Montana State University

Adult & Higher Education Program Overview

  • Program Overview
  • Masters Program
  • Doctoral Program
  • College Teaching Certificate
  • Course Descriptions
  • Application Process

Program Overview

This program offers the Master of Education and Doctor of Education in Adult & Higher Education to admitted students who have varied academic field/discipline and professional backgrounds. Students focus on the theory, research, and informed professional practice in either higher education (academics or administration) or student affairs.

Program faculty research foci include student development and student affairs, institutional research and assessment, scholarship of teaching and learning, faculty roles and responsibilities, K-20 student educational trajectory and higher education outcomes, particularly for students placed at risk, comparative and international higher education, and administration and leadership in higher education.  In most cases the diversity of learners and institutions represented in adult and higher education is addressed, and students are encouraged to develop specialization via course assignments. Required courses vary by degree and background of the student. Refer to the Adult & Higher Education handbook located at: http://www.montana.edu/wwweduc/grad/ahe/index.shtml#tab=0 for additional and current information regarding courses offered and schedules.

Coursework is divided into two categories: required and electives, and research and statistics. Doctoral students must conduct research and write an original theory-based dissertation. Courses are offered with working students as a target group and are generally offered evenings and weekends.  Many courses are offered as hybrid courses with a combination of face-to-face and distance delivery.  Some courses are offered 100% online.

The Adult & Higher Education Program also offers a Certificate in College Teaching to develop and promote exemplary teaching among graduate students, aspiring faculty, and current faculty wanting to enhance their teaching skills. The goal of the certificate is to make individuals more competitive in the job market as instructors and faculty members at colleges and universities. A total of 12 credits of course work are required to earn the College Teaching Certificate. Participants may enroll in the program either Fall or Spring.

Objectives

At the Master's level, the Adult and Higher Education program offers three specializations:

Adult Education

The M.Ed. Adult Education specialization is for persons who will or do work within programs of adult education in contexts other than higher education institutions. This program plan is designed to complement one's content expertise (gained outside of the Adult & Higher Education program) with adult education function skills and adult learner awareness (30 credits).

  • Community education
  • Religious education
  • Workplace training and development

Student Affairs

The M.Ed. Student Affairs specialization is for persons who will, or do, work within college student affairs programs in higher education institutions. This program plan is designed to provide the graduate with the fundamental skills and understandings necessary to enter the college student affairs workplace (30+ credits).

  • Residence life
  • Career services
  • Athletics
  • Student government

Higher Education

The M.Ed. Higher Education specialization is for students interested in the broadfield of higher education, and those who want to gain a general understanding of the structure and processes of higher education (30+ credits).

  • Entry-level general administrative positions in higher education
  • Intercollegiate athletics
  • Institutional development

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Program Flow

After acceptance, the student will be assigned a temporary advisor and should then meet with his/her assigned advisor. The student becomes acquainted with the Adult & Higher Education faculty and identifies a permanent chair and committee members. During the second semester of enrollment, the student, with committee approval, will establish and submit their program of study to the Graduate School and clarify plans for the comprehensive examination on a set of prescribed courses. Near the completion of course work, the student will write the comprehensive examination. If deemed necessary by any member of the student's committee after reading the written responses, an oral clarification examination may be required. Students writing a thesis will not be required to write a comprehensive examination. However, during the defense of the thesis, committee members will ask questions about material covered in courses taken in the student's master's program.

Initial courses are scheduled to include:

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Committees

Each master's student's committee must consist of three members. The chair and one other member must be from the Adult & Higher Education faculty. The third committee member must have academic credentials in the area of the student's program of study and be approved by the Dean of The Graduate School.

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Chairs

The student should carefully select his/her chair after thorough conversations with members of the Adult & Higher Education faculty. The chair will give strong leadership and approval regarding the balance of the committee's potential membership. The committee, as a whole, is subject to the approval of the Head of the Department of Education. The chair will facilitate program approval, comprehensive exam planning and clarification. Chairs and members of a student's committee are subject to change. In addition, revision to the program of study can be made during the course of study with the chair's approval.

