientific advances.

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Measurement Science and Engineering (MSE) Research Grant Programs
Department of Commerce and National Institute of Standards and Technology

Applications will be considered on a continuing/rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The OSP Grant Program provides financial assistance consistent with the OSP mission to support research in the broad areas of greenhouse gas and climate science measurements.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The GHG and Climate Science Measurements Grant Program provides financial assistance consistent with the program objective of supporting measurement science research to develop or extend internationally-recognized measurement standards, methodologies, and technologies that enhance science-based GHG emissions data and inventories and measurement capabilities to advance capabilities to quantify GHG emissions and improved measurement capabilities for observing Earth systems. Specific areas of interest include methodologies that: increase accuracy and confidence in GHG stationary source emissions determinations, develop and/or validate advanced measurement tools for area GHG sources and sinks, particularly for application to megacities, cities, and metropolitan areas, and increase the accuracy of climate science measurements, and develop and demonstrate measurement methodologies supporting reconciliation of U.S. GHG inventories with atmospheric GHG observing methodologies as a technical means of addressing requirements for measurable, reportable, and verifiable GHG emissions at local and regional scales. Advancing measurement capabilities that further understanding of greenhouse gas transport in the atmosphere is a primary area of interest.

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Oak Ridge National Laboratory Advanced Short-Term Research Opportunity
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

Receipt. Applications received on a year-round basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides opportunities to conduct research in areas that support ORNL missions in the basic and applied sciences, energy, and the environment.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Areas of interest include: computer science; earth, environmental, and marine sciences; engineering; life, health, and medical sciences; mathematics; and physical sciences.

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FY 2014 - 2015 Broad Agency Announcement (BAA)
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

September 30, 2015

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The purpose of this notice is to request applications for special projects and programs associated with NOAA's strategic plan and mission goals, as well as to provide the general public with information and guidelines on how NOAA will select applications and administer discretionary Federal assistance under this Broad Agency Announcement (BAA). This BAA is a mechanism to encourage research, education and outreach, innovative projects, or sponsorships that are not addressed through our competitive discretionary programs. Funding for activities described in this notice is contingent upon the availability of Fiscal Year 2014 and Fiscal Year 2015 appropriations. Applicants are hereby given notice that funds have not yet been appropriated for any activities described in this notice. Publication of this announcement does not oblige NOAA to review an application beyond an initial administrative review, or to award any specific project, or to obligate any available funds.

FUNDING PRIORITIES: 

As an agency with responsibilities for maintaining and improving the viability of marine and coastal ecosystems, for delivering valuable weather, climate, and water information and services, for understanding the science and consequences of climate change, and for supporting the global commerce and transportation upon which we all depend, NOAA must remain current and responsive in an ever-changing world. We do this in concert with our partners and stakeholders in federal, state, and local governments and private organizations,
applying a systematic approach that links our strategic goals through multi-year plans to the daily activities of our employees. Every year we are committed to re-evaluate our progress and priorities, look for efficiencies, and take advantage of new opportunities to improve our information, products, and services. In furtherance of this objective, NOAA issues this BAA for extramural research, innovative projects, and sponsorships (e.g., conferences, newsletters, etc.) that address one or more of the following four mission goal descriptions
contained in the NOAA Strategic Plan. Please see the program link for details of the Strategic Plan. 

SUBMISSION DATES: Full applications can be submitted on a rolling basis starting from the publication date of this Broad Agency Announcement up to 11:59:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on September 30, 2015. Applications received after this time will not be reviewed or considered for funding. 

 

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