Research Funding Opportunities



Internal Opportunities and Announcements

Dear Colleague Letter on the Ebola Virus (NSF 15-006)
National Science Foundation

post haste: applies to education, social and behavioral sciences, and other disciplines depending on approach.

UPDATE: MSU researchers are actively responding to this call. If you believe your expertise is useful to the following objectives described in this letter, please consider submitting a RAPID proposal. For assistance with a RAPID proposal, please contact the Office of Sponsored programs at 994-2381 and/or the program officer listed in the solicitation.

....................................................

October 16, 2014

Dear Colleague,

In light of the recent emergence of the lethal Ebola virus in the US, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting proposals to conduct non-medical, non-clinical care research that can be used immediately to better understand how to model and understand the spread of Ebola, educate about prophylactic behaviors, and encourage the development of products, processes, and learning that can address this global challenge.

I invite researchers to use the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism, which allows NSF to receive and review proposals having a severe urgency with regard to availability of, or access to data, facilities or specialized equipment, as well as quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events.

Complete guidance on submitting a RAPID proposal may be found here:
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf14001/gpg_2.jsp#IID1.

Sincerely,

Dr. France A. Córdova
Director

View Program URL


Open Access Author Fund at MSU - Pilot Project
MSU Library

The Open Access Author Fund

The MSU Library will run an author's fund on a two year pilot to judge if we can help remove the barrier between MSU authors and open access publishing. The Library will contribute $50,000 to the fund to be dispersed to authors who are being charged an APC. Authors will receive no more than $2,000 per fiscal year on a rolling basis.

Goals

  • To allow MSU created research to reach the greatest number of potential readers.
  • To remove some of the burden on authors as they work to make an impact in their field of expertise.


The Application Process

Eligible Publications and Data repositories

The publication venue must be an established journal or data repository, either, one that does not charge readers or their institutions for access to peer-reviewed articles or datasets, or an established hybrid journal.

Journals or Data repositories should fit at least one of the following criteria:

  • Be listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (unless the journal is too new for DOAJ eligibility) or similar list of data repositories, OR
  • Be a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association or adhere to its Code of Conduct, OR
  • Be a publicly available data repository, OR
  • Have a publicly available standard fee schedule.

Eligible Articles and Data

Articles/data should:

  • Be a peer-reviewed article submitted to an open access/hybrid journal or the associated data.
  • Have Publication Status of 'accepted-for-publication', funds are not available for articles still in process.
  • Not have been published prior to the authors' request for funds. Already-published articles are ineligible.
  • The library will not reimburse any author fees that have already been paid by an author.

Articles will be considered only if there is no other source of funding available. The fund is a limited resource intended to support open access publishing across the University. We expect researchers to request funding for open access publication from their funding agency if they can do so. For example, the National Institutes of Health will fund open access publications as part of their research grants. If such funds are not available, we welcome your application.

Eligible Authors

Funds are available for faculty, staff, professional and research positions, and students at MSU - Bozeman.

Eligible Fees

Article processing fees may include publication fees (charges levied on articles accepted for publication, including Open Access page charges). Eligible fees must be based on a publication's standard fee schedule that is independent of the author's institution. Reprint fees are not eligible. Reimbursement will cover only direct costs for open access publication (not the cost of reprints, color illustration fees, non-open access page charges, etc.). Requests for funding will be reviewed by the Library's Scholarly Communication Steering Group and a decision for funding support will be communicated to the author.

Fund Limits

The fund for FY15 is $50,000. Each author is limited to $2,000 per FY. Unused fund amounts do not roll over to future years. If the demand for funds exceeds expectations, publication charges will be paid to the publisher on behalf of an author on a first-come, first-served basis.

Institutional Repository

As an added service, the library will deposit a copy of funded articles in the institutional repository, and willingness to deposit here is a requirement of receiving funding. The placement of an article in the repository helps to build the collection of publications, supports the self-archiving arm of the open access movement, and provides institutional preservation and discoverability.

How do I apply?

Complete the online form.

View Program URL


2016 Request for Pilot Grant Proposals
MSU COBRE Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases

May 27, 2016

Overview

The COBRE Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases is soliciting proposals for Pilot Grants. The purpose of this Pilot Grants Program is to provide funding for peer-reviewed and meritorious pilot projects to accelerate biomedical research in the area of zoonotic and emerging infectious diseases at Montana State University.  Pilot Grants must address an important problem in basic and/or translational research relevant to zoonotic and/or emerging infectious diseases, and there must be a clear explanation of how the Pilot Grant is consistent with the goals of the COBRE Center.

The Pilot Grants program is focused on research projects relevant to zoonotic and emerging infectious diseases, with specific emphasis on disease pathogenesis, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in infectious disease, and development of novel immunotherapeutics for infectious disease. In addition, research on select agents or BSL-3 pathogens is encouraged. Of course, the structure of the program includes flexibility to address new and emerging areas of relevance to the Center, as well as address opportunities for developing larger collaborative programs. Projects are available to both junior- and senior-level investigators. It is anticipated that competitive projects could either be: 1) a new research direction for the PI; 2) a key extension of current research that will make the Pl more competitive for federal biomedical research support; or 3) an essential component in the development of an interdisciplinary, cross-programmatic, or collaborative program-type initiative.

Eligibility

Any investigator who holds a regular faculty appointment at Montana State University would be eligible to serve as PI of a Pilot Grant proposal. This includes both tenure track and research track faculty. Investigators may only submit one proposal in a given round of solicitation. Postdoctoral fellows may not serve as Pilot Grant PIs. Applicants who do not currently have the expertise needed to achieve the goals should consider partnering with an investigator with that expertise, as experience and expertise are considered during the proposal review process.

Application Format

Proposals will follow an NIH R21 format. This will be helpful in future development of these projects towards regular NIH applications and could provide an area of training for newer investigators who have limited experience applying for NIH funding.  The proposals must include the following items:

1. NIH form Page 1 (PHS 398 form)

2. NIH form page 2, including 250 word Abstract

3. Proposed itemized budget with budget justification

4. NIH-style biographical sketch for Principal Investigator and Co-investigators

5. Current and pending support (if not indicated on the biosketches)

6. One page for specific aims

7. Maximum of 5 page research plan (11 point Arial font size and minimum of ½" margins)

8. References

9. Statement(s) addressing animal welfare, human welfare, and any other regulatory issues, if applicable

The research plan must succinctly include: objectives, anticipated results, any relevant preliminary data or conceptually supportive data from the literature, and a brief experimental plan. Additionally, the research plan must clearly describe how the proposed project takes advantage of the COBRE and/or INBRE core facilities. The research plan should also describe how results obtained from the proposed research will increase investigator competitiveness for a new, externally-funded, biomedical research grant.  Projects should have a high likelihood of leading to independent funding.  Ideally, an explanation of how the proposed pilot research forms the necessary link to new external funding should be provided. A timeline for both the proposed research and the submission of a national grant application should also be included.

Support of $25,000-$50,000 may be requested. Funds can be budgeted for expenses normally supported by NIH; however, Pilot Grant funds cannot be used for the following: salary support or budget relief for faculty, staff, or students supported by ongoing funded projects, purchase of major pieces of equipment or equipment service contracts, or overhead costs. Work performed by anyone at another institution will also not be an allowable expense.  A second year of funding is possible, but renewal requests will be reviewed competitively with all other requests, and a large part of the review will focus on progress to date and whether the project PI has been submitting and presenting abstracts, submitting and publishing manuscripts, and submitting grant applications.  Pilot Grants will not be funded for longer than two years.

Submission Deadline

Pilot Grant applications must be submitted electronically to the COBRE Program Coordinator (Jennifer Hodges; jennifer.hodges3@montana.edu) on or before May 27, 2016. One printed copy must be submitted to the Program Coordinator, who will be responsible for proposal tracking and facilitate the review process. Please feel free to contact Dr. Mark Quinn, COBRE PI (mquinn@montana.edu) if you have questions about the submission process.

Proposal Review

Proposals will be reviewed by up to three experts in relevant disciplines. Reviewers will score the proposals on the NIH 1-9 scale and also include written strengths and weaknesses for significance, innovation, approach, and investigator. Additionally, reviewers will be asked to comment on 1) responsiveness of the proposed research to the goals and objectives of the COBRE Center, 2) clarity of the plan in outlining the steps whereby this research will result in the submission of a competitive NIH grant application, 3) potential for collaborative science leading to program project-type applications, 4) use of COBRE Scientific Core facilities, and 5) status of IRB and/or IACUC approvals, if applicable. IRB and/or IACUC approval must be obtained prior to the award of any funding. Reviewers' scores and comments will be considered by the COBRE Executive Committee (comprised of Core Directors and PI), which will then prioritize successful applications and forward them to the COBRE External Advisory Committee (EAC) for who will make the final prioritization of proposals. The final list of successful applicants and the information required for each project (narrative, budget, human subjects approval) will be forwarded to the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS) for final approval, after which applicants will be informed of the funding decision regarding their projects. Awards are contingent upon the availability of NIH funding. Funding for successful Pilot Grant applications must be expended by during the grant year. No carryover is allowed. Successful first year applicants will need to apply for second year funding to continue their projects; renewal proposals will be solicited from toward the end of the first grant year and will be awarded through a competitive process.

Funded applicants are required to acknowledge COBRE funding (NIH P30 GM110732) on all abstracts (if applicable) and manuscripts. A mentor will be assigned to each project, and it is the responsibility of the PI to engage the mentor in their project development and progress. In addition, the PIs are expected to participate in and present their progress to the COBRE group in our fall EAC meeting.

 

Fellowships

Student Internship Research Participant Program
National Renewable Energy Laboratory/DOE

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides internships at its facilities for undergraduate and graduate students enrolled full-time in a U.S. college or university. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. The applicant may be eligible for round-trip transportation.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Graduate and undergraduate students have the opportunity to participate in the laboratory's research and development programs, initiate new areas of research, and establish a base for ongoing collaborations through NREL's Research Participant Program. Students with new ideas and talents can contribute to research of mutual interest in NREL's research and deployment disciplines, while also contributing to the transfer of the technology resulting from that research.

Applications are accepted as positions become available.

View Program URL


Research Fellowship
Jacobs Foundation

April 15, 2016

The Jacobs Foundation offers a competitive fellowship program for early and mid-career researchers focusing on child and youth development.

Fellowships are awarded to the most highly talented and innovative young scholars and mid-career researchers working on child and youth development.

View Program URL


Research Participation/Internship Program for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education / EPA

Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers opportunities to participate in research in environmental areas through internships at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at various locations in the U.S.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Disciplines of interest include: life, health, and medical sciences; physical sciences; earth, environmental, and marine sciences; engineering; and related scientific disciplines.

View Program URL


Postdoctoral Fellowship
American Heart Association

July 27, 2016

Objective

To empower postdoctoral trainees who are not independent with assistance and training from a mentor to initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research.

Science Focus

All basic, clinical, and population research broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

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Predoctoral Fellowship
American Heart Association

July 27, 2016

Objective

To help students initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research by providing research assistance and training.

Science Focus

Research broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke and pertinent clinical, basic, bioengineering and biotechnology, public health, and multidisciplinary efforts.

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Medical/Graduate Student Fellowship
American Heart Association

August 17, 2016

Objectives

To provide mentored support for medical/graduate students who seek experience working in an academic research lab. The goal is to encourage them to pursue research careers, focus their research interests, and provide a background for future training and career development programs once they have completed their medical/graduate training.

This is an institutional award, made to qualified research institutions within the affiliate's geographic boundaries that can offer a meaningful research experience medical and health science students.

Science Focus

Funding is available for research broadly related to cardiovascular function and disease, stroke, or to related clinical, basic science, and public health problems. The program should be focused on basic, epidemiological and/or clinical disciplines that bear on cardiovascular and stroke problems. The extent to which the focus of the project is related to cardiovascular disease and/or stroke is an important factor that will be considered in the evaluation of the proposal.  However, the program director is not required to be a part of a cardiovascular/stroke-oriented laboratory, clinic or department. 

The institution must demonstrate the ability to provide a meaningful research experience to students during the allotted 10-week fellowship experience.

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Undergraduate Student Fellowship
American Heart Association

August 17, 2016

Objective

To encourage students from all disciplines to consider research careers.

This is an institutional award, made to qualified research institutions within the affiliate's geographic boundaries that can offer a meaningful research experience to undergraduate college students.

Science Focus

Research broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke and pertinent clinical, basic, bioengineering and biotechnology, public health, and multidisciplinary efforts.

The institution must demonstrate the ability to provide a meaningful research experience to students during the allotted 10-week fellowship experience.

View Program URL

Limited Submissions

MSU Limited Submissions Process
Office of Research and Economic Development


The Basics

Many funding agencies place limits on the number of pre-proposals, proposals, or applications that any one university may submit in response to a request for proposals. In order to prevent any potential disqualification of submissions by Montana State University, the following policies and procedures have been established. These policies and procedures apply to all grants and contracts including awards made directly to faculty members.

Identifying a Limited Submission

In the request for proposals document, organizations will specify whether or not the opportunity is a limited submission. They will typically indicate the number of proposals allowed per institution and the process by which they must be submitted. The Office of Sponsored Programs has developed an internal process that aids the institution in processing limited submission applications. These policies and procedures must be followed carefully and are detailed below. 

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Please also email whitepaper to research@montana.edu. It is critical that PI's select the agency in the ePCF screen. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  1. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  1. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services staff will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 


Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

Internal MSU LOI due March 11, 2016
Nominations due mid-March
Full agency submission due May 18, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences at undergraduate institutions. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. The award is based on accomplishment in scholarly research with undergraduates, as well as a compelling commitment to teaching, and provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000.

The Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program is open to academic institutions in the States, Districts, and Territories of the United States of America that grant a bachelor's or master's degree in the chemical sciences, including biochemistry, materials chemistry, and chemical engineering. Awardees are typically in departments that do not grant a doctoral degree. Nominees must hold a full-time tenure-track academic appointment, be after the fourth and not after the twelfth years of their independent academic careers, and be engaged in research and teaching primarily with undergraduates.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "Dreyfus Foundation Inc Camille & Henry (DREFOU)" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

View Program URL


NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM)
Directorate for Education & Human Resources Division of Undergraduate Education / NSF

Internal MSU LOI due February 1, 2016
Full submission due May 16, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics program (S-STEM) addresses the need for a high quality STEM workforce in areas of national priorities. The program seeks to increase the success of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The program provides awards to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to fund scholarships, and to enhance and study effective curricular and co-curricular activities that support recruitment, retention, student success, and graduation in STEM. The S-STEM program encourages collaborations among different types of partners: Partnerships among different types of institutions, collaborations of STEM faculty and educational and social science researchers, or partnerships among institutions of higher education and business and industry. The program seeks: 1) to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need obtaining degrees in STEM and entering the STEM workforce or graduate study; 2) improve the education of future scientists, engineers, and technicians, with a focus on academically talented low-income students; and 3) advance understanding of the factors or curricular and co-curricular activities affecting the success of low-income students.

In this solicitation, the acronym STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics that includes biological sciences (except medicine and other clinical fields); physical sciences (including physics, chemistry, astronomy, and materials science); mathematical sciences; computer and information sciences; geosciences; engineering; and technology areas associated with the preceding disciplines (for example, biotechnology, chemical technology, engineering technology, information technology, etc.)

The S-STEM program particularly encourages proposals from 2-year institutions, Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), and urban public and rural institutions.

Students who are interested in scholarships should contact their Institution's Office of Financial Aid to inquire about this and other scholarship opportunities. Students who are awarded S-STEM scholarships must be U.S. citizens, permanent residents, nationals, or refugees.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The S-STEM program provides Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) with funds for student scholarships to encourage and enable low income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need to enter the workforce or graduate study following completion of associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees in STEM. Recognizing that scholarships alone cannot address low retention and graduation rates in STEM, the program also supports the implementation and testing of effective curricular and co-curricular activities (e.g., curriculum, professional, and workforce development activities) featuring: i) close involvement of faculty, ii) student mentoring, iii) provisions of academic and student support, iv) adaptation of evidence-based practices, and v) recognition of S-STEM Scholars. Successful projects include involvement of the Offices of Financial Aid, Student Services, and Offices of Institutional Research.

Proposers are strongly encouraged, but not required, to implement and adapt evidence-based practices and student supports that have been developed and/or promoted by NSF awardees and to utilize research on undergraduate or graduate STEM education conducted by NSF-supported educational, social science, or discipline-based educational researchers. Proposals with a strong focus on workforce development are encouraged to partner with business, industry, and local community organizations. Proposals with a strong focus on the transfer of students from one educational level to another are encouraged to collaborate with appropriate institutional partners (for, example proposals supporting and investigating the transfer of students from 2-year institutions to 4-year institutions should include 2-year institutions and 4-year institutions or universities).

Proposals must include a literature review that establishes the basis for the proposed projects and should be informed by the Common Guidelines for Education Research and Development.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Be sure to select "National Science Foundation" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.        

View Program URL


Dreyfus Foundation Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

Internal MSU LOI due December 14, 2015
Full submission due February 10, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship attained in the early years of their appointment (see below), and a demonstrated commitment to education, signaling the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching. The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program is open to academic institutions in the States, Districts, and Territories of the United States of America that grant a bachelor's or higher degree in the chemical sciences, including biochemistry, materials chemistry, and chemical engineering. Nominees must hold a full-time tenure-track academic appointment, and are normally expected to have been appointed no earlier than mid-year 2010. Awardees are from Ph.D. granting departments in which scholarly research is a principal activity. Undergraduate education is an important component. Institutions may submit only one Camille Dreyfus nomination annually. Renominations are accepted.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation seeks Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars who demonstrate leadership in research and education. Nominations must provide compelling evidence of the advance of important knowledge in the chemical sciences by the nominee. Further, the nomination should describe dedication and contributions to education in the chemical sciences, particularly with respect to undergraduates.

The nominee's scholarly research achievements are assessed by a panel of distinguished faculty in the chemical sciences. The letters of recommendation should address the nominee's research accomplishments as an independent faculty member. Other considered factors are: awards and honors, publication of research achievements in leading journals, and success in attracting research funding.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Please also email whitepaper to research@montana.edu. It is critical that PI's select the agency in the ePCF screen. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Pre-Award Program will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.  

View Program URL


2016 Commercialization Initiation Program
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

Internal MSU LOI due March 21, 2016
Agency deadline is June 1, 2016 (MSU will submit on behalf of applicant)

SYNOPSIS: 

This program is intended to support the commercialization of bench discoveries at a select group of major research universities in the five states typically funded by the M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust, and translating the discoveries to the market. It is not designed to enable investigators to generate data for their next major research grant application, instead the Trust is looking at supporting projects that creates an inflection point for commercialization. Only the institution's highest priority project from the natural sciences, medicine, and engineering will be considered. This program will be launched for the first time in January 2015.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Please prepare an Executive Summary that answers the questions, 1) What is it that you propose to do, 2) How does your research and business plan address the objectives and outcomes of your project? Applicants are encouraged to visit the MJ Murdock program link to learn more about MJ Murdock's funding interests before answering these questions.
  2. Submit your Executive Summary and a current CV via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Be sure to select "MJ Murdock Charitable Trust" as the sponsor. These documents will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  3. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  4. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu. Applicants are encouraged to route any questions for the program officer through the above contact as the Trust prefers one point of contact per institution. 

View Program URL


Princess Grace Foundation Awards Program
Princess Grace Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due March 11, 2016
Full agency submission due June 1, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

Scholarships are awarded to help support students' thesis film projects at the undergraduate and graduate level. The category of Film is comprised of (but not limited to) narrative/documentary/experimental/animation/hybrid film and video work, as well as new media work including media installations, transmedia, webisodes, interactive web work and other projects where the moving image is the primary component.

These grants will be made in accordance with the student's thesis project budget; no administrative charges, overhead or indirect costs incurred by the school may be charged against the grant. Should funding be awarded, acknowledgement of winning a Princess Grace Award, including the Princess Grace Awards logo, must appear in film credits/any related materials, and a copy of the completed film must be sent to the Foundation.

Nominees must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a full-time student or matriculated but not yet have completed thesis film
  • Have completed at least one film as a director
  • Be the director of the proposed thesis film

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "Princess Grace Foundation (PRIGRA)" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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Beckman Scholars Program
Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due March 11, 2016
Full agency submission due June 15, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The purpose of the Beckman Scholars Program is to help stimulate, encourage and support research activities by exceptionally talented, full-time undergraduate students who are pursuing their studies at accredited four-year colleges and universities located in the United States of America. These research activities shall be centered in either chemistry, biochemistry, the biological and medical sciences or some interdisciplinary combination of these subjects. Candidates for the Beckman Scholars Award must be full-time students throughout the duration of the award.

The research activities performed by Beckman Scholars shall be conducted under the guidance of a full-time, approved faculty member at the college or university receiving an award. Research activities must be performed part-time (ten hours per week) during one academic year, and full-time over two summers (ten 40-hour weeks each summer) immediately before and after the academic year research experience.

Students will be named as Beckman Scholars in the spring of their freshman through junior years at their university or college. Once selected to be a Beckman Scholar, a student will retain the funding as long as he/she continues to excel academically and his/her research work shows satisfactory progress. Beckman Scholar funds provided to any one student may not exceed two summers and one academic year. Beckman Scholar summer funds may extend through the summer following graduation.

INSTITUTIONAL CATEGORIES AND NUMBER OF AWARDS:

Beckman Scholar awards are institutional (university or college) awards. Each year, the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation selects a variety of universities and colleges to be invited to submit applications for the Beckman Scholars Program.

An invited university/college will be eligible for one institutional Beckman Scholar Award, which must be used over a three-year period. Each Beckman Scholar Award may fund up to six Beckman Scholars (with funding for student and mentor stipends and travel funds and research supplies) extending over two summers and one academic year. The number of awards allocated to an institution is determined by the institution's Carnegie Classification, with awards distributed as follows:

  • Research Universities/Very High (RU/VH) will be eligible to receive up to six Beckman Scholar Awards; awards must be awarded over a three-year period with at least ONE award per year awarded and a maximum of three awards in any one of these three years.
  • Research Universities/High (RU/H), Doctoral/Research Universities (DRU), Master's Medium (Master's M) and Master's Large (Master's L) institutions will be eligible to receive up to five Beckman Scholar Awards; awards must be awarded over a three-year period with at least ONE award per year awarded and a maximum of three awards in any one of these three years.
  • Baccalaureate/Arts and Science (BAC/A&S) universities and colleges will be eligible to receive up to four Beckman Scholar Awards; awards must be awarded over a three-year period with at least ONE award per year awarded and a maximum of two awards in any one of these three years.

The 2017 Beckman Scholar Awardee institutions will select their scholars in early 2017 and begin their first award term in the summer of 2017. Followed by a second award term beginning in the summer of 2018, and a third award term in the summer of 2019. Institutions receiving the 2017 Beckman Scholars Award will not be considered for new application invitations until the 2020 program.

2017 Beckman Scholars Program: Award Cycle
Year 1 Scholars - Summer 2017 / Academic Year 2017-18 / Summer 2018
Year 2 Scholars - Summer 2018 / Academic Year 2018-19 / Summer 2019
Year 3 Scholars - Summer 2019 / Academic Year 2019-20 / Summer 2020

INSTITUTIONAL AWARDS TO THE SCHOLARS:

Each Beckman Scholar will pursue an independent research project, under the auspices of an approved mentor. The amount of funding for the 2017 Beckman Scholars Program is $26,000; $21,000 specifically for the Scholar and $5,000 for the Scholar's Mentor.

The Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation does not provide for overhead or for indirect costs. Institutions may not fund additional or "matching" Beckman Scholars.

CANDIDATE CRITERIA:

The Beckman Scholars Program is a merit based award. Beckman Scholars will ultimately become prominent leaders in their scientific and professional pursuits. As such, the Foundation has set forth the following requirements of a candidate for the Beckman Scholars Program:

  • Undergraduate student: chemistry, biochemistry, the biological and medical sciences or some interdisciplinary combination of these subjects.
  • Must be a full-time student throughout duration of award.
  • Must maintain good academic standing.
  • Must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States or its possessions.
  • Articulate, well spoken.
  • Strong writing skills.
  • In pursuit of PhD, MD, MD/PhD; or other scientific pursuits.

Demonstrated financial need and issues of race and gender should not be a qualifying criterion in the selection of Beckman Scholars.

APPLICATION PROCESS: 

MSU may submit one application for consideration for an award. The application must include endorsements from the chief academic officer and the dean(s) of the College(s), School(s) or Division(s) of the participating academic unit(s). PI's are advised to discuss their applications with the department head and dean of the college before submitting a LOI to ensure support for the proposed program.

MSU has designated one contact person for communications concerning its application and award and PI's are advised to contact the Office of Sponsored Programs with any questions in lieu of contacting the Foundation directly. MSU will submit the application on behalf of the selected applicant. 

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "Arnold & Mabel Beckman Foundation (BECKMAN)" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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Innovation Corps Sites Program (I-Corps Sites)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Internal MSU LOI due March 1, 2016
Full agency submission due June 14, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon research to guide the output of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products and processes that benefit society.

In order to contribute to a national innovation ecosystem, NSF established the NSF Innovation Corps Sites Program (NSF I-Corps Sites). Sites are funded at academic institutions, having already existing innovation or entrepreneurial units, to enable them to:

  • Nurture students and/or faculty who are engaged in projects having the potential to be transitioned into the marketplace. I-Corps Sites will provide infrastructure, advice, resources, networking opportunities, training and modest funding to enable groups to transition their work into the marketplace or into becoming I-Corps Team applicants (see NSF Innovation Corps Program, NSF 12-602).
  • Develop formal, active, local innovation ecosystems that contribute to a larger, national network of mentors, researchers, entrepreneurs and investors.

The purpose of an I-Corps Site is to nurture and support multiple, local teams to transition their ideas, devices, processes or other intellectual activities into the marketplace.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The goals of this program are to spur translation of research, to encourage collaboration between academia and industry, and to train students to understand innovation and entrepreneurship. NSF funding through I-Corps Sites enables academic institutions to support teams whose projects are likely candidates for commercialization.

A competitive proposal for an I-Corps Site will be led by an institution having an already existing unit whose goal is to assist faculty, students and other academic personnel to engage in entrepreneurial activities and transition scientific and technological innovations. Such units are typically called: innovation centers, entrepreneurial centers, technology incubators, etc. Their mission is to provide resources to individuals and teams in the form of space, seed funding, entrepreneurial mentoring, curriculum, or other assets needed to transition technology into the marketplace.

The purpose of an I-Corps Site is to nurture and support multiple, local teams that are transitioning their ideas, devices, processes or other intellectual activities into the marketplace. While different institutions may choose different mechanisms for achieving the goals of an I-Corps Site, certain characteristics of a Site must be consistent - the make-up of the teams the Site supports, the origin and nature of the projects, and the kind of support that is provided to the teams by the Site.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "National Science Foundation" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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NIH Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU LOI due February 1, 2016
LOI due 30 days before deadline
Full submission due June 22, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH.  The goal of the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program is to invest in educational activities that enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs.  To this end, this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages the development of innovative educational activities for pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12), teachers and students from underserved communities with a focus on Courses for Skills Development, Research Experiences, Mentoring Activities, Curriculum or Methods Development or Informal science Education (ISE) exhibits, and Outreach activities. 

Details on current ORIP SEPA projects can be found at the following links: http://dpcpsi.nih.gov/orip/ose/sepa/science_education_partnership_awards_index and http://nihsepa.org.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with the SEPA Scientific/Research Contact to be advised on the appropriateness of the intended P-12 STEM or ISE project for the SEPA program objectives and Office of Science Education/SEPA priorities.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

The goal of the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program is to invest in educational activities that complement or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs. SEPA encourages interactive partnerships between biomedical and clinical researchers and P-12 pre-service and in-service teachers (Teachers), schools and other interested organizations.  SEPA supports diversity in the workforce by providing opportunities for students from underserved communities to consider careers  in basic or clinical research, provides teachers with professional development in science content and teaching skills and improves community health literacy through its science centers and museum exhibits.   Applications that target P-12 or ISE topics that may not be addressed by existing school, community or ISE-based activities are encouraged. 

Educational activities supported under this FOA may include one or more of the following: 

  • Courses for Skills Development  
    • Professional Development activities for P-12 Teachers that will enhance their pedagogical skills and STEM content knowledge.
  • Research Experiences
    • Research experiences for P-12 Teachers and students that will provide hands-on exposure to training in research methods and concepts that are not available through conventional Teacher training or classroom activities.
  • Mentoring Activities
    • Programs that provide Mentors and Near-Peer role models, in terms of age, gender and ethnicity for P-12 students.
  • Curriculum or Methods Development
    • Innovative P-12 curricula that will increase student interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) topics, understanding of the scientific research process and motivation to pursue careers in basic and medical research.
    • Veterinarian-based P-12 projects or ISE exhibits that will encourage students to consider careers in veterinary medicine and to educate students, Teachers, and the community on the need for, and the ethical use of, animals in research.Curriculum or Methods Development activities for P-12 Teachers that provide instruction in novel approaches to STEM curriculum that challenge the current knowledge base of pedagogy and STEM content.
    • Game-based projects where scientists partner with educators and game developers to create digital game-based learning resources for P-12 students, Teachers and the public solve significant STEM and health-related challenges such as the incidence of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the spread of a new flu strain, or the impact of environmental pollution on community health.
    • Innovative and rigorous evaluation tools to assess the effectiveness of P-12 projects or ISE exhibits.  
  • Outreach
    • Collaborations with the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA), Institutional Development Awards (IDeA), Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) or STEM programs at other government agencies, e.g., Department of Education (ED), Department of Defense (DOD), National Science Foundation (NSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA).
    • Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) projects on important health prevention issues such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, e.g., non-clinical health fair format student and teacher-driven projects that bring information on food choices, exercise and health literacy to the community. 
    • Public service announcements, documentaries, films, radio, TV and other media-based health literacy projects.  Topics may include: lifestyle  and health correlations; chronic diseases, emerging infectious disease, NIH-funded research, regenerative medicine or the clinical trials process.
    • Science center and museum-based exhibits, traveling exhibits and public outreach activities,  e.g., Science Cafes and Community Health Fairs, that will educate students, Teachers and the community on health-related topics,

Proposed projects must focus on topics related to NIH-funded research.

SEPA funding does not support large scale STEM or ISE projects where the total cost of the project will exceed the total amount of the requested SEPA award.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Be sure to select "National Institutes of Health" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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Mallinckrodt Grants Program
Mallinckrodt Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due April 1, 2016
Full submission due August 1, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

Any domestic biomedical institution, whether solely research or educational,  is invited to submit two candidates for the Mallinckrodt Board's consideration. MSU is allowed to submit two proposals. Applicants should be in the first to fourth year of their tenure track faculty position and not have current R01 funding. Grants are usually $60,000 and funding commences on October 1.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "Mallinckrodt Foundation (MALFOU)" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.        

 

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Montana Healthcare Foundation 2016 Call for Proposals
Montana Healthcare Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due February 19, 2016 for both programs
Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS: 

The Montana Healthcare Foundation (MHCF) has announced the 2016 Call for Proposals. The Foundation will consider proposals in three areas:

  • American Indian Health 
  • Behavioral Health (mental illness and drug and alcohol use) (includes Integrated Behavioral Health Initiative) 
  • Partnerships for Better Health 

MSU may submit up to two applications under this call for proposals. 

Grants awarded under this CFP will fund projects that must be completed in between 12 and 24 months. The Foundation is offering two types of grants:

Rapid Response Grants:
Our Rapid Response program will offer grants between $10,000 and $50,000 for projects with a 12- to 24-month time period. These grants will be awarded through a one-step application process that is offered two times in 2016, with a possibility of a third opportunity this fall. The Rapid Response program is intended to support proposals focused on planning, training, and smaller-scale pilot projects. The typical grant award is expected to be between $10,000 and $25,000; the minimum request is $10,000. The maximum request is $25,000 for a one-year project, and $50,000 for a two-year project. The foundation expects to award only a small number of Rapid Response grants above $25,000.

Large Grants:
Our Large Grant program will offer grants above $50,000 and up to $150,000 for projects with a 12- to 24-month time period. These grants will be awarded through a two-step application process offered once in 2016. The typical grant award is expected to be between $50,000 and $100,000; the minimum request is $25,000 for a one-year project, and $150,000 for a two-year project. The Foundation expects to award only a small number of grants above $100,000.

ELIGIBILITY: MSU PI's are not eligible to apply for the American Indian Health program. Additional eligibility requirements apply. 

APPLICATION PROCESS: 

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). Applicants may follow agency format for letters of intent to save time and effort if selected to proceed. 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Applicants will need to select "Montana Healthcare Foundation" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

 

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Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program (R25)
National Institutes of Health

Internal MSU LOI due April 28, 2016
Full agency submission due Sept. 25, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH.  The over-arching goal of this NIGMS  R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce.  To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development,  Research Experiences, and Curriculum or Methods Development. A proposed program must include each activity and describe how they will be integrated.

The Bridges to Baccalaureate Program is intended to provide these activities to community college students to increase transfer and retention to BS graduation in biomedical sciences. This program requires partnerships between community colleges or other two-year post-secondary educational institutions granting the associate degree with colleges or universities that offer the baccalaureate degree.   Applicants should directly address how the set of activities will complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical and clinical research needs by discussing 1) the rationale underlying the balance of effort and resources dedicated to each activity; 2) how the activities integrate; and 3) objective indicators that can measure the effectiveness of the program. Recruitment and retention plans are required elements of the program.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

The over-arching goal of this National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Bridges to Baccalaureate R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce    To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on:

1.  Courses for Skills Development: For example, advanced courses in a specific discipline or research area, or specialized research techniques.    

2.  Research Experiences: For example, for undergraduate students: to provide hands-on exposure to research, to reinforce their intent to graduate with a science degree, and/or to prepare them for graduate school admissions and/or careers in research; for college science teachers: to enhance their science teaching.    

3.  Curriculum or Methods Development: For example, to improve biomedical science education, or develop novel instructional approaches or computer-based educational tools; to provide supplemental instruction for gateway courses; to develop "CURE" courses in community college first and second year classrooms.  

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "National Institutes of Health" as the sponsor and "Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program" as the program. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.        

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Inclusive Excellence: 2017 Undergraduate Science Education Grants
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Internal MSU LOI due June 10, 2015
Intent to apply due July 14, 2015
Pre-proposals accepted starting July 16, 2015; Full submission due October 2016 (date TBD)

SYNOPSIS:

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute announces a new competition for science education grants to colleges and universities. The goal of this initiative is to help institutions build their capacity to effectively engage all students in science throughout their undergraduate years, especially those who come to college via nontraditional pathways. HHMI expects to make up to 60 awards of up to $1 million each over five years.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The objective of this initiative is to increase institutional capacity for inclusion of students from all backgrounds in science. Institutions of higher education that aspire to lead in the 21st century must effectively engage all students, especially the increasing number of students who come to college through "nontraditional" pathways. Through this initiative, HHMI will support colleges and universities that commit to measurably increasing their infrastructure, resources, and expertise to involve undergraduate students in science, resulting in expanded access to excellence for all students and especially those who belong to the "new majority" in American higher education. Our long-term aim is for successful strategies pioneered by the grantee institutions to serve as models to be adapted and adopted by other institutions. We seek to catalyze the creation of lasting institutional capacity that will benefit all students well beyond the lifetime of the HHMI grant. By establishing practices and policies that ensure that students from nontraditional pathways can be successful, all students will benefit. An HHMI grant awarded through this competition will help the grantee institution achieve the following outcomes:

  • The institution clearly demonstrates that it values efforts to expand access to and achievement in science by all students.
  • The institution applies effective evidence-based teaching and learning practices across its science curriculum and for all students.
  • All students, especially students from the "new majority," have the opportunity to excel, complete the baccalaureate degree, and continue in science beyond the baccalaureate degree.
  • During the lifetime of the grant, the institution expands the project leadership team by increasing participation of faculty, including tenure-track and tenured faculty.
  • The institution provides faculty with opportunities to develop the skills needed to work effectively with nontraditional students and to contribute to the program.
  • The institution effectively uses program assessment that is systematic, ongoing, and informs improvements.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Please also email whitepaper to research@montana.edu. It is critical that PI's select the agency in the ePCF screen. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  1. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Pre-Award Program will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
Directorate for Education & Human Resources and the Division of Human Resource Development / NSF

Internal MSU LOI due March 1, 2016
Deadlines vary per program, next deadline October 14, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program assists universities and colleges in their efforts to significantly increase the numbers of students matriculating into and successfully completing high quality degree programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines in order to diversify the STEM workforce. Particular emphasis is placed on transforming undergraduate STEM education through innovative, evidence-based recruitment and retention strategies, and relevant educational experiences in support of racial and ethnic groups historically underrepresented in STEM disciplines: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders.

The LSAMP program provides funding to alliances that implement comprehensive, evidence-based, innovative, and sustained strategies that ultimately result in the graduation of well-prepared, highly-qualified students from underrepresented groups who pursue graduate studies or careers in STEM.

There are four alliance award types:

    1. Alliances(Multi-institutional Partnerships): 5-year projects focused on undergraduate recruitment and retention activities.
    2. Bridge to the Baccalaureate (B2B) Alliances (Alliances with a community college as lead institution): 3-year projects focused on activities that provide effective educational preparation of community college students for successful transfer to 4-year institutions in STEM.
    3. Bridge to the Doctorate (BD) Activity: 2-year projects eligible only to existing alliances funded more than 10 consecutive years; these projects are focused on providing post-baccalaureate fellowship support to a cohort of 12 LSAMP students for the first two years of their STEM graduate studies and on providing the necessary academic and research skills that will enable them to successfully earn STEM doctoral degrees and transition into the professoriate and/or STEM workforce.
    4. Pre-Alliance Planning Grants: Up to 18-month projects that undertake planning activities necessary to form new alliances or regional outreach and knowledge-diffusion centers of excellence.