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Comprehensive Examinations

Near the end of completing course work, M.Ed. students will complete a written comprehensive exam. Comprehensive examinations are required for completion of all graduate degrees at Montana State University. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of the program of study and the ability to interact with the research in that area. The level of mastery expected will vary according to the program. The specific format of this exam will be determined by the chair in consultation with the committee. Depending upon the format, an oral clarification may be required. In addition, students may be required to meet with the committee to provide clarification of responses.

The oral defense of comprehensive exams must occur before November 1st in the fall semester and before spring break in the spring semester. The oral defense of the thesis, portfolio, or final dissertation must occur 14 days before the Graduate Office deadline for spring and fall semesters.

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Contact Information

Dr. Carrie Myers, Program Leader
Higher Education and Research classes
cbmyers@montana.edu

Dr. Sweeney Windchief
Higher Education classes
sweeney.windchief@montana.edu

Dr. Marilyn Lockhart
Adult Education, Higher Education, and Research classes
lockhart@montana.edu

 

Objectives

At the doctoral level, the Adult & Higher Education program offers the following specializations:

Higher Education Administration 

This Ed.D. Higher Education Administration specialization is for persons who wish to contribute to the administrative leadership of a college or university. The primary objective of the program is to produce informed practitioners for mid-to-upper level management or administrative positions. These individuals typically manage or direct non-academic operational functions and/or work in academic and administrative staff positions. A minimum of 51-60 credit hours is required.

Higher Education Academics

This Ed.D. Higher Education Academics specialization is for persons who wish to contribute to the academic leadership of a college or university (51-60 credits beyond the master's).

Adult Education (not currently offered)

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Program Flow

After acceptance, the student will be assigned a temporary adviser and should then meet with his/her assigned adviser. Actual courses taken during the initial stage will be based on the student's previous academic work and adviser/committee approval. The student will become acquainted with the Adult & Higher Education faculty and identify a permanent chair and committee members.

In the third semester of enrollment, the student with committee approval, will establish and submit their program of study to The Graduate School and clarify plans for the comprehensive examination on a set of prescribed courses. Near the end of completing course requirements, the student will write the comprehensive exam. The student will meet with the committee for the oral clarification of the comprehensive exam. If deemed necessary by the committee, the student may be required to take additional coursework to make up identified deficiencies. Toward the end of the program, the student will take at least 3 hours of Doctoral Thesis (EDLD 690) to begin preparation of the proposal. During the proposal preparation, the student will work closely with his/her chair and the readers of the committee with progress being made each semester. The student presents/defends their proposal, which includes the study introduction, literature review, and research methodology. The student conducts the research and writes the dissertation work with the chair and committee readers with progress being made each semester towards completion of the dissertation. The student defends the dissertation.

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Committees

Each doctoral student's committee must consist of at least five approved members. The chair and one other approved member must be from the Adult & Higher Education faculty. Two other approved members will be selected based upon their ability to contribute to the student's studies leading up to and through the dissertation research. These two committee members must have academic credentials in the area of the student's program of study and be approved by the Dean of The Graduate School. A fifth member of the committee is an approved faculty member appointed by The Graduate School and serves as the graduate representative.

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Chairs

The student should carefully select his/her chair after thorough conversations with the approved Adult & Higher Education faculty members that he/she believes might have an interest in their doctoral research agenda and/or the ability to work with them toward generating a defensible dissertation. The chair will give strong leadership and approval regarding the balance of the committee's potential membership. The committee, as a whole, is subject to the approval of the Head of the Department of Education. The chair will facilitate program approval, comprehensive exam planning and clarification, proposal hearing, and dissertation defense. The chair and two other committee members will be the primary "readers" of the dissertation as it is being written. The importance of selecting the right chair cannot be overstated. However, chairs and members of a student's committee are subject to change. In addition, revision to the program of study can be made during the course of study with the chair's approval.

