MDI Program Handbook 2020-2022

To view the printable program handbook, please download the MDI Handbook 2020-2022

Welcome to the Montana Dietetic Internship!

History of the Program

With an interest in increasing the number of opportunities for dietitians in Montana, the initial idea for the Montana Dietetic Internship (MDI) was developed by Dr. Alison Harmon of MSU-Bozeman and Dr. Carla Cox of Missoula in 2007. The MSU Nutrition/Dietetic Faculty and The College of Education Health & Human Development Administration, along with the Montana Dietetic Association (now the Montana Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics), collaborated in the development of the MDI Program, and the first class of interns began the program in August 2011. With the change in degree requirements for future dietitians, MDI started working on development of an additional track for the MDI program that includes an online master’s degree (MS) in 2015. In 2020, the MDI program will enroll students into the first MS/Dietetic Internship (DI) cohort. The graduate level MS/DI track will offer 39-graduate level credits. Online coursework will be completed in the first year of the program, followed by 40-weeks of supervised practice in Montana and/or Wyoming. The existing non-degree graduate DI program will continue as a track as well.

The MDI program is unique and to appreciate this distinctiveness, one needs to recognize that Montanans possess characteristics that influence the way they educate themselves in a large rural state with only a few significant population centers. An independent spirit, strong work ethic, creativity, appreciation and dedication to its people and sensible land stewardship have been forces behind the creation of this dietetic education program and its maturity over the last few years. The uniqueness of MDI continues to stem from the program design consisting of a main support institution and eight primary geographic centers throughout the Montana and now Wyoming offering supervised practice (SP) experiences. MDI aims to develop nutrition professionals well suited for a career in dietetics who are job-ready to perform and excel in their efforts. MDI graduates contribute to the betterment of people and the communities in which they work and live.

Program Description

Located in Bozeman, MT, Montana State University (MSU) supports the Montana Dietetic Internship. MSU has been accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) since 1932 and is currently in good standing, re-accredited following the last self-study and site visit in October 2017.

Founded in 1893 as the state's land grant institution, Montana State University is the university of choice for those seeking a student-centered learning environment distinguished by innovation and discovery in a Rocky Mountain setting. The University offers baccalaureate degrees in 60 fields with numerous tracks, master's degrees in 54 fields with 13 options for graduate certificates, and doctoral degrees in 37 fields. More than 1200 faculty members in teaching and research and approximately1900 staff and professional personnel work together to provide a challenging and richly diverse learning environment in which the entire university community is fully engaged in supporting student success.

The MDI program offers two tracks to those seeking credentialing as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN). Students may select to apply to the online MS/DI track which will offer 39-graduate level credits and online coursework to be completed in the first year of the program, followed by 40-weeks of supervised practice in Montana and/or Wyoming. Upon successful completion of this track students will earn a MS degree in Dietetic Systems Leadership and a dietetic internship Verification Statement. The second track allows students to apply to the non-degree graduate DI 40-week supervised practice program which will offer supervised practice in Montana and/or Wyoming, plus 12 non-degree graduate credits and a Verification Statement upon successful completion.

MS/DI Graduate Program Track: 

Students enrolled in the MDI MS/DI graduate program track will be enrolled in online coursework for the first year. The 40 weeks of supervised practice hours will be completed during the second year of the MS/DI program. Students may remain in their home communities for the first year of the MS/DI graduate program. During the second summer of the program students will travel to Bozeman for professional development weeks, the sustainable food system rotation and then on to placement in one primary geographic location for the majority of their supervised practice hours. Students may be expected to travel to other locations throughout Montana and Wyoming during the internship year to engage in learning at various rural/urban rotations sites.

Non-degree Graduate DI Program Track:

Students enrolled in the MDI non-degree graduate DI program track will be enrolled as non-degree graduate students and begin the 40-week supervised practice program in Bozeman, MT at MSU. The DI program students will complete professional development and the sustainable food system rotations in the Bozeman area before being placed in one primary geographic location for the majority of their supervised practice hours. Students may be expected to travel to other locations throughout Montana and Wyoming to engage in learning at various rural/urban rotations sites.

Hospitals, facilities and agencies used for clinical nutrition, foodservice management, community nutrition and selfdetermined rotations are mainly located in eight major urban areas in addition to MSU-Bozeman, within the states of Montana and Wyoming. Hospitals are accredited by the Joint Commission and other facilities meet state licensure requirements.

Urban areas include: 1) Kalispell, 2) Missoula, 3) Great Falls, 4) Helena, 5) Billings, 6) Butte, 7) Gillette, WY and 8) Sheridan, WY. MSU-Bozeman is the site of orientation/professional development and the sustainable food system rotation. Bozeman and nearby communities may also be utilized and can offer supervised experiences at various facilities and programs: Bozeman Health, Bozeman and Belgrade School Foodservices, Livingston School Foodservice, Livingston Healthcare, Livingston Food Resource Center, Gallatin Valley Food Bank, Eagle Mount, Gallatin County HRDC – Head Start, Gallatin County WIC, and other programs at MSU-Bozeman including Food & Nutrition Extension, University Food Services, MSU Child Development Center, Team Nutrition, MUS Wellness and Towne’s Harvest Garden.