In this solicitation, the acronym STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics that includes biological sciences (except medicine and other clinical fields); physical sciences (including physics, chemistry, astronomy, and materials science); mathematical sciences (including statistics and data science); computer and information sciences; geosciences (including earth and ocean sciences); engineering; and technology areas associated with the preceding disciplines (for example, biotechnology, chemical technology, nanotechnology, engineering technology, information technology).

Important Notes on LSAMP Alliance Projects

The NSF LSAMP Program allows grantees to provide performance-based stipend support to undergraduate students. However, LSAMP is not a student financial aid scholarship program, and thus funds should NOT be used to award scholarships to students.

The LSAMP Program does NOT make awards directly to individual students to undertake their education or research activities. Students are encouraged to contact the respective institutions to inquire about whether there are LSAMP programs (including Bridge to the Doctorate) on their campuses.

All students receiving stipends/fellowships must be U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or permanent residents of the United States.

Institutional partners (including community colleges) in all LSAMP Alliances (including B2B) must be budgeted as sub-awardees unless designated as a lead institution in an alliance. Please contact a LSAMP Team member if your institution does not enter into subaward agreements.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "National Science Foundation" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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Amgen Grant Program
Amgen Inc.

Internal MSU LOI due January 1, 2016
Submissions accepted on a rolling basis but institutions may submit one funding request per year

SYNOPSIS: 

The Amgen Foundation, Inc. will consider grant requests from nonprofit organizations that are recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as tax exempt public charities under sections 501(c)(3) and 509(a)(1), (2), (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, located in the United States and Puerto Rico. In addition, the Amgen Foundation will consider requests for funding from governmental organizations located in the United States where the purpose of the grant is to support a charitable, educational, scientific or literary purpose. Thus, eligible grantees may include public elementary and secondary schools, as well as public colleges and universities, public libraries and public hospitals. Successful requests will fall within both the current eligibility guidelines and funding priority areas established by the Amgen Foundation. The Amgen Foundation has established grantmaking partnerships with qualified intermediary partners to manage donations to organizations chartered in Europe.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Please also email whitepaper to research@montana.edu. It is critical that PI's select the agency in the ePCF screen. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Pre-Award Program will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

 

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Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers
National Science Foundation

MSU Internal LOI due: June 1, 2016
Preliminary Proposal due: July 1, 2016
Full submission due: Dec. 2, 2016

Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSECs) provide sustained support of interdisciplinary materials research and education of the highest quality while addressing fundamental problems in science and engineering. MRSECs address research of a scope and complexity requiring the scale, synergy, and interdisciplinarity provided by a campus-based research center. They support materials research infrastructure in the United States, promote active collaboration between universities and other sectors, including industry and international institutions, and contribute to the development of a national network of university-based centers in materials research, education, and facilities. A MRSEC may be located at a single institution, or may involve multiple institutions in partnership.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

 Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.

  1. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format).
     
  2. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.

  3. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.

  4. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
     
  5. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.

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Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Dear Colleague Letter: NSF/SBE Partnering in Round 4 of the Digging into Data Challenge
National Science Foundation

Dear Colleagues:

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter is to announce that the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences is partnering in the Trans-Atlantic Platform 2016 Digging into Data Challenge (T-AP DiD). Digging into Data is a grant competition open to international, collaborative projects that address research questions in humanities and/or social science disciplines by using new, large-scale, digital data analysis techniques.

The Digging into Data Challenge has been funding cutting-edge digital research in the humanities and social sciences since 2009. Now under the auspices of T-AP, the program's fourth round of competition will support collaborative research teams from three continents: Europe (Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom); North America (Canada, Mexico, the United States); and South America (Brazil and Argentina).

T-AP is an unprecedented collaboration among key humanities and social science funders and facilitators from South America, North America and Europe. T-AP aims to enhance the ability of funders, research organizations and researchers to engage in transnational dialogue and collaboration. Among other activities, it works to identify common challenges and emerging priorities in social science and humanities research. T-AP also facilitates the formation of networks within the social sciences and humanities and helps connect them with other disciplines.

Sincerely,

Dr. Fay Lomax Cook
Assistant Director
Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences

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Announcement of the Availability of Funds for Phase I Research on Research Integrity
Department of Health and Human Services

Apr 22, 2016

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster innovative approaches to empirical research on societal, organizational, group, and individual factors that affect, both positively and negatively, integrity in research. Integrity is defined as the use of honest and verifiable methods in proposing, performing, and evaluating research and reporting research results with particular attention to adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms.

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The 2016 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize Competition
University of Pittsburg Press

After March 1, 2016 but before April 30, 2016

The 2016 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize Competition

The University of Pittsburgh Press announces the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize for a first full-length book of poems. Named after the first director of the Press, the prize carries a cash award of $5,000 and publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press in the Pitt Poetry Series under its standard royalty contract. The winner will be announced in the fall; no information about the winner will be released before the fall announcement. The Starrett Prize is our only venue for first-book poetry manuscripts.

Manuscripts must be received during March and April 2016. That is, they must be postmarked on or after March 1 and on or before April 30. Each manuscript must be accompanied by a check or money order in U.S. dollars only for $25 payable to University of Pittsburgh Press.

 

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Grants Program
Quigley (Cyrus M.) Foundation

May 15, 2016

The Cyrus M. Quigley Foundation seeks to create opportunities for individuals to develop the attributes of initiative, self-reliance, self-respect, a sense of humor, and a dedication to effecting positive change in the lives of others.

The Foundation seeks to create opportunities for individuals to develop the attributes of initiative, self-reliance, self-respect, a sense of humor, and a dedication to effecting positive change in the lives of others. The Foundation will focus on experiences that emphasize physical challenge and service to others.

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James Laughlin Award
Academy of American Poets

May 14, 2016

The James Laughlin Award is given to honor a second book of original poetry, in English, by a living citizen of the United States.

The winner receives a prize of $5,000, an all-expenses-paid weeklong residency at The Betsy Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida, and distribution of the winning book to approximately one-thousand Academy of American Poets members. (msw)

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FY 2016 Arts Envoy Program
Department of State

May 27, 2016

The Arts Envoy Program annually enables approximately 200 American artists and cultural experts (known as Arts Envoys) to travel abroad for individual programs or as part of an ensemble or group to engage and consult with key foreign audiences through performances, workshops, meetings, seminars, and appearances in foreign media. By addressing topics identified and developed by U.S. Missions (generally U.S. Embassies and Consulates) worldwide in cooperation with ECA, the program promotes an understanding of U.S. policies and institutions, and the political, economic, social, and cultural context from which they arise. Arts Envoy individuals and groups are programmed in one or more countries with a variety of audiences from a wide range of disciplines in the cultural arena, including in the performing and visual arts, and in arts management, as well as with museum professionals and other cultural experts. Arts Envoy programs range from five days to six weeks in length.

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Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers Data Challenge
National Endowment for the Humanities/Natl. Fndn. on the Arts & Humanities

June 15, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announces the Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers Data Challenge under Section 105 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (Pub. L.111-358). This challenge encourages the creation of web-based tools, data visualizations, and other creative uses of the information found in the Chronicling America historic newspaper database.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The subject of the competition is "How can you use open data to explore history?". NEH invites members of the public to produce creative web-based projects demonstrating the potential for using the data found in the Chronicling America Web site, available at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov. Chronicling America is a Web site providing access to digitized U.S. newspapers and to information about historic newspapers. The National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a joint effort between NEH and the Library of Congress, produces the site. Visit the Chronicling America Web site at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.

NEH encourages contestants to develop data visualizations, web-based tools, or other innovative and interesting web-based projects using the open data found in Chronicling America. There are over ten million pages of digitized newspapers in Chronicling America, published between 1836 and 1922, from towns and cities across the United States. The newspapers illuminate 19th and 20th century American life, with stories about politics, sports, shopping, music, food, health, science, movies, and everything in between. Entries should uncover trends, display insights, explore a theme, or tell a story. For example, entries using the Chronicling America newspaper data could show how local news in various places covered the World Series of baseball; trace the developing motion picture industry across the country; follow the enactment of amendments to the Constitution; show coverage of a historic political campaign in various locations; map the travels of a president across the country based on local news coverage; show changes in advertising logos or newspaper mastheads over time; track the price or adoption of consumer goods over time in different locations; explore tourism in different locations in the United States; discover how various regions of the country celebrated Thanksgiving at different times. Projects could also create data mashups that juxtapose Chronicling America data with other datasets or translate newspapers into different languages. The Library of Congress has developed a user-friendly Application Program Interface (API), which can be used to explore the data contained in Chronicling America in many ways. You can learn more about the API at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/about/api. Entrants must use this API to access the data, but are welcome to use existing software or tools to create their projects.

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Access to Historical Records
National Archives and Records Administration

Jun 15, 2016

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks proposals that promote the preservation and use of historical records collections to broaden understanding of our democracy, history, and culture. This grant program is designed to support archival repositories in preserving and processing primary source materials. The program emphasizes the creation of online tools that facilitate the public discovery of historical records.

The Commission looks to fund projects that undertake one or more of the following activities:

  • Preservation, arrangement, and online description of historical records in all formats
  • Digital preservation of electronic records and unstable audio or moving image formats

After completing arrangement and description activities, applicants may also propose to digitize materials to provide online access to collections.

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Grants Program
Earhart Foundation

Submission due 120 days before commencement of work plan

SYNOPSIS:

The sponsor provides Fellowship Research Grants and Grants to Organization, focusing on social sciences and humanities.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Fellowship Research Grants are offered to support individuals. The effort supported should lead to advancement of knowledge through teaching, lecturing and publication. Emphasis is on disciplines from the social sciences and humanities such as economic, philosophy, international affairs, and government/ politics.

Grants to Organizations are for publicly supported educational and research organizations.

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Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions
National Archives and Records Administration

Jun 15, 2016

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks proposals to publish documentary editions of historical records. Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American history or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, business, social reform, the arts, and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project.

The goal of this program is to provide access to, and editorial context for, the historical documents and records that tell the American story. The NHPRC encourages projects, whenever possible and appropriate, to provide access to these materials in a free and open online environment, without precluding other forms of publication. Applicants should demonstrate familiarity with the best practices recommended by the Association for Documentary Editing or the Modern Language Association Committee on Scholarly Editions.

Projects may also prepare print editions as part of their overall publishing plan. However, projects that do not have definitive plans for digital dissemination and preservation in place at the time of application will not be considered. It is also expected that the contents of any print volumes produced will be made available online within a reasonable period of time following print publication.

Grants are awarded for collecting, describing, preserving, compiling, transcribing, annotating, editing, encoding, and publishing documentary source materials in print and online. Because of the focus on documentary sources, grants do not support preparation of critical editions of published works unless such works are just a small portion of the larger project. All applicants should be aware that the application process is highly competitive.

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Research and Development
National Endowment for the Humanities

June 21, 2016

The Research and Development program supports projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation's cultural heritage--from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence--and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials. This program recognizes that finding solutions to complex problems often requires forming interdisciplinary project teams, bringing together participants with expertise in the humanities; in preservation; and in information, computer, and natural science. All projects must demonstrate how advances in preservation and access would benefit the cultural heritage community in supporting humanities research, teaching, or public programming.

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Grant Programs
Mellon (Andrew W.) Foundation

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports grantees within the following defined program areas: Higher Education and Scholarship in the Humanities; Arts and Cultural Heritage; Diversity; Scholarly Communications; and International Higher Education and Strategic Projects.

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Humanities Connections
National Endowment for the Humanities

Oct. 5, 2016

Humanities Connections grants seek to expand the role of the humanities in the undergraduate curriculum at two- and four-year institutions, offering students in all academic fields new opportunities to develop the intellectual skills and habits of mind that the humanities cultivate. Grant projects focus on connecting the resources and perspectives of the humanities to students' broader educational and professional goals, regardless of their path of study.

Through this new grant program, NEH invites proposals that reflect innovative and imaginative approaches to preparing students for their roles as engaged citizens and productive professionals in a rapidly changing and interdependent world. Grants support the development and implementation of an integrated set of courses and student engagement activities focusing on significant humanities content. A common topic, theme, or compelling issue or question must link the courses and activities.

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Humanities Program
Delmas (Gladys Krieble) Foundation

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The sponsor intends to further the humanities along a broad front, supporting projects which address the concerns of the historical "studia humanitatis," a humanistic education rooted in the great traditions of the past; the formation of human beings according to cultural, moral, and aesthetic ideals derived from that past; and the ongoing debate over how these ideals may best be conceived and realized.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Programs in the following areas are eligible: history; archaeology; literature; languages, both classical and modern; philosophy, ethics; comparative religion; the history, criticism, and theory of the arts; and those aspects of the social sciences which share the content and methods of humanistic disciplines. The Foundation welcomes projects that cross the boundaries between humanistic disciplines and explore the connection between the humanities and other areas of scholarship.

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Department of Defense (DOD)

Advance Notice of Solicitation: DOD To Award More Than $100M to Establish an Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Institute
Department of Defense

Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) is anticipated to be released in early November 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

In celebration of National Manufacturing Day, the Obama Administration announced it will release a new competition to award more than $100 million to launch a new Institute for Manufacturing Innovation (IMI) focused on Integrated Photonics. The proposed Integrated Photonics Institute will assist in developing an end-to-end photonics 'ecosystem' in the U.S. and support research and development efforts across the country on domestic foundry access, integrated design tools, automated packaging, assembly and test, and workforce development in the research area related to photonics. Administered by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the formal request for proposal (RFP) should be released in early November.

Click the related link to read more. 

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CDMRP Funding Opportunities
Department of Defense

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS: 

All pre-applications must be submitted electronically to the CDMRP eReceipt System https://ebrap.org. Full applications must be submitted electronically to the Grants.gov website http://grants.gov.

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Breast Cancer Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Clinical and Rehabilitative Medicine Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Gulf War Illness Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Orthotics and Prosthetics Outcomes Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Peer Reviewed Alzheimer's Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Psychological Health/Traumatic Brain Injury (PH/TBI) Research Program

 

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Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program (CDMRP) Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Pre-application Deadline: May 13, 2014 5 p.m., EST
Full Proposal Deadline - by invititation only

 

Applications to the Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP) are being solicited for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Defense Health Program (DHP), by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisitions Activity (USAMRAA). The BMFRP was established in FY08 to promote innovative research focused on BMF. Appropriations for the BMFRP from FY08 through FY13 totaled $20.15 million (M). The FY14 appropriation is $3.2M.

 

The vision of the BMFRP is to understand and cure BMF diseases. Toward that end, the program challenges the scientific community to design innovative research approaches based on sound scientific evidence that will advance the understanding of inherited and acquired BMF diseases to improve the health of individuals, with the ultimate goals of prevention and cure.

 

FY14 BMFRP Objective: The objective of the FY14 BMFRP is to fund scientifically meritorious research focused on BMF diseases and their long-term sequelae. Investigator-initiated research is encouraged in the areas of congenital or acquired BMF. Studies focused on BMF diseases and their progression to other malignancies such as leukemia are acceptable. However, research primarily focused on myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia, or other malignancies is discouraged. Projects including bone marrow transplantation or stem cell biology should address issues unique to BMF diseases.

 

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Department of Defense / CDMRP
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Deadlines: see program pre-announcements

The Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Defense Appropriations Act provides research funding for the peer reviewed programs managed by the Department of Defense (DOD) office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

This e-mail is to notify the research community of the recently released funding opportunities from the following programs: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP), Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP), Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP), Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP).

Detailed descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the respective Program Announcements. Each Program Announcement is available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP)

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

Therapeutic Idea Award

Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)

Concept Award

Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP)

Clinical Trial Award

Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

New Investigator Award

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Exploration Hypothesis Development Award

Idea Development Award

Pilot Clinical Trial Award

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Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ovarian Cancer Research Program (OCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Pre-Announcement / Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP): Era of Hope Scholar Award, Innovator Award and Breakthrough Award
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline: see program URL

The BCRP is providing the information in this pre-announcement to allow investigators time to plan and develop applications. FY14 BCRP Program Announcements and General Application Instructions are anticipated to be posted on Grants.gov in late March 2014. Pre-application and application deadlines will be available when the Program Announcements are released. This pre-announcement should not be construed as an obligation by the government.

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Breast Cancer Research Program - Breakthrough Fellowship Award
Department of Defense

April 21, 2016 - 3 p.m. MST (Pre-Application Submission)

The Breast Cancer Research Program challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Specifically, the BCRP seeks to accelerate high-impact research with clinical relevance, encourage innovation and stimulate creativity, and facilitate productive collaborations.

Each FY16 BCRP Breakthrough Fellowship Award application must address at least one of the following overarching challenges. Alternatively, with adequate justification, applications may identify and address another overarching challenge related to the breast cancer landscape.  Justification must be provided in the application.

  • Prevent breast cancer (primary prevention)
  • Identify determinants of breast cancer initiation, risk, or susceptibility
  • Distinguish deadly from indolent breast cancers
  • Conquer the problems of overdiagnosis and overtreatment
  • Identify what drives breast cancer growth; determine how to stop it
  • Identify why some breast cancers become metastatic
  • Determine why/how breast cancer cells lie dormant for years and then re-emerge (recurrence); determine how to prevent recurrence
  • Revolutionize treatment regimens by replacing them with ones that are more effective and less toxic
  • Eliminate the mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer

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Breast Cancer Research Program - Era of Hope Scholar Award
Department of Defense

April 21, 2016 - 3 p.m. MST (Pre-Application Submission)

The Breast Cancer Research Program challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Specifically, the BCRP seeks to accelerate high-impact research with clinical relevance, encourage innovation and stimulate creativity, and facilitate productive collaborations.

Each FY16 BCRP Era of Hope Scholar Award application must address one or more of the following overarching challenges. Alternatively, with adequate justification, applications may identify and address another overarching challenge related to the breast cancer landscape.  Justification must be provided in the application.

  • Prevent breast cancer (primary prevention)
  • Identify determinants of breast cancer initiation, risk, or susceptibility
  • Distinguish deadly from indolent breast cancers
  • Conquer the problems of overdiagnosis and overtreatment
  • Identify what drives breast cancer growth; determine how to stop it
  • Identify why some breast cancers become metastatic
  • Determine why/how breast cancer cells lie dormant for years and then re-emerge (recurrence); determine how to prevent recurrence
  • Revolutionize treatment regimens by replacing them with ones that are more effective and less toxic
  • Eliminate the mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer

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Joint Program Committee-2/ Military Infectious Diseases Research Program
Department of Defense Defense Health Program

LOI due January 25, 2016
Full submission due May 9, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

Applications to the Fiscal Year 2017 (FY17) Joint Program Committee-2/Military Infectious Diseases Research Program (JPC-2/MIDRP) are being solicited for the Defense Health Agency, Research, Development, and Acquisition (DHA RDA) Directorate, by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity (USAMRAA). As directed by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs [OASD(HA)], the DHA RDA Directorate manages and executes the Defense Health Program (DHP) Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) appropriation. The U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) provides Defense Medical Research and Development Program (DMRDP) execution management support for DHP core research program areas, including JPC-2/MIDRP. This Program Announcement and subsequent awards will be managed and executed by CDMRP with strategic oversight from JPC-2/MIDRP. The JPC-2/MIDRP is one of six major DHP core research program areas within the DHA RDA Directorate and is administered with oversight from JPC-2, which consists of Department of Defense (DoD) and non-DoD medical and military technical experts relevant to the program area. The JPC-2/MIDRP supports research and development leading to the fielding of effective, improved means of bacterial, parasitic and viral infection prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment to maintain maximal global operational capability with minimal morbidity and mortality. JPC-2/MIDRP's DHA-aligned mission is focused on polytrauma and blast injury, with a DHP core research program emphasizing wound infection prevention and management, as well as antimicrobial countermeasures.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

To meet the intent of the FY17 JPC-2/MIDRP Clinical Study Award (CSA) mechanism, applications MUST contain only one clinical trial/testing with a distinct study design and address at least one of the Focus Areas listed below. Applications focused on areas other than those listed below will not be considered for funding.

FOCUS AREAS:

  • Therapeutics. Evaluation of optimum preventive or directive therapies for combatrelated or trauma-induced wound infections using Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, biologics, or devices either alone or in combination. Studies focusing on new indications of FDA-approved drugs/biologics/devices or investigational new drugs/biologics/devices will be accepted.
  • Rapid detection of pathogens and/or anti-microbial drug resistance markers. Evaluation of a functional prototype device or assay for the rapid detection of pathogens and/or anti-microbial drug resistance markers in combat-related or traumainduced wounds. Research outcomes should support the development of an FDAregulated device or assay.
  • Rapid detection of biomarkers. Evaluation of a functional prototype device or assay for the rapid detection of novel and specific in vivo or in vitro biomarkers (from wound, serum, saliva, or urine) that predict development of infection or discriminate between infection and colonization. Research outcomes should support the development of an FDA-regulated device or assay.

APPLICABLE TO ALL FOCUS AREAS:

  • Studies involving carbapenem-resistant organisms are particularly sought.
  • Preference will be given to approaches that address infections with one or more multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), particularly, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (including Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and/or invasive fungal (mold) pathogens.

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Breast Cancer Research Program - Breakthrough Award Levels 3 and 4
Department of Defense

April 27, 2016 - 3 p.m. MST (Pre-Application Submission)

The Breast Cancer Research Program challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Specifically, the BCRP seeks to accelerate high-impact research with clinical relevance, encourage innovation and stimulate creativity, and facilitate productive collaborations.

Each FY16 BCRP Breakthrough Award application must address at least one of the following overarching challenges. Alternatively, with adequate justification, applications may identify and address another overarching challenge related to the breast cancer landscape. Justification must be provided in the pre-application.

  • Prevent breast cancer (primary prevention)
  • Identify determinants of breast cancer initiation, risk, or susceptibility
  • Distinguish deadly from indolent breast cancers
  • Conquer the problems of overdiagnosis and overtreatment
  • Identify what drives breast cancer growth; determine how to stop it
  • Identify why some breast cancers become metastatic
  • Determine why/how breast cancer cells lie dormant for years and then re-emerge (recurrence); determine how to prevent recurrence
  • Revolutionize treatment regimens by replacing them with ones that are more effective and less toxic
  • Eliminate the mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer

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Breast Cancer Research Program - Distinguished Investigator Award
Department of Defense

April 27, 2016 - 3 p.m. MST (Pre-Application Submission)

The Breast Cancer Research Program challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Specifically, the BCRP seeks to accelerate high-impact research with clinical relevance, encourage innovation and stimulate creativity, and facilitate productive collaborations.

Each FY16 Distinguished Investigator Award application must address one or more of the following overarching challenges. Alternatively, with adequate justification, applications may identify and address another overarching challenge related to the breast cancer landscape.  Justification must be provided in the application.

  • Prevent breast cancer (primary prevention)
  • Identify determinants of breast cancer initiation, risk, or susceptibility
  • Distinguish deadly from indolent breast cancers
  • Conquer the problems of overdiagnosis and overtreatment
  • Identify what drives breast cancer growth; determine how to stop it
  • Identify why some breast cancers become metastatic
  • Determine why/how breast cancer cells lie dormant for years and then re-emerge (recurrence); determine how to prevent recurrence
  • Revolutionize treatment regimens by replacing them with ones that are more effective and less toxic
  • Eliminate the mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer

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Breast Cancer Research Program - Innovator Award
Department of Defense

April 27, 2016 - 3 p.m. MST (Pre-Application Submission)

The Breast Cancer Research Program challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Specifically, the BCRP seeks to accelerate high-impact research with clinical relevance, encourage innovation and stimulate creativity, and facilitate productive collaborations.

Each FY16 Distinguished Investigator Award application must address one or more of the following overarching challenges. Alternatively, with adequate justification, applications may identify and address another overarching challenge related to the breast cancer landscape.  Justification must be provided in the application.

  • Prevent breast cancer (primary prevention)
  • Identify determinants of breast cancer initiation, risk, or susceptibility
  • Distinguish deadly from indolent breast cancers
  • Conquer the problems of overdiagnosis and overtreatment
  • Identify what drives breast cancer growth; determine how to stop it
  • Identify why some breast cancers become metastatic
  • Determine why/how breast cancer cells lie dormant for years and then re-emerge (recurrence); determine how to prevent recurrence
  • Revolutionize treatment regimens by replacing them with ones that are more effective and less toxic
  • Eliminate the mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer

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Breast Cancer Research Program - Various opportunities
Department of Defense

April 21-27, 2016 (varies by program) - 3 p.m. MST (Pre-Application Submission)

The BCRP challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Specifically, the BCRP seeks to accelerate high-impact research with clinical relevance, encourage innovation and stimulate creativity, and facilitate productive collaborations.

Each FY 16 BCRP Breakthrough Award application must address at least one of the following overarching challenges. Alternatively, with adequate justification, applications may identify and address another overarching challenge related to the breast cancer landscape. Justification must be provided in the application.

  • Prevent breast cancer (primary prevention)
  • Identify determinants of breast cancer initiation, risk, or susceptibility
  • Distinguish deadly from indolent breast cancers
  • Conquer the problems of overdiagnosis and overtreatment
  • Identify what drives breast cancer growth; determine how to stop it
  • Identify why some breast cancers become metastatic
  • Determine why/how breast cancer cells lie dormant for years and then re-emerge (recurrence); determine how to prevent recurrence
  • Revolutionize treatment regimens by replacing them with ones that are more effective and less toxic
  • Eliminate the mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer

View Program URL


CENTER OF EXCELLENCE: Multi-Fidelity Modeling of Combustion Instabilities
Department of Defense

May 11, 2016

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) seeks unclassified proposals from educational institutions in the United States for a University Center of Excellence in Multi-Fidelity Modeling of Combustion Instabilities. Proposals must not contain any proprietary information. This center is a joint project between the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Air Force Research Laboratory Aerospace Systems Directorate, Rocket Propulsion Division (AFRL/RQR).

The center will extend the research capabilities of the Air Force Research Laboratory, and provide opportunities for a new generation of United States scientists and engineers to address the basic research needs of the Air Force. We will consider proposals for up to six (6) years consisting of three (3) two-year segments. The first two (2) years are the base period, followed by two (2) two-year options to continue performance.

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Missile Defense Agency STEM Outreach BEST Robotics Grant
Department of Defense

May 12, 2016

Missile Defense Agency (MDA) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Outreach goal is to increase awareness of K-12 and college students to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), in order to enhance the number of U.S. scientists and engineers capable of solving future Missile Defense challenges in the Government, industry, and academia.

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Department of Defense LCRP and CRMRP Program Announcements
Department of Defense

Deadlines vary per program

Lung Cancer Research Program

Concept Award

Clinical and Rehabilitative Medicine Research Program

Vision Prosthesis Pilot Study Award

Detailed descriptions of the funding opportunity, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the Program Announcements. The Program Announcements are available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

All CDMRP funding opportunities, both recently and previously released, are available on the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil).

Subsequent notifications will be sent when additional funding opportunities are released. A listing of all open CDMRP funding opportunities can be obtained on the Grants.gov website by performing a basic search using CFDA Number 12.420.

Submission is a two-step process requiring both (1) pre-application submission through the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org/) and (2) application submission through Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov/). Refer to the General Application Instructions, Section II.A. for registration and submission requirements for eBRAP and Grants.gov.

eBRAP is a multifunctional web-based system that allows PIs to submit their pre-applications electronically through a secure connection, to view and edit the content of their pre-applications and full applications, to receive communications from the CDMRP, and to submit documentation during award negotiations and period of performance. A key feature of eBRAP is the ability of an organization's representatives and PIs to view and modify the Grants.gov application submissions associated with them. eBRAP will validate Grants.gov application files against the specific Program Announcement/Funding Opportunity requirements and discrepancies will be noted in an email to the PI and in the Full Application Files tab in eBRAP. It is the applicant's responsibility to review all application components for accuracy as well as ensure proper ordering as specified in this Program Announcement/Funding Opportunity. 

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Air Force Fiscal Year 2017 Young Investigator Research Program (YIP)
Department of Defense

June 1, 2016

The Fiscal Year 2017 Air Force Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) intends support for scientists and engineers who have received Ph.D. or equivalent degrees 1 April 2011 or later that show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research. The program objective is to foster creative basic research in science and engineering; enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators; and increase opportunities for the young investigator to recognize the Air Force mission and related challenges in science and engineering.

Individual awards are made to U.S. institutions of higher education, industrial laboratories, or non-profit research organizations where the principal investigator is employed on a full-time basis and holds a regular position. YIP primary investigators must be a U.S. citizen, national, or permanent resident. Researchers working at a Federally Funded Research and Development Center or DoD Laboratory are not eligible for this competition. Most YIP awards are funded at $120,000 per year for three years, for a total of $360,000. Exceptional proposals will be considered individually for higher funding levels and/or longer duration.

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Prolonged Field Care Research Award (PFCRA)
Department of Defense

Pre-Application deadline: May 12, 2016
Full Submission deadline: August 18, 2016

The intent of the PFCRA is to target the emerging need to provide extended trauma care prior to reaching a location that can provide definitive hemorrhage and contamination control. Trauma care during this period is often called "Prolonged Field Care" (PFC). Traditionally, improvements to the trauma care system have focused on shortening evacuation times from the point of injury to the first surgical site. However, in future conflicts or mass trauma events, it is anticipated that the initial evacuation time, and thus initial surgical hemorrhage and contamination control, may be delayed for hours or days.

This challenge also requires research to develop new solutions to provide for prolonged Damage Control Resuscitation (pDCR) including: support for medical providers in the out-of-hospital setting (point of injury, austere environment, or en route care) with limited resources; understanding the physiologic impact of pDCR; and techniques to mitigate the negative effects of delayed surgical intervention. The research and solutions must be focused on patient-level interventions and outcomes, rather than the broader trauma system. However, proposed research and solutions should consider the entire continuum of trauma care.

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INter-Professional TEam-Based Learning in Early Stages of Learning (Team_INTEL)
Department of Defense

Pre-Application deadline: May 11, 2016
Full Submission deadline: August 22, 2016

There are existing gaps in research relating to early adoption of inter-professional team-based learning within military medical healthcare settings. The literature suggests that after training, foundation skills are required to perform a task1. However, individual skills (novice or expert) do not always translate to competency or proficiency. For the purposes of this announcement, a competency model refers to the deconstruction of training into skills, knowledge, and attitude and those changes in skills, knowledge, and attitude compared to one's peers. Proficiency (or a proficiency model) measures performance and the defined set of observable behaviors to what is produced and what the person must do to achieve those results.

The FY17 JPC-1/MSIS Team_INTEL is seeking research to determine, define, and validate learning strategies that foster inter-professional team-based learning during the early stages i.e. when teams are forming and groups are becoming familiar with each other and are starting to implement their roles and responsibilities of medical skills training in order to eliminate the current culture of focusing on the individual's medical skills and leaving team training practice at a later date during "on the job training."

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Predictive Personality & Emotional State Performance Determinants for Training (PREEMPT)
Department of Defense

Pre-Application deadline: May 11, 2016
Full Submissin deadline: August 22, 2016

PREEMPT seeks the development of a proof-of-concept task performance assessment tool that incorporates personality and emotional state as determinant components to predict an individual's performance and overall stress level under a wide range of potential combat casualty care scenarios, environments, and other stressful situations relevant to patient care. For this award, it is anticipated that the various components will be integrated for initial testing purposes in a laboratory setting to evaluate how the components work together. The FY16 JPC-1/MSIS PREEMPT is seeking research on two (2) of the several predictors of an individual's performance: personality and emotional state. This knowledge can be used to:

  • Assess an individual's overall performance and stress levels during combat casualty care scenarios;
  • Deconstruct overall performance into its personality and emotional state determinants and assess each;
  • Combine the determinants to predict the person's overall performance on known tasks, especially as it applies to performance under stress.

 

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DoD Multiple Sclerosis Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award
Department of Defense

Pre-Application Submission due: May 26, 2016
Full Submission (by invitation only) due: Aug. 29, 2016

The MSRP EHDA mechanism is being offered for the first time in FY16. The EHDA supports the initial exploration of innovative, high-risk, high-gain, and potentially groundbreaking concepts in the MS research field. The studies supported by this award mechanism are expected to lay the groundwork for future avenues of scientific investigation. The proposed research project should include a well-formulated, testable hypothesis based on strong scientific rationale and study design. The presentation of preliminary and/or published data is not required. The proposed research project should be innovative, feasible, and supported by strong rationale. Innovative research may introduce a novel paradigm, challenge existing paradigms, look at existing problems from novel perspectives, or exhibit other highly creative qualities. Research that is an incremental advance upon published data is not considered innovative and is not consistent with the intent of this award mechanism. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator (PI) to clearly and explicitly articulate how the proposed research project is innovative in the field of MS.

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DoD Multiple Sclerosis Research Program
Department of Defense

Pre-Application Submission due: May 26, 2016
Full Submission (by invitation only) due: Aug. 29, 2016

The MSRP IIRA mechanism was first offered in FY15 for research topics addressing MS Symptoms. In FY15, 15 MSRP IIRA applications were received, and 2 were recommended for funding. This year, the IIRA mechanism is offered for research specifically addressing Obstacles to Remyelination in MS. The IIRA supports highly rigorous, high-impact research projects that have the potential to make an important contribution to MS research and/or patient care. Research projects may focus on any phase of research, excluding clinical trials. The rationale for a research idea may be derived from laboratory discovery, clinical trial results, population-based studies, a clinician's firsthand knowledge of patients, or anecdotal data. Applications must include preliminary and/or published data that are relevant to MS and the proposed research project.

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FY16 Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)
Department of Defense

Pre-Application due: June 9, 2016
Full Submission due: Sept. 14, 2016

The goal of the FY16 LCRP is to eradicate deaths from lung cancer to better the health and welfare of military Service members, Veterans, their families, and the American public. As such, the LCRP will support and integrate research from multiple disciplines for risk assessment, prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment for the control and cure of lung cancer.

Key elements of the award mechanism include the Career Development Award; the Clinical Exploration Award; the Idea Development Award; and the Investigator Initiated Translational Research Award.

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FY16 DoD ALSRP and BCRP Program Announcements
Department of Defense (DOD)

Varies by program area

SYNOPSIS: 

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National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

Deadline: September 30, 2017

NGA welcomes all innovative ideas for path-breaking research that may advance the GEOINT mission. The NGA mission is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security objectives. GEOINT is the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth. GEOINT consists of imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information. NGA offers a variety of critical GEOINT products in support of U.S. national security objectives and Federal disaster relief, including aeronautical, geodesy, hydrographic, imagery, geospatial and topographical information. The NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) is focused on innovative, far-reaching basic and applied research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics having the potential to advance the GEOINT mission. The objective of the NARP is to support innovative, high-payoff research that provides the basis for revolutionary progress in areas of science and technology affecting the needs and mission of NGA. This research also supports the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), which is the combination of technology, systems and organizations that gather, produce, distribute and consume geospatial data and information. This research is aimed at advancing GEOINT capabilities by improving analytical methods, enhancing and expanding systems capabilities, and leveraging resources for common NSG goals. The NARP also seeks to improve education in scientific, mathematics, and engineering skills necessary to advance GEOINT capabilities. It is NGA's intent to solicit fundamental research under this BAA. Fundamental research means basic and applied research in science and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly within the scientific community, as distinguished from proprietary research and from Industrial development, design, production, and product utilization, the results of which ordinarily are restricted for proprietary or national security reason. NGA seeks proposals from eligible U.S. institutions for path-breaking GEOINT research in areas of potential interest to NGA, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community (IC).

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AFRL/RXM Manufacturing Technology Open BAA
Department of the Air Force

Whitepaper request
Open until June 2019

A -- AFRL/RXM MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OPEN BAA - BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT (BAA)   SOL BAA-RQKM-2014-0020 POC P. S. Strader, Phone: (937) 713-9895 WE: FBO.gov Permalink https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLWRS/BAA-RQKM-2014-0020/listing.html E-MAIL: pamela.strader@us.af.mil pamela.strader@us.af.mil NAICS: 541712 Contract Data Requirements List (CDRLs) BAA Initial Announcement Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate is soliciting whitepapers and potentially technical and cost proposals under this announcement that supports the needs of its Manufacturing and Technology mission. Manufacturing Technologies that focus on strengthening defense manufacturing capabilities and efficiencies and transitioning capability to the factory floor are of interest. Descriptors of Manufacturing Technology interests are presented in two contexts; that of manufacturing technology competencies and that of Air Force application area needs. See BAA for more detailed description. CITE: https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=94e2504d133d6f61e67974ab3de4937d&tab=core&_cview=0 Posted 06/24/14 (W-SN03404922). (0175)

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Department of Education

Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs
Department of Education

Aug. 4, 2016

The Institute of Education Sciences announces its FY 2017 competitions for grants to support education research and special education research.  The Institute's purpose in awarding these grants is to provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of 1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability; and 2) education outcomes for all students from early cihldhood education through postsecondary and adult education.