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Comprehensive Examinations

Comprehensive examinations are required for completion of all graduate degrees at Montana State University. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of the program of study and the ability to interact with the research in that area. The level of mastery expected will vary according to the program. Students should refer to The Graduate School's web page at: http://www.montana.edu/gradschool/catalog.html

Near the end of completing coursework and before the dissertation proposal defense, Ed.D. students will complete a written comprehensive exam. The exam is completed in writing and then orally defended in front of the entire Graduate Committee. Through the comprehensive exam, students will be expected to demonstrate:

  • a competency in the breadth of knowledge covered in their coursework
  • the ability to integrate concepts from courses into a holistic viewpoint
  • the ability to apply material to anticipated real life situations based on the theoretical principles and concepts covered in classes
  • the ability to critically read, analyze, and critique research
  • a readiness to move forward to create their own research

Generally, there will be three primary question areas:

  • Major focus of study
  • Research - read, analyze, and critique a research article
  • Design a project - will be expected to demonstrate a mastery of aspects of both qualitative and quantitative projects (such as sampling, validity, reliability, and data analysis)

However, these areas may be revised according to individual programs.

The oral defense of comprehensive exams must occur before November 1st in the fall semester and before spring break in the spring semester. The oral defense of the thesis, portfolio, or final dissertation must occur 14 working days before the last day of the semester.

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Additional Doctor of Education Requirements

The Doctor of Education degree must meet the minimum requirements in the For Doctoral Students section on The Graduate School's website with the following exception: only fourteen (14) credits of dissertation are required. Additional requirements for the Ed.D. degree beyond these minimums are available through the Department of Education. All Ed.D. degree candidates are expected to be familiar with both The Graduate School's degree requirements listed here: http://www.montana.edu/gradschool/cat_for_doc_stud.html and Department of Education degree requirements listed on each of the three program's websites.

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Contact Information

Dr. Carrie Myers, Program Leader
Higher Education and Research classes
cbmyers@montana.edu

Dr. Sweeney Windchief
Higher Education classes
sweeney.windchief@montana.edu

Dr. Marilyn Lockhart
Adult Education, Higher Education, and Research classes
lockhart@montana.edu

College Teaching Certificate Objectives

The Adult and Higher Education Program offers a Certificate in College Teaching to develop and promote exemplary teaching among graduate students, aspiring faculty, and current faculty wanting to enhance their teaching skills.  The goal of the certificate is to make individuals more competitive in the job market as instructors and faculty members at colleges and universities. 

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Program Flow

A total of 12 credits of course work are required to earn the College Teaching Certificate.  Taking three credits a semester, participants will be able to earn the certificate in two years.  Taking six credits a semester, participants will be able to earn the certificate in one year.  Participants may enroll in the program for Fall or Spring semesters.

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Program of Study

Required Courses - 6 credits
EDLD 530 College Teaching 3
EDLD 574 Field Exper in Ed Ldrshp 3
Field Experience is the experiential component for the certificate program and is taken after the majority of the coursework is completed.
Electives - choose 6 credits
EDLD 531 Theoretical Fndtns/Col Stdnts 6
or EDLD 528 College Students
or EDLD 529 Postsecond Dist Delivered Educ
or EDLD 538 College Curriculum
or EDLD 598 Internship
or EDLD 592 Independent Study
or EDLD 509 Issues/Trends in High Ed
Total Credits 12
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Contact Information

Dr. Carrie Myers, Program Leader
Higher Education and Research classes
cbmyers@montana.edu

Dr. Sweeney Windchief
Higher Education classes
sweeney.windchief@montana.edu

Dr. Marilyn Lockhart
Adult Education, Higher Education, and Research classes
lockhart@montana.edu

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Application for Certificate in College Teaching 

The minimum requirement for admission to the certificate program is a master’s degree or current enrollment in a master’s or doctoral degree program as well as knowledge of a self-identified discipline or area of specialization.  In the personal statement candidates should describe their qualifications to teach the content of their discipline or area of specialization at the college level and their teaching goals.