Located in the Northwestern part of the state, Kalispell and Missoula may include supervised practice experiences at the University of Montana Dining Services, Missoula County WIC, Missoula School Foodservice, Missoula Food Bank, Saint Patrick’s Hospital, Community Medical Center, Riverside Health Care, Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, Flathead Tribal Health at St. Ignatius, Kalispell Regional Medical Center, Kalispell School Foodservice, Flathead County WIC, Flathead Food Bank, Northwest Montana Head Start, Dialysis Clinic, Inc., North Valley Hospital and community organizations such as the Community Food and Agriculture Coalition (CFAC).

Helena, which is the capital of the state of Montana, also serves as a supervised practice rotation area. It may consist of State Offices of Public Instruction, DPHHS CACFP Early Childhood Service Bureau, Lewis and Clark County WIC, St. Peter’s Hospital, Shodair Children’s Hospital, Montana VA Healthcare System at Fort Harrison, Helena School Foodservice, and community organizations such as Helena Food Share and the Alternative Energy Resources Organization (AERO).

Supervised Practice rotations in Great Falls may include Benefis Hospital, Blackfeet Community Hospital in Browning, Great Falls School Foodservice, and Cascade County Public Health and WIC.

Located in the south-eastern part of the state, the Billings urban area may consist of rotations at Billings Clinic, St. Vincent’s Healthcare, Billings VA Outpatient Clinic, Dialysis Clinic, Inc., Holy Rosary Healthcare Miles City, One Health in Miles City, Pioneer Medical Center Big Timber, Billings and Miles City School Foodservice, and Riverstone Health WIC.

Between Bozeman and Missoula, rotations in Butte may include St. James Healthcare, Community Hospital in Anaconda, Butte School Foodservice, and Butte-Silver Bow County WIC.

MDI offers supervised practice rotations is Sheridan and Gillette, Wyoming. Sites may include Sheridan Memorial Hospital, Sheridan VA Medical Center, Sheridan School Foodservice, Northern Wyoming Community College Culinary Arts Program, Campbell County Health, Campbell County School District, The Children’s Developmental Services of Campbell County, and Campbell County WIC to name a few.

After two weeks of orientation and professional development at MSU in Bozeman, interns spend another four weeks in the Sustainable Foods System rotation at MSU, then progress to rotations in their assigned geographic area for completion of supervised practice experiences. During a four-week self-selected rotation, interns may arrange Montana Dietetic Internship Program Handbook Updated 11.2019 8 experiences within their geographic area or travel to other areas of the state, another state or an international location. Self-select rotation plans are submitted by the intern for approval by the Program Director and faculty.

MS/DI Program Track Application Requirements

Requirements for the non-degree graduate DI application include: a completed DICAS application, a Verification Statement (or declaration of intent) from an accredited didactic program in dietetics, a preferred 100 hours of volunteer or work experience in food, nutrition, and/or dietetics, and 3 references from dietetic professionals, faculty and/or employers, and a GPA > 2.75 on a 4.0 scale.

Online interviews may be utilized to further discern best candidates for the non-degree graduate DI open slots. Once accepted students will be enrolled in a total of 12 non-degree graduate credits and start their 40-weeks of supervised practice hours in August. Students will complete orientation, professional development and the sustainable food system rotation on the main Bozeman campus then progress through rotations in clinical, foodservice management, community nutrition, and integrated or specialty supervised practice sites. Depending on goals, abilities, and preferred location, the supervised practice experience will be located in food and nutrition care facilities in Eastern, Central or Western Montana or Northern Wyoming.

Strategic Missions and Visions

AND Mission

A world where all people thrive through the transformative power of food and nutrition

AND Vision

Accelerate improvements in global health and well-being through food and nutrition

AND Principles: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and our members:

  • Amplify the contribution of nutrition and dietetics practitioners and expand workforce capacity and capability
  • Integrate research, professional development, technology and practice to stimulate innovation and discovery
  • Collaborate to solve the greatest food and nutrition challenges now and in the future
  • Focus on system-wide impact across the food, well-being and health care sectors
  • Have a global impact in eliminating all forms of malnutrition.

University Mission

Montana State University, as the State's land-grant university, integrates education, creation of knowledge and art and service to communities.

College Mission

The mission of the College of Education, Health and Human Development is to prepare highly qualified professionals through exemplary programs, advance knowledge about education, health, and human development, and serve the people of Montana and the nation through outreach and practical application of its expertise.

Departmental Mission

The Department of Health and Human Development strives to enrich human well-being through teaching, research and outreach.

Program Mission

The mission of the Montana Dietetic Internship (MDI) is to prepare highly capable entry-level registered dietitian nutritionists who can integrate sustainable food systems into dietetic practice when employed in clinical, foodservice, community nutrition and integrated practice settings located in rural or urban facilities in Montana or the Rocky Mountain region.

Goals and Graduate Outcomes

Program Goals

The following strategic goals and associated outcome measures are identified by MDI to achieve its mission and goals.

Goal 1:

Graduates of the MDI program will be highly capable entry-level registered dietitian nutritionists that can integrate sustainable food systems into dietetic practice.