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Department of Energy (DOE)

Innovative Development in Energy-Related Applied Science (IDEAS) (DE-FOA-0001002)
Department of Energy

LOI due on September 28, 2014
Full submission due dates are TBD

SYNOPSIS: 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) provides a continuing opportunity for the rapid support of early-stage applied research to explore innovative new concepts with the potential for transformational and disruptive changes in energy technology. IDEAS awards are intended to be flexible and may take the form of analyses or exploratory research that provides the agency with information useful for the subsequent development of focused technology programs. IDEAS awards may also support research to support proof-of-concept projects for a unique technology concept, either in an area not currently supported by the agency or as a potential enhancement to an ongoing focused technology program. This announcement is purposely broad in scope to encourage the submission of the most innovative, out-of-the-box ideas in energy technology.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

ARPA-E (Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy) seeks transformative ideas that enable most efficient, economical, sustainable, and environmentally benign conversion of energy while minimizing energy destruction. The broad objective of this FOA is to identify disruptive concepts in energy-related technologies that challenge the status quo and represent a leap beyond today's technology. An innovative concept alone is not enough; the idea must also have the potential to be impactful--meaning that, if successful, it represents a fundamentally new paradigm in energy technology with the potential to make a significant impact on ARPA-E's Mission Areas. Concepts of particular interest have the potential to achieve percentage-level reductions in U.S. energy consumption, energy-related imports, or greenhouse gas emissions.

Applicants may propose any idea that addresses an ARPA-E Mission Area and falls within one or more Areas of Interest selected from the six forms of energy involved in the conversion or interaction of energy. The six forms of energy are Mechanical, Thermal, Chemical, Electrical, Radiant, and Nuclear energy.

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DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program
U.S. Department of Energy

May 11, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The goal of the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program is to prepare graduate students for science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) careers critically important to the DOE Office of Science mission, by providing graduate thesis research opportunities at DOE laboratories.  The SCGSR program provides supplemental awards to outstanding U.S. graduate students to pursue part of their graduate thesis research at a DOE laboratory in areas that address scientific challenges central to the Office of Science mission. The research opportunity is expected to advance the graduate students' overall doctoral thesis while providing access to the expertise, resources, and capabilities available at the DOE laboratories.

The SCGSR program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS), in collaboration with the 6 Office of Science research programs and the DOE national laboratories. Online application and awards administration support is provided by Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) under Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

The SCGSR program provides supplemental funds for graduate awardees to conduct part of their thesis research at a host DOE laboratory in collaboration with a DOE laboratory scientist within a defined award period. The award period for the proposed research project at DOE laboratories may range from 3 to 12 consecutive months.

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Next Generation Electric Machines: Enabling Technologies
Department of Energy

April 12, 2016 (Concept Papers); June 7, 2016 (Full Applications)

The Next Generation Electric Machines (NGEM) program is an RD&D effort leveraging recent technology advancements in power electronics and motors to develop a new generation of energy efficient, high power density, high speed integrated MV drive systems for a wide variety of critical energy applications. This specific funding opportunity is focused on advancing three key enabling technologies that can take the development of electric machines a giant step further by addressing significant reductions in three major categories of energy losses in an electric machine.

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Financial Assistance Program (DE-FOA-0001414)
Office of Science/Department of Energy

Applications accepted until September 30, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The sponsor provides support for research in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The scientific and technical areas of interest include:

Advanced Scientific Computing Research--The mission of the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program is to advance applied mathematics and computer science; deliver, in partnership with disciplinary science, the most advanced computational scientific applications; advance computing and networking capabilities; and develop, in partnership with U.S. industry, future generations of computing hardware and tools for science. A particular challenge of this program is fulfilling the science potential of emerging computing systems and other novel computing architectures, which will require numerous and significant modifications to today's tools and techniques to deliver on the promise of exascale science.

Basic Energy Sciences--The mission of this program is to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels in order to provide the foundations for new energy technologies and to support DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The portfolio supports work in the natural sciences by emphasizing fundamental research in materials sciences, chemistry, geosciences, and biosciences. BES-supported scientific facilities provide specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientists to carry out experiments not possible at individual laboratories.

Biological and Environmental Research Program--The mission of the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program is to support fundamental research and scientific user facilities to achieve a predictive understanding of complex biological, climatic, and environmental systems for a secure and sustainable energy future.

Fusion Energy Sciences--The mission of the Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program is to expand the fundamental understanding of matter at very high temperature and density and to build the scientific foundation needed to develop a fusion energy source. This is accomplished by studying plasma and its interaction with its surroundings across wide ranges of temperature and density, developing advanced diagnostics to make detailed measurements of its properties and dynamics, and creating theoretical and computational models to resolve the essential physics principles.

High Energy Physics--This program's mission is to understand how the universe works at its most fundamental level, which is done by discovering the elementary constituents of matter and energy, probing the interactions between them, and exploring the basic nature of space and time.

Nuclear Physics--The mission of the Nuclear Physics (NP) program is to discover, explore, and understand all forms of nuclear matter. The fundamental particles that compose nuclear matter--quarks and gluons--are relatively well understood, but exactly how they fit together and interact to create different types of matter in the universe is still largely unknown. It is one of the enduring mysteries of the universe: What, really, is matter? What are the units that matter is made of, and how do they fit together to give matter the properties we observe?

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Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division
Department of Energy

SYNOPSIS:

The Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division supports the R&D, planning, construction, and operation of scientific user facilities for the development of novel nano-materials and for materials characterization through x-ray, neutron, and electron beam scattering; the former is accomplished through five Nanoscale Science Research Centers and the latter is accomplished through the world's largest suite of synchrotron radiation light source facilities, neutron scattering facilities, and electron-beam microcharacterization centers. (details)

These facilities provide unique capabilities to the scientific community and are a critical component of maintaining U.S. leadership in the physical sciences. Annually, the BES user facilities are visited by more than 15,000 scientists and engineers.pdf file (16KB) in many fields of science and technology.

The SUF staff members are responsible for construction project management, managing the funding of operations of these facilities, reviewing proposals, and assessing productivity. The Division also supports research activities leading to the improvement of today's facilities, paving the foundation for the development of next generation facilities.

USER FACILITIES AVAILABLE: 

The BES user facilities provide open access to specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientific users from universities, national laboratories, and industry to carry out experiments and develop theories that could not be done at their home institutions. These forefront research facilities require resource commitments well beyond the scope of any non-government institution and open up otherwise inaccessible facets of Nature to scientific inquiry. For approved, peer-reviewed projects, instrument time is available without charge to researchers who intend to publish their results in the open literature. These large-scale user facilities have made significant contributions to various scientific fields, including chemistry, physics, geology, materials science, environmental science, biology, and biomedical science. Over 16,000 scientists and engineers(16KB) conduct experiments at BES user facilities annually. Thousands of other researchers collaborate with these users and analyze the data measured at the facilities to publish new scientific findings in peer-reviewed journals.

 

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Wave Energy Prize
U.S. Department of Energy

Registration closes June 15, 2015; Design submission deadline is July 15, 2015

SYNOPSIS:

The Wave Energy Prize is a public prize challenge sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Water Power Program. The prize is designed to increase the diversity of organizations involved in Wave Energy Converter (WEC) technology development, while motivating and inspiring existing stakeholders. DOE envisions this competition will achieve game-changing performance enhancements to WEC devices, establishing a pathway to sweeping cost reductions on a commercial scale.

The wave energy industry is young and is experiencing many new innovations as evidenced by a sustained growth in patent activity. While the private industry is developing these early-concept WEC devices through design and benchtop prototype testing, funding is hard to secure for performance testing and evaluation of WEC devices in wave tanks at a meaningful scale. This is a problem for the industry since scaled WEC prototype tank testing, validation, and evaluation are key steps in the advancement of WEC technologies through the technical readiness levels to reach commercialization.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The Wave Energy Prize will encourage the development of more efficient WEC devices that double the energy captured from ocean waves, which in turn will reduce the cost of wave energy, making it more competitive with traditional energy solutions. 

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Department of Health & Human Services

The Early Detection Research Network: Biomarker Developmental Laboratories (U01)
Department of Health and Human Services

April 23, 2016 (Letter of Intent)
May 23, 2016 (Application Due Date)

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit organ-specific applications for Biomarker Developmental Laboratories (BDLs), one of the four scientific units of the recently funded Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). The EDRN is a national infrastructure funded to discover, develop, and validate biomarkers for risk assessment, detection, and molecular diagnosis and prognosis of early cancer. BDLs are responsible for the discovery, development, characterization, and testing of new, or the refinement of existing, biomarkers and biomarker assays for risk assessment, detection, and molecular diagnosis and prognosis of cancers.

The existing BDLs are primarily focused on ovary and gastrointestinal cancers. The proposed BDLs (to be supported under this FOA) must be focused on cancers of the breast, prostate and other genitourinary organs, and lung. In addition, cancers with rapidly rising incidence rates, e.g., endometrial, hepatocellular, kidney, thyroid, oropharyngeal cancers, and/or cancers with unique etiology, e.g., mesothelioma, will be responsive.

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Antimicrobial Use & Resistance Data Collection (U01)
Department of Health and Human Services

April 8, 2016 (Letter of Intent)
May 24, 2016 (Application Due Date)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announces the availability of fiscal year (FY) 2016 funds to support the collection of data on antimicrobial use in animal agriculture.  The funded data collection efforts are intended to 1) provide needed information on antimicrobial use practices in various animal production settings (i.e., cattle, swine, and poultry) and 2) provide important information on data collection methodologies to help optimize long-term strategies for collecting and reporting such data. 

This cooperative agreement will enable the collection of critical information to support the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria objective to enhance monitoring of antibiotic usage and management practices in food-producing animals.  The data obtained will support efforts to: (1) assess the rate of adoption of changes outlined in the FDA's Guidance for Industry #213; (2) help gauge the success of antibiotic stewardship efforts and guide their continued evolution and optimization; and (3) assess associations between antibiotic use practices and resistance.

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American Indians Into Nursing
Department of Health and Human Services/Indian Health Service

June 1, 2016

The purpose of this Indian Health Service cooperative agreement is to recruit, retain, graduate and increase the number of registered nurses, certified nurse midwives and nurse practitioners who deliver health care services to American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities.

The primary objectives of this cooperative agreement grant award are to: (1) recruit and train AI/AN individuals to be registered nurses; (2) facilitate associate degree registered nurses becoming baccalaureate prepared registered nurses; (3) provide a program that prepares practicing registered nurses for advance nursing education; (4) provide a program that encourages registered nurses and advance practice nurses to provide or continue to provide, health care services to AI/AN communities; and (5) provide scholarships to individuals that will cover tuition, books, fees, room and board, stipend for living expenses, or other expenses incurred in connection with nursing or advance practice nursing programs.

The funding opportunity announcement solicits applications that provide a preference to AI/AN students and a curriculum with a rural health and public health focus.

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NIOSH Exploratory/Developmental Grant Program (R21)
Department of Health and Human Services

July 20, 2016

The purpose of this grant program is to develop an understanding of the risks and conditions associated with occupational diseases and injuries, to explore methods for reducing risks and for preventing or minimizing exposure to hazardous conditions in the workplace, and to translate significant scientific findings into prevention practices and products that will effectively reduce work-related illnesses and injuries.

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Department of Justice (DOJ)

Comprehensive School Safety Initiative
Department of Justice

May 27, 2016

The Comprehensive School Safety Initiative (CSSI) funds rigorous research to produce practical knowledge that can improve the safety of schools and students. The initiative is carried out through partnerships between researchers, educators and other stakeholders, including law enforcement and mental health professionals. Projects funded under the CSSI are designed to produce knowledge that can be applied to schools and school districts across the nation for years to come. This solicitation includes multiple funding categories with different expectations and requirements to accomplish the purposes of the CSSI.

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Department of Transportation (DOT)

Broad Agency Announcement (BAA): Advancing Travel Behavior Information Gathering Through Public Domain Data
Federal Highway Administration

Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS:

Broad Agency Announcement (BAA): ADVANCING TRAVEL BEHAVIOR INFORMATION GATHERING THROUGH PUBLIC DOMAIN DATA SOL DTFH6115R00038 POC Samantha A Reizes, Phone (202) 366-4227, Fax (202) 366-3705, Email samantha.reizes@dot.gov - Matthew M. Carr, Contract Specialist, Phone 2023668404, Emailmatthew.carr@dot.govThis is a pre-solicitation notice (synopsis) for a broad agency announcement (BAA).

The Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) Office of Highway Policy Information has the responsibility to collect, analyze, and publish a wide range of data covering roadway inventory, performance and conditions, finance, vehicle, fuel, driver, travel behavior and future outlooks. The FHWA, through the Office of Highway Policy Information, is seeking proposals for research and development projects that could lead to innovative changes and revolutionary advances for travel behavior data and information-gathering through using public domain data rather than the traditional "survey" approach (for example through the National Household Travel Survey).

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The selected research projects would explore new methods and approaches in deciphering travel behavior data and information in metropolitan areas in the United States covering public transportation usages, private vehicles, for hire vehicles, bicycles and pedestrian movements. The research shall be in the area of travel behavior data and information acquisition methods. Research work in this area is considered foundational and therefore not all metropolitan areas in the United States need to be tested out. It is recommended that two to three metropolitan areas are to be selected by contractors for methods exploration and development.

The FHWA may award either contracts or cooperative agreements as a result of this BAA. The BAA will be released electronically only via this Government Point of Entry (GPE) otherwise known as Federal Business Opportunities (FBO) or www.fbo.gov. As such, no written, telephonic or other type of request for an advance copy of the solicitation will be entertained at this time. Potential offerors are encouraged to register on www.fbo.gov to receive any further information in reference to the subject action inclusive of any announcements, and/or amendments to the BAA after its release. CITE: https://www.fbo.gov/spg/DOT/FHWA/OAM/DTFH6115R00038/listing.html

 

 

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Foundations

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include:

  • examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and
  • exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

Researchers, as well as practitioners and public and private policy-makers working with researchers, are eligible to submit proposals through their organizations. Projects may be initiated from within many disciplines, including health services research, economics, sociology, political science, public policy, public health, public administration, law and business administration. RWJF encourages proposals from organizations on behalf of researchers who are just beginning their careers, who can serve either individually as principal investigators or as part of a project team comprising researchers or other collaborators with more experience.

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Education Reform - Shape Public Policy
Walton Family Foundation, Inc

LOI's accepted in an ongoing basis
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS:

The Walton Family Foundation seeks to build the capacity of organizations to help enact, strengthen and protect programs that empower parents to choose high-performing schools. The idea being that when all families are empowered to choose from among several quality school options, all schools will be fully motivated to provide the best possible education. Better school performance leads, in turn, to higher student achievement, lower dropout rates and greater numbers of students entering and completing college.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's Shape Public Policy initiative, focuses on advocacy groups promoting: Public charter school choice; Private school choice; District reforms, particularly open enrollment and district school choice; and, Cross-sector parental choice, parents are empowered to choose across school sectors. The need to continue improving the public policy environment is central to this education reform strategy.

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Environment Program
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

All organizations interested in applying for a grant from the Environment Program should read the Environment Program homepage. Depending on the nature of your organization's work, you may also want to read the Western Conservation page and the Western Conservation grant guidelines; the Energy and Climate page and Energy and Climate grant guidelines; and the Serving Bay Area Communities page before submitting a Letter of Inquiry. 

Our Approach

  • The vast majority of the grants we make are to organizations that work on policy development and advocacy because we think policy change provides the greatest opportunity to reach our goals.
  • We pursue our strategies with a focus on engaging the people and organizations most needed to achieve our goals. An important aspect of this approach is building a broad base of support among those not traditionally involved in environmental protection.
  • We are outcome focused and whenever possible use quantitative metrics to track progress toward goals.
  • Our Western Conservation grantmaking embraces the region west of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada, and includes Alaska, but not Hawaii.
  • Our Energy and Climate grantmaking is global.
  • Our grants for clean transportation mainly support work in China, Mexico, Brazil, and the United States.
  • We fund the vast majority of our Energy and Climate grants though large grants to organizations like the ClimateWorks Foundation and the Energy Foundation, which in turn make smaller grants to a variety of organizations.
  • When there is a high degree of alignment between our goals and those of a grantee, we often will provide general operating support rather than project support.
  • In some cases, we provide support to develop the organizational health and efficiency of our grantees.
  • Our Serving Bay Area Communities grantmaking funds efforts to improve outdoor recreational opportunities, urban parks, and access to transit in the San Francisco Bay Area and to minimize environmental threats in the region's disadvantaged communities.

If you think your project or organization fits within our guidelines, you are invited to submit a Letter of Inquiry for our Western Conservation, Energy and Climate, or Serving Bay Area Communities grantmaking. Please use the online Letter of Inquiry. Letters of Inquiry are accepted at any time. Do not submit full proposals until invited to do so; uninvited proposals will not be read.

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Grants for Organizations
Ford Foundation

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

For grant-seeking organizations, the Ford Foundation grant making focuses on reducing poverty and injustice; promoting democratic values; and advancing human knowledge, creativity and achievement. If your project reflects these priorities, you may submit a grant inquiry using the online form. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The foundation funds projects under the following focal areas: 

  • Democratic and Accountable Government
  • Economic Fairness 
  • Educational Opportunity and Scholarship
  • Freedom of Expression 
  • Gender, Sexuality and Reproductive Justice
  • Human Rights 
  • Metropolitan Opportunity 
  • Sustainable Development 

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Grants Program
National Endowment for Financial Education

LOI due on December 2, 2014
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The NEFE grants program seeks innovative research that can make a profound contribution to the field of financial literacy. Inquiries are encouraged from disciplines in fields as diverse as: behavior, economics, neuroscience, sociology, psychology, marketing, finance, education, change theory, and decision sciences and others.

NEFE seeks projects whose outcomes can improve the public's ability to achieve personal and household financial well-being. Of particular interest are pro-active research projects initiated from one of a broad spectrum of scholarly disciplines whose findings may cultivate critical thinking in the financial literacy community. Also of interest are development projects that put research recommendations into action. Project outcomes must be capable of achieving traction and measurable impact with audiences such as financial education intermediaries, researchers, practitioners, decision makers, and others who can achieve effective outreach to a target population with an unmet financial literacy need or to the general public.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Project outcomes should be actionable in the field of financial literacy, directly relevant to the financial well-being of the public, and able to be applied broadly. Funding requests are assessed within the parameters of the following three key grant themes:

1. Understand Financial Behavior: A fundamental element in all projects is the necessity to address optimal financial behaviors. Projects should include outcomes relevant to understanding or improving financial behaviors of specific segments of the American public or the public in general. NEFE encourages inquiry within the physical, social, and psychological sciences to facilitate the public's ability to improve personal financial well-being. Findings must be presented in a manner that engages educators, policy makers, segments of the public, and/or individuals to adopt policies, practices, attitudes, and skills that result in positive public and personal outcomes.

2. Advance Innovative Thinking: NEFE encourages projects that spawn rigorous, proactive research initiated from a broad spectrum of scholarly disciplines where potential findings indicate strong possibilities to advance critical thinking, cultivate vigorous debate, challenge the status quo, and/or illuminate trends likely to affect the personal financial well-being of the American public.

3. Assure Significance to Society: Projects should provide evidence that outcomes are likely to produce practical benefit for primary stakeholders such as financial education intermediaries, researchers, practitioners, decision makers, and/or entities who can achieve effective educational outreach to a population segment with an unmet financial literacy need or the public in general. Consideration is paid to research that pertains to solutions with traction and scale sufficient to make a measurable difference in financial responsibility, stability, and/or well-being.

Research findings are expected to result in actionable recommendations or make a profound and credible contribution to the financial literacy body of knowledge.

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Grants Program
Dell (Susan & Michael) Foundation

There is no deadline for grant applications.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation provides grants focus on education, health and family economic stability -- the factors essential to ensuring that underprivileged children escape poverty to become healthy, productive adults.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The sponsor focuses on urban education, childhood health, and family economic stability.

Urban Education: Education-related grants make up about two-thirds of the sponsor's global giving. The sponsor focuses on improving student performance, ensuring consistent quality of education and increasing access to schools.

Childhood Health: The sponsor's global health portfolio improves access to quality healthcare services, promotes healthy nutrition and lifestyle behaviors among families and children, and fosters world-class applied research.

Family Economic Stability: The sponsor's economic stability portfolio gives families opportunities to improve their socioeconomic status and break the cycle of poverty so their children have a chance at stable, productive lives.

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Grants Program
Spencer (W.L.S.) Foundation

LOI's accepted on a rolling basis
Full submissions by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation funds initiatives that embrace and encourage creativity and risk taking. The Foundation likes the leverage that arises from seed grants, challenge grants, and matching grants.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The program areas are:

ARTS - The Foundation funds educational activities, publications and outreach associated with innovative art and/or contemporary art exhibitions, especially those focusing on contemporary Asian Art. The Foundation is interested in projects that encourage knowledge about art and culture, foster international understanding, and are supported by academic scholarship.

EDUCATION - The Foundation funds programs that are innovative and that motivate children to stay in school, do well academically, and continue on in their education beyond high school (to college or other higher education opportunities). In this area, the Foundation may continue to fund programs that it believes in, and the Foundation may fund the replication of a successful program in a new site. The Foundation tends to fund programs that are national or regional in nature, but which have a chapter in San Francisco.

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Grants Program
RGK Foundation

LOI's accepted on a rolling basis
Full submissions by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community, and Health/Medicine. While RGK Foundation has no geographic restrictions, funding is limited to projects conducted within the United States.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's primary interests within Education include programs that focus on formal K-12 education (particularly mathematics, science and reading), teacher development, literacy, and higher education.

Within Community, the Foundation supports a broad range of human services, community improvement, abuse prevention, and youth development programs. Human service programs of particular interest to the Foundation include children and family services, early childhood development, and parenting education. The Foundation supports a variety of Community Improvement programs including those that enhance non-profit management and promote philanthropy and voluntarism. Youth development programs supported by the Foundation typically include after-school educational enrichment programs that supplement and enhance formal education systems to increase the chances for successful outcomes in school and life. The Foundation is also interested in programs that attract female and minority students into the fields of mathematics, science, and technology.

The Foundation's current interests in the area of Health/Medicine include programs that promote the health and well-being of children, programs that promote access to health services, and Foundation-initiated programs focusing on ALS.

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Grants Program
Hearst Foundations

Proposals are accepted year round

SYNOPSIS: 

The Hearst Foundations support well-established nonprofit organizations that address important issues within its major areas of interests - education, health, culture, and social service - and that primarily serve large demographic and/or geographic constituencies. In each area of funding, the Foundations look to identify those organizations achieving truly differentiated results relative to other organizations making similar efforts for similar populations. The Foundations also look for evidence of sustainability beyond their support.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

CULTURE - The Hearst Foundations fund cultural institutions that offer meaningful programs in the arts and sciences, prioritizing those which enable engagement by young people and create a lasting impression. The Foundations also fund select programs nurturing and developing artistic talent.

EDUCATION - The Hearst Foundations fund educational institutions demonstrating uncommon success in preparing students to thrive in a global society. The Foundations' focus is largely on higher education, but they also fund innovative models of early childhood and K-12 education, as well as professional development.

HEALTH - The Hearst Foundations assist leading regional hospitals, medical centers and specialized medical institutions providing access to high-quality healthcare for low-income populations. In response to the shortage of healthcare professionals necessary to meet the country's evolving needs, the Foundations also fund programs designed to enhance skills and increase the number of practitioners and educators across roles in healthcare. Because the Foundations seek to use their funds to create a broad and enduring impact on the nation's health, support for medical research and the development of young investigators is also considered.

SOCIAL SERVICE - The Hearst Foundations fund direct-service organizations that tackle the roots of chronic poverty by applying effective solutions to the most challenging social and economic problems. The Foundations prioritize supporting programs that have proven successful in facilitating economic independence and in strengthening families. Preference is also given to programs with the potential to scale productive practices in order to reach more people in need.

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Grants Program - Human Rights and Social Justice
Blaustein (Morton K and Jane) Foundation

Letters of intent and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of this program is to advance fundamental human rights both in the United States and abroad.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of this program is to advance fundamental human rights both in the United States and abroad. Areas of interest include: Equal justice for US citizens, as well as immigrants and asylum seekers in the United States, through legal strategies, advocacy and policy reform; Responses to urgent human rights crises created by natural disasters, civil strife, or war; and Social justice initiatives particularly around impoverished women and children, and vulnerable youth.

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Learning & Leadership Grants
NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis. Next deadline is October 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides support to public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences; or Grants to groups fund collegial study.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Grants support public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences, such as summer institutes or action research; or Grants to groups fund collegial study, including study groups, action research, lesson study, or mentoring experiences for faculty or staff new to an assignment.

All professional development must improve practice, curriculum, and student achievement. Decisions regarding the content of the professional growth activities must be based upon an assessment of student work undertaken with colleagues, and must be integrated into the institutional planning process. Recipients are expected to exercise professional leadership by sharing their new learning with their colleagues.

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Media Grantmaking
MacArthur (John D. & Catherine T.) Foundation

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

MacArthur's goal in media grantmaking is to provide the public with high-quality, professionally-produced documentary films, deep and analytical journalism, and well-produced news and public affairs programming. In a media environment characterized by proliferating information sources of varying degrees of reliability, the Foundation seeks to support serious, fact-based journalism for television, radio and the web, the type of original reporting that is likely to be blogged about, linked to, tweeted, and otherwise circulated throughout the Internet. Programs supported by the Foundation inform and educate their viewers about important and under-reported topics, provide balance and accurate information, encourage global conversations, and use technology to tell stories in engaging and interactive ways.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

MacArthur supports the production of social-issue documentary films on important contemporary topics, intended for a broad audience, particularly in the U.S. Over the last 30 years, we have supported over 200 films by some of the most critically acclaimed filmmakers in the country. Their documentary work combines exceptional storytelling with in-depth journalism. Many of these films have had a long life beyond festivals and broadcast, and been used in educational, community, and policymaking settings over many years, sparking conversations and activities that contribute to social and policy change.

Through an open call process, the program seeks to fund documentary projects that address the significant social challenges of our time or explore important but under-reported topics. Domestic and international topics are welcome, and preference will be given to projects that align with one of MacArthur's grantmaking areas. Support will be provided primarily for production and post-production activities, and to experienced filmmakers based in the U.S. with track records of completing excellent feature-length films that have been broadcast nationally and internationally and received critical recognition.

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Program Area Funding
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Letters of inquiry are required and are accepted on a rolling basis
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation supports leaders and institutions working to achieve a biologically rich, sustainable world where all families can plan for their children and all children reach their potential. We work on the issues our founders cared about most. 

Program Areas: 

  • Conservation and Science
  • Population and Reproductive Health 
  • Children, Families, and Communities
  • Organizational Effectiveness and Philanthropy 

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Public Understanding of Science, Technology & Economics
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

The Foundation makes grants year-round.

SYNOPSIS: 

This program seeks to bridge the two cultures--the humanities and the sciences--through support of books, radio, film, television, theatre, and new media to reach a wide, non-specialized audience.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The program's primary aim is to build bridges between the two cultures of science and the humanities and to develop a common language so that they can better understand and speak to one another--and ultimately to grasp that they belong to a single common culture. The Foundation has established a nationwide initiative that works through programs in books, theater, film, television, radio, and new media to commission, develop, produce, and distribute new work and new initiatives that focus on science and technology for the lay public.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES:

Interested grantseekers with a relevant project idea should e-mail a one page letter of inquiry to Program Director Doron Weber.

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Alternatives Research Grant Program
Alternatives Research and Development Foundation

May 2, 2016

The Alternatives Research & Development Foundation, a U.S. leader in the funding and promotion of alternatives to the use of laboratory animals in research, testing, and education, is currently soliciting research proposals for its 2016 Alternatives Research Grant Program. For 20 years, this innovative program has created opportunities for scientists who have interest and expertise in alternatives research.

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New Connections: Increasing Diversity of RWJF Programming
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

May 4, 2016

New Connections has long focused on expanding the diversity of perspectives that inform Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) programming and introducing to the Foundation new researchers from across disciplines. The program supports a network of early career researchers from backgrounds that are underrepresented in research disciplines or historically disadvantaged.
 
Participants will become the next generations of leaders, collaborating across sectors to upend the status quo, address health disparities, and take bold steps to achieve greater equity in communities across the country.

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Research Grant
Brain Aneurysm Foundation

May 18, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The Brain Aneurysm Foundation invites applications for basic scientific research directed at early detection, improved treatment modalities, and technological advances that will ultimately improve outcomes for patients with brain aneurysms, as well as projects that are translational, clinical/outcome, early detection, imaging, and SAH/SAH complications focused.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Any project with the potential to advance basic scientific, translational, and clinical brain aneurysm research will be considered. Grants are available for research conducted in the United States and Canada.

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Grand Challenges Explorations
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

May 11, 2016

Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative to encourage innovative and unconventional global health and development solutions, is accepting grant proposals until May 11, 2016, 11:30 A.M. US Pacific Day Light Time. Applicants can be at any experience level; in any discipline; and from any organization, including colleges and universities, government laboratories, research institutions, non-profit organizations, and for-profit companies.

Two-page proposals are being accepted online on the following topics:

Initial grants will be US $100,000 each, and projects showing promise will have the opportunity to receive additional funding of up to US $1 million. Full descriptions of the new topics and application instructions in Chinese, English, French, Portuguese and Spanish are available here.

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Colleges and Universities Grant Programs
Alavi Foundation

Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS:

The Alavi Foundation has been giving grants to colleges and universities since 1984. These grants were made in support of Shia studies, Iranian studies and the teaching of Persian language. In the past twenty five years, Alavi Foundation has distributed over several millions of dollars in the form of grants to over thirty colleges and universities in North America.

Among the academic institutions that have received grants are: Harvard University, Princeton University, Columbia University, University of California, McGill University, Rutgers University, Catholic University of America, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of Arizona, Portland State University, Binghamton State University, San Diego State University, Sacred Heart University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Wisconsin, Boston University, Georgia State University, Ohio State University, University of Virginia, University of Texas, Carleton University, University of Alberta, University of Southern California, California State University, Kutztown University, Hunter College, Bard College, Lake Forest College, and Hartford Seminary.

The absence of diplomatic relations between Iran and the United States has resulted in a substantially diminished exchange of scholars and students between the two countries. As a result, Shia studies, Iranian studies, and especially the teaching of Persian language have all drastically been reduced or even eliminated from many university programs. Therefore, the Alavi Foundation's academic grant program has been vital to the community and toward the preservation of Shia studies, Iranian studies, and the teaching of persian language.

The Alavi Foundation encourages universities in North America to offer courses on Persian language, Iranian studies and the Islamic culture with a focus on Shi'ite studies. Alavi Foundation grants are instrumental in building the continuity and quality of such higher education programs.

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Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

March 18, 2016 (Brief Proposals); May 18, 2016 (Full Proposals, if invited)

The Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP) is a free, summer enrichment program to strengthen the academic proficiency and career development of rising sophomore and junior college students, and community college students from backgrounds that are underrepresented in the health professions and who are interested in pursuing health-related careers.

Through this call for proposals, RWJF seeks to identify an increased number of institutions to participate as SMDEP sites--providing this proven model for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) enrichment, life-skills development, exposure to health-related professions, and research and leadership training.

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Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

LOI due March 15, 2016
Full submission due June 17, 2016 (by invitation only)

SYNOPSIS:

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health (P4A) was created to help build an evidence base for policies that can lead to a Culture of Health. P4A seeks to engage long-standing health and health care researchers, as well as experts in fields like housing, education, transportation, and the built environment, to name a few, who have not worked in health before. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

We welcome applications from all investigators, and the following are especially encouraged to apply:

  • Interdisciplinary or cross-sector research teams;
  • Investigators from a variety of areas and disciplines, including but not limited to architecture, business, community planning, data scientists, economics, epidemiology, health policy, medicine, public health, social work, sociology; urban planning and system engineers;
  • First-time applicants to RWJF.

The goal is to develop research that generates actionable evidence--the data and information that can guide legislators and other policymakers, public agencies, educators, advocates, community groups, and individuals. The research may examine established laws, regulations, and policies as well as potential new policies and approaches. The research funded under this call for proposals (CFP) should inform the significant gaps in our knowledge regarding what policies can serve as levers to improve population health and well-being, and achieve greater levels of health equity. Additional information on this program can be found at policiesforaction.org.

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International Research Scholars Program
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), The Wellcome Trust, and The Gulbenkian Foundation

June 30, 2016

 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), The Wellcome Trust and The Gulbenkian Foundation, are jointly holding a competition to award grants to outstanding early career scientists working outside the United States and other G7 countries. This International Research Scholars program aims to provide support for promising international scientists and to bring them into an eco-system that can foster their work and allow them to better understand and address biomedical issues of global relevance.

We invite you to check this blog by Dr. Chris Wilson. Application deadline is June 30, 2016. For more information please visit here.

 

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The Blue Economy Challenge: Launching a Blue Revolution for Aquaculture
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

June 30, 2016

The Blue Economy Challenge: Launching a Blue Revolution for Aquaculture: This challenge aims to find solutions to three important issues of aquaculture: 1) Rethinking feed for aquaculture 2) New ocean products and 3) Sustainable design by encouraging innovations that will revolutionize aquaculture in the developing world with a focus on the Indian Ocean region, where transformations in aquaculture can help eradicate poverty, end hunger, and preserve ecosystems.

Application deadline is June 30, 2016. For more information please visit http://www.theblueeconomychallenge.org

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Lyle Spencer Research Awards (LSRA): Advancing Understanding of Education Practice and Its Improvement
Spencer Foundation

Letter of Intent due: July 12, 2016

This program was introduced in 2014 as the successor to the Foundation's long-standing Major Research Grants program. Its aim is to support intellectually ambitious, large-scale education research projects with budgets between $100,000 and $1,000,000. This program encourages proposals initiated by scholars across a variety of disciplines and fields in an effort to create much-needed space for creative and ambitious research projects that promise to advance our understanding of educational practice and its improvement.

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Healthy Eating Research: Building Evidence to Prevent Childhood Obesity
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

August 3, 2016

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is seeking research proposals that will inform efforts aimed at helping all children grow up at a healthy weight. Studies must be related to food, nutrition, and healthy eating and have strong potential to help reduce children's excess calorie intake and eliminate racial, income, and/or geographic disparities in childhood obesity rates.

Up to one-third of the available funds will be allocated to research focused on the rural United States, including the Appalachian region, Asian/Pacific Islander children, and/or American Indian children.

Each grant will award up to $190,000 for a maximum funding period of 18 months. Approximately $2.4 million will be awarded.

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Evidence for Action: Investigator-Initiated Research to Build a Culture of Health
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

Evidence for Action: Investigator-Initiated Research to Build a Culture of Health is a national program of RWJF that supports the Foundation's commitment to building a Culture of Health in the United States. The program aims to provide individuals, organizations, communities, policymakers, and researchers with the empirical evidence needed to address the key determinants of health encompassed in the Culture of Health Action Framework. In addition, Evidence for Action will also support efforts to assess outcomes and set priorities for action.  It will do this by encouraging and supporting creative, rigorous research on the impact of innovative programs, policies and partnerships on health and well-being, and on novel approaches to measuring health determinants and outcomes.

Approximately $2.2 million will be awarded annually. We expect to fund between five and 12 grants each year for periods of up to 30 months. We anticipate that this funding opportunity will remain open for at least a period of three years; however, decisions about modifications to the program and the duration of the program will be made by RWJF at its sole discretion.

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Targeted Grants in Mathematics and Physical Sciences
Simons Foundation, Mathematics and Physical Sciences Division

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The program is intended to support high-risk projects of exceptional promise and scientific importance on a case-by-case basis. 

Applicants may submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) through proposalCENTRAL (https://proposalcentral.altum.com/default.asp) beginning August 1, 2015. The deadline is rolling and an applicant can submit at any time.

Please coordinate submission of the proposal with the appropriate officials in accordance with institution policies. Please refer to the Application Instructions for further information on and requirements for submitting an application.

For projects with Principal Investigator (PIs) at different institutions, the LOI should be signed submitted by the PI designated as the main PI and his/her institution.

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National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)

ROSES 2015: Planetary Major Equipment
National Aeronautics & Space Administration

April 30, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

This program element allows proposals for new or upgraded analytical, computational, telescopic, and other instrumentation required by investigations in eligible Planetary Science research programs, as offered in this solicitation. Eligible programs are: Emerging Worlds (C.2); Solar System Workings (C.3); Habitable Worlds (C.4); Exobiology (C.5); Solar System Observations (C.6); Planetary Science and Technology from Analog Research (C.14); Planetary Protection Research (C.15); Laboratory Analysis of Returned Samples (C.18); and Exoplanets (E.3). A Planetary Major Equipment (PME) proposal may be submitted in one of two ways: (1) as a special section that is appended to a new science research proposal to one of the eligible programs in this NRA; or (2) as a stand-alone equipment proposal submitted to one of the eligible programs. A stand-alone PME proposal must be explicitly affiliated with an existing "parent" award in the eligible program. A stand-alone PME proposal may also be affiliated with an existing award in the following list of "grandfathered" (discontinued) programs that were solicited under ROSES announcements from previous years. See program link for additional details. 

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Human Exploration Research Opportunities (HERO) (NNJ15ZSA001N)
National Aeronautics & Space Administration

September 3, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Announcement (NRA), entitled Human Exploration Research Opportunities (HERO)-2015, solicits research in support of NASA's Human Research Program. The HRP contains six Elements: Space Radiation, Human Health and Countermeasures, Exploration Medical Capability, Behavioral Health and Performance, Space Human Factors and Habitability, and International Space Station Medical Project.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Fourteen disciplines or areas support the Program: Behavioral Health and Performance, Bone, Cardiovascular, Extravehicular Activity, Immunology, Medical Capabilities, Muscle, Nutrition, Pharmacology, Radiation, Sensorimotor, Advanced Food Technology, Advanced Environmental Health, and Space Human Factors Engineering. National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is a nonprofit organization competitively selected by NASA that uses an integrated team approach to advance biomedical research and countermeasure development. NSBRI works in close partnership with the HRP through a Cooperative Agreement. This NRA covers all aspects of research to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration, and to ensure safe and productive human spaceflight.