Complete the online application through the Graduate School Online Application System

Applicants are to submit the following documentation during the application process:

  1. Official Transcripts – current students at MSU may submit copies of transcripts
  2. Three letters of reference  –  one of these must address the discipline/specialization qualifications of the applicant to teach at the college level.
    1. NOTE:  If applicant is a current graduate student at MSU then only one reference is required.
  3. Current Curriculum Vitae
  4. Personal statement – please address the following:
    1. Brief background
    2. Goal for completing the Certificate – What are the applicants teaching goals?
    3. Discipline/content knowledge –  What qualifications does the applicant have to teach the content of the discipline or area of specialization at the college level?
    4. List of current teaching responsibilities or experiences
    5. Initial ideas on a possible course(s) the applicant would like to “teach” as part of the practicum experience. Also, include names of any mentors who might serve as a master teacher for the practicum experience.
    6. Has the applicant taken or are currently enrolled in any courses that might count towards the Certificate? If yes, list these and when taken.

Note: Additional information may be requested by the Admissions Committee upon receipt of application.

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Application Deadlines

The following are the preferred application deadline dates by which all of the application materials must be submitted via the online application system.

Fall Semester:  May 1st
Spring Semester:  November 1st
Summer Semester:  April 1st

The following is the absolute deadline date for the fall semester. If an applicant is unable to submit all application materials via the online application system by the preferred dates listed above, he or she can submit the materials by the date listed below, as there will be a second review for the fall semester.

Fall Semester: August 15th

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Contact Information

For additional application information:

Maggie Secrest, Graduate Program Assistant
Department of Education, Montana State University
PO Box 172880
Reid Hall 215, Bozeman, MT 59717-2880 
Email: margaret.secrest@montana.edu

 

 

Minors and Support Areas

Graduate students not wishing to be admitted to a specific program, but wishing to take specific courses or support/minor areas of study within the A&HE curriculum are encouraged to do so. The faculty sees this as a way to better prepare future faculty members for all disciplines/fields and to serve MSU's teaching effort through graduate assistants. Interested graduate students should seek the advice of a program faculty member and their committee chair.

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Schedule of Course Offerings

The schedule of course offerings has been designed with students in mind. The majority of students in Adult and Higher Education are part-time graduate students with full-time adult responsibilities. Therefore, the schedule has several significant features:

  • Most fall and spring semester courses are offered evenings or weekends.

  • Courses are offered in a regular, predictable rotation as much as possible. Core courses defined for each focus are offered at least once each year. At a minimum, all other courses are offered every other year. During the summer, courses are offered based on student needs.

  • Students may begin classes in the fall, spring or summer as a full-time or a part-time student. Adult and Higher Education has a history of delivering courses some at a distance, and the efficient and effective expansion of the distance education strategy is an on-going topic of discussion. Many courses are offered as hybrid courses - with a combination of face-to-face and distance delivery.

  • This schedule chart depicts a working schedule of course offerings for Higher Education Administration, Higher Education Academics (Teaching), Student Affairs, and Adult Education foci.

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Program Delivery

Adult and Higher Education is interested in serving students who are not able to attend on-campus courses. Therefore, numerous, creative means of course and advising delivery are being considered for development. Alternatives include the establishment of cohort groups in centers of population; particularly, those centers where several higher education institutions are within easy driving distance for students who express similar aspirations for studies in higher education. Contact us to discuss making this possibility a reality in your area of Montana or the country.

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Course Descriptions

STATISTICS AND RESEARCH COURSES

  • EDCI 500 Dissertation Design Seminar (1 credit)

    Designed for students who are in the process of planning their doctoral research.

  • EDCI 501 Educational Statistics I (3 credits)

    The application of statistical processes to the analysis of educational data. Educational problems that require hypothesis testing, test construction statistics, regression, estimation and the Tdistribution, analysis of frequencies, and ANOVA in their solution will be included.