Program Objective Measures MS/DI Track
  • 100% of MS/DI students will maintain, per semester of online coursework and in supervised practice, an overall GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4-point scale.
  • 100% of MS/DI interns will pass the Sustainable Food Systems (SFS) concentration evaluation with an overall 80% score or higher after the related rotation.
  • 80% of MDI preceptors will evaluate MS/DI interns with an overall average rating of 3 or greater on a 5-point Likert scale (3 = Doing well, performing as expected for intern level) after each rotation.
  • 90% of MS/DI graduates will rate their internship experience on how well prepared for entry-level practice they are with an overall average rating of 4 or greater on a 5-point Likert scale (4 = satisfied).
  • At least 80% percent of MS/DI interns complete program requirements within 36 months (150% of the program length).
  • Of MS/DI graduates who seek employment, 70% percent are employed in nutrition and dietetics or related fields within 12 months of graduation.
  • 90% of MS/DI graduates take the CDR credentialing exam for Register Dietitian Nutritionist within 12 months of program completion.
  • The MDI one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for Register Dietitian Nutritionist is at least 80%.
  • 80% of employers will rate employees who are MS/DI graduates with an overall average rating of 4 or greater on a 5-point Likert scale (4 = satisfied).
Program Objective Measures Non-Degree Graduate DI Track
  • 100% of DI interns will pass the Sustainable Food Systems (SFS) concentration evaluation with an overall 80% score or higher after the related rotation.
  • 80% of MDI preceptors will evaluate MDI interns with an overall average rating of 3 or greater on a 5-point Likert scale (3 = Doing well, performing as expected for intern level) after each rotation.
  • 90% of MDI graduates will rate their internship experience on how well prepared for entry-level practice they are with an overall average rating of 4 or greater on a 5-point Likert scale (4 = satisfied).
  • At least 80% percent of DI interns complete program requirements within 15 months (150% of the program length).
  • Of MDI graduates who seek employment, 70% percent are employed in nutrition and dietetics or related fields within 12 months of graduation.
  • 90% of MDI graduates take the CDR credentialing exam for Register Dietitian Nutritionist within 12 months of program completion.
  • The MDI one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for Register Dietitian Nutritionist is at least 80%.
  • 80% of employers will rate employees who are MDI graduates with an overall average rating of 4 or greater on a 5-point Likert scale (4 = satisfied)
Goal 2:

The MDI program prepares entry-level registered dietitian nutritionists who will serve the needs and enrich the well-being of diverse populations in Montana and the Rocky Mountain region.

Program Objective Measures for MS/DI and Non-degree Graduate DI Tracks
  • Within five years, 25% of MDI RDs will serve the populations of Montana and Rocky Mountain region through employment or volunteer service.

Program Information

Sources of Program Information

Information about the MDI can be found through a variety of avenues: Program Handbook (hard copy and online), the Dietetics section of the webpage for Department of Health and Human Development, and the Montana State University-Bozeman catalog (online).

Description of how the program fits into the credentialing process to be a registered dietitian and state certification/licensure for dietitians

Both tracks of the MDI program (MS/DI and non-degree graduate DI) will provide supervised practice experiences, which will meet requirements for ACEND accreditation. If successfully completed, an intern will receive a Verification Statement that allows him or her to take the Registration Examination to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. To become a Licensed Nutritionist (LN), Montana dietitians are required to be an active Registered Dietitian Nutritionist; therefore, MDI can provide a route for successful graduates of ACEND accredited dietetic education programs and MDI to eventually become registered and licensed in the State of Montana.

Cost to Intern

Interns will pay the program application fee and fees required by MSU-Bozeman. Travel will vary for each intern due to various areas of the state in which facilities are located. Books, professional attire, background checks, drug screens, car and health insurance, memberships and physical exams are additional expenses. The final week of the internship will include attendance at the Montana Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics annual Food and Nutrition Summit, plus a graduation celebration. The intern is responsible for all transportation, lodging and per diem costs.

Estimated MS/DI Tuition and Fees for 2020-22 cohort ***
MDI Application Fee*

$55

Program Enrollment Fee**^ $11,000
39 Graduate Credits, Tution, + Fees*** (In-State) $11,025
39 Graduate Credits, Tution, + Fees*** (Out-of-State) $14,884
Course Registration and Computer Fees** $2,080
Total

$24,160 (In-state)

$28,019 (Out-of-State)

*The nonrefundable MDI application fee is paid when DICAS application is submitted.

**All fees subject to change according to Montana Board of Regents directive updates. 

^The nonrefundable $1,000 down payment paid upon acceptance to MDI will be applied to the Program Enrollment fee. The Program Enrollment fee is assessed during the supervised practice hours.

*** Tuition fees for the MS/MDI degree are based on estimated graduate level tuition and student fees for the current year and are subject to change.

The Program Fee Includes:
  • Professional liability insurance coverage
  • MSU library access
  • Program activities associated with orientation, professional development, supervised practice, graduation week, MTAND Food & Nutrition Summit, and RDN exam preparation.

Estimated Non-Degree DI Tuition and Fees for 2020-21 cohort **

MDI Application Fee* $55
Program Enrollment Fee**^ $11,000
12 Graduate Credits Tuition Fee** (In-State) $3,392
12 Graduate Credits Tuition Fee** (Out-of-State)         $4,580
Course Registration and Computer fees** $645
   Total

$15,092 (In-state)

$16,280 (Out-of-State)

*The nonrefundable MDI application fee is paid when DICAS application is submitted.