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National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Advanced Neural Prosthetics Research and Development (U01)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent Deadline: One month prior to application due date
Full Proposal Deadline: Standard Dates apply, by 5 p.m. local time

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications to pursue translational and pilot clinical studies for neural prosthetics. The program will utilize the cooperative agreement mechanism to enable support for milestone-driven projects for the development and demonstration of clinically-useful neural prosthetic devices. Activities supported in this program include implementation of clinical prototype devices, preclinical safety and efficacy testing, design verification and validation activities, pursuit of regulatory approval for clinical study, and proof-of-concept or pilot clinical studies.

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Advancing Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence (R01)
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is being issued by the NIH Adherence Network through the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), with participation from multiple NIH Institutes and Centers. This FOA seeks Research Project Grant (R01) applications that propose interventions to significantly improve medication adherence in individuals. Applications may target medication adherence in the context of treatment for a single illness or chronic condition (e.g., hypertension), to stave off a disease recurrence (e.g., cancer) or for multiple comorbid conditions (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, alcohol use disorders and HIV/AIDS). A well-articulated theoretical or conceptual framework is key for applications encouraged under this announcement. Primary outcomes of the research can include a patient self-report of medication adherence, but must also at least one non-self-report measure of medication adherence (e.g., pharmacy refill records, electronic monitoring, etc.). In addition, applications are encouraged to include a relevant health outcome or biomarker (e.g., blood pressure, viral load in HIV-infected individuals, cholesterol levels, HbA1c) that is expected to be affected by changes in the targeted adherence behavior. For diseases without identified biomarkers, inclusion of a clinical assessment (e.g., a medicine blood level, diagnostic interview or an independent clinician rating of the symptoms and behaviors) may be considered. 

 

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AHRQ Health Services Research Projects (R01)
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality/DHHS

Standard Due Dates

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) invites applications for discrete, specified health services research projects. The projects will be performed by the named investigator and study team. The R01 research plan proposed by the applicant institution/organization must be related to the mission and portfolio priority research interests of AHRQ. This FOA will use the AHRQ Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

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Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS (DP2)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Avenir means future in French, and this award looks toward the future by supporting early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field. NIDA has developed two Avenir Award Programs, one for HIV/AIDS research and the other for genetics or epigenetics studies. The Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS will support creative individuals who wish to pursue innovative research at the nexus of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. The Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS will support research approaches for substance using populations with or at risk for HIV/AIDS that may lead to improved preventive interventions, improved therapies and/or long term retention in care, and ultimately, eradication of HIV.

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement and Management in Pain Research (R21)(R01)(R03)
National Institutes of Health

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute insult is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators.

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-119.html (R21)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/PA-files/PA-13-118.html (RO1)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/PA-files/PA-13-117.html (R03)


Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award (Parent K25)
National Institutes of Health/DHHS

January 7, 2015, February 12, 2015, May 7, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for the Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award. The award is designed to attract to NIH-relevant research those investigators whose quantitative science and engineering research has thus far not been focused primarily on questions of health and disease. The K25 award will provide support and "protected time" for a period of supervised study and research for productive professionals with quantitative (e.g., mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, chemistry) and engineering backgrounds to integrate their expertise with NIH-relevant research. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The overall goal of the NIH Research Career Development program is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in appropriate scientific disciplines to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. Examples of quantitative scientific and technical backgrounds considered appropriate for this award include, but are not limited to: mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, chemistry, and engineering. The specific objectives of the K25 award are to:

--Encourage research-oriented quantitative scientists and engineers with little or no experience in biomedicine, bioengineering, bioimaging, or behavioral research to gain fundamental knowledge in these areas and develop relevant research skills, and to gain experience in current concepts, advanced methods, and experimental approaches that will allow them to conduct basic or clinical biomedical, behavioral, bioimaging, or bioengineering research, and to become independent investigators or play leading roles in multi-disciplinary research teams.

--Increase the pool of quantitative researchers who can conduct biomedical, behavioral, or bioengineering studies, capitalizing on the quantitative backgrounds of these investigators to inform new directions in biomedical, behavior and bioengineering research.

--Provide a unique opportunity for candidates holding degrees in quantitative science or engineering to embark on three to five years of special study, including course work, seminars, meetings, and mentored research, to achieve the career enhancement goals outlined above.

Because of the focus on a progression toward independence as a quantitative biomedical, behavioral, bioimaging, or bioengineering researcher, the prospective candidate for the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award will require enhanced skills in the experimental, theoretical and conceptual approaches used in biomedicine, behavioral science, bioimaging or bioengineering. To satisfy this requirement, the candidate should propose a period of study and career development that is complementary to his or her previous research and experience. 

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mHealth Tools to Promote Effective Patient - "Provider Communication, Adherence to Treatment and Self Management of Chronic Diseases In Underserved Populations (R01)

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate research utilizing Mobile Health (mHealth) tools aimed at the improvement of effective patient-provider communication, adherence to treatment and self-management of chronic diseases in underserved populations. With the rapid expansion of cellular networks and substantial advancements in Smartphone technologies, it is now possible - and affordable - to transmit patient data digitally from remote areas to specialists in urban areas, receive real-time feedback, and capture that consultation in a database. mHealth tools, therefore, may facilitate more timely and effective patient-provider communication through education communication around goal setting, treatment reminders, feedback on patient progress and may improve health outcomes. This announcement encourages the development, testing and comparative effective analysis of interventions utilizing mHealth technologies in underserved populations. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) (R03) and (R21) award mechanisms.

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-330.html (R01)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-331.html (R03)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-332.html (R21)


NIAID Career Transition Award (K22)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of the NIAID Career Transition Award (CTA) program is to increase and maintain a strong cohort of new and talented NIH-supported independent investigators that will address the health needs of the Nation. The NIAID CTA is specifically designed to facilitate the transition from a postdoctoral research position to an independent research position.

The overall goal of the NIH Research Career Development program is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available in appropriate scientific disciplines to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. In addition to this opportunity, NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) support a variety of other mentored career development programs designed to foster the transition of new investigators to research independence. These other programs may be more suitable for particular candidates.  NIH also supports non-mentored career development programs for independent investigators. More information about Career programs may be found at the NIH Extramural Training Mechanisms website.

The objective of the of the NIAID Career Transition Award is to support postdoctoral fellows transitioning to positions of assistant professor or equivalent, and initiate a successful biomedical career as an independent research scientist.

NIH believes that the creativity and innovation of new independent investigators in their early career stages play an integral role in addressing our Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. However, the average age of first-time (new) Principal Investigators obtaining R01 research funding from the NIH has risen to 42 years for Ph.D. degree holders and 44 years for M.D./Ph.D. degree holders in 2013. The intent of the NIAID K22 program is to help alleviate this trend and to assist new investigators in transitioning to stable independent research positions at an earlier age and with an enhanced probability of success in obtaining independent NIH or other independent research support.

Nature of the career/research transition opportunity

The K22 award will provide two years of support to conduct biomedical research as an independent scientist at an extramural sponsoring institution/organization to which the individual has been recruited, been offered and has accepted a tenure-track full-time assistant professor position (or equivalent). This support is to allow the individual to continue to work toward establishing his/her own independent research program and prepare an application for regular research grant support (R01).

The postdoctoral fellow, also referred to as a candidate, submits a K22 application from the institution where s/he currently pursues his/her postdoctoral research training.  The application will be peer reviewed and assigned an overall impact score.  Successful candidates (i.e. whose application has received a fundable overall impact score) will receive an approval letter from NIAID that will include the terms and conditions to activate the K22 award. In order to activate the K22 award, the candidate will need to secure a tenure-track full-time assistant professor position within a year of the receipt of the approval letter.  Once the assistant professor position has been secured, the candidate will submit updated information about the K22 application with the support of the sponsoring institution.  The sponsoring institution can be the same as the post-doctoral institution, though it is most likely a different institution from the original submission of the K22 application.  The updated information of the transition to an assistant professor position at the sponsoring institution will be evaluated by senior NIAID staff to ensure that all programmatic requirements are met prior to the activation of the K22 award. The details of the requirements for the activation of the K22 award are described in Section VI of this announcement.

 

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NIAMS Small Grant Program For New Investigators (R03)
National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is November 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) invites applications to stimulate and facilitate the entry of promising new investigators into research on arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases and injuries. This FOA will provide support for pilot research that is likely to lead to a subsequent individual research project grant (R01). Clinical trials of any phase will not be supported by this FOA. This program will use the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The NIAMS Small Grant program (R03) is designed to facilitate the entry of promising new investigators into research on arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases and injuries by providing support for pilot research that is likely to lead to a subsequent individual research project grant (R01).

Division of Musculoskeletal Diseases--supports fundamental research in bone, muscle and connective tissue biology as well as research aimed at improving the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system and its component tissues. Key public health problems addressed by this research include osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, orthopaedic disorders and injuries, including sports medicine and regenerative medicine and the muscular dystrophies.

Division of Skin and Rheumatic Diseases--promotes and supports basic, translational and clinical studies of skin biology; wound healing; autoimmune, inflammatory, and genetic skin disorders; adult as well as pediatric rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, lupus, scleroderma, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune myositis. Approaches that could be utilized by this program may include, but are not limited to genetics and genomics research, identification of risk factors, autoimmunity and inflammation research, biopsychosocial/behavioral research, outcomes and health services research, and research leading to prevention, diagnosis and cure of these disorders.

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NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS and Drug Use Research (DP1)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

The NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research supports individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose high-impact research that will open new areas of HIV/AIDS research and/or lead to new avenues for prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The term avant-garde is used to describe highly innovative approaches that have the potential to be transformative. The proposed research should reflect approaches and ideas that are substantially different from those already being pursued by the investigator or others. The NIDA Avant-Garde award supports innovative, basic research that may lead to improved preventive interventions or therapies; creative, new strategies to prevent disease transmission; novel approaches to improve disease outcomes; and creative approaches to eradicating HIV or improving the lives of those living with HIV.

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NIDA Avenir Award Program for Genetics or Epigenetics of Substance Abuse (DP2)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Avenir means future in French, and this award looks toward the future by supporting early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field. NIDA has developed two Avenir Award Programs, one for HIV/AIDS research and the other for genetics or epigenetics studies.

The Genetic Avenir Award program supports early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies that open new areas of research for the genetics or epigenetics of addiction. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field of genetics or epigenetics of substance abuse.

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NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (DP2) SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
National Institutes of Health

Special Announcement $1.5M DP2 Award
See Program Annoucement

The NIH Director's New Innovator (DP2) Award initiative supports a small number of early stage investigators of exceptional creativity who propose bold and highly innovative new research approaches that have the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important problems in biomedical and behavioral research. The New Innovator Award initiative complements ongoing efforts by NIH and its Institutes and Centers to fund early stage investigators through R01 grants, which continue to be the major sources of NIH support for early stage investigators. The NIH Director's New Innovator Award initiative is a component of the High Risk - High Reward Research Program of the NIH Common Fund.

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NIH Director's Pioneer Award (DP1) SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
National Institutes of Health

Special Announcement $2.5M DPI Award
See Program Announcement

The NIH Pioneer Award initiative complements NIH's traditional, investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering and possibly transforming approaches to addressing major biomedical or behavioral challenges that have the potential to produce an unusually high impact on a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research. To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect substantially different scientific directions from those already being pursued in the investigator's research program or elsewhere.

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NINDS Requirements for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Development and Resource Sharing

The purpose of this Notice is to alert the research community to the current NINDS best practices guidelines for development and distribution of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) through the NINDS Repository, also known as the NINDS Human Genetics Resource Center. The iPSC lines available through the NINDS Repository were primarily developed through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and collaborations with government (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)) and non-government organizations (the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association, the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, CHDI, the Hereditary Disease Foundation, the Huntington's Disease Society of America, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, and the Parkinson's Disease Foundation).

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NLM Express Research Grants in Biomedical Informatics (R01)
National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers support for innovative research in biomedical informatics. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is interdisciplinary, encompassing informatics problem areas in the application domains of health care, public health, basic biomedical research, bioinformatics, biological modeling, translational research and health information management in disasters. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal organization, management, presentation and utilization of information relevant to human health and biology. Informatics research produces concepts, tools and approaches that advance what is known in the field and have the capacity to improve human health. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers support for innovative research in biomedical informatics. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is interdisciplinary, encompassing informatics problem areas in the application domains of health care, public health, basic biomedical research, bioinformatics, biological modeling, translational research and health information management in disasters. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal organization, management, presentation and utilization of information relevant to human health and biology. Informatics research produces concepts, tools and approaches that advance what is known in the field and have the capacity to improve human health. Informatics projects of interest to NLM involve the application of computer and information sciences concepts to information problems in a biomedical domain. NLM also supports research projects focused on biomedical (rather than informatics) research questions, but approached exclusively by novel or advanced informatics techniques applied to information and data produced by others.

The following basic informatics problem areas demonstrate the scope of NLM's research interests:

--Information & knowledge processing, including understanding, translation or summarization of natural language in real-time or near real-time, integration of heterogeneous data types.

--Advanced information retrieval, knowledge discovery in databases, discovery mining, and other techniques for in silico discovery and research including approaches for accelerating the linkage of phenomic and genomic information.

--Incorporation of machine intelligence into decision tools and resources for health care providers, scientists and consumers.

--Modeling complex data, simulations, information visualization and presentation approaches to enhance decisions, learning or understanding.

--Innovative approaches for ensuring privacy and security of clinical and biomedical research data.

Examples of application domains for these informatics problem areas include, but are not limited to:

--Health Care; Public Health; Disaster Information Management;

--Biological, Social and Behavioral Research relating to human health;

--Multi-level computational models of biological and clinical processes;

--Translational Research that supports (1) uses of data in electronic health records to support biomedical research and (2) translation of biomedical research outcomes through application to problems in clinical care;

--Information Sciences; Simulation; User customization; Virtual environments; Innovative information techniques.

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Program Announcements

  • Advancing Research in      Voice Disorders (R21), (R01)
         (PA-14-235) , (PA-14-236)
         National Institute on Deafness and Other      Communication Disorders
         Application      Receipt/Submission Date(s): Multiple      dates, see announcement.  

  • NIOSH Support for      Conferences and Scientific Meetings (U13)
         (PAR-14-229) 
         National Institute for Occupational Safety and      Health
         Application      Receipt/Submission Date(s): Multiple      dates, see announcement.

Program Notices

  • Notice of Clarification      Regarding the Additional Educational Information Required for PA-14-147,      148, and 149 "Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award      (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31, F31 - Div, and F32)"
         (NOT-OD-14-094)  (NOT-OD-14-095) (NOT-OD-14-096) National      Institutes of Health

  • Notice of NEI      Participation in Administrative Supplements for Research on Dietary      Supplements (Admin Supp)
         (NOT-EY-14-001)
         National Eye Institute

  • Notice of Clarification      and Correction to PAR-14-207 "Center for Inherited Disease Research      (CIDR) High Throughput Sequencing and Genotyping Resource Access      (X01)"
         (NOT-HG-14-028)
         National Human Genome Research Institute

  • Notice of NHLBI      Participation in PAR-14-201 "Administrative Supplements for Research      on Dietary Supplements (Admin Supp)"
         (NOT-HL-14-224)
         National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Notice to Correct      NOT-NS-13-040 "Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity      Announcement for the NINDS Exploratory Grant Program in Parkinson's      Disease Research (P20)" 
         (NOT-NS-14-033)
         National Institute of Neurological Disorders and      Stroke

Request for Applications

  • Nutrition Obesity      Research Centers (NORCs) (P30) 
         (RFA-DK-14-002)
         National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and      Kidney Diseases
         Application Receipt Date(s): November 25, 2014 and June 18, 2015

  • Development of an      Integrated Mathematical Model for Comparative Characterization of Complex      Molecules (U01)
         (RFA-FD-14-082)
         Food and Drug Administration
         Application Receipt Date(s): June 30, 2014

Weekly NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices
National Institutes of Health

Click on the link below to view a weekly update of NIH funding opportunities.

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NIA Revision and Resubmission Program Project Applications (P01)
National Institute on Aging/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is May 25, 2015

SYNOPSIS:

National Institute on Aging (NIA) invites revision applications to ongoing NIA-supported program project (P01) awards and resubmissions of unfunded program project applications (including unfunded revision requests). The applications should address scientific areas relevant to the NIA mission. Revision applications should include expansion of (an) existing, or proposal of (a) new project or projects within a program project. Revision applications may not request support beyond the end date of the parent P01 award. This FOA will use the Program Project P01 award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

National Institute on Aging (NIA) invites (i) resubmitted applications for Program Project Grant (P01) awards and (ii) revision requests to active P01 awards in areas relevant to its mission. These include: genetic, biological, neuroscientific, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research related to the aging process, diseases and conditions associated with aging, and other special problems and needs of older Americans. The proposed topic must both be related to the current focus of the funded research and be relevant to the mission of NIA. The revision may propose to expand existing projects or create new projects within the existing P01. However, NIA will not accept applications that are proposed to expand existing cores or to create new cores, with no changes to projects.

Program project awards represent synergistic research programs that are designed to achieve results that cannot be attained by investigators working independently. They consist of at least three projects and an administrative core all of which are active through all years of the program project. The Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) of the program project t must serve as the lead of at least one project and the Administrative Core.

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NIH NIAID Indo-U.S. Vaccine Action Program (VAP) Small Research Grant Program (R03) PA-13-179
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Standard R03 small grant deadlines: June 16, Oct. 16; Standard AIDS-related deadlines: May 7, Sept. 7, Jan. 7; Expiration date: May 8, 2016

Applications are encouraged from organizations/institutions that propose to conduct vaccine-related research through U.S.-Indo collaborations on the following: dengue, influenza (including avian influenza), malaria, enteric diseases, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Basic, translational, clinical, or epidemiological vaccine research may be proposed. 

Only U.S. and India Organizations are eligible to apply. 

Eligibility: faculty with PI eligibility and CE faculty (with an approved CE Faculty PI waiver)

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Center without Walls for the Identification and Validation of Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to Tau Pathogenesis and Associated Neurodegeneration in Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) (U54)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke / NSF

LOI due April 10, 2016
Full submission due May 10, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The purpose of this FOA is to support innovative interdisciplinary, multi-institute research that will lead to the identification and validation of molecular mechanisms relevant to human biology that contribute to tau toxicity associated with Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD). It is anticipated that this research will also contribute to tool development that can be applied to target validation in FTD clinical trials.  Applications must include an administrative core, a scientific governance structure, a minimum of three research projects with milestone plans, resource core(s) that support the basic research efforts of at least two proposed research projects, a data coordination core that will facilitate the distribution of data generated through the Center without Walls with the broad research community and a human biology validation core that will support the validation of mechanisms identified and resources developed under this FOA. Synergy must be evident among Center research projects and cores, such that successful completion of the aims could not be accomplished without the Center structure. This FOA is in response to the Alzheimer's Disease Related Dementias (ADRD) challenges outlined in the 2015 update to the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease.

This FOA does not support clinical trials or projects focused predominantly on translational research activities.  

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support a multi-center, interdisciplinary approach that uses innovative, cutting-edge technologies to identify and validate the molecular mechanisms contributing to tau toxicity and associated neurodegeneration characteristic of FTD tauopathies. This multi-center, interdisciplinary approach will be established through a Center without Walls, which will incorporate key scientific expertise in research projects and cores, to drive the identification of the molecular mechanisms associated with tau toxicity and include, through the use of existing government and non-government resources, validation of the relevance of these mechanisms to human tau pathogenesis.

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Weekly NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices
National Institutes of Health

Updated April 29, 2016

Click on URL for the latest in NIH funding opportunities and notices.

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Pre-application: Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Technologies to Understand the Control of Organ Function by the Peripheral Nervous System (OT1)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Applications are accepted March 11, 2016, and May 16, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite pre-applications from applicants who have an interest in ultimately submitting an application to "Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Technologies to Understand the Control of Organ Function by the Peripheral Nervous System (OT2)" (RFA-RM-16-003).

The OT1 SPARC pre-application is the required first step in the application process for the companion OT2 FOA (RFA-RM-16-003).  Potential applicants should read both FOAs.

Applicants whose OT1 pre-applications are found to be meritorious and programmatically relevant will be invited to submit a full application to the OT2 "Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC):  Technologies to Understand the Control of Organ Function by the Peripheral Nervous System" FOA (RFA-RM-16-003).  There will be substantial interaction with NIH Program Staff leading to the development of programmatic and budget elements for an acceptable OT2 application.  OT2 applications must include a copy of the Invitation to Submit from the SPARC program as a requirement for submission.  The Invitation to Submit an OT2 application is not an indication of any award.

No Other Transaction awards will be made under this FOA.

This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits pre-applications to develop new and/or enhance existing tools and technologies to be used to elucidate the neurobiology and neurophysiology underlying autonomic control of organs in health or disease, which will ultimately inform next generation neuromodulation therapies. These two-year projects will facilitate technology development for neural mapping activities through the NIH SPARC Common Fund program.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this FOA is to invite innovative research pre-applications from applicants who have an interest in submitting an application to "Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Technologies to Understand the Control of Organ Function by the Peripheral Nervous System (OT2)", companion announcement RFA-RM-16-003.  This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits pre-applications to develop new and/or enhance existing tools and technologies to be used to elucidate the neurobiology and neurophysiology underlying autonomic control of organs in health or disease, which will ultimately inform next generation neuromodulation therapies. These two-year projects will facilitate technology development for neural mapping activities through the NIH SPARC Common Fund program.

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Improvement of Animal Models for Stem Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine (R21)
National Institutes of Health

For AIDS Related Applications - June 16, 2016

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is interested in the following research topics as applied to the mission areas of the Institute: i) stem cell engineering and regeneration of complex heart, vascular, lung, and blood systems; ii) stem cell correction of either congenital or acquired heart, lung and blood defects, iii) stem cell regeneration/reconstruction of heart, lung, and blood tissue;  and iv) optimization of the host's microenvironment to improve the survival and function of transplanted human heart, vascular, lung, and blood tissues, including but not limited to, in vivo models that aim to overcome immunological/ex vivo manipulation/tumorigenic safety concerns associated with  FDA regulatory requirements.   Preference will be given to in vivo models developed using NHLBI resources (e.g., Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT), Science Moving towards Research Translation and Therapy (SMARTT), and the Gene Therapy Resource Program (GTRP).  NHLBI has interest in the development of new in vivo models for health and disease, particularly large animal models such as sheep, pig, dog and non-human primates, to overcome the unique dynamics of heart, lung, and blood systems, which can be scientifically justified.  New models should include in their research plan validation studies for the purpose of preclinical experiments that may lead to an Investigational New Drug (IND), Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) or similar regulatory approval. NHLBI does not have interest in applications proposing mechanistic studies on mouse models.

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) is interested in applications conducting basic and translational research to facilitate the use of stem cell-based therapies for both rare and common diseases/conditions in the NIAMS mission (arthritis, musculoskeletal and skin diseases). Some diseases/conditions that would be of interest include, but are not restricted to, acute injury and chronic degenerative diseases and conditions affecting the musculoskeletal system and skin, as well as monogenic diseases affecting these systems, such as epidermolysis bullosa, some ichthyoses, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, osteogenesis imperfecta, osteopetrosis, and chondrodysplasias. Proposed projects can include the improvement of animal disease models for testing stem cell-based therapeutics for these diseases/conditions. Other research areas covered by this FOA may be of interest to NIAMS, provided that the research focuses on musculoskeletal and skin tissues and diseases within the NIAMS mission.

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement, and Management in Pain Research (R01)
National Institutes of Health

June 5, 2016

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to inform the scientific community of the pain research interests of the various Institutes and Centers (ICs) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute injury is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators.

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Silvio O. Conte Centers for Basic or Translational Mental Health Research (P50)
National Institute of Mental Health/NIH/DHHS

LOI due April 25, 2016
Full submission due May 25, 2015

SYNOPSIS:

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) invites applications for Silvio O. Conte Centers for Basic or Translational Mental Health Research. The institute seeks teams of researchers working at different levels of analysis and employing integrative, novel, and creative experimental approaches to address high-risk, high-impact questions with the primary objective of: (a) advancing the state of the science in brain and behavior research that will ultimately provide the foundation for understanding mental disorders; (b) supporting the integration and translation of basic and clinical neuroscience research on severe mental illnesses; and/or (c) advancing our understanding of the neurobehavioral developmental mechanisms and trajectories of psychopathology that begin in childhood and adolescence. The Conte Centers program is intended to support interdisciplinary basic and/or translational research demonstrating an extraordinary level of synergy, integration, and potential for advancing the state of the field. This program is intended only for projects that could not be achieved using other, more standard grant mechanisms. The Conte Centers program also provides an opportunity to establish interdisciplinary basic and/or translational research experiences for individuals in training. This FOA will utilize the NIH Specialized Centers (P50) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of these Centers is to support interdisciplinary teams of researchers engaged in integrative, novel, and creative experimental approaches to address high-risk, high-impact scientific questions that will significantly advance the state of the science in brain and behavioral research that will ultimately provide the foundation for understanding mental disorders and/or transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses, as well as developing data and other research resources that are available to the scientific community to further advance research in this field. Conte Centers exemplify a collaborative, cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research program conducted at multiple levels of analysis spanning genes to circuits to behavior to disease in model systems and humans, from the prenatal period through adulthood. Successful centers address a well-defined and unified scientific question (hypothesis) or problem. Areas of interest span the full range of basic neuroscience, basic behavioral science and genetics, and the translational integration of neuroscience. They also include testing in humans to identify the etiology, pathogenesis, developmental progression, potential biomarkers and/or the mechanistic substrates of potential interventions with a view towards the eventual prevention or cure of mental disorders across the lifespan. Proposed Centers should be directed towards a well-defined and unified scientific question or problem and, in some instances, may include discovery-based as well as technology development components in support of the primary scientific question. The Conte Centers program is intended to support research that demonstrates an extraordinary level of synergy, integration, and potential impact on our understanding of basic brain mechanisms and/or the pathophysiology, progression, and treatment of mental disorders. The program is intended only for projects that could not be achieved using other, more standard grant mechanisms. Support is provided both for individual research projects and for cores that are critical for the integration across Center components. Centers must be characterized by an interdisciplinary framework guiding highly integrated programs of cutting-edge research, and provide plans for rapid, widespread sharing of the resulting data, methods, and resources to accelerate basic or translational research relevant to mental disorders. A strong vision of how the Center will advance the field beyond the goals of the individual projects is essential for successful applications.

Conte Center applications should integrate research projects at multiple levels of analysis, but it is not necessary for an individual Conte Center to include both basic and translational components. A Conte Center may comprise basic research projects only, both basic and translational research projects, or translational research projects only. Conte Centers may include exploratory or high risk projects that add value to the Center and increase the potential for fundamentally important new discoveries towards understanding brain mechanisms directing the development and expression of behaviors including pathophysiology across the lifespan. Exploratory component projects using patient populations to test biomarkers or interventions developed/identified elsewhere within the Conte Center may be included in a Conte Center application if they conform fully with NIMH policies for clinical trials. Conte Centers may include technology development as a component, but not as the main focus, of the Center. When technology development is an integral part of the scientific goals, it should be proposed as a project. When technology development is part of a standard service provided to support Center projects, it should be proposed as a Research Support Core. Research Support Cores provide research support functions, including administrative, animal, analytical, data management, diagnostic, recruitment, informatics, etc. Conte Centers should comprise three or more research projects and one (administrative) or more cores. Newer groups are encouraged to form smaller, shorter duration feasibility centers to establish workability and collaborations. Centers may comprise projects and cores at a single institution or at multiple institutions. Collaborations between highly active laboratories using state-of-the-art methods are encouraged, even if this means that the investigators are geographically distributed. Plans for the synergistic integration of projects and cores within a Center, whether at a single institution or geographically distributed, should be clearly described.

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Improvement of Animal Models for Stem Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine (R21) (R01)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Standard dates apply; next deadline June 5, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

This FOA encourages Exploratory/Developmental Research grant (R21) applications from institutions and organizations proposing research aimed at characterizing animal stem cells and improving existing, and creating new, animal models for human disease conditions.  The intent of this initiative is to facilitate the use of stem cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine. The initiative focuses on the following areas: 1) comparative analysis of animal and human stem cells to provide information for selection of the most predictive and informative model systems; 2) development of new technologies for stem cell characterization and transplantation; and 3) improvement of animal disease models for stem cell-based therapeutic applications.  

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This FOA encourages Exploratory/Developmental Research grant (R21) applications from institutions and organizations proposing research aimed at characterizing animal stem cells and improving existing, and creating new, animal models for human disease conditions for testing regenerative medicine applications. The R21 mechanism is intended to encourage innovative research projects that should break new ground or extend previous discoveries toward new directions or applications. Applications for R21 awards should describe projects distinct from those supported through the traditional R01 mechanism. For example, long-term projects, or projects designed to increase knowledge in well-established area, are not appropriate for R21 awards. The ORIP and representatives from other NIH institutes convened an NIH workshop in 2012 that addressed the current status of animal stem cell biology and made recommendations concerning improvements in technologies and applications of animal stem cells to regenerative medicine (see https://dpcpsi.nih.gov/sites/default/files/orip/document/summary_of_the_improving_animal_models.pdf ). The results of this workshop provide the basis for this FOA. The intent of this initiative is to facilitate the use of stem cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine. The initiative focuses on the following areas: 1) comparative analysis of animal and human stem cells to provide information for selection of the most predictive and informative model systems; 2) development of new technologies for stem cell characterization and transplantation; and 3) improvement of animal disease models for stem cell-based therapeutic applications.

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Restructured and Streamlined Application Guides and Supplemental Instructions
National Institutes of Health

This Notice informs the biomedical and health services research communities that we have updated our application guide and supplemental instructions for use with grant application due dates on or after May 25, 2016. In addition to incorporating policy changes summarized in NOT-OD-16-004, the updated (FORMS-D) application guide has been restructured and streamlined based on helpful feedback received from the NIH Request for Information issued last summer (NOT-OD-15-134). Updates to form instructions are listed at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/how-to-apply-application-guide/forms-d/general/g.120-significant-changes.htm. Changes to the approach to delivering application instructions are outlined in the document accessed by clicking on the URL below.

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Imaging and Biomarkers for Early Detection of Aggressive Cancer (U01)
National Cancer Institute/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply; next deadline is June 11, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

National Cancer Institute (NCI) invites collaborative research project (U01) applications to improve cancer screening, early detection of aggressive cancer, assessment of cancer risk and cancer diagnosis aimed at integrating multi-modality imaging strategies and multiplexed biomarker methodologies into a singular complementary approach, and (ii) establish a Consortium for Imaging and Biomarkers (CIB) to perform collaborative studies, exchange information, share knowledge and leverage common resources. The research will be conducted by individual multi-disciplinary research teams, hereafter called Units. All Units are expected to participate in collaborative activities with other Units within the Consortium. This FOA will utilize the NIH U01 Research Project - Cooperative Agreements award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to: (i) invite researchers to submit collaborative research project (U01) applications to improve cancer screening, early detection of aggressive cancer, assessment of cancer risk and cancer diagnosis aimed at integrating multi-modality imaging strategies and multiplexed biomarker methodologies into a singular complementary approach, and (ii) establish a Consortium for Imaging and Biomarkers (CIB) to perform collaborative studies, exchange information, share knowledge and leverage common resources. The research will be conducted by individual multi-disciplinary research teams, hereafter called Units. All Units are expected to participate in collaborative activities with other Units within the Consortium.

The specific objective of this FOA is to stimulate and support cancer imaging and biomarker research to develop, optimize, and clinically validate novel methods to:

--Detect aggressive cancers at the earliest stages possible;

--Reduce overdiagnosis;

--Reduce false positive tests; and

--dentify lethal cancers from non-lethal disease.

-These goals can be met by a research strategy involving preclinical and clinical investigations to improve early cancer detection and diagnosis where validated cancer biomarkers can be combined with experimental imaging methods, or conversely, where established clinical imaging methods can be combined with experimental biomarkers. It is also possible that experimental imaging and biomarker integration strategies may be combined in such a manner that a clear path to clinical application is maintained. For example, clinically established imaging approaches or validated multiplexed biomarker(s) tests may not be currently available, well defined and suitable for direct incorporation into multi-site validation studies, i.e., experimental imaging combined with experimental biomarker(s) or the development of novel imageable biomarkers. For grant applications involving such a strategy, an established reference standard or gold standard (e.g., histology or immunohistochemistry) is required and should be clearly defined within the grant application in order to perform ongoing or future verification, pre validation and clinical validation studies.

This FOA will support collaborative research focused on the integration of imaging and biomarker(s) applied specifically toward improving current clinical methods used for cancer screening, early detection of aggressive cancer, assessment of cancer risk and diagnosis.

Applicable clinical research directions could include, but not be limited to, the following:

--Use of molecular diagnostic tests to evaluate lesions observed by imaging and biomarker(s) to distinguish aggressive from indolent cancer or benign lesion from cancer.

--Use of imaging to evaluate biomarker results to improve sensitivity and specificity of early detection and diagnostic tests.

--Correlation of imaging with genomic results (radiogenomics) or other 'omics' results, such as the rich TCGA database.

Combine and develop multiplexed panels of both multimodality molecular imaging and multiplexed biomarker panels that could improve current standards-of-care for screening, early detection of aggressive cancer, assessment of risk or diagnosis.

Appropriate strategies used to optimize the performance of imaging and biomarker approaches for ultimate clinical validation include:

--Leveraging advances in novel imaging methods that can perform across wide resolution scales from the molecular, cellular and organ level either by external

--tomography, localized detectors or implanted devices in vivo or as applied to laboratory methods;

--Leveraging advances in novel multi-parametric biomarker detection technologies and approaches including genomics, proteomics, epigenomics, metabolomics, radiogenomics, and histologic approaches; and/or

--The development of informatics resources to help optimize the above strategies and support sharing of data and validation methods to promote more standardized approaches for data integration and clinical decision support for combining laboratory, imaging and/or imageable biomarkers.

The optimization, application and validation of emerging imaging or biomarker approaches targeted specifically for clinical application are appropriate and can include:

--Novel imaging probes or contrast (enhancing) agents applied to established, commercially available imaging instrumentation would be considered if used to answer a well-defined clinically significant question, and, quantitative reference standards are used for verification and validation.

--Customized imaging probes or approaches incorporated into commercially available imaging instrumentation that might be acceptable include, but not limited to: positron emission tomography (PET), single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), photo acoustic imaging (PAI), nuclear polarization (NP) and photonic based approaches.

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Oocyte Mitochondrial Function in Relation to Fertility, Aging, and Mitochondrial Diseases (R21)
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply; next deadline is June 16, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) invites applications for outstanding research in the area of oocyte mitochondrial function in relation to fertility, aging, and mitochondrial disease transmission to offspring. The overarching goal is to gain fundamental insight into the role of mitochondria and long-term consequences of their dysfunction in the oocyte, and to develop therapeutic or alternative approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction for improving oocyte quality and competency, and health of the resultant offspring. It is anticipated that the results from studies supported by this FOA will provide women, suffering from infertility or subfertility and other illnesses due to mitochondrial dysfunction, practical approaches to enhance their fertility and the well-being of their offspring. This FOA will use the NIH R21 Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

A major goal of this FOA is to stimulate research that will broaden our understanding of how stage-specific formation and function of mitochondria impact upon the oocyte quality and fertility in women, and on mitochondrial disease transmission to the offspring. Possible research topics that may be addressed in response to this FOA include, but are not limited to, the following:

--Mitochondrial function in all aspects of mammalian reproduction including oocyte development and maturation, fertilization, and embryonic development;

--Role of mitochondria in stem cell maintenance and lineage specification in the embryo;

--Assisted reproductive technologies and their impact on mitochondrial function in oocytes and embryos;

--Mitochondrial function in oocytes and embryos during maternal aging;

--Studies on the link between diminished ovarian follicle reserve and mitochondrial function;

--Metabolic disorders and their impact on mitochondrial function in oocytes and embryos;

--Fundamental studies on mitochondrial mutations and their transmission to the offspring, and characterization of mitochondrial diseases;

--Studies on the interaction of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and its impact on oocyte and fertility, development and disease processes;

--Approaches to enhance mitochondrial function in the oocyte through therapeutic agents;

--Preclinical studies in animal model systems for development of novel procedures for mitochondrial replacement in the oocytes.

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Collaborative Supplements for Cryo-Electron Microscopy Technology Transfer (Admin Supp)
National Institutes of Health

June 7, 2016

The purpose of this funding opportunity is to assist qualified laboratories to develop technical expertise in high resolution cryo-electron microscopic (cryoEM) single particle analysis. The applicant and a collaborating established cryoEM laboratory will work together to solve structures of novel, tractable specimens by cryoEM. Applicant laboratories should have relevant technical expertise and previous experience in structural biology or related fields that will allow them to develop independent expertise in cryoEM. One or two years of support should train the parent laboratory in cryoEM basics to a moderate level of skill, provide hands-on experience with all aspects of cryoEM analysis, and result in a structure.

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Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award (Parent K25)
National Institutes of Health

June 12, 2016

The purpose of the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award (K25) is to attract to NIH-relevant research those investigators whose quantitative science and engineering research has thus far not been focused primarily on questions of health and disease. The K25 award will provide support and protected time for a period of supervised study and research for productive professionals with quantitative (e.g., mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, chemistry) and engineering backgrounds to integrate their expertise with NIH-relevant research.