  • EDCI 502 Educational Statistics II (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDCI 501. The application of statistical processes to the analysis of educational data. Educational problems that apply multifactor ANOVA, multiple comparison techniques, ANCOVA, multiple regression, and factor analysis in their solution are included.

  • EDCI 504 Assessment and Evaluation in Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Evaluation as an ongoing process in education. This course will engage students in a discussion regarding the construction, selection and use of criterion-referenced, norm-referenced, and alternative assessment methods. In addition, students will be involved in special projects which allow them to explore evaluation at the classroom, program, and/or institutional levels.

  • EDCI 506 Applied Educational Research (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Nine hours competed in major field of study. Students are introduced to systematic scientific inquiry, its purpose in an educational environment, the different approaches to conducting educational research, and the major components of an educational research study. Providing a foundation for further study of research methodologies, students will identify and evaluate existing literature on a topic and conduct an educational research study.

  • EDCI 507 Qualitative Educational Research (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing and EDCI 506. Within the context of systematic inquiry, the qualitative research paradigm and methods and techniques from many fields of the social sciences will be addressed. Students will plan and complete a qualitative research project. HIST 540 Historical Methods (3 credits) Consideration of historical thinking, the uses of evidence and historical methodology.

  • EDCI 607 Quantitative Education Research (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDCI 502, EDCI 506, graduate standing. Within the context of systematic scientific inquiry, the quantitative research paradigm and designs, design-related data collection and management methodologies, appropriate data analysis and writing strategies, and the role of quantitative research in decision-support will be addressed. Students will plan and complete a quantitative research project.

ADULT AND HIGHER EDUCATION COURSES

  • EDLD 501 Foundations of Adult Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. A survey of the field and profession of adult education as part of lifelong learning. Professionalism in adult education is approached through the study of: related adult education; historical and philosophical foundations; providers and programs; and, issues and trends. EDLD 504 Teaching and Learning in Adult Education (3 credits) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This is a study of the adult learner, adult learning theories, and teaching strategies appropriate for adult education strategies. Practice teaching will be evaluated.

  • EDLD 505 Higher Education History and Philosophy (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is an indepth past-to-present tour of the historical and philosophical development of American higher education set agains the dynamic backgrounds of political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual landscapes.

  • EDLD 509 Issues and Trends in Higher Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is an indepth and contemporary exploration of critical issues, trends, and forces facing and influencing higher education. The emphasis is on current issues, but we do cover some of the historical roots. The theme throughout the course is of addressing the ways in which contemporary institutions respond to the critical issues and challenges as they are set within and often against the dynamic context of social, political, and economic forces.

  • EDLD 510 Organization and Administration of Higher Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDLE 505. In this course students will examine the different organizational structures that characterize and govern American higher education. In this introduction to the field of higher education governance, organizational structures will be examined in relation to the role of the "educational" unit and organization theory.

  • EDLD 511 Planning Program Assessment (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDLD 506 and graduate standing. This course exposes students to the necessary and accepted literature, models, standards, strategies, and skills to plan and implement an assessment or program evaluation of educational programs, services, and administration. These assessments are aimed at various internal and external clients including accrediting agencies, national funding organizations, and other governing bodies in higher education. To this end, students are introduced to systematic assessment methodologies appropriate for a variety of academic programs, the different approaches to conducting assessment research, and the major components of an assessment plan. Students identify and evaluate existing literature on a topic and then conduct an original assessment project to deepen their understanding of the assessment process.

  • EDLD 512 Finance and Administration in Higher Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDLD 505 or consent of instructor. The study of financial governance across higher education from macro-systems (national and state governing boards) to micro-systems (university, college, and department.) In the course, students assess the impact of various decisions and levels of funding on students and an institution's financial status.

  • EDLD 513 Resource and Program Management (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The study of program/department management in higher and adult education, for both academic and administrative/support units. Includes issues that deal with the management of faculty, support personnel, programs, facilities, and budgeting.