**All fees subject to change according to Montana Board of Regents directive updates. 

^The nonrefundable $1,000 down payment paid upon acceptance to MDI will be applied to the Program Enrollment fee. The Program Enrollment fee is assessed during the supervised practice hours.

*** Tuition fees for the MS/MDI degree are based on estimated graduate level tuition and student fees for the current year and are subject to change.

The Program Fee Includes:
  • Professional liability insurance coverage
  • MSU library access
  • Program activities associated with orientation, professional development, supervised practice, graduation week, MTAND Food & Nutrition Summit, and RDN exam preparation

Estimated Annual Intern Living Expenses*

Travel (will vary according to location, vehicle and insurance) $500
Housing (will vary according to individual situation) $4,000-5,000
Optional books and supplies $100-300
Medical exams, immunizations, etc. $150
Health insurance (will vary according to coverage) $2000
Laptop computer with internet capability $1,200
Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics student membership $58
CastleBranch (background check, drug screen and immunization records) $140

* This is only an estimate of possible expenses. Some expenses may not be incurred, while others may be less or more depending on individual situations and choices.

Interns will need to have their own laptops (with wireless capability) for this internship in order to fully participate in the online webinar course from a variety of locations around the state on Montana.

The availability of financial aid and loan deferments (Federal or private) scholarships and/or other monetary support.

Students that are eligible for federal financial aid may apply for loans. Additionally, other assistance may be available to interns in the form of scholarships and short-term loans depending on individual eligibility. Loan information and applications are available from the Office of Student Financial Aid Services located in the Student Union Building at MSU-Bozeman or on the MSU website at http://www.montana.edu/wwwfa/.

MDI specific financial aid questions can be directed to:

Julie Watson

[email protected]

Office of Financial Aid Services, Montana State University

(406) 994-2845 or (406) 994-6044

Interns may also want to consider national scholarship programs and are encouraged to apply directly to:

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics:https://eatrightfoundation.org/why-it-matters/awards/#Scholarships

Contact information for questions regarding the AND application process can be directed to Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation

(800) 877-100, ext. 1133

Or email: [email protected]

MDI Scholarship Funds

MDI has many individual scholarships available. Information on applying is provided to the incoming MDI class.

Accreditation

The Montana State University – Montana Dietetic Internship (MDI) is a fully accredited program.

“The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics is the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' accrediting agency for education programs preparing students for careers as registered dietitians or dietetic technicians, registered. ACEND serves the public by establishing and enforcing eligibility requirements and accreditation standards that ensure the quality and continued improvement of nutrition and dietetics education programs that reflect the evolving practice of dietetics. ACEND defines educational quality as the ability to prepare graduates with the foundation knowledge, skills and/or competencies for current dietetics practice and lifelong learning.”

For verification, you may contact the Commission at the following address:

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190

Chicago, IL 60606-6995

Phone: 800.877.1600, ext. 5400

e-mail: [email protected]

Admission Requirements MS/DI

To be considered for admission to the MS/DI tracks the following degree, statements and certifications are necessary. Transcript(s) and a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Verification Statement (or declaration of intent) are also required for the application process.

  1. Proof of a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics from an ACEND accredited program and/or related major from an accredited college or university is needed. Proof of earned degree will be provided by a final transcript. (Alternatively, prospective students may have earned a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field but completed post-baccalaureate DPD from an accredited college or university).
  2. Verification Statement (or declaration of intent) from an accredited didactic program.
  3. Preferred 100 hours of volunteer or work experience in food, nutrition and/or dietetics
  4. 3 references from dietetic professionals, faculty and/or employers Montana Dietetic Internship Program Handbook Updated 11.2019 15
  5. An undergraduate GPA of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale). Applicants with post-baccalaureate experience must have a graduate GPA of at least 3.00. in at least one of analytical, quantitative and/or verbal reasoning categories.
    1. GRE scores should be sent to Montana State University, Campus Code 4488
  6. Applications will be evaluated based on a variety of factors including scholastic achievement, work/volunteer experience, professional references, leadership abilities and program fit.

Once admitted to the program, proof of health and liability insurance, immunizations, ServSafe and CPR certification and a successful background check and drug screen are needed to remain in the program.

Admission Requirements Non-Degree Graduate DI

To be considered for admission to the non-degree graduate DI track the following degree, statements and certifications are necessary. Transcript(s) and a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Verification Statement (or declaration of intent) are also required for the application process.

  1. Proof of a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics from an ACEND accredited program, or proof of a master’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics and/or related major from an accredited college or university is needed. Proof of earned degree will be provided by a final transcript. (Alternatively, prospective students may have earned a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field but completed post-baccalaureate didactic coursework in dietetics from an accredited college or university).
  2. Verification Statement (or declaration of intent) from an accredited didactic program.
  3. Preferred 100 hours of volunteer or work experience in food, nutrition and/or dietetics.
  4. Three references from dietetic professionals, faculty and/or employers.
  5. GRE is not required for MDI internship only program.
  6. Application will be evaluated based on a variety of factors including scholastic achievement, work/volunteer experience, professional references, leadership abilities and program fit.

Once admitted to the program, proof of health and liability insurance, immunizations, ServSafe and CPR certification and a successful background check and drug screen are needed to remain in the program. 