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Human Tissue Models for Infectious Diseases (U19)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent due: June 6, 2016
Full Submission due: July 6, 2016

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will establish multidisciplinary research Centers focused on developing innovative in vitro human tissue models for basic and translational research on infectious diseases.

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Growing Great Ideas: Research Education Course in Product Development and Entrepreneurship for Life Science Researchers (R25)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent due: June 20, 2016
Full Submission due: July 20, 2016

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this NIDA R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development.

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NIH NIAID International Research in Infectious Diseases, including AIDS (R01) (PAR-14-080)

Application Receipt/Submission Date(s): May 22, 2014; May 22, 2015; May 20, 2016 AIDS Date: August 22, 2014; August 21, 2015; August 19, 2016

Eligibility:  This FOA will accept applications from organizations/institutions in eligible foreign countries that propose research related to infectious diseases that are of interest/importance to that country. 

Collaborative projects involving investigators and institutions from international sites and the U.S. are particularly encouraged; however, a U.S. partner is not required. 

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NIDDK Short-Term Research Experience Program for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) (R25)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent due: July 9, 2016
Full Submission due: Aug. 9, 2016

The over-arching goal of this National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce. NIDDK's Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) provides funding to research institutions to provide for a national summer research experience program for both high school and undergraduate students for eight to ten weeks. STEP-UP seeks to facilitate exposure opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research on a national basis, including individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups and individuals with disabilities. To accomplish the stated goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Research Experiences and Mentoring Activities.

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Behavioral and Social Science Research on Understanding and Reducing Health Disparities (R21)
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is January 7, 2015

SYNOPSIS:

NIH participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for behavioral and social science research on the causes and solutions to health and disabilities disparities in the U. S. population. Health disparities between, on the one hand, racial/ethnic populations, lower socioeconomic classes, and rural residents and, on the other hand, the overall U.S. population are major public health concerns. Emphasis is placed on research in and among three broad areas of action: 1) public policy, 2) health care, and 3) disease/disability prevention. Particular attention is given to reducing "health gaps" among groups. Applications that utilize an interdisciplinary approach, investigate multiple levels of analysis, incorporate a life-course perspective, and/or employ innovative methods such as systems science or community-based participatory research are particularly encouraged. This program will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

NIH issues this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to encourage research project grant applications (R21) employing behavioral and social science theories, concepts, and methods (1) to improve understanding of the causes of disparities in health and disability among the various populations of the United States and (2) to develop and test interventions for reducing and eventually eliminating health disparities. The goal is to move beyond documenting the existence of health and disability disparities to addressing causes and solutions.

This announcement calls for research to address and to improve understanding of the causes of health disparities. In so doing, the announcement stresses the explicit employment of concepts and models from the behavioral and social sciences to guide applications in basic social and behavioral, and applied social and behavioral research by focusing on three action areas: public policy, health care, and disease/disability prevention. It emphasizes (1) basic social and behavioral research -- acting with or through biological -- pathways that give rise to disparities in health and (2) applied or translational research on the development, testing, adaptation, and delivery of interventions to reduce disparities. It encourages a multi-level analytic framework (i.e., ranging from individuals to societies) in investigating public health issues and their interactions (e.g., multiple morbidities rather than single illnesses) as well as attention to risk factors or causal processes common to various health conditions (e.g., smoking, diet, exercise, environmental risk, and access to health care).

Moreover, this announcement encourages research on the causes of and solutions to the "health differences" between a focus-population group and a reference-population group. By definition, health disparities refer to the health of a group in comparison to that of other groups. Although improving the absolute level of a group's health is a laudable goal, it may not result in changing the group's relative level of health. The reference population's health might also improve, thereby maintaining or widening the gap. The study of a single population group, in order to elucidate the circumstances that may contribute to health disparities or to test an intervention targeting a particular group, may be included under this announcement; however, the relevance to disparities must be addressed explicitly.

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Lasker Clinical Research Scholars Program (Si2/R00)
National Institutes of Health

Aug. 26, 2016

This FOA encourages applications for the Lasker Clinical Research Scholars Program for the purpose of supporting the research activities during the early stage careers of independent clinical researchers. The program offers the opportunity for a unique bridge between the NIH intramural and extramural research communities and contains two phases. In the first phase, Lasker scholars will receive appointments for up to 5-7 years as tenure-track investigators within the NIH Intramural Research Program with independent research budgets. In the second phase, successful scholars will receive up to 3 years of NIH support for their research at an extramural research facility; or, the scholar can be considered to remain as an investigator within the intramural program.  

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NIH Director's Pioneer Award Program (DP1)
National Institutes of Health

Sept. 2, 2016

The NIH Director's Pioneer Award initiative complements NIH's traditional, investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering and possibly transforming approaches to addressing major biomedical or behavioral challenges that have the potential to produce an unusually high impact on enhancing health, lengthening life, and reducing illness and disability. To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect substantially different scientific directions from those already being pursued in the investigator's research program or elsewhere.

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Systems Science and Health in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R01)
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research/NIH/DHHS

LOI due 30 days prior to application due date
Standard dates apply. Next deadline is February 5, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications to increase the breadth and scope of topics that can be addressed with systems science methodologies. This FOA calls for research projects that are applied and/or basic in nature (including methodological and measurement development), have a human behavioral and/or social science focus, and employ methodologies suited to addressing the complexity inherent in behavioral and social phenomena, referred to as systems science methodologies. Additionally, this FOA seeks to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among health researchers and experts in computational approaches to further the development of modeling- and simulation-based systems science methodologies and their application to important public health challenges. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This FOA encourages R01 applications that apply system science approaches such as system dynamic modeling, agent-based modeling, social network analysis, discrete event analysis, and Markov modeling to better understand complex and dynamic behavioral and social sciences processes and problems relevant to health. Research projects applicable to this FOA are those that are either applied or basic in nature (including methodological development), have a human behavioral and/or social science focus, and employ systems science methodologies, a suite of methods suited to addressing the complexity inherent in behavioral and social phenomena.

This FOA is intended to increase the breadth and scope of topics that can be addressed with systems science methodologies. This FOA calls for research projects that are applied and/or basic in nature (including methodological and measurement development), have a human behavioral and/or social science focus, and employ methodologies suited to addressing the complexity inherent in behavioral and social phenomena, referred to as systems science methodologies. Additionally, this FOA seeks to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among health researchers and experts in computational approaches to further the development of modeling- and simulation-based systems science methodologies and their application to important public health challenges.

Systems science methodologies are specific methodological approaches that have been developed to understand connections between a system's structure and its behavior over time. "Systems science methodologies" is an umbrella term that refers to a variety of such methodologies including, but not limited to, agent-based modeling, microsimulation, system dynamics modeling, network analysis, discrete event analysis, Markov modeling, control systems engineering and related engineering methods, and a variety of other dynamic and computational modeling and simulation approaches.

A system, in this context, refers to the particular configuration of all relevant entities, resources, and processes that together adequately characterize the problem space under study (i.e., a system is defined by the boundaries that stakeholders use to determine which acts/observations are relevant for their inquiry as well as the interpretations/judgments that they use to guide decisions or actions). Systems science methodologies are valued for their ability to address the complexity inherent in behavioral and social phenomena. For example, these approaches excel at identifying non-linear relationships, bi-directional feedback loops, time delayed effects, emergent properties of the system, and oscillating system behavior. Examples of research topics encouraged under this FOA include, but are not limited to, those listed below:

NCI is interested in research projects that address the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients.

NIA supports genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research related to the aging process and the life course, diseases and conditions associated with aging, and other special problems and needs of older Americans.

NIAAA conducts and supports research in a wide range of scientific areas including genetics, neuroscience, epidemiology, health risks and benefits of alcohol consumption, prevention, and treatment.

NIBIB is dedicated to improving health by leading the development and accelerating the application of biomedical technologies http://www.nibib.nih.gov/About. The Institute is committed to integrating the physical and engineering sciences with the life sciences to advance basic research and medical care. This is achieved through: research and development of new biomedical imaging and bioengineering techniques and devices to fundamentally improve the detection, treatment, and prevention of disease; enhancing existing imaging and bioengineering modalities; supporting related research in the physical and mathematical sciences; encouraging research and development in multidisciplinary areas; supporting studies to assess the effectiveness and outcomes of new biologics, materials, processes, devices, and procedures; developing technologies for early disease detection and assessment of health status; and developing advanced imaging and engineering techniques for conducting biomedical research at multiple analytic scales.

NICHD is interested in basic and applied research on models of behavioral and social processes associated with health, disability, and developmental outcomes from pre-conception to adulthood.

NIDCR supports research that examines community characteristics, the organization of health care systems, and the social contexts that contribute to oral health. Many of the opportunities for improving oral health lie in achieving behavioral, lifestyle and social changes--objectives that are shared with many other scientific areas. The NIDCR supports systems science projects that explain the determinants of and/or methodologies to improve dental, oral, and craniofacial health.

NIEHS supports research that spans the range from basic mechanistic research, research involving laboratory animal models and systems, to clinical and epidemiologic studies using human subjects (see http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/index.cfm). NIEHS is particularly interested in projects that address complex, multi-faceted problems related to how environmental pollutants impact human health. Projects should involve environmental scientists and test scientific questions and/or develop simulations models to examine how environmental exposures (physical, chemical, and biological) interact with social and behavioral conditions to influence the development and progression of human disease. The ultimate goal of this research should be to generate knowledge that can inform the development and prioritization of environmental policies, interventions, and programs that are designed to promote healthier lives.

NIMH supports research to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic, translational, clinical, and services research, paving the way for prevention, recovery, and cure.

NINR is interested in research projects that promote and improve the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations. The Institute supports and conducts clinical and basic research and research training on health and illness across the lifespan to build the scientific foundation for clinical practice, prevent disease and disability, manage and eliminate symptoms caused by illness, and improve palliative and end-of-life care.

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Exploratory Clinical Trials of Mind and Body Interventions for NCCAM High Priority Research Topics (R34)
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is February 10, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites applications for early phase clinical trials of mind and body approaches for conditions that have been identified by NCCAM as high priority research topics. This funding opportunity is intended to support exploratory clinical trials, which will provide data that are critical for the planning and design of a subsequent controlled cohort study, clinical efficacy or effectiveness study, or a pragmatic trial. The data collected should be used to fill gaps in scientific knowledge necessary to develop a competitive full-scale clinical trial. This FOA is not appropriate for support of randomized clinical trials to test or determine efficacy or effectiveness. Applications that propose solely to write a protocol or manual of operations or to develop infrastructure for a clinical trial are not appropriate for this announcement. The subsequent larger trial should have the potential to make a significant impact on public health. This FOA will use the NIH R34 Planning Grant award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of this FOA is to provide support to investigators for such early phase clinical trials on mind and body approaches that have been identified as priority areas of research for NCCAM (see below). Applicants are encouraged to submit R34 grant applications that focus on exploratory clinical trials of mind and body approaches, using a variety of study designs (e.g., intervention refinement, feasibility testing, or assessing acceptability and adherence to various doses of the intervention).

Mind and body interventions are widely used by the public. They are increasingly recognized to meet the need for non-pharmacological approaches to the management of common troublesome symptoms refractory to standard care such as pain. Since its establishment as a Center at the National Institutes of Health, NCCAM has supported a strong portfolio of meritorious investigator-initiated projects on mind and body interventions for specific indications. These studies have yielded evidence that, for certain indications, mind and body approaches show promise and a beneficial risk/benefit ratio. Nevertheless, although a number of systematic reviews support the inference of benefit, the small size and variability of these studies has limited the ability to combine data for meta-analyses and to develop the definitive evidence-base.

There is a critical need for research studies to evaluate these practices as they are used and delivered to determine whether or not they provide benefit, as the public believes, or if they have any deleterious side effects. For larger trials to be impactful, they must be well designed and test hypotheses that will guide decisions about their inclusion into the delivery of health care. A series of early-phase clinical trials can be conducted to gather the multiple types of preliminary data needed to design large and rigorous efficacy and effectiveness studies. This FOA will support early-phase clinical trials in the area of mind and body research.

As NCCAM's mind and body clinical research portfolio matures, NCCAM is identifying targeted areas of investigation for complementary health approaches as part of the clinical research program. There are many areas of research with scientific promise and potential. However, for this funding opportunity applications will be considered of high programmatic priority if they meet the following two criteria:

The mind and body or integrated approach must include one or more of the following: spinal manipulation, mobilization, massage, tai chi, qi gong, yoga, acupuncture, hypnosis, guided imagery, light therapy, breathing activity, progressive relaxation, meditation, biofeedback, or mindfulness techniques. Integrated approaches to care could include one or more of these complementary health approaches added to standard care or other interventions such as a natural product, pharmacological approach, and/or another conventional behavioral approach (e.g. health coaching, physical activity or nutritional recommendations).

In addition, proposed projects must study a mind and body or integrated approach for one of the following high priority topic areas: symptom management, particularly for chronic pain syndromes; reduction of prescription drug (opioid) use or abuse in patients with chronic pain; medication adherence; post-traumatic stress (disorder); traumatic brain injury; sleep disorders or disturbances; anxiety; depression; promotion of psychological resilience; weight loss and weight loss maintenance; smoking cessation; and promotion of healthy eating and physical activity.

In view of the preliminary work required to initiate research activity for exploratory clinical testing of mind and body interventions, this NCCAM R34 can provide support for an early administrative period of the award, prior to implementation of the preliminary clinical trial. This early administrative period of the award can be up to 12 months in length and could include support for, but is not limited to, developing tools for data management and clinical safety oversight (including the Data and Safety Monitoring Plan [DSMP]), finalizing the clinical protocol and informed consent documents, developing the manual of operations/procedures, and obtaining appropriate regulatory approvals (e.g., IRB, FDA). Investigators are encouraged to review the NCCAM Clinical Research Toolbox (http://nccam.nih.gov/grants/toolbox) to learn more about NCCAM's requirements for clinical trials. Successful achievement during the early administrative period will be a requirement for initiating clinical testing and continued support of the project.

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Partnerships for Countermeasures Against Select Pathogens (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent due: Sept. 3, 2016
Full Submission due: Oct. 3, 2016

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit research applications for milestone-driven projects focused on preclinical development of lead candidate countermeasures (therapeutics, vaccines and related technologies, or diagnostics) against select NIAID Emerging Infectious Diseases/Pathogens. Applications must include a Product Development Strategy attachment and demonstrate substantive investment by at least one industrial participant. 

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NIH Director's Transformative Research Awards (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent deadline September 7, 2016
Full Submission deadline October 7, 2016

The NIH Director's Transformative Research Awards complement NIH's traditional, investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists or groups of scientists proposing groundbreaking, exceptionally innovative, original and/or unconventional research with the potential to create new scientific paradigms, establish entirely new and improved clinical approaches, or develop transformative technologies. Little or no preliminary data are expected. Projects must clearly demonstrate the potential to produce a major impact in a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research.

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Announcement of NIH Plans for the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

not applicable

SYNOPSIS:

Following the closure of the National Children's Study in fiscal year (FY) 2015, Dr. Francis Collins, the NIH Director, emphasized the importance of and need for research addressing the links between the environment and child health and development. A working group of NIH staff with expertise in these areas was established, and sought input from the community through multiple mechanisms, including a Request for Information, roundtable meetings, webinars, and a feedback blog. Informed by the feedback received, the new program for FY 2016 - Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) - continues to leverage investments made in extant programs, while providing the flexibility to investigate key questions of interest at the intersection of environmental health and pediatric research. NIH will support multiple synergistic, longitudinal studies using extant maternal/pediatric cohorts that represent a broad range of environmental exposures (e.g., physical, chemical, biological, behavioral, social). All longitudinal studies will collect a standardized, targeted set of data (Core Elements), such as demographics, normative development, patient/person reported outcomes (PRO), environmental exposures, and genetic influences. The studies will focus on four key pediatric outcomes (Focus Areas) - upper and lower airway; obesity; pre-, peri-, and postnatal outcomes; and neurodevelopment. Basic mechanistic studies that can only be done using human cohorts will be an important aspect of the ECHO program. An additional, but significant, element is an IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network. This network also will leverage the existing IDeA infrastructure by embedding clinical trials experts at IDeA state locations and facilitating their partnership with other academic institutions.

The NIH will explore a variety of options to support the development of relevant ECHO program components: cohort sites, a coordinating center, a data analysis center, a genetics core, a PRO core, and IDeA data coordination and operating center and research sites. Interested entities with expertise and insights into the four Focus Areas and Core Elements are encouraged to watch the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts for further information.

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Cutting-Edge Basic Research Awards (CEBRA) (R21)
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

August 20, 2015; December 18, 2015; August 19, 2016; December 20, 2016; August 18, 2017; and December 20, 2017, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization

SYNOPSIS: 

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) is designed to foster highly innovative or conceptually creative research related to drug abuse and addiction and how to prevent and treat them. It supports research that is high-risk and potentially high-impact that is underrepresented or not included in NIDA's current portfolio. The proposed research should: (1) test a highly novel and significant hypothesis for which there are scant precedent or preliminary data and which, if confirmed, would have a substantial impact on current thinking; and/or (2) develop or adapt innovative techniques or methods for addiction research, or that have promising future applicability to drug abuse research.  

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Basic science discoveries have consistently been the basis for many major advances in both clinical and applied drug abuse research and have contributed to the development and implementation of successful treatment strategies for drug addiction and pain. Pharmacological, neurobiological, behavioral, cell biological and genetic research has provided insight into questions such as how drugs of abuse exert their actions on the brain and other organs to produce addiction. Systems neurobiological, behavioral and cognitive studies have shown how drugs of abuse affect behavior and information processing in the brain, and they have elucidated the normal behavioral and neurobiological processes that are "hijacked" by drugs of abuse.  They have also helped us understand motivational aspects of drug use and other behaviors, emotional regulation, and decision-making processes. Basic research has also led to the discovery of new targets for medications, non-addictive treatments for pain, the development of new technologies that enhance prevention and treatment programs for drug addiction, and new approaches for statistical analysis of epidemiological and clinical trials data. Basic research to establish new animal models and new methods to synthesize small molecules and immunotherapies has supported the development of new medications to treat addiction. Basic research has also addressed how abused substances interact with viral infections such as HIV, HBV, and HCV. In addition, new technologies and approaches, such as nanobiology, bioengineering, epigenetics, computational science, and imaging methods, have had a significant impact on cutting-edge research as they have emerged. However, there is still a need to increase our understanding of drug abuse and related disorders through basic research in all these areas in order to develop effective treatment and prevention interventions to alleviate the pain and devastation of addiction.

The goal of NIDA's CEBRA program is to accelerate the pace of discoveries that can advance addiction research by encouraging scientifically sound applications that focus on innovation. The CEBRA seeks to encourage researchers to explore new approaches, test imaginative new ideas, and challenge existing paradigms in drug addiction research in both humans and animal models. The CEBRA program will support high-risk, high impact research that either: (1) tests a highly novel and significant hypothesis for which there are scant precedent or preliminary data and which, if confirmed, would have a substantial impact on current thinking; or (2) develops or adapts innovative techniques or methods for addiction research, or of potential future use in addiction research.

 

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Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) High Throughput Sequencing and Genotyping Resource Access (X01)
National Human Genome Research Institute/NIH/DHHS

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) high-throughput genotyping, sequencing and supporting statistical genetics services are designed to aid the identification of genes or genetic modifications that contribute to human health and disease. The laboratory specializes in genomic services that can't be readily handled by individual investigator laboratories. CIDR provides the most up-to-date platforms, services and statistical genetic support. This is an NIH-wide initiative that is managed by NHGRI. Information about the current services offered can be accessed via: http://www.cidr.jhmi.edu. This FOA will utilize the X01 grant mechanism. There are no funds associated with a resource access award.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This FOA allows investigators to apply for access to high-throughput sequencing and genotyping services carried out by CIDR. The services provided include careful quality control and data cleaning. Some statistical analysis service is also offered. The FOA seeks projects that show promise of identifying genetic or epigenetic elements important to human health and disease. There should be strong evidence that the project proposed will have sufficient power to detect genetic or epigenetic factors affecting the trait under study. Appropriate projects would include but not be limited to: whole-genome, whole exome and custom-targeted next-generation sequencing; human genome wide association studies (GWAS), high-throughput custom SNP genotyping and analyses of DNA methylation. Although the main focus of this FOA is on human studies, some model organism studies are also appropriate.

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Arts-Based Approaches in Palliative Care for Symptom Management (R01)
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is February 5, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for mechanistic clinical studies aimed at understanding the impact of arts-based approaches in palliative care for symptom management. This FOA is intended to support mechanistic clinical studies to provide an evidence base for the use of the arts in palliative care for symptom management. The objective is to understand the biological, physiological, neurological, psychological, and/or sociological mechanisms by which the arts exert their effects on symptom management during and throughout the palliative care continuum. The goal is for the research supported under this FOA to develop an evidence-base that could be used as a basis for the uptake of arts-based therapies in palliative care settings, among individuals across the lifespan, with a wide variety of serious chronic conditions and their accompanying symptoms. This FOA is not intended to determine efficacy or the comparative effectiveness of interventions, or to assess interventions designed to treat the underlying cause of a particular disease state. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

This FOA is intended to foster research on the potential for arts-based approaches to enhance palliative care for individuals living with multiple symptoms related to serious chronic or terminal illness. The objective is to encourage research to determine how the specific arts intervention might be working mechanistically in managing or ameliorating patients' serious chronic symptoms related to quality of life (QoL). Mechanism refers to the biological, physiological, neurological, psychological, and/or sociological manner by which the arts exert its purported effect(s) on selected outcomes. Also of interest is the comparison of differences in mechanisms in male and female sample populations. The term "arts" refers not only to artistic activities, but also to creative activities, such as literature, rituals, oral histories, storytelling, etc. The intent of palliative care is multifaceted and includes relieving the myriad of disease-related symptoms (such as pain), mitigating the impact of co-morbidities, and enabling a positive influence on the course of illness. Palliative care integrates and coordinates the emotional, psychological, social, and physical aspects of care with a focus on enhanced QoL. Throughout the course of illness, a team approach composed of a variety of practitioners is used to achieve this end - to prevent suffering by managing stressful clinical complications and improving the patient's sense of well-being.

NIH encourages applications to this FOA that also address health disparities, symptom management in patients with HIV/AIDS, evaluate the use of the arts in under-represented individuals/groups, focus on the caregivers of individuals who receive palliative care, and utilize special populations such as older adults, children, women, individuals in the military, or veterans. Also of interest is the comparison of male and female sample populations with respect to mechanistic outcomes. Of particular interest is research which will increase the understanding of sex and gender differences, as well as sex and gender factors in health and disease, to support implementation of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research (http://orwh.od.nih.gov/research/strategicplan/index.asp).

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NeuroNEXT Infrastructure Resource Access (X01)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH/DHHS

Applications accepted until November 13, 2017

SYNOPSIS:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for exploratory clinical trials of investigational agents (drugs, biologics, surgical therapies or devices) that may contribute to the justification for and provide the data required for designing a future trial, for biomarker validation studies, or for proof of mechanism clinical studies. Diseases chosen for study should be based on the NINDS' strategic plan and clinical research interests (www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/areas/index.htm). Successful applicants will be given access to the NeuroNEXT infrastructure. Following peer review, NINDS will prioritize and order trials that are given access to the NeuroNEXT infrastructure. The NeuroNEXT Clinical Coordinating Center (CCC) will work with the successful applicant to efficiently implement the proposed study. The NeuroNEXT Data Coordinating Center (DCC) will provide statistical and data management support. The NeuroNEXT clinical sites will provide recruitment/retention support as well as on-site implementation of the clinical protocol. Applicants do not need to be part of the existing NeuroNEXT infrastructure. This FOA will utilize the NIH X01 Resource Access Award mechanism. NOTE: This is an infrastructure access award, not a grant.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This FOA encourages applications for exploratory clinical trials of investigational agents (drugs, biologics, surgical therapies or devices) that may contribute to the justification for and provide the data required for designing a future trial, for biomarker validation studies, or for proof of mechanism clinical studies. Applications for drugs or biologics should provide compelling scientific evidence that the investigational agent proposed for study will reach/act upon the designated target or that its mechanism of action is such that it is expected to be of benefit in ameliorating a specific aspect of the disease. Neurologic diseases chosen for study must fall within the primary responsibility of NINDS (www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/areas/index.htm).

Applications in rare diseases are encouraged while recognizing that available patient pools may not be adequate to meet the sample size requirements normally required to establish the efficacy of an intervention. NINDS acknowledges that innovative, non-traditional trial designs including adaptive designs may be appropriate in rare disease studies. While NeuroNEXT is primarily intended for exploratory trials, the network will consider Phase2/3 trials in diseases with a US prevalence of under 5,000 persons. Examples of appropriate studies under this FOA include, but are not limited to, those designed to:

--Evaluate and optimize the dose, formulation, safety, tolerability or pharmacokinetics of an intervention in the target population.

--Evaluate whether an intervention produces sufficient evidence of short-term activity (e.g., biomarker activity, pharmacodynamic response, target engagement, dose-response trends) in a human "proof of concept" trial.

--Select or rank the best of two or more potential interventions or dosing regimens to be evaluated in a subsequent trial, based on tolerability, safety data, biological activity, or preliminary clinical efficacy (e.g., futility trials).

--Evaluate biological activity relative to clinical endpoints.

--Applications seeking to obtain data needed for pharmacometric modeling are encouraged, with the ultimate aim of enabling the optimal design of a future efficacy trial of an intervention.

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National Science Foundation (NSF)

Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Deadlines vary per directorate

SYNOPSIS: 

Advanced computational infrastructure and the ability to perform large-scale simulations and accumulate massive amounts of data have revolutionized scientific and engineering disciplines.  The goal of the CDS&E program is to identify and capitalize on opportunities for major scientific and engineering breakthroughs through new computational and data analysis approaches.  The intellectual drivers may be in an individual discipline or they may cut across more than one discipline in various Directorates.  The key identifying factor is that the outcome relies on the development, adaptation, and utilization of one or more of the capabilities offered by advancement of both research and infrastructure in computation and data, either through cross-cutting or disciplinary programs. 

The CDS&E program welcomes proposals in any area of research supported through the participating divisions that:

·         Promote the creation, development, and application of the next generation of mathematical, computational and statistical theories and tools that are essential for addressing the challenges presented to the scientific and engineering communities by the ever-expanding role of computational modeling and simulation and the explosion and production of digital experimental and observational data.

·         Promote and encourage integrated research projects that create, develop and apply novel computational, mathematical and statistical methods, algorithms, software, data curation, analysis, visualization and mining tools to address major, heretofore intractable questions in core science and engineering disciplines, including large-scale simulations and analysis of large and heterogeneous collections of data.

·         Encourage adventurous ideas that generate new paradigms and that create and apply novel techniques, generating and utilizing digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, observational, and theoretical tools for scientific discovery and application.

·         Encourage ideas at the interface between scientific frameworks, computing capability, measurements and physical systems that enable advances well beyond the expected natural progression of individual activities, including development of science-driven algorithms to address pivotal problems in science and engineering and efficient methods to access, mine, and utilize large data sets.

Supplement requests to existing awards within a program that address one of the points above will also be considered. 

The CDS&E program in MPS explicitly addresses the distinct intellectual and technological discipline lying at the intersection of applied mathematics, statistics, computer science, and the core science disciplines of astronomy, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and materials research.  Proposals are expected to be relevant to mathematical and physical sciences.  The CDS&E program in ENG recognizes the importance of complex and heterogeneous data as well as high fidelity simulations over disparate scales that can be interrogated, analyzed, modeled, optimized or controlled, and even integrated with experiments or physical facilities representing engineering systems.  Proposals are expected to be relevant to engineering and to have cross-cutting and integrative themes.  The Engineering Directorate encourages the effective leveraging of NSF centers and public-private partnerships to realize CDS&E program objectives and accelerate innovation.  The CDS&E program in ACI encourages the development and use of new cyberinfrastructure capabilities that advance complex applications in science and engineering and further the integration of modeling, experiment and observation.  Proposals are expected to be relevant to ACI and are encouraged to leveraging existing or upcoming cyberinfrastructure investments.

Astronomy:  CDS&E encompasses those areas of inquiry where significant progress is critically dependent upon the application of new computational hardware, software, or algorithms, or upon the use of massive data sets. CDS&E encompasses fundamentally new approaches to large-scale simulation and to the analysis of large and heterogeneous collections of data, as well as research into the nature of algorithms and techniques that can be both enabled by data and enable more data-intensive research.

Chemistry: CDS&E encourages innovative and adventurous ideas that generate new paradigms at the algorithmic, software design and data acquisition levels in computational chemistry, simulations, chemical data analysis and cheminformatics, producing new approaches to gaining fundamental chemical knowledge and understanding. 

Materials Research:  CDS&E includes the creation, development, and application of computational tools, or the creation and application of novel techniques that utilize digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, and theoretical methods to discover new materials, new materials-related phenomena, or advance fundamental understanding of materials.

Mathematical Sciences: CDS&E includes the creation, development, and application of the next generation of mathematical and statistical theories and tools that will be essential for addressing the challenges presented to the scientific and engineering communities by the ever expanding role of computational modeling and simulation on the one hand, and the explosion and production of digital and observational data on the other.

Physics:   CDS&E includes ideas at the interface between scientific frameworks and computing capability that enable advances well beyond the expected natural progress of either activity, including development of science-driven algorithms to address pivotal problems in physics and efficient methods to access and mine large data sets.

Directorate of Engineering: The CDS&E program in engineering recognizes the importance of engineering in CDS&E and vice-versa. Many natural and built engineering processes, devices and/or systems require high fidelity simulations over disparate scales that can be interrogated, analyzed, modeled, optimized or controlled, and even integrated with experiments or physical facilities. This program accepts proposals that confront and embrace the host of research challenges presented to the science and engineering communities by the ever-expanding role of computational modeling and simulation on the one hand, and experimental and/or observational data on the other.  The goal of the program is to promote the creation, development, and utilization of the next generation of theories, algorithms, methods, tools, and cyberinfrastructure in science and engineering applications.

Successful research supported by CDS&E in engineering will encompass all engineering and related disciplines that are potentially transformative and multidisciplinary and that address computational and/or data challenges.  Proposals submitted to this program should draw on productive intellectual partnerships that synergistically capitalize upon knowledge and expertise in multiple fields or sub-fields in science or engineering and/or in multiple types of organizations.  Proposals submitted to this program announcement should address the relevance of the proposed project to engineering.

Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport (CBET): CDS&E in CBET includes the use of high performance and emerging computational tools and environments in advancing mathematical modeling, simulation and analysis to describe and analyze with greater fidelity, complexity and scale, engineering processes in chemical, biochemical and biotechnology systems, bioengineering and living systems, sustainable energy and environmental systems, and transport and thermal-fluids systems.

Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI): CDS&E in CMMI encourages the submission of proposals that meet the expectations of the Directorate of Engineering and include advancing mathematic modeling and simulation to describe and analyze, with greater fidelity, complexity and scale, as well as create and apply novel techniques that utilize digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, and theoretical methods. Proposals should advance the frontiers in advanced manufacturing, mechanics and materials, tools for dynamics, monitoring and control of complex systems, resilient and sustainable infrastructures and novel theories, or algorithms and methods in systems engineering and design.

Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI):  CDS&E in ACI addresses research in cyberinfrastructure with the clear potential to impact multiple research disciplines through the development of the paradigms, algorithms and processes needed to provide general CDS&E solutions as part of comprehensive, integrated, sustainable and secure cyberinfrastructure.

The CDS&E program is not intended to replace existing programs that make awards that involve computation and the analysis of large data sets.  Rather, the CDS&E program is meant to fund awards that have a significant component of cyber development or cyber science that goes well beyond what would normally be included in these programs.  PIs should ask for consideration and review as a CDS&E proposal only if the proposal addresses at least one of these additional cyber components.  Any proposal submitted to the CDS&E program that does not satisfy at least one of these additional criteria will be reviewed within the context of the individual program.  A proposal that is requesting consideration within the context of CDS&E should begin the title with the identifying acronym "CDS&E:". 

 

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Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies (Cyberlearning)

Deadline: Various, see program announcement

The purpose of the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program is to integrate opportunities offered by emerging technologies with advances in what is known about how people learn to advance three interconnected thrusts:

  • Innovation: inventing and improving next-generation genres (types) of learning technologies, identifying new means of using technology for fostering and assessing learning, and proposing new ways of integrating learning technologies with each other and into learning environments to foster and assess learning;

  • Advancing understanding of how people learn in technology-rich learning environments: enhancing understanding of how people learn and how to better foster and assess learning, especially in technology-rich learning environments that offer new opportunities for learning and through data collection and computational modeling of learners and groups of learners that can be done only in such environments; and

  • Promoting broad use and transferability of new genres: extracting lessons from experiences with these technologies that can inform design and use of new genres across disciplines, populations, and learning environments; advancing understanding of how to foster learning through effective use these new technologies and the environments they are integrated into. 

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Cybermanufacturing Systems (CM)
National Science Foundation

Proposals accepted anytime

The Cybermanufacturing Systems (CM) Program supports fundamental research to enable the evolution of a wide range of network-accessed manufacturing services that:

  • employ applications (or "apps") that reside in the "cloud" and plug into an expansible, interactive architecture;
  • are broadly accessible, guarantee reliable execution and have capabilities that are transparent to users; and
  • are accessible at low cost to innovators and entrepreneurs, including both users and providers.

Current manufacturing software applications are predominantly large, manufacturer-centric, general-purpose programs with the universal applicability needed to justify their development, marketing and acquisition costs.  They usually have broad capabilities, but are cumbersome to learn and often require expert intervention.

There is an opportunity for researchers to pursue research and educational efforts to accelerate the creation of an interoperating, cross-process manufacturing service layer that enables the rapid, bottom-up transformation of access to manufacturing services.  Such a service layer can allow creative entrepreneurs and companies to both furnish and access manufacturing apps that span the full spectrum from ideation to physical realization, giving rise to an era of "cybermanufacturing." 

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Dear Colleague Letter - Support for Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure and Research during FY 2015-FY 2019
NSF - Advance Notice

90 Days after publication date

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) is to inform the natural hazards engineering research community of two forthcoming program solicitations anticipated to be issued by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Engineering, Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, between April and June 2014, for the following: (1) operations of natural hazards engineering research infrastructure for FY 2015-FY 2019 and (2) research on multi-hazard resilient and sustainable civil infrastructure. NSF does not intend to provide additional information beyond this DCL until the program solicitations and any accompanying Frequently Asked Questions are issued, as those will be the official issuances for these competitions and take precedence over the information in this DCL. The anticipated due dates for full proposals submitted to these solicitations will be 90 days following the publication date.

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Dear Colleague Letter: BRAIN EAGERs to Enable Innovation Neurotechnologies to Reveal the Functional and Emergent Properties of Neural Circuits Underlying Behavior and Cognition

Deadline: This notice does not constitute a solicitation; therefore, no award of any kind will result from this notice.

This Dear Colleague Letter is aimed at identifying opportunities to leverage and synthesize technological and conceptual innovation across disciplines and scales to accelerate progress toward an integrated understanding of neural circuits in behavior and cognition, or more simply "catching circuits in action". The neuroscience research community and specialists in other areas including, but not limited to genetics, physiology, synthetic biology, engineering, physics, mathematics, statistics, behavior and cognition are encouraged to work across disciplines to develop new approaches and neurotechnology focused at understanding the properties of circuits that underlie behavior and/or cognition in any organism. Projects that take advantage of existing DBI investments in informatics, computing and other infrastructure, such as the Neuroscience Gateway, in novel ways are also eligible.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP): Supplemental Funding to Current SBIR/STTR Phase II Awards

Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP) supplements to Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program Phase II grants are intended to assist the small businesses in their technology commercialization efforts. Specifically, this supplemental funding is aimed at enabling the grantee to secure the services of a third-party service provider that will assist with one or more of the following commercialization activities:

  1. the identification and development of customers for the NSF-funded technology;
  2. providing advice on financing strategy and fundraising from private sector;
  3. establishing strategic partnerships with relevant stakeholders; and/or
  4. the evaluation and protection of intellectual property.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Computing About the Ebola Virus
Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI) (National Science Foundation)

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

November 13, 2014

Dear Colleague:

This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) follows a recent National Science Foundation (NSF) DCL (NSF 15-006,http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf15006) that referred to the emergence of the lethal Ebola virus in the US and expressed NSF's interest in proposals to conduct non-medical, non-clinical care research that can be used immediately to better understand how to model and understand the spread of Ebola; educate about prophylactic behaviors; and encourage the development of products, processes, and learning that can address this global challenge.

In that DCL, NSF invited researchers to use the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism, which allows NSF to receive and review proposals having a severe urgency with regard to availability of, or access to, data, facilities or specialized equipment, as well as quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events.

The NSF Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI) is particularly interested in proposals that include software development activities, such as those that would be funded by the Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E, http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504813) or Software Structure for Sustained Innovation (SI2, http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf14520) programs, along with the use of petascale computing on Blue Waters, such as that which would be funded by the Petascale Computing Resource Allocations (PRAC, http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf14518) program. ACI encourages such submissions through this DCL.

Complete guidance on submitting a RAPID proposal may be found in the NSF Grant Proposal Guide (GPG):http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf14001/gpg_2.jsp#IID1.

Questions about this specific DCL should be addressed to:

Daniel S. Katz, dkatz@nsf.gov or Rudolf Eigenmann, reigenma@nsf.gov.