  • EDLD 528 College Students (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This foundations course reviews theory and research on undergraduate college students' learning, development, culture, demographics, and sub-populations which inform current educational practice.

  • EDLD 529 Post Secondary Distance Delivered Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Higher, continuing, and adult education professionals will study the literature, strategies, and practices involved in delivering post secondary education at a distance.

  • EDLD 530 College Teaching (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is designed to explore the learningteacher nexus with special attention to effective teaching practices and models, learning and assessment theories and perspectives, and effective course design. We will approach all of these topics in the spirit of the scholarship of teaching and learning and with attention to tradition and diverse learners.

  • EDLD 531 Theoretical Foundations of Student Services (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. This course will introduce the theories which have been advanced regarding college students and the professional practice of student affairs. The course will examine the similarities and differences among college students and the impact which different environments and policies may have on student psycho-social development, learning attitudes, values, behaviors, and satisfaction with college.

  • EDLD 533 Law and Policy in Higher Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Analysis and interpretation of landmark legislation affecting American higher education since 1960 and the resulting policies that govern the management of universities and colleges. Topics include separation of church and state, access, collective bargaining, intercollegiate athletics, affirmative action, and relations with state and federal governments.

  • EDLD 535 Student Services (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDLD 510. Students will examine philosophical, organizational and programmatic aspects of postsecondary student services and the ethical and legal dimensions of student affairs professional practice.

  • EDLD 537 Institutional Research and Assessment (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: EDLD 510. Students will explore the roles of institutional research and assessment in higher education identifying appropriate measures for academic and administrative assessment, internal and external data sources, analytic techniques, and the communication of information to academic and administrative decision makers.

  • EDLD 538 College Curriculum (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course considers the definition, philosophical and historical roots, disciplinary organization, current issues, designs, administration, and evaluation of the college curriculum.

  • NAS 523 American Indians and Minorities in Higher Education (3 credits)

    Prerequisite: NAS 100 or NAS 242. The course will develop and build the student's understanding of the historical and current situation of American Indians and other minorities in U.S. higher education. It will also focus on the unique place of tribal colleges in U.S. higher education.

APPROVED ELECTIVES

Beyond required courses, a student's program of study may (with approval of the chair, committee, and faculty member) complete other courses as well as those included in the following list.

  • EDCI 500 Seminar (1 credit, 4 max.)
  • EDLD 570 Individual Problems (1-3 credits, 6 max.)
  • EDLD 575 Research or Professional Paper/Project (1-4 credits, 6 max.)
  • EDLD 576 Internship (2-12 credits, 12 max.)
  • EDLD 580 Special Topics (1-4 credits)

NOTE: EDCI 500, 570, and 576 credits may only total a maximum of one third of the total credits in the student's program of study. These courses are particularly useful when:

  • supplemental, specialized knowledge is required by the student's committee or desired by the student.
  • a student has available elective credit space because they selected to complete the Support Area (9 credits) rather than a minor.
  • there are special circumstances that the student's committee believes would justify substituting a required course with a more appropriate one from this list or other courses.

Application Process for the M.Ed. in Adult & Higher Education (scroll down for Ed.D.)

Click Here to access the online application

Applicants are to submit the following documentation during the application process:

  1. GPA calculation sheet – The form is provided during the application process.
  2. Resume/Curriculum Vitae
  3. Documentation of verbal and quantitative skills needed for the degree  Do one of the following:
    1. Submit official GRE (minimum Verbal 150, Quantitative 145) or MAT scores (minimum 390) to Montana State University (code 4488).
    2. Submit documented evidence of masters level verbal and quantitative skills in lieu of test scores. This may include reports or quantitative calculations completed for a job, or documentation of work responsibilities using masters level verbal and quantitative skills.
  4. Academic Transcripts – Provide official transcripts verifying all Bachelors degree course work submitted directly to the Department of Education Graduate Programs Office, 215 Reid Hall, PO Box 172880, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717. Transcripts will be evaluated for rigor and academic fit.
  5. Personal essay – The suggested length is 2-3 pages, double-spaced. Briefly describe your background, prior professional and leadership experience, why you are interested in our program, and how you plan to use your degree.
  6. Three (3) professional references – The letters should be from individuals qualified to assess your ability and potential as a graduate student and/or be able to attest to your work ethic and professionalism. References from relatives are not acceptable.
  7. For International Applicants ONLY
    TOEFL (http://www.ets.org/toefl) or ACE level 7 – Applicants who are not U.S. citizens and not from countries where English is the official language are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and score a minimum 213 (paper version- 550, 80 for the iBT). This requirement may be waived if the applicant has earned an undergraduate or graduate degree from an institution in the U.S.
  8. For International Applicants ONLY
    International Student Financial Certificate (http://www.montana.edu/wwwdg/pdf_files/fin_cert.pdf)
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Application Process for the Ed.D. in Higher Education 

Click Here to access the online application

Applicants are to submit the following documentation during the application process:

  1. GPA calculation sheet - The form is provided during the application process.
  2. Resume/Curriculum vitae
  3. Documentation of verbal and quantitative skills needed for the degree – Submit official GRE (minimum Verbal 150, Quantitative 145) or MAT scores (minimum 390) sent from the testing agency to Montana State University (code 4488).
  4. Academic Transcripts – Provide official transcripts verifying all Bachelors degree and Masters degree course work. These can be unofficially uploaded during the application process; however, official transcripts will also need to be submitted directly to the Department of Education Graduate Programs Office, 215 Reid Hall, PO Box 172880, Montana State University, 59717. Transcripts will be evaluated for rigor and academic fit. Electronic transcripts are also acceptable as long as they arrive directly from the applicants certifying university.
  5. Personal essay – Suggested length is 2-3 pages, double-spaced. The applicant should briefly describe the following: background, prior professional and leadership experience, why the interest in the Ed.D. program, and how the applicant plans to use the degree.
  6. Three (3) professional references – The letters should be from individuals qualified to assess one's ability and potential as a graduate student and/or be able to attest to the applicants work ethic and professionalism. References from relatives are not acceptable.
  7. For International Applicants ONLY
    TOEFL (http://www.ets.org/toefl) or ACE level 7 – Applicants who are not U.S. citizens and not from countries where English is the official language are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and score a minimum 213 (paper version- 550, 80 for the iBT). This requirement may be waived if the applicant has earned an undergraduate or graduate degree from an institution in the U.S.
  8. For International Applicants ONLY
    International Student Financial Certificate (http://www.montana.edu/wwwdg/pdf_files/fin_cert.pdf)

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Application Deadlines

The following are the preferred application deadline dates by which all of the application materials must be submitted via the online application system.
*Note - By submitting materials by the preferred deadline, accepted students will be eligible for early registration.

Fall Semester:  May 1st
Spring Semester:  November 1st
Summer Semester:  April 1st

The following is the absolute deadline date for fall semester. If an applicant is unable to submit all application materials via the online application system by the preferred dates listed above, he or she can submit the materials by the date listed below, as there will be a second review for fall semester.

Fall Semester: August 15th

We hope that you are interested in our program!  We strongly suggest that you contact one of our faculty by e-mail or phone for further information and before applying. We would like to get to know you as early as possible. E-mail addresses of our faculty are listed on the Overview page.

We encourage individuals to take a course or two as non-degree students to see if our program will meet your needs and interests. Contact one of our faculty and they will be happy to discuss your individual situation and what initial classes you may be most interested in and that are being offered for the upcoming semester.

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Contact Information

For additional application information:

Maggie Secrest
Graduate Program Assistant
PO Box 172880
Montana State University
Reid Hall 215
Bozeman, MT 59717-2880 
margaret.secrest@montana.edu 

 


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