The Montana State University Police Department is seeking community members for its new Volunteers in Police Service program.

Volunteers will help staff the front counter of the University Police Department, answering the public’s questions about the department and parking issues, taking non-emergency phone calls, selling parking permits, helping with recordkeeping, fingerprinting customers and assisting with general office duties.

Some volunteers will also be asked to help at special events, such as football games, Catapalooza and other campus functions. Others may be asked to help with fleet management, quartermaster duties or other support functions.

“The MSU Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of law enforcement and public safety services to our campus community,” said Chief Frank Parrish. “The Volunteers in Police Service program will let us enhance those services and, importantly, involve the community in more of our policing efforts.”

Parrish noted that similar programs have been in place around the country for nearly two decades.

Those looking to apply should have strong written and verbal communication skills, a sense of discretion in maintaining confidential information and courteous customer service skills. Applicants will be interviewed and will be subject to background checks. Volunteers will receive a departmental polo shirt, name badge and ID card.

To Apply

Please fill out the volunteer application. Applications are also available at our front counter, in the Huffman Building at the corner of 7th Avenue and Kagy Boulevard, open M-F from 730am- 530pm. We also ask that you write a cover letter addressing what types of skills, knowledge, and abilities you can contribute to our organization, what interested you in the program, and a number of hours you would like to work a week or month or if you just want to be called when we have special events and needs. The cover letter will then give us an idea of where we can best place you. You may email your completed application and cover letter to kmashaw@montana.edu or you may drop it off at our office. For any questions, contact Kristine Mashaw, UPD business operations manager, at 406-994-5428 or kmashaw@montana.edu

 

Top 5 Reasons to Volunteer for the Police

Making the decision to volunteer for the Police is an admirable one. You have not only chosen to volunteer your time and skills but also to donate them to a service which serves as a lifeline to our Nation in terms of public safety. Now, more than ever, volunteers are needed and wanted to assist the Police in their duties. But just what do you, the volunteer, get out of it? DutySheet decided to delve into the realms of Police volunteering and find five impressive reasons for volunteering for the Police, so you too, can see the benefits.

1. Become an ambassador

By volunteering within the Police you become an ambassador for them too. Whether you choose to volunteer in an operational or administrative role, you can positively represent and promote the work of the Police to your community, friends and family. So, in effect, you also become a valuable link between the Police and the public. And not only will you gain an understanding into how the local area is policed, you may be a regular presence within that community too, meaning you can make an important contribution towards building social capital.

2. Personal development

Whilst the act of volunteering is selfless this doesn’t mean you can’t personally benefit too. Volunteering within the Police will certainly spark your interest because of the varied nature of the service. You will experience a host of different duties and scenarios which will require existing and new skills to be utilised. Expect to develop essential interpersonal skills, boost your confidence, realise your capabilities, learn the art of diffusion and diplomacy and feel motivated in other areas of your life.

3. Make a definite difference

Choosing to volunteer within the Police provides them with direct and effective support. The help you offer supplements the work of each Force so additional duties may be attended to. For instance, a PSV taking meeting minutes means all the attending officers can freely contribute to the meeting, or a Special Constable assisting Regular Police Officers in a busy town centre on a Saturday night, helps to increase Police presence and support. Within these roles, each task you complete is a valuable contribution.

4. Ongoing support

Special Constables, Volunteer Police Cadets, Police Support Volunteers and Volunteer Police Community Support Officers are all prepared for their individual roles by being trained, managed and mentored within the force. Ongoing supervision and training is provided too which means these roles are excellent for ensuring you feel capable and useful within these roles as well as feeling part of a supportive and appreciative team.

5. Professional experience

Having a Police volunteer role on your CV is impressive. It creates a conversation point; prospective employers will be interested to know why you chose to volunteer within the Police and your current workplace may even take advantage of your new, emerging skills. These roles create a positive reaction and make your CV stand out.

DutySheet Ltd. (2016, May 26). Volunteering Blog | Top five reasons to volunteer for the Police.