Sincerely,

C. Suzanne Iacono
Acting Assistant Director
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering

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Dear Colleague Letter: Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE)
National Science Foundation

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) pilot seeks to support bold interdisciplinary projects in all NSF-supported areas of science, engineering, and education research. INSPIRE has no targeted themes and serves as a funding mechanism for proposals that are required both to be interdisciplinary and to exhibit potentially transformative research (IDR and PTR, respectively). Complementing existing NSF efforts, INSPIRE was created to handle proposals whose: scientific advances lie outside the scope of a single program or discipline, such that substantial funding support from more than one program or discipline is necessary; lines of research promise transformational advances; and prospective discoveries reside at the interfaces of disciplinary boundaries that may not be recognized through traditional review or co-review.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The implementation of the INSPIRE pilot is based on two overarching goals:

Goal 1: To emphasize to the science, mathematics, engineering and education research community that NSF is welcoming to bold, unconventional ideas incorporating creative interdisciplinary approaches. INSPIRE seeks to attract unusually creative high-risk/high-reward "out of the box" interdisciplinary proposals.

Goal 2: To provide NSF Program Officers (POs) with additional tools and support to engage in cross-cutting collaboration and risk-taking in managing their awards portfolios.

INSPIRE supports projects that lie at the intersection of traditional disciplines, and is intended to 1) attract unusually creative high-risk / high-reward interdisciplinary proposals; 2) provide substantial funding, not limited to the exploratory stage of the pursuit of novel ideas (unlike NSF's EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research, or EAGER); and 3) be open to all NSF-supported areas of science, mathematics, engineering, and education research. NSF will initiate an external formative assessment to test whether the INSPIRE pilot is achieving program and portfolio-level goals.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Joint NSF/NOAA Agreement regarding the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and related AGS

Deadline: Not Specified

This letter announces opportunities in FY2014 and FY2015 to support the translation of research supported by the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) to operations at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). AGS will provide support to enable the AGS research community to transition the basic research in which they are engaged to use in national operational activities at NCEP. This opportunity would support extended visits by AGS-supported investigators and research groups, including students and post-doctoral researchers to NOAA's NCEP. Support would be awarded in the form of a supplement to an existing NSF award. This opportunity provides AGS PIs an opportunity to advance their NSF-supported research by working closely with environmental scientists at NOAA's NCEP and having access to a wealth of real-time and archived datasets and computational facilities.

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Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities (EAR/IF)
Directorate for Geosciences and Division of Earth Sciences (National Science Foundation)

Proposals accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Instrumentation and Facilities Program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR/IF) supports meritorious requests for infrastructure that promotes research and education in areas supported by the Division (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR). EAR/IF will consider proposals for:

    1. Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment that will advance laboratory and field investigations and student research training opportunities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000. The maximum request for upgrade of research group computing facilities is $75,000.
    2. Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software that will extend current research and research training capabilities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000.
    3. Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities that will make complex and expensive instruments, systems of instruments or services broadly available to the Earth science research and student communities.
    4. Support for Early Career Investigators to facilitate expedient development and operation of new research infrastructure proposed by the next generation of leaders in the Earth Sciences. The Early Career opportunity specifically allows for submission of a proposal for Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment or Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software which may include additional budget line items associated with support of a new full-time technician who will be dedicated to manage, operate and maintain the instrument(s) being requested. Any request for technical support under this opportunity is limited to three years duration. The maximum total request is $1,000,000.

Planned research uses of requested instruments, software, and facilities must include basic research on Earth processes SUPPORTED BY CORE PROGRAMS OR SPECIAL PROGRAMS OF THE DIVISION OF EARTH SCIENCES (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR for a current list of programs funded by the Division of Earth Sciences).

Support is available through grants or cooperative agreements awarded in response to investigator-initiated proposals.

Human resource development and education are expected to be an integral part of all proposals submitted to EAR/IF.

Efforts to support participation of underrepresented groups in laboratory and/or field instrument use and training are encouraged.

All proposers to EAR/IF are encouraged to consider Support of Outreach and/or Broadening Participation Activities. Proposals submitted to the EAR/IF Program may request up to $20,000 for such activities (please refer to Sections V.A Proposal Preparation Instructions and V.B Budgetary Information). Proposals for Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities are excluded from the $20,000 maximum for outreach and broadening participation activities.

Proposals requesting equipment, infrastructure or personnel that will also serve disciplines outside the Earth sciences may be jointly reviewed with other programs within the Foundation. EAR/IF will consider co-funding of projects with other NSF programs and other agencies. Potential applications who consider joint review a possibility for their proposal are encouraged to contact the relevant program officer to discuss this possibility.

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Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program Directorate for Biological Sciences/NSF

Deadlines: July 21, 2014 (CISE) (BIO) (EHR) July 22, 2014 (ENG) July 23, 2014 (GEO) (MPS) (SBE)

CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

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Recompetition of the Management of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

Deadline: TBD

Deadline:  This notice does not constitute a solicitation; therefore, no award of any kind will result from this notice. Although the competition is still in the planning stage, NSF anticipates that a program solicitation will be issued in the second quarter of calendar year 2014.

Consistent with the National Science Board Resolution on Competition and Recompetition of NSF Awards (NSB-08-12), NSF will carry out a competition for the next cooperative agreement to manage and operate the IceCube Neutrino Observatory through an open, merit-based external peer-review process. The Division of Polar Programs (PLR) of the Directorate for Geosciences and the Division of Physics of the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences are currently preparing the program solicitation. This solicitation is expected to lead to the award of a five- to ten-year cooperative agreement for the management and operation of ICNO following the end of the current cooperative agreement on September 30, 2015.

This letter provides general information regarding the upcoming competition and invites potential proposing organizations to contact NSF representatives to identify information they believe is needed for proposal preparation.

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Expeditions in Computing
National Science Foundation

May 2, 2016 (Preliminary Proposal)

The far-reaching impact and rate of innovation in the computing and information disciplines has been remarkable, generating economic prosperity and enhancing the quality of life for people throughout the world.

The Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) has created the Expeditions in Computing (Expeditions) program to provide the CISE research and education community with the opportunity to pursue ambitious, fundamental research agendas that promise to define the future of computing and information.

In planning Expeditions projects, investigators are encouraged to come together within or across departments or institutions to combine their creative talents in the identification of compelling, transformative research agendas that promise disruptive innovations in computing and information for many years to come.

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Dear Colleague Letter: NSF-USDA Joint Funding Opportunity - Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGERs) to Develop and Enable Breakthrough Technologies for Animal and Plant Phenomics and Microbiomes
National Science Foundation

May 12, 2016 (Proposal Inquiries)

Dear Colleagues:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Biological Sciences Directorate (BIO) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) have established a joint funding opportunity to support the development of transformative plant and animal phenomics, and microbiome technologies. This opportunity seeks to advance our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and principles. Insights thus gained have the potential to result in improved agricultural productivity and more efficient use of natural resources such as land, water, nitrogen, and phosphorous.

Proposed studies should be potentially transformative and may be considered "high-risk, high-payoff", and be compatible with the budget and time limits ($300,000, 2 years) of the EAGER funding mechanism. For more information on EAGERs, please review the NSF Grant Proposal Guide.

Sincerely,

Jane Silverthorne
Deputy Assistant Director
Directorate for Biological Sciences
National Science Foundation

Parag Chitnis
Deputy Director
Institute of Food Production and Sustainability
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA

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Antarctic Research
National Science Foundation

May 16, 2016

Scientific research, along with operational support of that research, is the principal activity of the U.S. Antarctic Program in Antarctica. The National Science Foundation's Antarctic Sciences Section (ANT), Division of Polar Programs (PLR), fosters research on globally and regionally important scientific problems. In particular, the Antarctic Sciences Section supports research that expands fundamental knowledge of the region as well as research that relies on the unique characteristics of the Antarctic continent as a platform from which to support research.

Antarctic fieldwork will be supported for research that can only be performed or is best performed in Antarctica. The Antarctic Sciences Section strongly encourages research using existing samples, models, and data as well as research at the intersection between disciplines.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Innovative Computational Infrastructure for Understanding the Brain
National Science Foundation

May 20, 2016

Through this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) aims to support initial exploratory activities toward the creation of comprehensive shared computational infrastructure solutions that are designed to transform the practice of collaborative neuroscience and enable systematic and grand-scale investigations of the brain and nervous system.

NSF supports fundamental research across the broad spectrum of disciplines associated with Understanding the Brain (see https://www.nsf.gov/brain), and is a partner in the federal "Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies" (BRAIN) Initiative. In February 2016, NSF announced the intention to foster the development of national research infrastructure for neuroscience (i.e., "National Brain Observatory," NBO, effort) to support collaborative and team science for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the brain in action and context (NSF 16-047). Please refer to that DCL for NSF's overall interests and plans for NBO activities.

The present DCL encourages two types of funding requests: (1) Proposals for Conferences (community workshops) that are designed to bring together domain neuroscientists and computational infrastructure developers to explore needs for and opportunities to develop innovative computational infrastructure solutions that transform the practice of neuroscience; and (2) Early-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGERs) proposals for high risk/high reward innovative concepts and pilot projects that aim to ultimately result in deployment of ambitious, sustainable computational infrastructure resources, capabilities, and services that will enhance and accelerate the neuroscientific discovery process for a broad base of users.

Sincerely,

James Kurose
Assistant Director for Computer & Information Science & Engineering

 

 

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GEO Opportunities for Leadership in Diversity (GOLD)
Directorate for Geosciences / NSF

LOI due February 1, 2016
Full submission due June 2, 2016

SYNOPSIS: 

The geosciences continue to lag other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines in the engagement, recruitment and retention of traditionally underrepresented and underserved minorities, requiring more focused and strategic efforts to address this problem. Diversity is a vital priority for the geosciences community because it promotes innovation, strengthens the community's ability to tackle complex geoscience research problems, and engenders widespread public Earth and environmental science literacy.

Prior investments made by the National Science Foundation (NSF) related to broadening participation in STEM have identified many effective strategies and model programs for engaging, recruiting, and retaining underrepresented students in the geosciences. These investments also have documented clearly the importance of committed, knowledgeable, and persistent leadership for making local progress in broadening participation in STEM and the geosciences. Achieving diversity at larger and systemic scales requires a network of diversity "champions" who can catalyze widespread adoption of these evidence-based best practices and resources. Although many members of the geoscience community are committed to the ideals of broadening participation, the skills and competencies that empower people who wish to have an impact, and make them effective as leaders in that capacity for sustained periods of time, must be cultivated through professional development. But, it is not sufficient to educate prospective leaders on the issues and resources related to broadening participation in STEM. Research on leadership development has documented the complex interplay of personal traits, motivating factors, and environmental contexts that must also be considered in making such professional development efforts successful.

This solicitation describes an Ideas Lab on "GEO Opportunities for Leadership in Diversity." Ideas Labs are intensive workshops focused on finding innovative solutions to grand challenge problems. The ultimate aim of this Ideas Lab, organized by the NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO), is to facilitate the design, pilot implementation, and evaluation of innovative professional development curricula that can unleash the potential of geoscientists with interests in broadening participation to become impactful leaders within the community. The expectation is that mixing geoscientists with experts in broadening participation research, behavioral change, social psychology, institutional change management, leadership development research, and pedagogies for professional development will not only engender fresh thinking and innovative approaches for preparing and empowering geoscientists as change agents for increasing diversity, but will also produce experiments that contribute to the research base regarding leader and leadership development. U.S. scientists and educators may submit preliminary proposals only via FastLane as an application to participate in the Ideas Lab, through which a set of multidisciplinary ideas will be developed. The Ideas Lab will be held March 20-24, 2016 in the Washington, DC metro region. Promising approaches developed through the Ideas Lab process will be submitted as full proposals from invited participants.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

GEO is using the Ideas Lab mechanism described in Chapter II Section D.3 of the NSF Grant Proposal Guide (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf16001/nsf16_1.pdf) to achieve its goals of preparing new leaders within the geosciences community who can catalyze progress in broadening participation within their local spheres of influence and, ideally, foster transformative impact at community-wide scales through collective action and scale up of their individual efforts. An Ideas Lab is a mechanism to provide NSF funding that is designed to support the development and implementation of creative and innovative project ideas with potential to transform research paradigms and/or solve intractable problems. This mechanism was developed collaboratively within NSF, modeled on the "sandpit" workshops that are a key component of the United Kingdom Research Council's "IDEAs Factory" program.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Computer Science for All
National Science Foundation

March 28, 2016 (STEM C Program) or May 31, 2016 (EAGERs, Supplements & Conferences)

Dear Colleagues:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is pleased to be part of the Computer Science for All (CS for All) initiative announced by the Administration on January 30, 2016. As the lead Federal agency for building the research knowledge base for CS education, NSF plans to make available $120 million over the next five years to accelerate its ongoing efforts to enable rigorous and engaging CS education in schools across the nation. This acceleration could enable as many as 9,000 additional high-school teachers to be well prepared to teach CS and integrate computational thinking into their teaching over the next five years.

We wish to draw attention to existing NSF funding opportunities in Fiscal Year 2016 that are available to support the goal of providing opportunities for all students to participate in computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning in the elementary, middle, and high school grade levels. The Directorates for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) and Education and Human Resources (EHR) are interested in receiving proposals that advance the CS for All initiative.

We expect that, as appropriate, proposals will explain the education research questions and issues that are being pursued in conjunction with the development, implementation, and testing, and what kinds of new knowledge about CS and CT teaching and learning will be built through the research to be conducted in the project.

Sincerely,

James Kurose
Assistant Director, Computer & Information Science & Engineering

Joan Ferrini-Mundy
Assistant Director, Education and Human Resources

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Dear Colleague Letter: Advanced Cellular Biomanufacturing
National Science Foundation

June 1, 2016 (Full EAGER Proposals)

Dear Colleague:

Cell-based therapies, especially immune cells, have the potential to revolutionize human healthcare in various different contexts, including cancer and personalized medicine. For example, CAR (Chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy for cancer requires modification, in vitro culture and expansion of human T-cells. Manufacturing of therapeutic cells as the end product presents major engineering challenges. New therapies and cell-based products depend critically on the development of robust, reliable and reproducible biomanufacturing technologies.

Large-scale manufacturing of therapeutic cells has the potential to benefit millions of people with new life saving opportunities. Advanced biomanufacturing is a field that builds upon ground breaking discoveries in engineering and biology for producing the next generation of therapeutics. Cellular biomanufacturing is a very promising area of advanced biomanufacturing, and includes technological advances in large scale cell processing, cell preservation and distribution, and process monitoring and quality control.

This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) is aimed at identifying opportunities for leveraging and synthesizing conceptual scientific and technological innovation integrating disciplines such as immunology, cell biology and engineering, and to enhance developments in cellular biomanufacturing for the purposes of accelerating solutions to critical challenges in the field.

Sincerely,

JoAnn Slama Lighty
Division Director
Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems
Directorate for Engineering

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Gen-3 Engineering Research Centers (ERC)
Directorate for Engineering, Engineering Education and Centers / NSF

LOI due October 3, 2015
Full submission due June 16, 2016 by invitation only

SYNOPSIS:

The goal of the ERC Program is to integrate engineering research and education with technological innovation to transform national prosperity, health, and security. ERCs create an innovative, inclusive culture in engineering to cultivate new ideas and pursue engineering discovery that achieves a significant science, technology, and societal outcome within the 10-year timeframe of NSF support. For information on individual ERCs and their achievements, go to:http://www.ERC-assoc.org.

Those who submit proposals in response to this solicitation will need to address the following questions:

  1. What is the compelling new idea and how does it relate to national needs?
  2. Why is a center necessary to tackle the idea?
  3. How will the ERC's infrastructure integrate and implement research, workforce development and innovation ecosystem development efforts to achieve its vision?

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The goal of the ERC Program is to integrate engineering research and education with technological innovation to transform national prosperity, health, and security. It links scientific discovery to technological innovation and supports engineering graduates who can be leaders in industrial practice and creative pioneers in a global economy. The ERCs awarded through this solicitation shall have an infrastructure that integrates and implements the key features (research, workforce development, and innovation ecosystem development) to address the following gaps/barriers:

  • Research
    • To conduct an interdisciplinary research program that aligns systems-motivated fundamental and applied research with enabling and systems technologies to demonstrate proofs-of-principle of the engineered systems developed in test beds
    • To translate interdisciplinary advances from research in fundamental knowledge, enabling technology, and transformational engineered systems to innovation
  • Workforce Development
    • To implement research-based education programs that produce a diverse, globally competitive, and team-oriented engineering workforce that has experience in research, industrial practice, technology advancement, entrepreneurship, and innovation
    • To broaden pathways to engineering for underrepresented students
  • Innovation Ecosystem Development
    • To create an innovation ecosystem that brings industrial/practitioner perspectives in research and workforce development to the ERC by leveraging industry resources and research capacity
    • To accelerate transfer of ERC advances in knowledge, technology, and systems to impact key sectors of industry and professional engineering practices and academic curricula

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Plant-Biotic Interactions
National Science Foundation

June 6, 2016

The Plant-Biotic Interactions (PBI) program supports research on the processes that mediate beneficial and antagonistic interactions between plants and their viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal, plant, and invertebrate symbionts, pathogens and pests. This joint NSF-NIFA program supports projects focused on current and emerging model and non-model systems, and agriculturally relevant plants. The program's scope extends from fundamental mechanisms to translational efforts, with the latter seeking to put into agricultural practice insights gained from basic research on the mechanisms that govern plant-biotic interactions.

Projects must be strongly justified in terms of fundamental biological processes and/or relevance to agriculture and may be purely fundamental or applied, or include aspects of both perspectives. All types of symbiosis are appropriate, including commensalism, mutualism, parasitism, and host-pathogen interactions. Research may focus on the biology of the plant host, its pathogens, pests or symbionts, interactions among these, or on the function of plant-associated microbiomes. The program welcomes proposals on the dynamics of initiation, transmission, maintenance and outcome of these complex associations, including studies of metabolic interactions, immune recognition and signaling, host-symbiont regulation, reciprocal responses among interacting species and mechanisms associated with self/non-self recognition such as those in pollen-pistil interactions.

Explanatory frameworks may include molecular, genomic, metabolic, cellular, network and organismal processes, with projects guided by hypothesis and/or discovery driven experimental approaches. Where appropriate, quantitative modeling in concert with experimental work is encouraged. Overall, the program seeks to support research that will deepen our understanding of the fundamental processes that mediate interactions between plants and the organisms with which they intimately associate and advance the application of that fundamental knowledge to benefit agriculture.

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Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS)
National Science Foundation

June 7, 2016

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are engineered systems that are built from, and depend upon, the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components. Advances in CPS will enable capability, adaptability, scalability, resiliency, safety, security, and usability that will far exceed the simple embedded systems of today. CPS technology will transform the way people interact with engineered systems -- just as the Internet has transformed the way people interact with information. New smart CPS will drive innovation and competition in sectors such as agriculture, energy, transportation, building design and automation, healthcare, and manufacturing.

Tremendous progress has been made in advancing CPS technology over the last five-plus years. We have explored foundational technologies that have spanned an ever-growing set of application domains, enabling breakthrough achievements in many of these fields. At the same time, the demand for innovation in these domains continues to grow, and is driving the need to accelerate fundamental research to keep pace.

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US Ignite: Networking Research and Application Prototypes Leading to Smart and Connected Communities
National Science Foundation

June 14, 2016

US Ignite is an initiative that seeks to promote US leadership in the development and deployment of next-generation gigabit applications with the potential for significant societal impact. The primary goal of US Ignite is to break a fundamental deadlock: there is insufficient investment in gigabit applications that can take advantage of advanced network infrastructure because such end-to-end infrastructure is rare and geographically dispersed. And conversely, there is a lack of broad availability of advanced broadband infrastructure for open experimentation and innovation because there are few advanced applications and services to justify it.

US Ignite aims to break this deadlock by providing incentives for imagining, prototyping, and developing gigabit applications that address national priorities, and by leveraging and extending this network testbed across US college/university campuses and cities.

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Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE)
National Science Foundation

June 16, 2016

The Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE) Program is a Directorate-wide initiative dedicated to supporting the development of a diverse and well-prepared engineering workforce. Across every educational juncture (e.g., elementary, secondary, and postsecondary levels), efforts to improve engineering interests, preparation, connections, experiences, and opportunities among underrepresented groups is of major importance to BPE.

In FY 2016, aligned with NSF-wide INCLUDES, BPE is interested in funding projects that bring together multiple groups (e.g., school districts, community colleges, engineering schools, industry, philanthropy, government, etc.) and offer the greatest return on investment by producing outcomes that are scalable, sustainable, and applicable to various contexts, settings, and demographics within the engineering enterprise.

For example, it is interested research projects that help us to analyze and understand the problem of insufficient interest and poorly sustained participation in engineering across underrepresented demographic groups; insignificant preparation and scarce opportunities for members of underrepresented demographic groups to learn meaningful, relevant engineering and other STEM-related content; insufficient access to support systems and social networks that raises career awareness about different engineering pathways among underrepresented groups; and structural inequalities and biases within educational and workforce systems that may influence engineering persistence.

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Dear Colleagues: NSF INCLUDES (Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science
National Science Foundation

Dear Colleagues:

Today, NSF is releasing the first NSF INCLUDES solicitation, which aims to fund approximately 40 Design and Development Launch Pilots at ~$300,000 each. I encourage you to enlist partners (e.g., industry, foundations, states) who can help leverage and expand support beyond the Federal dollars. More importantly, in FY 2017, all of these Pilot projects will be eligible to apply for full NSF INCLUDES Alliances, proposed in the President's FY 2017 Budget Request at a level of $12.5 million each for five years.

Diversity - of thought, perspective, and experience - is essential to achieving excellence in 21st century science and engineering research and education. And, there is a business case for diversity. A recent McKinsey & Company study found that companies were 15% more likely to gain financial returns above their national industry median if they were in the top quartile of gender diversity; the probability climbed to 35% for companies in the top quartile for racial/ethnic diversity.

Sincerely,

France A. Córdova
Director

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Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES)
National Science Foundation

April 15, 2016 (Preliminary Proposal); June 24, 2016 (Full Proposal)

Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES) is a comprehensive national initiative designed to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations focused on NSF's commitment to diversity, inclusion, and broadening participation in these fields.  NSF INCLUDES supports efforts to develop talent from all sectors of society to build the STEM workforce.

The initiative aims to improve the preparation, increase the participation, and ensure the contributions of individuals from groups that have traditionally been underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise, including women, members of racial and ethnic groups, persons with disabilities, and persons with low socio-economic status. Significant advancement of these groups will result in a new generation of promising STEM talent and leadership to secure our nation's future in science and technology.

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Dear Colleague Letter: ACI & Career
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) / NSF

July 20, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

Dear Colleague:

The Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI) invites proposals from junior faculty within the community of scientists, engineers, and educators involved with cyberinfrastructure research to apply to the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program (http://www.nsf.gov/career). ACI's research interests include use-inspired and/or applied multidisciplinary research. Additional context for ACI's interests in this solicitation can be found in "Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21)" at http://www.nsf.gov/cif21. These proposals are due this year on July 21, 2015 and next year on July 20, 2016.

CAREER is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's (NSF) most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

Within this context, ACI encourages proposals that are either of:

  1. primary interest to ACI, or
  2. primary interest to another division of NSF, and of secondary interest to ACI.

In both cases, to be of interest to ACI, proposals should promote research, education, and the integration of research and education in projects that:

  1. Contribute to exploration, experimentation, development, and/or deployment of comprehensive, integrated, sustainable, and secure cyberinfrastructure at the campus, regional, national, and/or international scale,
  2. Have an effective cyberinfrastructure impact with clearly defined benefits across multiple research disciplines, and
  3. Build on or complement the existing or upcoming ACI investments, as well as major cyberinfrastructure investments from other NSF divisions.

CAREER proposals that seek ACI support should clearly address these issues within the body of the proposal, and should designate ACI as the primary or secondary program during proposal submission.

Many general questions are answered in the program's FAQ document, which is available from the CAREER program page (http://www.nsf.gov/career). The FAQ question #34 relates to ACI (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15057/nsf15057.jsp#b34).

ACI-specific questions regarding the solicitation should be addressed to Sushil Prasad, sprasad@nsf.gov.

Sincerely,

James Kurose,
Assistant Director, CISE

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Tectonics
National Science Foundation

July 8, 2016

The Tectonics Program supports a broad range of field, laboratory, computational, and theoretical investigations aimed at understanding the deformation of the terrestrial continental lithosphere (i.e. above the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary). The Program focuses on deformation processes and their tectonic drivers that operate at any depth within the continental lithosphere, on time-scales of decades/centuries (e.g. active tectonics) and longer, and at micro- to plate boundary/orogenic belt length-scales.

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Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers Program (I/UCRC)
Directorate for Engineering, Industrial Innovation and Partnerships / NSF

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS:

The Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers (I/UCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by an investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry Center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the Center. Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An I/UCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an I/UCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

A comprehensive range of disciplines and skills is often necessary to address research issues of interest to industry, and thus it is often necessary to form a consortium of universities to achieve a critical mass of interdisciplinary research capabilities for the formation of an I/UCRC. The NSF encourages multiple universities to come together to form an I/UCRC, with each university constituting a Site of the Center. The Center is a logical entity, with a defined leadership spanning the Center's constituent Sites.

An Institution that wants to be part of a Center applies to become an NSF I/UCRC Site. Upon award, this Site will become part of the Center. If this is the only Site within the Center, then it will be a single Site I/UCRC with the corresponding membership obligations. If there are additional sites that are or can be part of the Center, then the new Site will be part of a multi-Site I/UCRC.

The first stage in forming an I/UCRC involves the successful completion of an I/UCRC planning grant. Planning grants for Site additions to existing I/UCRCs may be waived by NSF, provided the proposed research Site meets the minimum membership and financial requirements and has the approval of the leadership of the existing I/UCRC.

Upon successful completion of the Planning Grant, the proposed Site of the Center submits an application to join the Center in its current Phase. New I/UCRCs start at Phase I that lasts five-years. This initial five-year period of support allows for the development of a strong partnership between the academic researchers and interested industrial and government parties. A significant proportion of the Center's support is expected to come from industrial, state, and other funds. As a Center progresses, it is likely to have increased opportunities for funding from additional firms, other federal agencies and laboratories, and state and local governments; thus, increasing the leverage of NSF funds. After five years, Sites within Centers that continue to meet the I/UCRC Program requirements may request support for a second five-year (Phase II) period. Phase II grants allow Centers to continue to grow, and to leverage and diversify their memberships and research portfolio during their Phase II period. After ten years, Sites within Centers may apply for a third five-year (Phase III) period. Phase III awards are provided for Centers that demonstrate significant impact on industry research as measured through robust and sustained membership, student impact, annual reports, Site visits, and adherence to I/UCRC requirements. Centers are expected to be fully supported by private and public partners after fifteen years as an I/UCRC.

All Sites within a Center may apply for a Phase II (years 6 through 10 of the Center) grant if each Site meets the Phase II minimum requirements specified in the solicitation as well as having satisfactorily completed the Phase I grant.

All Sites within a Center may apply for a Phase III (years 11 through 15 of the Center) grant if each Site meets the minimum Phase III requirements specified in the solicitation as well as having satisfactorily completed the Phase II grant.

A Site joining an existing Center will apply for the current Phase of the Center. For example, if a Center is in Phase II, the Site can only apply to join that Center provided it meets the minimum Phase II requirements specified in the solicitation. Similarly, if a Center is in Phase III, the Site can only apply to join that Center provided it meets the minimum Phase III requirements. New Site awards are limited to the remaining duration of the Phase of the Center (for example, if founding Sites of the Center were awarded three years prior to a new Site coming onboard, the new Site will receive funds for only the two years that remain in the duration of that Phase).

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Perception, Action & Cognition (PAC)
Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences / NSF

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS:

The PAC program funds theoretically motivated research on a wide-range of topic areas focused on typical human behavior. The aim is to enhance the fundamental understanding of perceptual, motor, and cognitive processes and their interactions. Central research topics for consideration by the program include vision, audition, haptics, attention, memory, reasoning, written and spoken language, and motor control. The program welcomes a wide range of perspectives, such as individual differences, symbolic computation, connectionism, ecological, genetics, nonlinear dynamics, and complex systems, and a variety of methodologies including both experimental studies and modeling. The PAC program is open to co-review of proposals submitted to other programs both within the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate and across other directorates. Proposals may involve clinical populations, animals, brain imaging, or computational modeling, or factors such as emotion and sleep, only if the work has direct impact on our understanding of basic processes underlying human perception, action, or cognition. 

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Division of Integrative Organismal Systems
Directorate for Biological Sciences and Division of Integrative Organismal Systems / NSF

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS:

The Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) supports research aimed at understanding why organisms are structured the way they are and function as they do. Proposals should focus on organisms as a fundamental unit of biological organization. Principal Investigators (PIs) are encouraged to apply systems approaches that will lead to conceptual and theoretical insights and predictions about emergent organismal properties. Areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to, developmental biology and the evolution of developmental processes, nervous system development, structure, and function, physiological processes, functional morphology, symbioses, interactions of organisms with biotic and abiotic environments, and animal behavior.

Proposals are welcomed in all of the core scientific program areas supported by the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems. Proposals may be submitted to the two tracks described in this solicitation. All investigator-initiated proposals submitted to the Core track of this solicitation must now be invited based on merit review of preliminary proposals. There is a single submission deadline with a limit of 2 preliminary proposals per investigator per year as PI or Co-PI in response to the Core track of this solicitation.Please see the GPG for definition of roles for PI and Co-PI. There are no limits on the number of proposals you can participate on as collaborator. These PI/Co-PI limits do not apply to full proposals submitted to the EDGE track of this solicitation, which has no PI or Co-PI limits on number of proposals submitted. The PI/Co-PI limits apply only to the preliminary proposals submitted to the Core track of this solicitation and do not pertain to proposals submitted in response to other NSF solicitations.

Unsolicited full research proposals are no longer accepted into the IOS Core Programs. Full proposals submitted on a single deadline to the EDGE track of this solicitation do not require prior submission of a preliminary proposal. A Letter of Intent is required before submission of a full proposal to the EDGE track of this solicitation.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

A. Core Track

Proposals are welcomed in all of the core scientific program areas supported by the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems, including projects that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. The core scientific programs in IOS are organized into four clusters. Click on the cluster name to go to the cluster web page to learn more about each cluster.

Proposers should note that substantial changes have been made to the description of the Symbiosis, Defense, and Self-recognition (SDS) Program in the Physiological and Structural Systems Cluster of IOS to be able to accommodate changes in this solicitation about plant-microbial symbiosis proposals. Proposals focused on plant-microbial symbioses of all types that were formerly accepted for review in the SDS Program in response to this Core Programs solicitation will not be accepted for review in the Core track. Proposals in this area of research should be submitted to a new solicitation that will be jointly managed by NSF/IOS and USDA NIFA. Information about this new solicitation will become available in late 2015. However, researchers who wish to develop functional genomic tools aimed at enabling genome manipulation of plant-microbial symbioses are eligible to submit proposals to the EDGE track of this solicitation.

After reading the cluster and program descriptions, discuss any questions about the potential fit of a project to one of the clusters with the Program Director you believe is most closely associated with your field of interest. Biological questions, rather than techniques or approaches, should guide program selection.

Please consult the IOS web page (http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=IOS) for information about Program Directors associated with each programmatic area. This interaction can be a critical aspect for ensuring that your proposal is assigned to the most appropriate program for review.

The core scientific programs in IOS are organized into four clusters:

Behavioral Systems Cluster

The Behavioral Systems Cluster consists of the Animal Behavior Program and the Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant program (DDIG). Only the Animal Behavior Program is part of the IOS Core Programs Solicitation.

Developmental Systems Cluster

Programs within the Developmental Systems Cluster are: the Plant, Fungal and Microbial Developmental Mechanisms Program, the Animal Developmental Mechanisms Program and the Evolution of Developmental Mechanisms Program.

Neural Systems Cluster

Programs within the Neural Systems Cluster are the Organization Program, the Activation Program and the Modulation Program.

Physiological and Structural Systems Cluster

Programs within the Physiological and Structural Systems Cluster are: the Symbiosis, Defense and Self-recognition Program (SDS), the Physiological Mechanisms and Biomechanics Program (PMB), and the Integrative Ecological Physiology Program (IEP). Substantial changes have been made to the description of the SDS Program. Proposers to the SDS Program are advised to examine those changes carefully and to be aware of the relevant changes to this Core Programs solicitation.

Please note that you must select a program name on the Fastlane cover page during submission.

REVIEW PROCESS FOR THE CORE TRACK

A two-stage review process is used fore applications to the Core track of the IOS core programs, including RUI proposals:

Preliminary Proposals: All proposers must submit a preliminary proposal that outlines the major goals of the project including the components described below. Preliminary proposals will typically be reviewed by a panel of outside experts. The Program Directors will communicate the decision to Invite/Not Invite full proposals via FastLane and these decisions will be based on the panel recommendations and additional portfolio considerations. Invite/Do Not invite decisions are binding.

Full Proposals: Invited full proposals will receive ad hoc and/or panel review at the discretion of the Program, as described in Section VI of this Solicitation. Full proposals that were not invited (except as noted for RCN, CAREER and ABR) will be returned without review.

B. Enabling Discovery Through Genomic Tools (EDGE) Track

IOS recognizes that a lack of functional genomic tools, approaches, and associated infrastructure in emerging model organisms is a significant impediment to progress in a wide array of basic research fields focused on the structure and function of organisms and to the advancement of our understanding of the relationship between genomes and phenomes -- a grand challenge in biology. Therefore, a new track, "Enabling Discovery through Genomic Tools" (EDGE), is incorporated in this solicitation to help overcome these obstacles.

Researchers addressing important questions in organismal biology are using a wide array of organisms because their unique features make them especially well-suited to address many fundamental questions in biology. Moreover, support for research on diverse organisms is essential to developing strong inferences about the principles or rules governing the interaction between genomes and phenomes. Although lower costs now make it possible for many PIs to obtain genome and transcriptome sequences, these researchers are frequently blocked from testing hypotheses about cause-and-effect mechanisms because they lack tools to manipulate their systems' genomes. Consequently, investigations often come to a standstill at the stage of correlation (e.g., transcriptomic studies in which gene expression is correlated with experimental and/or environmental conditions), rather than proceeding to testing of causal relationships between genes, genomes and phenotypes. IOS recognizes that establishing causal relationships is essential to understanding the genomes to phenomes relationship.

To address these constraints, EDGE will support projects from individual investigators, small groups of collaborators, or larger collaborative teams who aim to develop functional genomic tools and infrastructure for manipulating genes in diverse organisms. EDGE-supported investigators are expected to rapidly disseminate their tools and train other researchers in their use, thereby catalyzing a broad-scale improvement in the community's capacity to test mechanistic hypotheses. Examples of relevant tools, approaches, and infrastructure include, but are not limited to:

  • Innovative approaches for establishing gene function
  • Development and testing of transformation approaches
  • Expansion of the use of gene editing, knock-out, and overexpression approaches in diverse organisms
  • Development of approaches and establishment of conditions for maintaining organisms to test and manipulate genetic function.

PIs may use taxonomic, question-based, and/or technology-based strategies to develop tools that will be used by larger communities of researchers. Projects may include instrumentation development in the context of developing functional genomic tools to enable emerging model organisms but should not be exclusively limited to instrumentation development. Tools, approaches, and infrastructure that will have significant catalytic effect in enabling large numbers of PIs to overcome bottlenecks in testing function will receive priority. EDGE proposals must include training and rapid dissemination plans, as well as a rationale for support that is based on an assessment of current impediments and the potential impact of proposed projects on the relevant research communities. PIs are encouraged to bring together novel combinations of expertise to achieve the greatest impact of the proposed tools and infrastructure.

EDGE projects are aimed at rapid development and dissemination of functional genomic tools for use in emerging model organisms. Consistent with this overarching goal, budget requests up to $3,000,000 over a project period of up to three years will be considered.

REVIEW PROCESS FOR THE EDGE TRACK

Letter of Intent (LOI): All proposers intending to submit an EDGE track full proposal must submit a LOI, which contains the names of senior personnel, a proposed title, a list of participating organizations (if applicable), and a synopsis that describes the work in sufficient detail to permit an appropriate selection of reviewers. Letters of Intent are not externally evaluated or used to determine funding.

Full Proposals: EDGE track full proposals will receive ad hoc and/or panel review at the discretion of the Program, as described in Section VI of this Solicitation. EDGE track full proposals do not require submission of a preliminary proposal. However, EDGE track full proposals that were not preceded by submission of the required Letter of Intent will be returned without review.

Special Information for:

Research in Undergraduate Institution (RUI) Proposals

Both the Core track and the EDGE track of this solicitation will accept Research in Undergraduate Institution (RUI) proposals. RUI submissions to the Core track must start with a preliminary proposal, and RUI submissions to the EDGE track must start with a Letter of Intent. The preliminary proposal or Letter of Intent must be received by the deadlines listed in this solicitation. Information on the scope of RUI projects and the format of these proposals can be found at http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5518&from=fund.

Research Coordination Network (RCN) Proposals

The Core track of this solicitation will accept Research Coordination Network (RCN) Proposals. RCN proposals do not start with a preliminary proposal and instead should be submitted at the deadline for the Core track invited full proposals listed in this solicitation. Information on the scope of RCN projects and the format of these proposals can be found at http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=11691.