Application Process

Dietetic Internship Computer Application Service (DICAS) information

  1. Submit application materials through the Dietetic Internship Computer Application Service (DICAS) using the URL application portal which can be found at https://portal.dicas.org.
    1. Resources including instructional videos for using DICAS are available from https://www.eatrightpro.org/acend/students-and-advancing-education/dietetic-internship-matchstudents
      1. In the menus on the left side of the page click on “computer matching.” On the page that opens there are links for:
      2. Applicants - Video for Dietetic Internship Centralized Application System
  2. In theDICAS application personal statement section please title your statement specifically for MDI andaddress the following questions:
    1. Which program are you applying for? MS/DI or DI only?
    2. Why have you selected a career in the field of dietetics?
    3. How does your background and experience strengthen your ability to succeed in the internship and your potential to contribute to the food and nutrition profession?
    4. State your professional goals: short-term (1-3 years) and longer (3-5 years).
      1. How will the MDI program help you achieve these goals?
    5. How would a sustainable food systems background benefit you as a dietetic professional? Montana Dietetic Internship Program Handbook Updated 11.2019 16
      1. What is the importance of considering sustainable food systems to the profession?
    6. Describe how you would be successful living and working in rural communities in Montana.
      1. Include your experience and/or philosophy in working with Native or minority populations
    7. Address any weaknesses in your application.
    8. Why should you be selected as an intern for the MDI program?
      1. In addition to answering the questions listed please identify your top two preferred regions for the majority of your rotation placement (Billings, Butte, Helena, Kalispell, Great Falls, or Missoula in Montana or Gillette or Sheridan in Wyoming). Preferences will be taken into account, but there is no guarantee for a particular placement. Interns will be given their rotation placement prior to the beginning of the internship for the purposes of planning logistics.
  3. Three letters of recommendation are required and will be submitted throughDICAS in an electronic format. References should be written by:
    1. One or two collegiate professors (RD or non-RD)
    2. Employer, (RD or Non-RD) and/ or an RD with whom you have worked or volunteered.
    3. Please notify your references that once their contact information has been provided to DICAS an email is generated requesting them to complete a reference for you. Refer your references to, Submitting Reference Letters to Centralized Dietetic Internship Application System, to view the instructional video for further clarification.
  4. To be considered, an application fee of $55 needs to be submitted directly to Montana State UniversityMontana Dietetic Internship upon submission of application to DICAS. Please note that the fee is nonrefundable.

Computer matching information (for national applicants only)

During the process of applying to the internship, you will participate in a computer matching procedure.

The procedure is summarized below:

  1. Pay the fee to the D & D Digital Systems by February 15th. You can complete this at their website: http://www.dnddigital.com/.
  2. Once the matching process has been completed, you will be notified on a specific day at the D & D Digital Systems website (https://www.dnddigital.com/ada/index.php) regarding the outcome of your appointment to MDI.
  • Applicants who were not matched (appointed) in the first round of applications are then given the opportunity to contact Supervised Practice/ Dietetic Internship programs with unmatched openings. The list of unmatched openings is posted at the D & D Digital Systems website and an unmatched applicant may contact these programs directly regarding those openings after the established appointment date.
  • Applicants who were selected and receive a match are not eligible to apply for an alternative choice in the second round of applications for unmatched openings in Supervised Practice/Dietetic Internship programs. Do not prioritize any Internship on your D & D Digital Systems form that you would not accept. Each applicant only receives one match.

Do not prioritize any Internship on your D & D Digital Systems form that you would not accept. Each applicant only receives one match. 

Program Requirements

Once admitted to the program, proof of health and liability insurance, immunizations, ServSafe and CPR certification and a successful background check and drug screen are needed to remain in the program. 

  1. Proof of current health insurance, car insurance, a medical exam, and immunizations.
  2. Current ServSafe and CPR certification.
  3. Current membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
  4. A successfully completed background check and drug screen.
  5. Once admitted to the program, interns will be assigned to a particular region for the majority of rotations. Preferences are taken into account but do no guarantee a particular assignment.

MS/DI Program Track Overview

The MS/DI track will start in the summer term (see MSU academic calendar for exact dates). Online coursework will span the first four semesters and will follow the MSU academic calendar for holidays and breaks. Students will then travel to Bozeman during late July/early August of their second year of the program for professional development weeks and the start of supervised practice hours.

Sample Course Curriculum

*Curriculum subject to change based on faculty and course availability

Year 1 Credits
  Fall Spring Summer

HDFS 465 - Family Law & Public Policy

     3

NUTR 520 - Advanced Diet and Disease Systems

     3

HHD 512 - Research Methods in HHD

3    

NUTR 5xx - Critical Thinking, Research & Evidence-Informed

Practice: Current issues in Obesity

3    

SFBS 552 - State of the Environment: Policy, Management, and    

Practice

3    

HTR 5xx - Advanced Food Systems Management (in Dietetics)

  3  

NUTR 5xx - Advanced Medical Nutrition Therapy

  3  

NRSG 610 - Health Care Informatics

  3  
Year 2 Credits
  Fall Spring Summer

HTR 5xx - Food Innovation and Entrepreneurship

     3

Montana Dietetic Internship (MDI)

NUTR 591 - Food Systems Leadership for Nutrition Professionals

3    

NUTR 598 - Dietetic Professionalism/Supervised Practice

3    

NUTR 598 - Dietetic Professionalism/Supervised Practice

  6  

 

