This award is designed to honor a student who has worked to improve issues related to gender, equity, and diversity on any of MSU's four campuses. There can be up to one undergraduate winner and one graduate winner and each award carries a $500 scholarship. 

2016 Winners

Darby Lacey

Darcy Lacey

Darby Lacey received an English literature degree, an honors degree, and a minor in biochemistry when she graduated May. She has been a moderator and program coordinator for MSU Sustained Dialogue, a moderator and program developer of the MSU Common Ground Retreat, a student leadership coach, and a volunteer for the Eagle Mount Adaptive Recreation Program. Darby has volunteered for Planned Parenthood, the national HOSA program for future health professionals, and presented at this year’s MLK Day celebration. Though her path to a pre-med career was unusual, she plans to combine her passion for social justice and healthcare in order to facilitate “access to quality and compassionate healthcare for all people regardless of sex, gender expression, race, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic status, and ability status.”

Katherine Stocker

Katherine Stocker

Katherine Stocker, a senior in physics, has been instrumental in helping found and develop what is now known as Engineering Peer Advising Leaders (EPALs). As a sophomore, Katherine was one of two undergraduate women who assisted Dr. Sarah Codd and Angela Des Jardins in carrying out the pilot peer advising program, which focused on freshman women in engineering and physics.  The program became so successful it now encompasses all engineering and physics freshmen and sophomores, while maintaining a focus on women and minorities. Katherine herself has helped mentor up to 25 EPALs per year. Katherine appreciates the benefits of the program personally as well, and states, “Being a student adviser has allowed me to grow as a role model. Providing information on research opportunities and aiding in the fulfillment of the mentees’ passions is a way for me to give back and show gratitude to the people who helped me.”

2015 Winners

Joe Schumacher

Joe Schumacher

Joe Schumacher is truly a leader in creating positive change for students around issues relating to gender, equity, and diversity on our campus through his work with the VOICE Center, Pre-Law club, Student Veteran Club, and the Not In our House Task Force.  He takes personal responsibility for the education of our campus through his work with the VOICE Center and has traveled to testify in Helena as a student representative to keep the issue of gender equity on the table.  Joe presented to over 5,000 students in just one semester alone on the topic of interpersonal violence and has trained over 100 student advocates during his time at the VOICE Center.  He has presented at a number of statewide and national conferences focusing on sexual assault and violence against women. Joe has also been a volunteer with HAVEN, THRIVE and the Bozeman Help Center.  Joe discusses his work with all of these organizations in the following statement: “Our goal is to educate men on our campus and facilitate discussions about masculinity and encourage healthy sexuality and relationships. But I feel that in order to see real progress in equality and the prevention of interpersonal violence, collaboration between MSU and the community is absolutely vital.” Joe has actively forged those connections between our campus and the Bozeman community and is a well-respected member of both.

Abbie Bandstra

Abbie Bandstra

Abbie Bandstra is  a graduate student in Native American Studies.  During her undergraduate career at MSU, she was the President of Students for Choice, a volunteer and employee of the Women’s Center, an ASMSU Senator, a National Student Exchange Intern, and a First Year Seminar Peer Coordinator.   As a feminist and activist, Abbie’s work towards social justice in the realms of race, socioeconomic class, and gender equity has been admirable.  Abbie has also accrued impressive “real life” experience in her positions as program director with Shift Empowerment, as the Livingston School District Farmer Educator, and as a volunteer facilitator and advisor for a girls’ empowerment group at Livingston High School.  Abbie’s thoughtful consideration of the intersectionality of all oppressions is highlighted in this statement: “I often think that one of the most meaningful tools in advocating for change and equality can be in situations of discourse, particularly not just in upholding a constant presence of censor, but also a continual questioning and articulation of whose voice is not at the table.”  It has been Abbie’s life work to seek out those missing voices and make sure that they can be heard.  Her research on Native American women’s access to reproductive healthcare will likely prove to be both enlightening and invaluable.

 


2014 Winner 

Undergraduate

Lindsay Murdock

Lindsay Murdock, sociology, is an advocate for diversity and inclusion across campus through her work in student government and several clubs. As the President of ASMSU Murdock worked with the campus and the state Equal Pay for Equal Work Task Force to bring $tart $mart Salary Negotiation workshops to MSU. She was also instrumental in coordinating the efforts to bring Lilly Ledbetter to campus in April for the Equal Pay Summit. Furthermore, Murdock worked with several different student organizations like Not In Our House, QSA, Sustained Dialogue and many others to support diversity related program in order to ensure campus was inclusive for people of all identities. Murdock spent her time in school studying sociology with a focus on race and gender relations and how social justice movements must continue to inform academic social theory. 

 

2013 Winners

Undergraduate Student 

Kiah Abbey Kiah Abbey, political science, worked to found Sustained Dialogue on campus, a group dedicated to helping students better understand the different roles diverse identities played in creating a truly diverse community. By allowing people to grasp intersectional identities, others are more open to dialogue to action in order to create true institutional change. Abbey was also the President of ASMSU and worked to change Board of Regents policy in order to ensure it was inclusive of LGBTQ rights on campuses across the Montana University System. 

 

 

 

 Graduate Student 

Kathryn Williamson

Kathryn Williamson, physics, moved to Bozeman after receiving her bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy at the University of Georgia. She's a graduate student in the physics program at MSU and works with both the Solar Physics Group and the Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT). Kathryn works to expand the visibility of women and other underrepresented minorities in STEM programs at MSU. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President Cruzado with two student award winners

 

 

President Cruzado is pictured at the left in between two past student award winners, Lindsay Murdock (left) and Kiah Abbey (right). 

 

 

 

 

 

President Cruzado Thinking Gender Award

The President Cruzado Thinking Gender Award was named for the first woman president of Montana State University. This award, sponsored by TRIOTA honor society, recognizes one outstanding student for academic excellence in women's and gender studies, advocacy, community service, or other significant contribution to gender equality on campus or otherwise.