Accomplishment Based Renewal (ABR) Proposals

The Core track of this Core Programs solicitation will accept Accomplishment Based Renewal Proposals. ABR proposals do not start with a preliminary proposal and instead should be submitted at the deadline for Core track invited full proposals listed in this IOS solicitation. Information on eligibility and the scope and format for ABR submissions can be found in the GPG. If you are considering an ABR submission you MUST contact a program officer in the relevant cluster prior to submission. Failure to do so may result in your proposal being returned without review.

U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) Collaborative Proposals

Both the Core and EDGE tracks of this solicitation will accept proposals for international research in accordance with the IOS Dear Colleague Letter that announced this international collaborative activity with the BSF (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15090/nsf15090.jsp). These international collaborative proposal submissions to the Core track (whether reviewed by NSF or the international partner) will be subject to the submission limits in the Core track of this solicitation for any PI or Co-PI. International collaborative submissions to the EDGE track must start with a Letter of Intent. There are no submission limits to the EDGE track. The preliminary proposal (Core track) or Letter of Intent (EDGE track) must be received by the deadlines listed in this IOS solicitation. Questions about this activity should be directed to NSF-IOS-BSF@nsf.gov.

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Faculty Development in the Space Sciences (FDSS)
National Science Foundation - Limited Submissions

CORRECTION:  Due to the current budget situation, the National Science Foundation has withdrawn invitations for proposals and archived this program.  NSF will consider issuing solicitations again in 2017.

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Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program
National Science Foundation

Sept. 6, 2016

The National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and professionals to become K-12 STEM teachers. The program invites creative and innovative proposals that address the critical need for recruiting and preparing highly effective K-12 STEM teachers, especially in high-need local educational agencies. The program offers four tracks: Track 1: The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships and Stipends Track; Track 2: The NSF Teaching Fellowships Track; Track 3: The NSF Master Teaching Fellowships Track; and Track 4: Noyce Research Track.  In addition, Capacity Building proposals are accepted from proposers intending to develop a future Track 1, 2, or 3 proposal.

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Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities (EAR/IF)
Directorate for Geosciences / NSF

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The Instrumentation and Facilities Program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR/IF) supports meritorious requests for infrastructure that promotes research and education in areas supported by the Division (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR). EAR/IF will consider proposals for:

1) Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment that will advance laboratory and field investigations and student research training opportunities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000. The maximum request for upgrade of research group computing facilities is $75,000.

2) Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software that will extend current research and research training capabilities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000.

3) Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities that will make complex and expensive instruments, systems of instruments or services broadly available to the Earth science research and student communities.

4) Support for Early Career Investigators to facilitate expedient development and operation of new research infrastructure proposed by the next generation of leaders in the Earth Sciences. The Early Career opportunity specifically allows for submission of a proposal for Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment or Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software which may include additional budget line items associated with support of a new full-time technician who will be dedicated to manage, operate and maintain the instrument(s) being requested. Any request for technical support under this opportunity is limited to three years duration. The maximum total request is $1,000,000.

Planned research uses of requested instruments, software, and facilities must include basic research on Earth processes SUPPORTED BY CORE PROGRAMS OR SPECIAL PROGRAMS OF THE DIVISION OF EARTH SCIENCES (seehttp://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR for a current list of programs funded by the Division of Earth Sciences).

Support is available through grants or cooperative agreements awarded in response to investigator-initiated proposals.

Human resource development and education are expected to be an integral part of all proposals submitted to EAR/IF.

Efforts to support participation of underrepresented groups in laboratory and/or field instrument use and training are encouraged.

All proposers to EAR/IF are encouraged to consider Support of Outreach and/or Broadening Participation Activities. Proposals submitted to the EAR/IF Program may request up to $20,000 for such activities (please refer to Sections V.A Proposal Preparation Instructions and V.B Budgetary Information). Proposals for Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities are excluded from the $20,000 maximum for outreach and broadening participation activities.

Proposals requesting equipment, infrastructure or personnel that will also serve disciplines outside the Earth sciences may be jointly reviewed with other programs within the Foundation. EAR/IF will consider co-funding of projects with other NSF programs and other agencies. Potential applications who consider joint review a possibility for their proposal are encouraged to contact the relevant program officer to discuss this possibility.

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Lower Atmosphere Observing Facilities (LAOF)
Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences / NSF

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) Lower Atmosphere Observing Facilities (LAOF) Program oversees a portfolio of multi-user national facilities that are sponsored by NSF for use by the geosciences research community. Program management resides within AGS in the NCAR and Facilities Section (NFS) which provides a single point for coordination of planning and resources.

The LAOF program enables geoscience research through the provision of specialized facilities, instrumentation, and field support services necessary to carry out the scientific field work associated with investigations of a wide range of geophysical phenomena. The program is actively involved in decisions about the acquisition, operation, maintenance, upgrading and replacement of these facilities based on input from the scientific community. LAOF funding supports both the planning for scientific field programs (e.g., experimental design, operational plans, logistical support) and the actual deployment of NSF-sponsored facilities.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Interagency and International Research on North Atlantic - Arctic Oceanographic Processes
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) and Division of Polar Programs (PLR) / NSF

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS:

October 13, 2015

Dear Colleague:

The oceanography and ecology of the North Atlantic Ocean are fundamentally linked to the health, economy, and overall well-being of North America and Europe, and to the global climate system. The trilateral Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation of May, 2013, between the European Union (EU), Canada, and the United States (US) (available athttp://www.coopeus.eu/galway-statement/) emphasizes the need for international cooperation in discovering and understanding processes influencing this dynamic region of the oceans. In April 2014, NSF and the European Commission cosponsored a workshop on the coupled North Atlantic-Arctic System to identify critical research questions, discuss common research interests, and explore areas of potential collaboration. Participants included multidisciplinary scientists from Canada, the EU, and the US and representatives from ocean-relevant US and EU government agencies. The workshop report is available at http://www.whoi.edu/fileserver.do?id=208864&pt=2&p=192971.

This Dear Colleague Letter provides guidance for US scientists who will request support from the NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) and Division of Polar Programs (PLR) over the next 18 months to conduct research related to the workshop goals in collaboration with scientists from Canada or the European Union.

PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION

  1. NSF proposals should be basic-research oriented and focused on discovery at the cutting-edge of science. NSF-funded activities must be focused on basic research. Research performed by EU, Canadian, or other collaborators may involve applied science.
  2. Once the project scope is clearly defined, contact the appropriate OCE or PLR program officer by email (seehttp://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=OCE and http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?org=PLR for program foci). Include a brief description of your research goals, work plan, and anticipated collaborative arrangements. If the project is interdisciplinary, consider contacting multiple programs for joint consideration. If the work is primarily Subarctic contact OCE or if primarily Arctic (ARC) contact PLR. Contact program managers well in advance of the submission date, as coordination among programs or funding agencies may be required.
  3. For proposals submitted via FastLane, standard Grant Proposal Guide proposal preparation and submission guidelines apply. For proposals submitted via Grants.gov, the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide: A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Grants.gov Guidelines applies. (Note: The NSF Grants.gov Application Guide is available on the Grants.gov website and on the NSF website at:http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=grantsgovguide). Additional requirements with regard to logistics, data submission, etc. apply as specified in the OCE and PLR Arctic solicitations.
  4. Collaborative arrangements, including funding status and logistical arrangements for both US and non-US investigators should be thoroughly documented in the Special Information / Supplementary Documents section of the proposal.

TARGET DATES FOR PROPOSAL SUBMISSION

Annual OCE Proposal Submission Target Dates * for unsolicited proposals:

February 15 and August 15.
See http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=OCE

PLR\ARC: Proposal Submission Deadline for the Arctic Research Opportunities program solicitation:

October 18, 2016 
October 18, Annually Thereafter
See http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf14584

*If either falls on a weekend day or on a federal holiday, the target date is automatically transferred to the next available weekday.

PEER REVIEW AND FUNDING

North Atlantic proposals will be reviewed alongside and compete for funding with the other proposals submitted to the same funding competition. There will not be a separate or special review process. The normal NSF review criteria as described in the NSF Grant Proposal Guide will apply.

For further information, please contact the appropriate program(s) by visiting http://nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?org=OCE and/or http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?org=PLR.

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Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC)
National Science Foundation - Limited Submissions

Internal MSU LOI due June 1, 2016
Full Submission due Oct. 14, 2016

This program seeks to enhance and expand the national resource of digital data documenting existing vouchered biological and paleontological collections and to advance scientific knowledge by improving access to digitized information (including images) residing in vouchered scientific collections across the United States. The information associated with various collections of organisms, such as geographic, paleogeographic and stratigraphic distribution, environmental habitat data, phenology, information about associated organisms, collector field notes, and tissues and molecular data extracted from the specimens, is a rich resource providing the baseline from which to further biodiversity research and provide critical information about existing gaps in our knowledge of life on earth.

The national resource is structured at three levels: a central coordinating organization, a series of thematic networks based on an important research theme, and the physical collections. The national resource builds upon a sizable existing national investment in curation of the physical objects in scientific collections and contributes vitally to scientific research and technology interests in the United States. It will become an invaluable tool in understanding contemporary biological issues and challenges.

Internal MSU LOI Procedure:

  1. Submit Internal MSU Letters of Intent by the internal due date published in the opportunity announcement.
  2. Although agency letter of intent formats may vary, white papers shall be no more than two pages long, shall consist of a project summary, and be submitted along with a CV (also two page maximum). (digital format: Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format). 
  3. Submit whitepapers and CV's via ePCF (available from the MSU OSP webpage: http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/) by selecting "limited submission pre-proposal" in the ePCF screen and upload documents as an attachment. Select "National Science Foundation (NSF)" as the sponsor. Whitepapers and CV's will be routed to the VP Research and Economic Development office (VPRED) for review. Submissions that do not follow this format are at risk of not being reviewed.
  4. If more than the allowed applications are received, the MSU Research Council (or subcommittee) will select the project(s) to be put forth on behalf of the university. Evaluation criteria will include, but not be limited to quality of the proposal, key deliverables, what makes the project competitive, and eligibility of the investigator. Other key considerations include probability of successful funding and support of the mission of the University.
  5. In the event that the opportunity requires a nomination from the chair of the PI's division, a letter of support shall also be attached to the application. The content of these letters may follow the criteria specified in the agency announcement.
  6. For Questions and Help: The Office of Sponsored Programs, Proposal Services Office will be available for whitepaper questions and assistance with full proposal development including proposal review and edit, budget development, broader impacts, evaluation, sustainability, compliance, and other assistance as needed. For questions related to the internal submission process (ePCF, etc.) or to receive proposal assistance contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist at micaelayoung@montana.edu or Sandy Sward, OSP Director at ssward@montana.edu.   

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Petascale Computing Resource Allocations (PRAC)
Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering and Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure / NSF

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS:

In 2013, a new NSF-funded petascale computing system, Blue Waters, was deployed at the University of Illinois. The goal of this project and system is to open up new possibilities in science and engineering by providing computational capability that makes it possible for investigators to tackle much larger and more complex research challenges across a wide spectrum of domains. The purpose of this solicitation is to invite research groups to submit requests for allocations of resources on the Blue Waters system. Proposers must show a compelling science or engineering challenge that will require petascale computing resources. Proposers must also be prepared to demonstrate that they have a science or engineering research problem that requires and can effectively exploit the petascale computing capabilities offered by Blue Waters. Proposals from or including junior researchers are encouraged, as one of the goals of this solicitation is to build a community capable of using petascale computing.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This solicitation seeks proposals to make use of Blue Waters for breakthrough research in any domain supported by the National Science Foundation or any other federal agency.

Blue Waters includes the largest NSF-funded system and staff dedicated to supporting a small number of projects at the frontiers of computational science. The system is a heterogenous Cray XE6/XK7 consisting of more than 22,000 XE6 compute nodes (each containing two AMD Interlagos processors) augmented by more than 4000 XK7 compute nodes (each containing one AMD Interlagos processor and one NVIDIA GK110 "Kepler" accelerator) in a single high speed Gemini interconnection fabric. This configuration enables sustained petascale simulations on hundreds of thousands of traditional CPUs for science and engineering discovery, while also supporting development and optimization of cutting-edge applications capable of leveraging the compute power of thousands of GPUs. The system incorporates extremely large memory and a tightly integrated I/O subsystem and is suitable for both integer and floating point computations with very large data requirements. The system is also designed to directly support visualization of large-scale datasets produced by computations that use the system. A large amount of archival storage is associated with the system. The system design responds to input from researchers in a broad range of science and engineering disciplines. Non-proprietary details of the system design may be obtained from https://bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/hardware-summary .

Trends in HPC architectures are such that current and anticipated production systems typically consist of hundreds of thousand to millions of processor cores with each core capable of executing multiple threads, and, often, arithmetic units that support small vector instructions. These features present a programmer with a variety of mechanisms to exploit the levels of parallelism within algorithms. Optimizing performance involves a number of challenges, including discovering and exploiting parallelism within codes and overlapping different types of operations. Multi-level caches, local and remote main memory, intra-nodal and inter-nodal communication networks and parallel I/O interfaces offer an increasingly deep hierarchy of latency within computing systems. In addition, increasingly, commercial HPC system designs such as Blue Waters, are hybrid systems offering general purpose processors coupled with specialized co-processors, either on-chip or separate. Recent and ongoing developments attempt to simplify the challenge of developing scientific and engineering computer codes that scale.

To effectively use computation at sustained rates of a petaflop/s or more, with memory-resident data of order one petabyte and correspondingly large input-output datasets is a considerable computational science challenge in itself. Some algorithms readily scale across large numbers of processing elements. In general, though, the design and implementation of computing codes that can harness all of the resources of a system like Blue Waters to address complex science and engineering problems that are not readily amenable to attack by other means is not trivial. It is anticipated that research groups may require several years of preparation before being ready to exploit a sustained petaflop/s systems. A number of research groups are currently or have been recently funded by federal agencies and/or industry to develop petascale applications. The purpose of this solicitation is to identify groups who require petascale computing for ground-breaking science or engineering research, who have a need for the unique resource that Blue Waters represents, and that are able to use Blue Waters effectively. Because of the intrinsic value of the Blue Waters resources, a research group will only be granted significant access to the production system after its request for a resource allocation has been successful in a competitive, merit review managed by NSF. Successful proposers to this solicitation will be granted an allocation of Blue Waters resources together with a small amount of funds to cover travel costs. The Blue Waters project team will offer consulting support and assistance to each project team that is granted access through this solicitation. This consulting support includes assistance in performance analysis and prediction.

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Electronics, Photonics and Magnetic Devices
National Science Foundation

Nov. 1, 2016

The Electronics, Photonics, and Magnetic Devices (EPMD) Program seeks to improve the fundamental understanding of devices and components based on the principles of micro- and nano-electronics, optics and photonics, optoelectronics, magnetics, electromechanics, electromagnetics, and related physical phenomena.

The Electronics & Magnetic Devices component of EPMD enables discovery and innovation advancing the frontiers of nanoelectronics, spin electronics, molecular and organic electronics, bioelectronics, biomagnetics, non-silicon electronics, and flexible electronics. It also addresses advances in energy-efficient electronics, sensors, low-noise, power electronics, and mixed signal devices.

The Optic & Photonic Devices component of EPMD supports research and engineering efforts leading to significant advances in novel optical sources and photodetectors, optical communication devices, photonic integrated circuits, single-photon quantum devices, and nanophotonics. It also addresses novel optical imaging and sensing applications and solar cell photovoltaics.

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Energy, Power, Control, and Networks
National Science Foundation

Nov. 1, 2016

Recent advances in communications, computation, and sensing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for the design of cyber-physical systems with increased responsiveness, interconnectivity and automation. To meet new challenges and societal needs, the Energy, Power, Control and Networks (EPCN) Program invests in systems and control methods for analysis and design of cyber-physical systems to ensure stability, performance, robustness, and security.

Topics of interest include modeling, optimization, learning, and control of networked multi-agent systems, higher-level decision making, and dynamic resource allocation as well as risk management in the presence of uncertainty, sub-system failures and stochastic disturbances. EPCN also invests in adaptive dynamic programing, brain-like networked architectures performing real-time learning, and neuromorphic engineering. EPCN supports innovative proposals dealing with systems research in such areas as energy, transportation, and nanotechnology.

EPCN places emphasis on electric power systems, including generation, transmission, storage, and integration of renewables; power electronics and drives; battery management systems; hybrid and electric vehicles; and understanding of the interplay of power systems with associated regulatory and economic structures and with consumer behavior. Also of interest are interdependencies of power and energy systems with other critical infrastructures. Topics of interest also include systems analysis and design for energy scavenging and alternate energy technologies such as solar, wind, and hydrokinetic.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) pilot continues to support bold interdisciplinary projects in all NSF-supported areas of science, engineering, and education research in FY16. INSPIRE has no targeted themes and serves as a funding mechanism for proposals that are required both to be interdisciplinary and to exhibit potentially transformative research (IDR and PTR, respectively). Complementing existing NSF efforts, INSPIRE was created to handle proposals whose: Scientific advances lie outside the scope of a single program or discipline, such that substantial funding support from more than one program or discipline is necessary; Lines of research promise transformational advances; and Prospective discoveries reside at the interfaces of disciplinary boundaries that may not be recognized through traditional review or co-review.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The implementation of the INSPIRE pilot is based on two overarching goals:

Goal 1: To emphasize to the science, mathematics, engineering and education research community that NSF is welcoming to bold, unconventional ideas incorporating creative interdisciplinary approaches. INSPIRE seeks to attract unusually creative high-risk/high-reward "out of the box" interdisciplinary proposals.

Goal 2: To provide NSF Program Officers (POs) with additional tools and support to engage in cross-cutting collaboration and risk-taking in managing their award portfolios.

INSPIRE supports projects that lie at the intersection of traditional disciplines, and is intended to 1) attract unusually creative high-risk/high-reward interdisciplinary proposals; 2) provide substantial funding, not limited to the exploratory stage of the pursuit of novel ideas (unlike NSF's EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research, or EAGER); and 3) be open to all NSF-supported areas of science, mathematics, engineering, and education research.

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Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources (IUSE: EHR)
Directorate for Education & Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education / NSF

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS:

A well-prepared, innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is crucial to the Nation's health and economy. Indeed, recent policy actions and reports have drawn attention to the opportunities and challenges inherent in increasing the number of highly qualified STEM graduates, including STEM teachers. Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. Both of these priorities depend on the nature and quality of the undergraduate education experience. In addressing these STEM challenges and priorities, the National Science Foundation invests in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understanding STEM learning; to designing, testing, and studying instruction and curricular change; to wide dissemination and implementation of best practices; and to broadening participation of individuals and institutions in STEM fields. The goals of these investments include: increasing the number and diversity of STEM students, preparing students well to participate in science for tomorrow, and improving students' STEM learning outcomes.

The Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE: EHR) program invites proposals that address immediate challenges and opportunities that are facing undergraduate STEM education, as well as those that anticipate new structures (e.g. organizational changes, new methods for certification or credentialing, course re-conception, cyberlearning, etc.) and new functions of the undergraduate learning and teaching enterprise. The IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation.

Note: Because it addresses undergraduate STEM education, the IUSE: EHR funding opportunity is offered in alignment with the NSF-wide undergraduate STEM education initiative, Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (NSF-IUSE). More information about NSF-IUSE can be found in the Introduction of this solicitation.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The IUSE: EHR program envisions all undergraduate students fully engaged in their STEM learning, within institutions of higher education deeply committed to the broad use of practices of teaching and learning that are rooted in a solid research base of demonstrated effectiveness. Towards this vision, the program recognizes the key role faculty play both as creators of innovative learning materials and teaching approaches, and implementers of promising practices. To achieve this vision, two goals guide the IUSE: EHR program: 1) to promote the development, use, and testing of instructional practices and curricular innovations that engage and improve student learning and retention in STEM, and 2) to promote community and institutional transformation that will increase opportunities for the application of highly effective STEM teaching methods.

The National Science Foundation is committed to agency-wide investments to increase the numbers, to broaden the diversity, and to improve the preparation of STEM professionals through undergraduate education. Projects supported by IUSE: EHR can serve to build evidence, adding to the literature on what works and the conditions under which success is achieved. Equally important, projects can serve to generate new knowledge about how to continue to transform undergraduate STEM teaching and learning. Moreover, projects can lead to new understanding of how to apply and encourage the application by others of such improved practices at an institution-wide scale, and how to sustain such applications across and within discipline specific communities. Indeed, transferability and propagation are critical aspects for IUSE: EHR-supported efforts and should be addressed throughout a project's lifetime by ensuring attention to designing for use in a large variety of institutions. Principal Investigators are encouraged to consider the value of the project from the perspective of the end users as well as the relationships, partners, and structures which would eventually be needed to sustain the improvement on a wide scale.

IUSE: EHR supports a broad range of projects, including: research and development of innovative learning resources; design research to understand the impact of such resources; strategies to implement effective instruction in a department or multiple departments, within or across institutions; faculty development projects; design and testing of instruments for measuring student outcomes; and proposals for untested and unconventional activities that could have a high impact on learning and contribute to transforming undergraduate STEM education. Proposals are particularly encouraged that address immediate challenges and opportunities facing undergraduate STEM education, as well as those that anticipate new structures (e.g. organizational changes, new methods for certification or credentialing, course re-conception, Cyberlearning, etc.) and new functions of the undergraduate learning and teaching enterprise.

Included among such projects are conferences that explore revolutionary ideas to improve undergraduate STEM education, proposals to increase the diversity of the institutions and faculty participating in the IUSE: EHR enterprise, and efforts involving collaborations of education researchers and discipline scientists, to ensure that undergraduate STEM education benefits from both cutting-edge STEM and educational research and the development of a healthy community of STEM education researchers and practitioners. Indeed, through all of its projects, the IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance knowledge and adoption of evidence-based teaching and learning practices. Results and findings of IUSE: EHR projects, in turn, contribute to NSF's and EHR's larger themes that focus attention on STEM workforce development, STEM literacy across the population, and increasing participation and persistence in STEM, especially by members of underrepresented groups.

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Dear Colleague Letter: National Brain Observatory: A Phased Approach for Developing a National Research Infrastructure for Neuroscience
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

SYNOPSIS:

February 19, 2016

Dear Colleagues:

With this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the National Science Foundation (NSF) is announcing the intention to foster the development of a national research infrastructure for neuroscience (National Brain Observatory) to support collaborative and team science for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the brain in action and context. Understanding the brain is one of the grand scientific challenges at the intersection of experimental, theoretical, and computational investigation in the biological, physical, social and behavioral sciences, education research, and engineering. Achieving a comprehensive understanding of the brain requires increased emphasis on systematic, multidisciplinary collaboration and team science to establish quantitative and predictive theories of brain structure and function that span levels of organization, spatial scales of study, and the diversity of species. This challenge necessitates the development of innovative, accessible, and shared capabilities, resources and cyberinfrastructure, along with the eventual organizing of these into a coherent national infrastructure for neuroscience research.

Large-scale collaborative efforts facilitated by shared instrumentation, communication, data representation, and workflow systems, and advanced computational and data resources have enabled transformative discoveries across the spectrum of scientific disciplines. In neuroscience, rapid proliferation of advanced measurement instrumentation and techniques has allowed researchers to study the brain, nervous system, cognition, and behavior at ever-finer physical and temporal scales, and generate very large datasets. However, integrative efforts in neuroscience research are hampered by a lack of systematic means for encouraging maximal utilization of existing resources, and for developing and disseminating new resources that can serve whole disciplines in collecting, managing, and analyzing large-scale data, and comparing those data to theoretical and computational models.

This multi-directorate effort is part of the NSF's Understanding the Brain activity, including NSF's participation in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative (http://www.nsf.gov/brain/) and the National Brain Observatory (NBO) effort.

This effort will be realized through a phased approach that:

  • Fosters development and dissemination/deployment of innovative research resources and instrumentation, neurotechnologies and behavioral paradigms that can be applied across the phylogenetic spectrum, theoretical and computational frameworks, and data infrastructure resources while providing greater access to existing resources where possible and serving broad communities within the brain sciences;
  • Supports collaborative networks composed of neuroscientists, behavioral scientists, and theorists working in concert with technology and cyberinfrastructure developers on a common question or theme from a variety of perspectives; and
  • Facilitates the emergence of a coherent national infrastructure comprising the above shared and accessible tools, resources and networks that will allow rapid integration, analysis, and modeling of brain data associated with behaviors from multi-disciplinary projects and enable large-scale collaborative research efforts nationally and internationally that will advance our understanding of brain structure and function.

NSF plans to continue to release Dear Colleague Letters and Solicitations with refined guidance and specific funding opportunities aligned with each of the three phases described above, as this campaign continues into the future. NSF anticipates that this initiative will usher in a new frontier of brain exploration by empowering research communities to cooperatively collect, share, analyze, and model data across molecular, cellular, organismal, developmental, behavioral and evolutionary levels in order to reveal the fundamental principles of nervous system function and complex behavior. If you have questions concerning this DCL, please contact a program officer representing the program or solicitation of interest.

Sincerely,

James L. Olds
Assistant Director for Biological Sciences

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U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

National Institute of Food and Agriculture International Wheat Yield Partnership Program
USDA - NIFA

LOI due March 1, 2016
Full submission due May 3, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

NIFA in coordination with the International Wheat Yield Partnership (IWYP), requests applications for fiscal year (FY) 2016 to seek breakthroughs for cereal breeding using new technologies and also discoveries that lead to significantly greater grain size, grain set and grain filling duration following embryo formation, in diverse environments, without compromising grain protein concentration in Triticeae species. The anticipated amount available for NIFA to support this program in FY 2016 is approximately $3,446,000. NIFA intends to provide additional support of approximately $12 million during FY 2017-2019. The intent of future funding provides an anticipated total amount of funding of approximately $15.4 million to support this program during FY 2016-2019, provided appropriations are available for this purpose.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

NIFA aims to support the G20 nations' Wheat Initiative which is committed to coordinate wheat research in the areas of genetics, genomics, physiology, breeding and agronomy internationally. One of the Wheat Initiative's key aims - increasing the genetic component of wheat yield and developing new wheat varieties adapted to different geographical regions - will be delivered by the International Wheat Yield Partnership (IWYP) - an international partnership of research funders and research organizations that includes the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council of the United Kingdom (BBSRC), Grains Research and Development Corporation of Australia (GRDC), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (USDAARS), Department of Biotechnology of India (DBT), International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, in Spanish, Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), and Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture (SFSA).

NIFA's programs are intended to promote advances in U.S. food, agriculture and forestry. Agriculture, for instance, is increasingly worldwide in scope and reach. If appropriate, applicants to NIFA-IWYP may include international partnerships or engagement in proposals. In doing so, applicants are to keep in mind that any international activity included in a proposal (e.g., partnerships, exchanges, training, travel) must first and foremost support NIFA-IWYP program goals. Applicants must clearly describe and demonstrate how international activities proposed in the application will contribute to and support the objectives and desired outcomes within the United States while also benefiting the international partner.

 

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Regional Conservation Partnership Program
United States Department of Agriculture

May 10, 2016 (Pre-Proposals required)

The Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) promotes coordination between the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and its partners to deliver conservation assistance to producers and landowners. NRCS provides assistance to producers through partnership agreements and through program contracts or easement agreements.

RCPP encourages partners to join in efforts with producers to increase the restoration and sustainable use of soil, water, wildlife and related natural resources on regional or watershed scales.

Through RCPP, NRCS and its partners help producers install and maintain conservation activities in selected project areas.  Partners leverage RCPP funding in project areas and report on the benefits achieved. 

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Global Change, Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program
U.S. Department of Agriculture

May 16, 2016

The USDA has long been concerned about high levels of ultraviolet radiation (UV-B) from the sun, which are known to have harmful effects on agricultural crops, rangelands, forest ecosystems, livestock, humans, and built infrastructure. The purpose of the Global Change, Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring and Research Program is to support research and research infrastructure which generates an uninterrupted stream of climatology data; determines mechanisms and symptoms of plant and animal response; and applies tightly integrated models to assess regional and national impacts (both biological and economic) of multiple plant stressors.

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Outreach and Education, Technical Assistance, and Financial Education for FSA Programs, Functions, and Activities
U.S. Department of Agriculture - Farm Service Agency

Application window open until May 27, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

As part of our mission supporting farmers and ranchers, the Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides extensive education and outreach for producers. This typically involves public meetings, mailings, news releases, and interactions with individual producers seeking additional information or to enroll in a program. However, there remains a need for additional outreach and education that could benefit potential participants in FSA's portfolio of programs. This RFA seeks proposals to further support and expand FSA's existing outreach and education efforts. The additional outreach and education could, for example, be public meetings, training sessions, and/or workshops for producers including new and beginning farmers, veterans, underserved communities, and/or established producers. Emphasis will be afforded to proposals that propose to address producers who are ethnic minorities, women, new and beginning, veterans, urban, or who grow non-commodity crops (e.g., fruits and vegetables or specialty crops). Proposals may include innovative outreach approaches that ease the learning curve for farmers and ranchers through training on best practices, common challenges and solutions, and local networking opportunities. The subject matter should include an introduction to FSA, its programs, and common provisions that generally apply. FSA's common provisions include maintenance of producer-level records regarding payment eligibility and limitations, conservation compliance, and name and address, payments, and farm and tract information.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Due to the complex nature of some of FSA's programs, FSA intends for this RFA to focus additional outreach and education to those producers in those areas who could benefit from the additional outreach. The goal of this RFA is to provide additional outreach and education to producers related to Agency programs and operations and thereby: (1) increase access to FSA programs and services; and (2) improve technical assistance and financial education related to FSA farm and farm loan programs.

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Rural Health and Safety Education
United States Department of Agriculture

June 1, 2016

The Rural Health and Safety Education program proposals are expected to be community-based, outreach education programs, such as those conducted through Human Science extension outreach, that provide individuals and families with: Information as to the value of good health at any age; Information to increase individual or families' motivation to take more responsibility for their own health; Information regarding rural environmental health issues that directly impact on human health; Information about and access to health promotion and educational activities; and Training for volunteers and health services providers concerning health promotion and health care services for individuals and families in cooperation with state, local and community partners.

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Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program (RHSE)
United States Department of Agriculture

June 1, 2016

The RHSE program proposals are expected to be community-based, outreach education programs, such as those conducted through Human Science extension outreach, that provides individuals and families with: Information as to the value of good health at any age; Information to increase individual or family's motivation to take more responsibility for their own health; Information regarding rural environmental health issues that directly impact on human health; Information about and access to health promotion and educational activities; and Training for volunteers and health services providers concerning health promotion and health care services for individuals and families in cooperation with state, local and community partners.

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Food Safety Outreach Program
U.S. Department of Agriculture

June 2, 2016

Under the National Food Safety Training, Education, Extension, Outreach, and Technical Assistance Competitive Grants Program, NIFA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began jointly funding an infrastructure of national and regional centers to extend food safety education, training, education, and technical assistance to those affected by Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). In FY 2016, the Food Safety Outreach Program will build upon that national infrastructure, with a sustained focus on delivery of customized training to members of the target audiences. Grant applications will be solicited directly from those in local communities - to include those from community-based organizations, non-governmental organizations, food hubs, farm cooperatives, extension, and other local groups. Successful awardees will be required to interact with Regional Centers by reporting project outcomes to the Centers.

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Rural Cooperative Development Grant (RCDG)
United States Department of Agriculture

June 20, 2016

The primary objective of the RCDG program is to improve the economic condition of rural areas by assisting individuals or entities in the startup, expansion or operational improvement of rural cooperatives and other business entities. Grants are awarded competitively on an annual basis to Rural Cooperative Development Centers who in turn provide technical assistance to individuals and entities.

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Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification
United States Department of Agriculture

June 20, 2016

Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) Program for fiscal year (FY) 2016 supports national efforts to deliver timely, pertinent, and appropriate farm safety education to youth seeking employment or already employed in agricultural production.

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Miscellaneous Programs and Announcements

American Heart Association: New Topics and Open Science Policies
American Heart Association

LOI due October 30, 2014
Full submission deadline TBA

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS/NEW TOPICS: 

Network Topic Announcement

The Strategically Focused Research Network will focus on Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease.

The AHA is interested in the science community exploring all aspects of disparities in cardiovascular disease, which can assist the AHA in reaching its 2020 Goals and overall mission of building healthier lives free of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

A Network is comprised of three to four institutions, or Centers, working on three projects each that are focused on one strategic area.

To that end, the AHA pursues research from the basic, clinical and population sciences. This RFA will require that each submission have an overall application from the Center Director, as well as three proposals from project Principal Investigators in this specific area:

  • One proposal addressing basic science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
  • One proposal addressing clinical science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
  • One proposal addressing population science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease 
A Center application can comprise projects from more than one institution. The sponsoring institution will be determined by where the Center Director is located and will be charged with oversight and financial responsibilities of the Center as a whole. Applications should convey how these different areas of science will be integrated, both in their scientific discoveries and through joint team communication and integration. 

Institutions are limited to one Center application per location, however individuals at said institution who are not participating in said institution's Center application, may indeed participate in another Center's application.

Offered by:
 AHA National Research Program 

More information will be announced with specific deadlines. For now, use this high level timeline as a guide:  
  • March 2014 - Topics announced to the community via AHA Research Website with timelines
  • Jan/Feb 2015 - Applications for Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease SFRN due
  • June 2015 -  Awardees for Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease SFRN Announced
Please come back and visit this page in mid-September for the full Request for Applications for the Strategically Focused Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Research Network.
 

POLICY UPDATES: 

AHA OPEN SCIENCE POLICIES ARE NOW IN EFFECT
New AHA Open Science policies will go into effect with applications due in July 2014 and new awards beginning January 2015. 

AHA's public access policy
The AHA requires that all journal articles resulting from AHA funding should be made freely available in PubMed Central within 12 months of publication.

AHA's open data policy
The AHA requires grant applicants to include a data sharing plan as part of the application process. Any data that is needed for independent verification of research results must be made freely and publically available within 12 months of the end of the funding period (and any no-cost extension).

Specific early career awards are currently exempt from this requirement (Undergraduate Fellowships, Medical Student Research Fellowships, Predoctoral Fellowships, Mentor/AHA Mentee Awards, Postdoctoral Fellowships, and Mentored Clinical & Population Research Awards).

View more information about AHA Open Science policies and answers to Frequently Asked Questions.  

 

 

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Autism Speaks: Suzanne and Bob Wright Trailblazer Award

Letter of intent Deadline: accepted anytime

The Trailblazer Award mechanism supports highly novel "out of the box" autism-relevant research that open new avenues to understanding the causes, diagnosis, subtyping, prevention, treatments, and cure of autism spectrum disorders. The Trailblazer Award mechanism is designed to fund small investigator-initiated high risk/high impact projects that are potentially transformative, paradigm shifting, and/or will overcome significant roadblocks in autism research within a 12 month period.

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Charitable Giving Program
Community Works

Ongoing

The charitable programs are among the ways that NorthWestern Energy participates as an active participant in the communities where they do business. Donations will generally be made to those non-profit groups that have the greatest opportunity for positively affecting the communities served by NorthWestern Energy and are focused in one of the following categories: 

- Education: Education remains a primary focus of the company. Donations to education will primarily be made through university system foundations, scholarship programs, and employee matching gifts. Donations will also be made in support of local colleges, and special primary and secondary education programs in the fields of math, science and youth leadership. 

- Health and Human Services: Donations will be considered for organizations serving human needs such as the United Way, youth homes and special community health and safety needs. Donations will generally not be made to national health organizations or for medical equipment or research funds. 

- Civic & Community: Donations will be considered for civic improvment, special events, and youth and senior citizen organizations. 

- Culture & The Arts: Donations will be considered for local museums, libraries, cultural centers, and the performing arts. 

- Resource Conservation: Donations will be considered in the areas of habitat preservation, and fish and wildlife protection. 

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Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences
National Science Foundation

Proposals accepted anytime

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND REVISION NOTES

Proposals must be submitted to the appropriate DMS disciplinary program subject to the lead-time requirements specified by that program. For more information about the required lead time, refer to the particular disciplinary program web page listed on the DMS home page.

This revision clarifies the expectations for DMS support of international group travel.

Any proposal submitted in response to this solicitation should be submitted in accordance with the revised NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 16-1), which is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 25, 2016.

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Department of Defense / CDMRP
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Deadlines: see program pre-announcements

The Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Defense Appropriations Act provides research funding for the peer reviewed programs managed by the Department of Defense (DOD) office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

This e-mail is to notify the research community of the recently released funding opportunities from the following programs: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP), Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP), Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP), Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP).

Detailed descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the respective Program Announcements. Each Program Announcement is available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP)

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

Therapeutic Idea Award

Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)

Concept Award

Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP)

Clinical Trial Award

Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

New Investigator Award

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Exploration Hypothesis Development Award

Idea Development Award

Pilot Clinical Trial Award

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Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ovarian Cancer Research Program (OCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ecological Services Program Fiscal Year 2014 Recovery Implementation Fund
Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Program

July 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

The FWS Endangered Species Program provides Federal financial assistance on a competitive basis to States, other Federal agencies, landowners, educators, non-profit organizations, researchers, and other partners to secure information about endangered, threatened or candidate species, to aid in the recovery of these species, to avert listing of species pursuant to the Endangered Species Act, and to help conserve the ecosystems upon which these species depend. The FWS and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), which is part of the Department of Commerce's NOAA Fisheries office, share Endangered Species Act responsibilities for several species such as sea turtles. Projects for NMFS-managed species are not included in this funding opportunity.

OBJECTIVES: 

This Recovery Implementation funding opportunity is intended for projects that will contribute to the recovery of FWS-managed endangered and threatened species in the United States, and is limited to projects carrying out actions described in a species approved recovery plan, in the implementation schedule of a species approved recovery plan, actions recommended in a completed 5-year status review of the species or in a spotlight species action plan, or projects documenting species response to climate change. For example: securing scientific information about endangered or threatened species, implementing restoration actions that will lead to delisting of a species, help prevent extinction of a species, or aid in the recovery of a species. Projects that address species response to climate change will receive additional consideration.