Supervised Practice Sample Schedule MS/DI and Non-Degree Graduate DI Tracks

MDI interns from either track complete two weeks of program orientation/professional development and four weeks of sustainable food systems introduction and practicum in Bozeman beginning in late July or early August of each year. During this time, they will receive an overview of program policies, procedures, expectations and logistics; complete assessments for cultural competency and knowledge; review content for Clinical Nutrition, Foodservice Management, Community Nutrition and Sustainable Food Systems. In addition, they will hear presentations by state and local experts and participate in various field trips and tours across the state. Interns will then proceed to supervised practice rotations in a variety of facilities across the state of Montana or Wyoming through early June of the following year. Each intern will have unique, but coordinated and similar experience in rotations to complete the required supervised practice hours. The final week of the internship will include attendance at the Montana Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics (MTAND) annual Food and Nutrition Summit (FANS), plus a graduation celebration.

Following is a summary with descriptors of potential supervised practice hours (SPH):

2 weeks Orientation/Professional Development Projects                                     

70 hours  (20 hrs SP)            

8 weeks Community Nutrition   280 hours
Sustainable Foods Syststems (SFS) Concentration    
Foundation Work (2 wks)  
SFS Applied - Towne’s Harvest/ Campus/Community (2 wks)  
Community Rotations    
Various (i.e., MSU Extension, Team Nutrition, IHS, NCAT, University Community, HHD Child Development Center, Farm to School, etc.) (2 wks)  
Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) (2 wks)  
 9 weeks Food Service Management   315 hours
Office of Public Instruction (OPI) (2 wks)  
K-12/University Food Service (2 wks)  
Large Hospital Food Service (3 wks)  
Food Bank or Non-profit (i.e., NCAT, Food-Hubs and Coalitions, etc.) (2 wks)  
16 weeks Clinical Nutrition   560 hours
Comprehensive Care Facilities (14 wks)  
(Depending on cluster may include VA Hospital, private pay or children’s hospital, long-term care, etc.)    
Rural Health    
Critical Access Hospital (2 wks)  
4 weeks Self-Select Rotation   140 hours
Potential Out of State or International    
Potential Clinical Rotation: Eating Disorders; Mental Health; Bariatric Surgery; Sports/Wilderness    
Potential Food Service Rotation: Restaurant; Chef, Dept. of Corrections    
Potential Community Rotation: Human Resource Council; Child Nutrition Programs; Marketing/Media OR Business/Industry; Policy Legislation; Hunger/Food Insecurity    
Potential Sustainable Food Systems: Farm production; Non-profits, Agricultural Business    
1-week Final Evaluation/Graduation   35 hours 
     
TOTAL WEEKS:   40 wks
TOTAL SUPERVISED PRACTICE HOURS:   1315 hours
TOTAL PROGRAM HOURS:   1400 hours

 

Self-Select Rotation

The self-selected experience will be an opportunity for interns to further their experience in foodservice management, community nutrition, clinical nutrition, sustainable food systems, or other area of interest. The intern, with assistance from the program directors and preceptors, will design the experience and establish goals to achieve during the 4 weeks. Further information about self-select rotations will be provided during the orientation period while in Bozeman, MT, and the final planning will occur at mid-point during the internship.   

The following is a general program schedule indicating number of potential weeks, location, facility type, and rotation:

    Week

Geographical location or Cluster site

Facility

Rotation Comment
1-2 Bozeman MSU Orientation/Professional Development All Interns
3-4 Bozeman MSU Sustainable Food Systems Foundation All Interns

5-6: SFS Group 1

7-8: SFS Group 2

9-10: SFS Group 3

11-12: SFS Group 4

Bozeman MSU Sustainable Food Systems Practicum Each subgroup will be placed in the SFS practicum for two weeks.

5-6: SFS Group 2

5-8: SFS Group 3

5-10: SFS Group 4

Bozeman, surrounding region  Varies FSM, Clinical or Community Nutrition or related experience Groups not in the SFS practicum will complete rotations in the Bozeman area.

7-35: Group 1

9-35: Group 2

11-35: Group 3

13-35: Group 4

Placement track Varies FSM, Clinical or Community Nutrition or related experience After the SFS practicum, interns complete remaining prescribed rotations in their area of placement. 

36 – 39

Self - Selected Rotations Various –selection dependent FSM, Clinical or Community Nutrition or related experience Intern determines and arranges their own rotations.

40

Bozeman, Billings or Helena depending on year Assessment, evaluation and graduation     The last week of the internship will be used to complete knowledge & skill assessments, RD examination preparation, program evaluation, and graduation procedures.

Graduation and program completion requirements MS/DI and Non-Degree Graduate DI

Following successful completion of their supervised practice and final assessment, interns are eligible to take the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) exam to become credentialed and begin practicing as a dietitian in a variety of settings. Successful completion of supervised practice hours and final assessment is defined as:

  1. Ratings of 4 out of 5 (80%) on rotation evaluations
  2. Successful completion of all weekly workshops and other assignments during program orientation, internship and final assessment
  3. Master log record to verify the completion of 1315 supervised practice hours
  4. MS/DI students – satisfactory completion of the MS online coursework

Upon presenting proof of successful DI program completion, the intern will be presented with a Verification Statement for supervised practice and eligible to sit for the registration exam. Upon successful completion of the MS online coursework the MS/DI student will also be awarded a MS in Dietetic Systems Leadership.

Professional Behavior Guidelines

Lifestyle, Professional Attire, and Conduct

Interns have the opportunity to set a good example to their patients and clients by leading a healthy lifestyle.  Dietetic interns not only study appropriate nutrition, exercise, and rest habits, but should practice them as well.

Because dietitians and dietetic interns present a particular image to the patient, a neat, professional appearance is very important. In some situations, certain attire is recommended or required. Check with the supervisor at each facility for specific requirements for professional attire and conduct. 

In foodservice areas, enclosed shoes are required and those with non-skid rubber or crepe soles are required.

Nametags should be worn when in the clinical, foodservice facilities and community nutrition sites. Whenever in a foodservice area, a hair restraint must be worn with hair worn off the shoulders and securely pinned away from the face. Interns should wear a hairnet or cap in these locations if required by the facility. Avoid perfume/cologne in all rotations and wear only modest colored nail polish. Use of tobacco products is not recommended and should be avoided completely during supervised practice hours. Refer to the Montana Tobacco Quit Line for free cessation assistance www.QuitNowMontana.com. Only non-dangling, non-obtrusive earrings (maximum of two in each ear) can be worn in clinical, community or foodservice areas. Tattoos and body piercing should not be visible during any lab or supervised practice. 

Professional attire is expected for tours, guest speakers, health fairs, and professional meetings or anytime you are representing MDI. Because you will work in professional settings, your best guideline is conservative dress. Interns need to avoid wearing tight-fitting clothes, extremes in fashion, or torso revealing clothes. Professional attire for women includes medium length skirts and dresses and/or dress slacks coordinated with appropriate top and/or jacket. Professional attire for men includes dress slacks, shirt and, when appropriate, a tie. Because of the importance of professional dress to your future career and job prospects, this issue will also be discussed during MDI Program Orientation.

Guidelines for Clinical, Community and Foodservice Management Facilities

  1. Do not chew gum or use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs while in clinical, community or foodservice facilities.
  2. All hospital-related materials and information are confidential. Do not discuss any patient information in any public place/space, especially elevators, lounges, cafeterias or social media. Use only initials when referring to patients in written case studies, reports, or logbooks. Do not repeat gossip or discuss personality conflicts with co-workers. All information obtained through patient assessment and clinical rounds is to remain strictly confidential. Sharing of information with the preceptor or appropriate health professional should only be done in a private location and not in a public area.
  3. Microorganisms are more prevalent in the hospital; therefore, avoid mouth contact with hands, pencils, etc.
  4. Telephones in the clinical facilities are for business purposes ONLY. Cellular phones are to be turned off during any presentations, meetings, and supervised practice times.
  5. Conversation should be kept at a minimum and at a discreet volume while moving through hallways and patient areas within a clinical facility.
  6. Arrive at the clinical facility before the stated time to start work. This allows time to be prepared for your daily tasks. Be sure that the clinical instructor or preceptor knows your general whereabouts when in the clinical facility. It is the intern’s responsibility to call the facility and the preceptor if unable to arrive as scheduled.
  7. Supervised practice hours for clinical experiences meet the minimum ACEND requirements. If clinical clock hours are missed at any time, the intern must complete those hours at another arranged time. Extra hours accumulated during the clinical rotation can be considered to replace some “missed" clinical hours, but this is at the discretion of the preceptor and director.
  8. As a professional courtesy, preceptors and instructors are to be addressed by their appropriate title (Doctor, Professor, Miss, Mrs., or Mr.).

Code of Ethics in Dietetics for the Nutrition and Dietetics Profession

Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics (AND) and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR)

When providing services, the nutrition and dietetics practitioner adheres to the core values of customer focus, integrity, innovation, social responsibility, and diversity. Science-based decisions, derived from the best available research and evidence, are the underpinnings of ethical conduct and practice.  

This Code applies to nutrition and dietetics practitioners who act in a wide variety of capacities, provides general principles and specific ethical standards for situations frequently encountered in daily practice. The primary goal is the protection of the individuals, groups, organizations, communities, or populations with whom the practitioner works and interacts.  

The nutrition and dietetics practitioner supports and promotes high standards of professional practice, accepting the obligation to protect clients, the public and the profession; upholds the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and its credentialing agency the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) Code of Ethics for the Nutrition and Dietetics Profession; and shall report perceived violations of the Code through established processes.

The Academy/CDR Code of Ethics for the Nutrition and Dietetics Profession establishes the principles and ethical standards that underlie the nutrition and dietetics practitioner’s roles and conduct. All individuals to whom the Code applies are referred to as “nutrition and dietetics practitioners”. By accepting membership in the Academy and/or accepting and maintaining CDR credentials, all nutrition and dietetics practitioners agree to abide by the Code. 