Special Instructions: Applicants must contact their regional FWS office to coordinate the letter of intent and application. 

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General Grants
MJ Murdock Charitable Trust

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

General Grants

The Trust awards grants for projects that are of strategic importance to the organization and consistent with its mission. Awards are made in the following four areas:

Arts and Culture

Performance and visual arts projects that enrich the cultural environment of the region are of interest to the Trust. There is a high value placed on educational outreach efforts.

Education

The Trust considers educational projects offered in both formal and informal settings. Special interest is afforded to private higher education.

Health and Human Services

The Trust is interested in a diverse range of projects to enhance the quality of life in the region. Preventive efforts that address physical, spiritual, social, and psychological needs, especially those focused on youth, are preferred.

Research

Most of the Trust's funding for scientific research is limited to specific organizations and projects. However, the Trust does consider other science-based initiatives.

The Trust makes grants for building the capacity of non-profit groups in these primary ways for the following three types of projects:

Capital

The Trust regularly funds projects that involve construction, renovation, land purchase, and more. Requests for capital projects are preferred once a portion of the funds needed have been secured.

Program

Both new programs and the expansion of existing programs are considered. Requests may be for start-up costs and/or related additional staff members. The Trust prefers to fund these grants on a declining basis over three years (100/67/33 percent).

Equipment

Scientific research instrumentation, technology, and other essential equipment items are often funded. In every case, the Trust requires a cost share of 50 percent or more.

Before proceeding, interested parties should review the Guidelines for Grantseekers to learn more and determine the organization's eligibility and the appropriate nature of the project to the Trust.

 

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MCubed Diamond Program
University of Michigan

SYNOPSIS: 

The MCubed Diamond Program provides an unprecedented opportunity for donors to invest in research projects that align exactly with their interests, from global health to education, and sustainability to social justice.  Funders set the parameters for each project, interact with the University of Michigan to identify faculty experts to lead their project, and receive compelling updates about the work of the team through the MCubed website.

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Media Grantmaking
MacArthur Foundation

Deadline: No fixed deadlines

MacArthur's goal in media grantmaking is to provide the public with high-quality, professionally-produced documentary films, deep and analytical journalism, and well-produced news and public affairs programming. In a media environment characterized by proliferating information sources of varying degrees of reliability, the Foundation seeks to support serious, fact-based journalism for television, radio and the web, the type of original reporting that is likely to be blogged about, linked to, tweeted, and otherwise circulated throughout the Internet. Programs supported by the Foundation inform and educate their viewers about important and under-reported topics, provide balance and accurate information, encourage global conversations, and use technology to tell stories in engaging and interactive ways.

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Michelson Grants in Reproductive Biology
Found Animals Foundation

Deadline: Letters of intent are accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis and, if approved, researchers are invited to submit grant proposals for a March, July, or November deadline

Funding for promising proposals in pursuit of non-surgical sterilization products or technologies for use in dogs and cats. The foundation encourages scientists from any and all fields to compete for the Michelson Grants, including but not limited to researchers in disciplines such as biology, biotechnology,cell biology, endocrinology, gene silencing, immunology, materials science, nanotechnology, neuroscience, pharmacology, reproductive biology, theriogenology, and more.

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Michelson Prize in Reproductive Biology

Deadline: none specific

The $25 million Michelson Prize will be offered to the first entity to provide Found Animals Foundation with a single dose, safe and effective non-surgical sterilant for male and female cats and dogs.

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Pioneering Ideas Unsolicited Proposals
Johnson (Robert Wood) Foundation

Deadline: There are no specific submission deadlines for unsolicited proposals

The Pioneer Portfolio is uniquely suited to invest in innovation at many different stages. The sponsor seeks to: Identify and explore new issues and approaches; Accelerate progress on issues and approaches that have significant potential to create breakthroughs in health and health care; and Support projects that use original, unconventional, or cross-sectoral approaches to create transformative change.

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Priority Grantmaking Program
United States Institute of Peace

Deadline is on a rolling basis

The Grant Initiative will focus on the following regions:

Afghanistan--Grantmaking in Afghanistan will support projects designed to promote public understanding of peaceful alternatives to the violent resolution of conflict, the rule of law, transitional justice, and to improve local capacities for dialogue and peacebuilding.

Pakistan--Grantmaking in Pakistan will strengthen civil society capacities for conflict prevention and promote greater understanding of issues related to identity, tolerance, diversity, and sectarian extremism in Pakistan through education, training, research, and the media.

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Promoting International Arts Engagement
Clark (Robert Sterling) Foundation

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's aim is to strengthen cultural organizations of the highest artistic quality by enabling them to participate in the global marketplace. The Foundation hopes that the Promoting International Arts Engagement program will help leverage new support in this area and introduce American culture to communities around the world, as well as bring diverse world cultures to American audiences.

While the Foundation considers support for projects that bring international artists to the U.S., preference is given to projects that send American arts abroad. While there are no restrictions on countries or regions, the Foundation is more inclined to support activities that involve underserved or underrepresented parts of the world. Favor is given to projects having lasting impact and value, including international tours that lead to new engagements, programs that broaden audiences and attract new sources of income, documentation of work that is disseminated widely, and arts engagement activities that benefit the community.

The objectives of Promoting International Arts Engagement are to: strengthen performing and visual arts organizations by helping to make possible international touring and collaborations that offer broad audience outreach and build lasting partnerships; provide presenting organizations with the opportunity to showcase important international artists from underrepresented regions, and introduce audiences to new artistic perspectives from world cultures; assist organizations that organize significant exchanges or forums bringing together U.S. artists and their international counterparts to inform the creative process; and sustain arts service organizations that advance global arts engagement, through new Internet technologies, program documentation and dissemination, translations, and technical assistance for artists, among other activities. 

Other Information: The Foundation receives and reviews proposals year-round.  The Board of Directors meets four times per year: January, April, July, and October to review submissions. 

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Proposal Deadline: Open

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports investigator-initiated research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include: examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

This call for proposals is intended to stimulate projects that: examine significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and explore or test major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

Grants will be awarded in two categories: Small grants for projects requiring $100,000 or less and projected to take up to 12 months or less; and Large grants for projects requiring more than $100,000 and/or projected to take longer than 12 months. 

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Saudi American Educational and Cultural Initiative Grant
Department of State

June 30, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

Saudi-American Educational and Cultural Initiative Grants support innovative forms of collaboration between Saudi and U.S. non-governmental and community organizations, universities, entrepreneurs, cultural organizations and qualified individuals to expand the diversity of activities in the U.S.-Saudi partnership and develop the next generation of leaders, especially among youth, young professionals and women, to promote mutual understanding and respect through long-term partnership and cooperation between our two countries. The Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is now accepting proposals from Saudi and U.S. non-governmental and community organizations, universities, entrepreneurs, cultural organizations or qualified individuals who propose to work together to develop or expand educational, professional and cultural exchange activities and promote dialogue and partnership between the people of the United States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The Embassy is especially interested in identifying and supporting U.S-Saudi partnerships that include a focus on the development of exchanges, projects and partnerships between U.S. and Saudi youth or women; or that involve the development of professional linkages in business, healthcare or media, including social media; or that build on Saudi efforts to modernize and build a knowledge-based economy; or that expand Saudi-U.S. educational partnerships; or that are submitted by or involve alumni of exchange programs sponsored by the U.S. or Saudi governments. Projects may include, but are not limited to:

& Academic and professional lectures, seminars and speaker programs;

& Artistic and cultural workshops, joint performances and exhibitions;

& Cultural heritage conservation and preservation projects;

& Cultural, professional and academic exchanges and projects;

& Professional development workshops and training.

Requests for funding provided by the U.S. Embassy should be at least $3000 and not more than $25,000; the most competitive proposals will include significant funding from other sources as cost-share in the project budget. Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis from qualified U.S. or Saudi individuals and organizations. Proposals must include a letter of support from the proposed U.S. or Saudi partner, whether a qualified individual or organization. The proposal or letter of support from the Saudi partner must confirm the ability and willingness of the Saudi partner to sponsor the visa(s) for the U.S. partner, if necessary, and to assume responsibility for all travel and logistics within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The U.S. Embassy in Saudi Arabia is not able to assist with visas or travel arrangements funded through the grant. Proposals will be evaluated for funding by an Embassy committee on a monthly basis. The committee will identify projects with outstanding educational, artistic, or cultural merits for funding. In deciding which projects to support, the committee will give consideration to the full range and diversity of American and Saudi educational and cultural traditions and seek to target geographically and demographically diverse audiences. Projects that involve direct, in-depth professional interaction, with the potential for sustained collaboration and that show evidence of professional accomplishment and innovation will receive priority. The proposals will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

& The proposal demonstrates that the Saudi and U.S. individuals and/or organizations have sufficient expertise, skills and capacity to implement the project.

& The project will make a substantive contribution to the expanding types of partnerships between Saudi and U.S. individuals, organizations and institutions.

& The individuals and/or organizations demonstrate that they have a clear understanding of the topic or issue that the project is aiming to address.

& The individuals and/or organizations have identified appropriate beneficiaries or target groups to maximize project outputs and outcomes and the project has a clear focus and manageable scope.

& The project idea and approach is innovative yet proposed project activities are concrete and detailed and supported by a work plan.

& The project budget is well-organized, detailed and reasonable. There are no budget lines labeled "miscellaneous expenses." The budget demonstrates that the individual or organization has devoted time to plan for and assess actual expenses associated with the project instead of providing rough estimates. No grant funds are proposed for the purchase of food, drink, or entertainment.

& The proposal clearly articulates how the partners will assess and measure performance throughout the project implementation phase using quantitative and qualitative assessment tools.

& The proposal describes clearly the approach that will be used to ensure the sustainability of the project or partnership. The following types of projects are not eligible for funding:

& Requests by organizations and individuals who are neither Saudi nor American;

& those relating to partisan political activity;

& humanitarian or charitable activities;

& conferences and individual trips abroad;

& trade activities;

& fund-raising campaigns;

& commercial projects;

& scientific research;

& projects aiming only at primary institutional development of the organization; or

& projects that duplicate existing projects.

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Simons Foundation for Autism Research Initiative (SFARI)

Deadline: Accepted on a rolling basis

Explorer Awards are intended to provide resources to support exploratory experiments that will strengthen hypotheses and lead to the formulation of competitive applications for subsequent larger-scale funding by SFARI or other organizations. Innovative, high-risk/high-impact proposals are encouraged. We especially encourage applications from investigators who are new to the field of autism, but who have expertise that could be brought to bear on this complex disorder.

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Statistical Consulting Services - Assistance with study design and statistical analysis
MSU

Available Fall 2014

In Fall 2014 formal statistical consulting services will be available to all researchers on campus.  This includes assistance in study design, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.  The inaugural statistical consultant will serve as the director of statistical consulting services on campus and help guide the future direction and growth of the service.  This position is funded for the first five years through an NIH-INBRE grant.

We encourage researchers to think about the future availability of this service as they are preparing research proposals.  Many funding agencies highly value demonstrated collaboration with statistical consultants in research design, data analysis, and dissemination of results.   The success of the service will depend on demonstrated need and use of its resources.  Therefore, we encourage researchers who anticipate using the service to assist in their research to consider including a budget item for MSU Statistical Consulting Services in their proposals.  A great place to start is with proposals submitted under the recent call from the VPR due May 9.  If you have questions about what to include please contact Megan Higgs (higgs@math.montana.edu) or any other Statistics faculty member (http://www.math.montana.edu/faculty/index.html#statistics).

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Sustainable Development Program
Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc.

Ongoing

SYNOPSIS: 

The Sustainable Development program advances global stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. Human activity is causing global warming, rapid loss of biodiversity, and accelerating degradation of Earth's life support systems. With the recognition that the impact of unchecked climate change threatens all other conservation efforts, the program focuses its grantmaking on advancing solutions to climate change.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Human activity is causing climate change, rapid loss of biodiversity, and accelerating degradation of Earth's life support systems. These developments threaten the livelihoods, health, and security of people in all nations and cultures as well as the well-being of the greater community of life. The RBF's sustainable development grantmaking endeavors to address these challenges by supporting development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The program supports global stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. The Fund encourages government, business, and civil society to work collaboratively on climate change, to acknowledge the moral and ethical consequences of inaction, and to make it an integral part of all development planning and activity. Recognizing the global nature of many environmental problems, the Fund also promotes international cooperation in addressing these challenges.

The Sustainable Development program maintains a significant focus on the United States in light of its disproportionate impact on the global economy, politics, and the environment. The program's work is also advanced in collaboration with the Fund's "pivotal place" programs--New York City, Southern China, and the Western Balkans--and with the Democratic Practice program's Global Governance portfolio. Pivotal place programs support work in specific countries or regions to build the knowledge, policies, organizational capacity, and leadership needed to advance sustainable development in locally appropriate ways. The Fund's Global Governance portfolio supports broad participation in forging the international agreements and institutional arrangements needed to encourage investment in sustainable development. Fund staff work to ensure that global developments inform work in specific places and that locally grounded efforts generate lessons and innovations needed for global impact.

With the recognition that the impact of unchecked climate change threatens all other conservation efforts, the Sustainable Development program focuses its U.S. grantmaking on building a green economy at the federal, state, and local levels.

Grant Inquiries are accepted throughout the year.

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Toyota Motor North America, Inc. (TMA)

Deadline: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis

Nationally, Toyota focuses in three areas: environment, safety and education. National programs in these areas must have a broad reach by impacting several major U.S. cities, communities or groups.

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Grants for Adaptive Sports Programs for Disabled Veterans and Disabled Members of the Armed Forces
Department of Veterans Affairs

April 28, 2016

The Grants for Adaptive Sports Programs for disabled Veterans and Members of the Armed Forces (ASG Program) provides grant funding to organizations to increase and expand the quantity and quality of adaptive sport activities disabled Veterans and members of the Armed Forces have to participate in physical activity within their home communities, as well as more advanced Paralympic and adaptive sport programs at the regional and national levels.

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Kick-Off Workshop on Connected and Automated Vehicles
MSU College of Engineering and Western Transportation Institute

April 28, 2016

DATE: Thursday, April 28, 2016
TIME: 7:45 - 11:30 a.m.
LOCATION: Western Transportation Institute (2327 University Way, Room 333)

 

The transportation industry is at a crossroads.  In a recent episode of 60 Minutes, NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind said that the nation is at the largest transformational moment in the history of the automobile, as well as society at large.  MSU has an opportunity to be a leader in research, demonstration and workforce development if we move quickly and strategically around this issue, and the College of Engineering and Western Transportation Institute have collaborated on a plan for a Connected Vehicle Initiative.  This is an excellent opportunity for multiple disciplines to be involved, not only in technology (electrical engineering and computer science), but also the policy and business implications of Connected Vehicles and the impact on society (sociology, psychology).

Workshop participants will not only learn about the latest developments in Connected Vehicle/Automated Vehicle research, they will also have the opportunity to provide direct input through break-out sessions.  The principle goal and deliverable from this workshop will be a white paper to outline strategic directions and identify research areas in which MSU can successfully compete.

To RSVP for the workshop, please contact Steve Albert, WTI Director, at stevea@montana.edu.

 

 

 


Fire Prevention and Safety Grant Program
Federal Emergency Management Agency

May 6, 2016

The purpose of the FP&S Program is to enhance the safety of the public and firefighters with respect to fire and fire-related hazards by assisting fire prevention programs and supporting firefighter health and safety research and development. FP&S Grants are offered to support projects in the two following activities: Fire Prevention and Safety Activity and Firefighter Safety Research and Development Activity.

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Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science
Franklin Institute

Intent to Nominate due April 30, 2016
Nominations due May 31, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The Franklin Institute seeks nominations for the 2017 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science of individuals who have made significant contributions to the search for extrasolar planets.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Nominations should recognize fundamental contributions that played an important role in the ultimately successful search. Such contributions may include goal-oriented analysis of the search options, the design of telescopes and spectrographs, data analysis, and integrative scientific leadership. Nominations should clearly indicate the scientific impact of the nominee's work, whether conceptual, technical, or integrative.

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Fatigue in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Receipt

SYNOPSIS:

Fatigue in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems SOL DTNH2215R00022 POC Brian Jenkins, Email NhtsaOam@dot.gov The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)is an agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). NHTSA's mission is to save lives, prevent injuries and reduce traffic-related health care and other economic costs. The agency develops, promotes, implements, and supportseffective educational, engineering and enforcement programs with the goal of ending preventable tragedies and reducing economic costs associated with vehicle use and highway travel. The availability of medical care provided by EMS workers is necessary at all times, day or night.

This requirement has led to circumstances where EMS workers across the entire industry are working in sleep deprived andfatigued states - a very dangerous situation. A number of recently published scientific articles have demonstrated that not only is severe fatigue present in around 50% of EMS providers surveyed but that drowsy or fatigued EMS providers are substantially more likely to be injured on the job, commit a medical error, or perform a safety-compromising behavior. In 2013, the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC) issuedan advisory proposing that NHTSA explore the issue of fatigue in EMS systems. The following three recommendations were submitted to NHTSA: 1. The NHTSA Office of EMS (OEMS) should cross-validate findings from studies and reports of fatigue in other professions with that of fatigue in EMS.

This effort should involve a convening of subject matter experts, individual providers of EMS services, and representatives from local, state, and federal organizations, national organizations (e.g., NAEMT, NAEMSP, and NASEMSO) that play a role in EMS oversight or care delivery. The effort should clarify the evidence linking EMS provider fatigue and safety and health outcomes of patients, providers, and the public. The effort should include an analysis of regulatory requirements of the employer and employee and legal framework with respect to the threat of fatigue on safety. 2. The NHTSA Office of EMS (OEMS) should work through its federal and non-federal partners to address the lack of a standardized method for investigating the role of fatigue in ground and air-medical crashes, clinical errors, and provider injuries. This effort may include developing a valid and reliable measurement tool and check list for investigators. 3. The NHTSA Office of EMS (OEMS) should disseminate (evidence-based) information to the EMS community to aid development of fatigue management programs / interventions to fit local needs.

 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The overall objectives of this contract are to:1. Bring together a panel of experts to define the specific fatigue related clinical questions and outcomes to be addressed in an Evidence Based Guidelines creation process. Develop Questions and Expected Outcomes 2. Perform a literature review, generate an annotated bibliography, and create evidence tables; 3. Develop evidence based guidelines on fatigue mitigation in EMS; 4. Develop performance measures for tracking the effectiveness of the fatigue EBGs;5. Produce a final report, a conference presentation, and a manuscript for submission toa peer-reviewed journal; 6. Produce a Publication for EMS Systems and Personnel 7. Optional Task 1: Create a Software/Web Tool to Assist in EMS Workforce Scheduling; 8. Optional Task 2: Develop a Fatigue Reporting Instrument for the EMS Community; 9. Optional Task 3: Disseminate fatigue EBGs to stakeholders. NHTSA seeks a contractor to assist NHTSA in generating anddisseminating evidence-based information and tools to the EMS community. These findings and tools will empower the EMS community to develop fatigue management programs at the local level in order to improve ambulance safety on the road as well as for more effective and safer patient care.

This acquisition is being offered for full and open competition. The NAICS Code for the anticipated contract is 541720. Contractors must be registered in the Systems for Award Management Database located at http://www.sams.gov, and must complete electronic representations and certification on the ORCA database located at http://orca.bpn.gov to be considered for contractaward. It is the Government's intent to award a Time & Material type contract resulting from the solicitation, with or without discussions, to the responsible offeror whose proposal, conforming to the solicitation, is most advantageous to the Government based on the evaluation factors contained in the solicitation. It is the Offeror's responsibility to monitor the FedBizOpps Internet site for the release of the solicitation and amendments (if any). Potential Offerors will be responsible for downloading their own copy of the solicitation and amendments (if any). Requests forpaper copies of the RFP will not be accepted. The estimated date for release ofthe solicitation is on or about April 20, 2015. Period of Performance: Base period of twenty-four (24) months. Contract Award: The anticipated award date for the resultant contract is expected to be on or about July 2015. 

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Unrestricted Education Grants
Allergan Foundation

Applications accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS:

Allergan recognizes the importance of independent medical education programs that enhance the level of patient care in the United States. As such, Allergan funds educational activities through its extensive unrestricted educational grant program to foster increased understanding of scientific, clinical, or health care issues. They seek to provide an efficient and effective grant review process to help facilitate grant requests for quality independent education.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

Allergan's goal is to advance the development of medicine to improve patient care. Allergan is committed to supporting independent educational activities that foster increased understanding of scientific, clinical, and healthcare issues.They seek to conduct an efficient, effective, and compliant review process to support high-quality education. Grants are awarded to support legitimate education and scientific activities within the following areas: Ophthalmics - Glaucoma, Ocular Surface Disease/Dry Eye, and Retinal Diseases; Neurosciences; Urologics; Medical Dermatology; Non-Surgical Facial Aesthetics and Rejuvenation; Plastic Surgery; Surgical Scaffold for Soft Tissue Support and Repair; Breast Augmentation and Reconstruction.

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Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS)
National Science Foundation

Submission Window Date: May 24, 2016 - June 07, 2016 (5 p.m. proposer's local time)

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND REVISION NOTES:

The Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) program solicitation has been revised for the FY 2016 competition, and prospective Principal Investigators are encouraged to read the solicitation carefully. Among the changes are the following:

  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA) has joined the program;
  • New emphases on CPS research toward Smart & Connected Communities (S&CC), CPS Security and Privacy, and CPS Autonomy have been added;
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) and Manufacturing research foci have been updated;
  • The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) CPS program interests have been revised;
  • The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) CPS program interests have been revised;
  • Additional instructions about the "Justification for Breakthrough Proposals" have been specified; and,
  • Requirements for participation in the annual CPS Principal Investigator (PI) meetings have been clarified.

Any proposal submitted in response to this solicitation should be submitted in accordance with the revised NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 16-1), which is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 25, 2016.

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BLM-MT, Archaeological and Paleontological Studies and Curation Support
Department of the Interior

June 14, 2016

The Bureau of Land Management Montana State Office is seeking to support archaeological and paleontological programs, studies, and curation and protection of the region's finds, with programs such as the following:

1) The Crooked Creek region that spans the Montana/Wyoming border contains spectacular natural resources, including spectacular views, biological diversity, a wild horse preserve, and important geologic outcrops containing rare fossils from the Early Cretaceous period.

 2) One of the most intensive studies of the fossil-rich Hell Creek Formation, dubbed The Hell Creek Project, has been underway for the past 20 years. The Hell Creek contains abundant fossils of dinosaurs, plants, and other animals from the critical time right before, during, and after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs.

3) The Museum of the Rockies (MOR) is the primary repository for fossils from state-managed land, and perhaps the most significant repository for fossils from BLM-managed land. For decades, the MOR has been the approved repository for paleontological material collected from BLM land, as well as many other Federal agencies. Over the years their holdings of public trust material has outgrown their ability to house and curate the fossils, so they are available for research and education. An untold number of potentially scientifically valuable fossils are stored in off-site temporary storage. Support from the BLM will help fund long-sought expansion of the museum's collection space, greatly facilitating proper housing of their managed collections and improving access and usefulness of these fossils to the public.

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National IDeA Symposium of Biomedical Research Excellence (NISBRE)
National Institutes of Health

June 26-28, 2016

To the IDeA Community:

 

This is a reminder for you to attend the Institutional Development Award (IDeA) Program's very important National IDeA Symposium of Biomedical Research Excellence (NISBRE) Conference being held to showcase and promote the objectives and scientific achievements of the IDeA Program, including Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBREs), IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBREs) and IDeA Program Infrastructure for Clinical and Translational Research (IDeA-CTRs). Your attendance--as well as the attendance of your project investigators and students--is essential to further promote and advance the agenda of the IDeA Program.

 

The Symposium is an opportunity to demonstrate the dedication that IDeA investigators have toward performing competitive biomedical and behavioral research, and toward increasing the investigative capabilities of their institutions. We strongly urge you and your Center's/Network's participants to attend and participate in this meeting.  Please note that the deadline for abstract submission is April 29 at 5:00 p.m. Central time.  It is important that the work supported by the IDeA Program is showcased.

 

Who can attend

The meeting is open to ALL IDeA (COBRE, INBRE and CTR) participants and all other interested parties. IDeA Principal Investigators are encouraged to bring along their project investigators, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. In addition, INBRE Principal Investigators and Program Coordinators should encourage faculty and students at participating institutions to attend.

 

What

The 6th Biennial NISBRE is being held to celebrate the success of the IDeA Program, and to showcase the scientific and training accomplishments of its participants. The program this year promises a high level of scientific presentations, enthusiastic participants, and a friendly atmosphere with open discussions and exchange of ideas on science and training.  The Director of NIGMS, Dr. Jon Lorsch, is scheduled to deliver an address at the Symposium on the morning of Monday, June 27.

 

All the best,

 

Fred

 

W. Fred Taylor, Ph.D.

Acting Director

Center for Research Capacity Building

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

National Institute of Health

45 Center Drive

MSC 6200, Room 2As43s

Bethesda, MD 20892-6200

Tel 301-435-0765

Fax 301-480-2753

Email: Taylorwf@mail.nih.gov

 

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Association-Wide Established Investigator Award
American Heart Association

July 26, 2016

Objective

To support mid-career investigators with unusual promise and an established record of accomplishments; candidates have a demonstrated commitment to cardiovascular or cerebrovascular science as indicated by prior publication history and scientific accomplishments.  A candidate's career is expected to be in a rapid growth phase.

Science Focus

Research broadly related to cardiovascular function and disease and stroke, or to related clinical, basic science, bioengineering or biotechnology, and public health problems, including multidisciplinary efforts.

Disciplines

Proposals are encouraged from all basic, behavioral, epidemiological, and community and clinical investigations that bear on cardiovascular and stroke problems.

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Innovative Research Grant
American Heart Association

July 26, 2016

Objective

To support highly innovative, high-risk, high-reward research that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular and stroke research.

Research deemed innovative may introduce a new paradigm, challenge current paradigms, look at existing problems from new perspectives, or exhibit other uniquely creative qualities.  The Innovative Research Grant (IRG) promotes new ideas; therefore, proposals need not include preliminary data.  However, a solid rationale for the work must be provided.  Proposed work should not be the next logical step of previous work, but should have a high probability of revealing new avenues of investigation, if successful.  This program aims to provide pilot or seed funding that should lead to successful competition for additional funding beyond the pilot period.

The principal investigator (PI) is responsible for clearly and explicitly articulating the project's innovation and the potential impact on cardiovascular and stroke research.

Science Focus

Research broadly related to cardiovascular function and disease and stroke, or to related clinical, basic science, bioengineering or biotechnology, and public health problems, including multidisciplinary efforts.

Disciplines

Proposals are encouraged from all basic, behavioral, epidemiological, and community and clinical investigations that bear on cardiovascular and stroke problems.

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Mentored Clinical and Population Research Award
American Heart Association

July 26, 2016

Objective

To encourage early investigators with supportive mentoring relationships to conduct introductory pilot studies that will guide future strategies for reducing cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Science Focus

All population research broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

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Scientist Development Grant
American Heart Association

July 26, 2016

Objective

To support highly promising beginning scientists in cardiovascular and stroke research between their initial research training and their complete independence.

Science Focus

All basic, clinical, and population research broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Disciplines

Proposals are encouraged from all basic, behavioral, epidemiological, and community and clinical investigations that bear on cardiovascular and stroke problems.

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Grant-in-Aid
American Heart Association

July 27, 2016

Objective

To support independent investigators with innovative and advanced projects related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Science Focus

All basic, clinical, and population research broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

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Comparison of Surgical and Nonsurgical Options for Management of Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Letter of Intent deadline May 4, 2016
Full Submissin deadline August 8, 2016

PCORI seeks to fund pragmatic clinical trials that compare surgical and nonsurgical options for management of nonspecific chronic low back pain. The research is expected to examine treatment options, as well as systems-level interventions or those aimed at eliminating health or healthcare disparities.

Proposed studies must address clinical and healthcare delivery choices faced by patients, their caregivers, clinicians, or delivery systems. Proposed studies must compare two or more active interventions. They must involve patient populations that represent the U.S. population; be large enough to provide precise estimates of hypothesized effectiveness differences; and be large enough to support evaluation of potential differences in treatment effectiveness in patient subgroups.

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Pragmatic Clinical Studies to Evaluate Patient-Centered Outcomes - Cycle 2 2016
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Letter of Intent deadline May 4, 2016
Full Submission deadline August 8, 2016

PCORI seeks to fund pragmatic clinical trials, large simple trials, or large-scale observational studies that compare two or more alternatives for addressing prevention, diagnosis, treatment, or management of a disease or symptom; improving healthcare system-level approaches to managing care; communicating or disseminating research results to patients, caregivers, or clinicians; or eliminating health or healthcare disparities.

Proposed studies must address critical clinical choices faced by patients, their caregivers, clinicians, or delivery systems. They must involve broadly representative patient populations and be large enough to provide precise estimates of hypothesized effectiveness differences and to support evaluation of potential differences in treatment effectiveness in patient subgroups.

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U.S. Mission to Cuba Public Affairs Large Grants Program Statement
U.S. Department of State

August 15, 2016

The U.S. Embassy to Cuba Public Affairs Section (PAS) of the U.S. Department of State is pleased to announce that limited funding is available through the U.S. Embassy to Cuba Public Affairs Large Grants Program to support activities that promote U.S.-Cuba bilateral relations in the following three priority areas: 

  1. Increase entrepreneurship and economic opportunities, especially among youth and underserved communities; 
  2. Institutional linkages between academic or nonprofit organizations  to enhance bilateral partnerships through the promotion of education, the access and use of technology, sports, and partnerships across the Americas. 
  3. Promote cultural exchange and enhance understanding of our shared history, traditions, and values through innovative means. 

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Broad Agency Announcement for Science, Technology, Innovation and Partnership (STIP) BAA
U.S. Agency for International Development

August 31, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

This Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) seeks opportunities to co-create, co-design, co-invest, and collaborate in the research, development, piloting, testing, and scaling of innovative, practical and cost-effective interventions to leverage the enormous potential of Science, Technology, Innovation and Partnership (STIP) to help solve humanity's greatest challenges. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) invites organizations and companies to participate with USAID in response to STIP BAA Addenda issued under this BAA, as described below, to apply STIP approaches to support sustainable development outcomes.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

USAID is interested in finding opportunities for co-creation and co-design of programs that increase the utilization of STIP to address long standing development challenges. USAID is looking for collaborators who share our interest in utilizing STIP to: 1) produce breakthrough development innovations by sourcing, testing and scaling proven solutions to reach hundreds of millions of people; and, 2) to accelerate the transformation of the development enterprise by opening development to people anywhere with good ideas, promoting new and deepening existing partnerships, bringing data and evidence to bear, and harnessing scientific and technological advances.

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Instrument Grant Program
Micromeritics Instrument Corp.

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The Instrument Grant Program provides materials characterization instruments to nonprofit universities and research organizations for the purpose of fostering and supporting meritorious research projects.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The objective of the Program is to make Micromeritics' particle characterization instruments available to nonprofit universities and institutions for use in the conduct of meritorious research projects. This Program is designed to promote and advance the acquisition and use of expensive particle characterization instrumentation not generally available through other means.

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Democratic Practice Program
Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc.

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The Democratic Practice program seeks to strengthen the vitality of democracy in the United States and in global governance. The program's core ideas--that for democracy to flourish and deliver on its promises its citizens must be engaged, empowered, and assertive, and institutions of governance must be inclusive, transparent, accountable, and responsive--provide a frame for the Fund's Democratic Practice work in the United States and in global governance.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The Fund's Democratic Practice program has two parts: advancing a vital and inclusive democracy in the United States and strengthening democratic practice in global governance. Based on a careful assessment of local needs and priorities, the Fund also pursues one or more of the democratic principles underlying the program in its "pivotal places." Recognizing that there is no single model of effective democratic practice, the Fund emphasizes flexibility and adaptability to different contexts in these pivotal places.

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Grants Program
Pollock-Krasner Foundation

Applications accepted on a rolling basis

SYNOPSIS:

The sponsor awards grants to provide financial assistance to visual artists, who are painters, sculptors, and artists who work on paper, including printmakers. Grants are intended for a one-year period of time.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The sponsor awards grants to provide financial assistance to visual artists, who are painters, sculptors, and artists who work on paper, including printmakers. The sponsor's dual criteria for grants are recognizable artistic merit and financial need, whether professional, personal, or both.

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Chemical/Biological Technologies Department Ebola Broad Agency Announcement
Defense Threat Reduction Agency

October 23, 2016

SYNOPSIS:

The purpose of this Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) is to solicit research proposals for Chemical and Biological Defense Program (CBDP), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) requirements for the CBDP Ebola BAA for the FY2015-2016 program.

DTRA, with industry and government partners, has been working aggressively for the past decade to understand and counter Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV). DTRA's program is currently supporting the accelerated development of a therapeutic through preclinical Investigational New Drug (IND) enabling activities as well as the clinical evaluation for one EBOV vaccine. The program co-developed the rapid field deployable diagnostic systems currently in use in West Africa. The program has also been adapting and improving upon North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) approved and high performance computing methods of modeling EBOV to perform analysis of the current EBOV outbreak. Recognizing that industry may have solutions applicable to the current EBOV outbreak in West Africa, this BAA has been released to ensure that all potential near-term solutions are considered.

The World Health Organization (WHO) currently reports an ongoing outbreak ofEbola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa. The West African countries currently affected include Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, with past cases occurring inNigeria and Senegal. There are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical countermeasures for EBOV, the causative strain of the ongoing EVD epidemic in West Africa. Although diagnostic capabilities are available and are being utilized in West Africa, limitations with these current capabilities must beaddressed. Similarly, improved modeling data, methods, and/or tools are required to better understand and predict the course of the current outbreak.

The primary objective of this BAA is to support development of near-term solutions such as therapeutic and vaccine candidates; diagnostic capabilities; modeling capabilities; and data gaps. For Medical Countermeasures (MCMs), only late stage development products for EBOV that can be completed and implemented in thenear-term; defined as in time to assist with the current EBOV outbreak will be considered under this solicitation.

  CITE: https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/DTRA/DTRA01/HDTRA1-15-EBOLA-BAA/listing.html

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A Nanotechnology-Inspired Grand Challenge for Future Computing
Office of Science and Technology

not applicable

SYNOPSIS:

In June, the Office of Science and Technology Policy issued a Request for Information seeking suggestions for Nanotechnology-Inspired Grand Challenges for the Next Decade. After considering over 100 responses, OSTP is excited to announce the following grand challenge that addresses three Administration priorities--the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI), and the BRAIN initiative:

Create a new type of computer that can proactively interpret and learn from data, solve unfamiliar problems using what it has learned, and operate with the energy efficiency of the human brain.

While it continues to be a national priority to advance conventional digital computing--which has been the engine of the information technology revolution--current technology falls far short of the human brain in terms of both the brain's sensing and problem-solving abilities and its low power consumption. Many experts predict that fundamental physical limitations will prevent transistor technology from ever matching these twin characteristics. We are therefore challenging the nanotechnology and computer science communities to look beyond the decades-old approach to computing based on the Von Neumann architecture as implemented with transistor-based processors, and chart a new path that will continue the rapid pace of innovation beyond the next decade.

There are growing problems facing the Nation that the new computing capabilities envisioned in this challenge might address, from delivering individualized treatments for disease, to allowing advanced robots to work safely alongside people, to proactively identifying and blocking cyber intrusions. To meet this challenge, major breakthroughs are needed not only in the basic devices that store and process information and the amount of energy they require, but in the way a computer analyzes images, sounds, and patterns; interprets and learns from data; and identifies and solves problems.

Many of these breakthroughs will require new kinds of nanoscale devices and materials integrated into three-dimensional systems and may take a decade or more to achieve. These nanotechnology innovations will have to be developed in close coordination with new computer architectures, and will likely be informed by our growing understanding of the brain--a remarkable, fault-tolerant system that consumes less power than an incandescent light bulb.

Recent progress in developing novel, low-power methods of sensing and computation--including neuromorphic, magneto-electronic, and analog systems--combined with dramatic advances in neuroscience and cognitive sciences, lead us to believe that this ambitious challenge is now within our reach. The Federal government is driving many of these initial advances through programs such as Expeditions in Computing and Robust Intelligence at the National Science Foundation (NSF);Computational Cognition and Machine IntelligenceNanoscale Computing Devices and Systems,DARPA SyNAPSEDARPA UPSIDE, and DARPA STARnet (a public-private partnership with the Semiconductor Research Corporation) at the Department of Defense; and MICrONS at IARPA.

Some of the problems to be addressed by this grand challenge are highlighted in a recent reportsponsored by the Semiconductor Industry Association and Semiconductor Research Corporation with support from NSF, and white papers released today by the IEEE and the Computing Community Consortium. Over the coming months, Federal agencies, professional societies, industry groups, and non-profit organizations will be coming together in workshops and other forums to determine the best path forward to address this grand challenge, with the first Department of Energy study group roundtable discussion planned for next week. Information about agency activities and other relevant resources are available at a new grand challenges portal at nano.gov.

We look forward to working with colleagues from across the nanotechnology, computer science, and neuroscience communities to transform future computing. If you'd like to help organize or participate in a planning activity, let us know at NNIChallenges@nnco.nano.gov.

Lloyd Whitman is Assistant Director for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Randy Bryant is Assistant Director for Information Technology Research and Development at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Tom Kalil is Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

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