Principles and Standards:

  1. Competence and professional development in practice (Non-maleficence)
    1. Nutrition and dietetics practitioners shall:
      1. Practice using an evidence-based approach within areas of competence, continuously develop and enhance expertise, and recognize limitations.
      2. Demonstrate in depth scientific knowledge of food, human nutrition and behavior.
      3. Assess the validity and applicability of scientific evidence without personal bias.
      4. Interpret, apply, participate in and/or generate research to enhance practice, innovation, and discovery
      5. Make evidence-based practice decisions, taking into account the unique values and circumstances of the patient/client and community, in combination with the practitioner’s expertise and judgment.
      6. Recognize and exercise professional judgment within the limits of individual qualifications and collaborate with others, seek counsel, and make referrals as appropriate.
      7. Act in a caring and respectful manner, mindful of individual differences, cultural, and ethnic diversity.
      8. Practice within the limits of their scope and collaborate with the inter-professional team
  2. Integrity in personal and organizational behaviors and practices (Autonomy)
    1. Nutrition and dietetics practitioners shall: 

      1. Disclose any conflicts of interest, including any financial interests in products or services that are recommended. Refrain from accepting gifts or services which potentially influence, or which may give the appearance of influencing professional judgment.
      2. Comply with all applicable laws and regulations, including obtaining/maintaining a state license or certification if engaged in practice governed by nutrition and dietetics statutes.
      3. Maintain and appropriately use credentials.
      4. Respect intellectual property rights, including citation and recognition of the ideas and work of others, regardless of the medium (e.g. written, oral, electronic).
      5. Provide accurate and truthful information in all communications.
      6. Report inappropriate behavior or treatment of a patient/client by another nutrition and dietetics practitioner or other professionals.
      7. Document, code and bill to most accurately reflect the character and extent of delivered services.
      8. Respect patient/client’s autonomy. Safeguard patient/client confidentiality according to current regulations and laws.
      9. Implement appropriate measures to protect personal health information using appropriate techniques (e.g., encryption).
  3. Professionalism (Beneficence) 
    1. Nutrition and dietetics practitioners shall: 
      1. Participate in and contribute to decisions that affect the well-being of patients/clients.
      2. Respect the values, rights, knowledge, and skills of colleagues and other professionals.
      3. Demonstrate respect, constructive dialogue, civility and professionalism in all communications, including social media.
      4. Refrain from communicating false, fraudulent, deceptive, misleading, disparaging or unfair statements or claims.
      5. Uphold professional boundaries and refrain from romantic relationships with any patients/clients, surrogates, supervisees, or students.
      6. Refrain from verbal/physical/emotional/sexual harassment.
      7. Provide objective evaluations of performance for employees, coworkers, and students and candidates for employment, professional association memberships, awards, or scholarships, making all reasonable efforts to avoid bias in the professional evaluation of others.
      8. Communicate at an appropriate level to promote health literacy.
      9. Contribute to the advancement and competence of others, including colleagues, students, and the public. 
  4. Social responsibility for local, regional, national, global nutrition and well-being (Justice)
    1. Nutrition and dietetics practitioners shall:
      1. Collaborate with others to reduce health disparities and protect human rights.

      2. Promote fairness and objectivity with fair and equitable treatment.

      3. Contribute time and expertise to activities that promote respect, integrity, and competence of the profession.

      4. Promote the unique role of nutrition and dietetics practitioners.

      5. Engage in service that benefits the community and to enhance the public’s trust in the profession.

      6. Seek leadership opportunities in professional, community, and service organizations to enhance health and nutritional status while protecting the publicServsafe® and CPR Certification

All interns are required to obtain Servsafe® certification or its equivalent prior to admittance and approved CPR course.

Criminal Background Check

Before being placed in supervised practice facilities, interns are required to have background checks conducted by CastleBranch. The background checks include criminal and public record searches Montana statewide, counties resided in outside of the state, and Fraud & Abuse Control Information Systems (FACIS) checks. https://www.castlebranch.com/.  

Drug Screening

Before beginning clinical rotations, interns will complete a 10-panel urine drug test. The screening will be ordered on CastleBranch and conducted at a local facility. 

Medical Examination, Tests and Immunizations

Entrance into MDI is contingent upon the satisfactory completion of a thorough medical examination. Hospital facilities require various laboratory tests and immunization records which will be uploaded to and maintained by CastleBranch. Details are provided to interns after enrollment.

Program and Preceptor Evaluation

At the completion of a site rotation, student interns are asked to electronically submit preceptor and program evaluation feedback forms of supervised practice experiences (MDI Intern Evaluation of Preceptor; Appendix A). This assists faculty in improving the program and responding to interns' concerns, while also providing interns with evaluation experience.

EHHD Guidelines for Graduate Students 

The following guidelines have been developed to facilitate your progress from admission through graduation. Responsibilities are outlined regarding the role of the student, the committee chair, and the graduate committee. The MS/DI program track is a Plan C: Coursework only master’s degree. A thesis/capstone project is not required.

Responsibilities

Role of the Student

To reiterate, all graduate students in our department are matriculated into The Graduate School and design their program of study within the Department of Health and Human Development. Consequently, students must follow and meet the expectations and policies of both The Graduate School and our department.

The Graduate School requires that by the end of the second semester, a graduate committee be formed and a Program of Study be filed in their office. Students failing to submit a program of study by this date will be seen as failing to achieve satisfactory progress. Consequently, the student will be placed on academic probation and will become ineligible for financial aid, including graduate assistantships and work study. The chair of a student’s committee is usually the leader for the major area of study. Additionally, two other committee members are selected in consultation with the student's chair. Signatures on your program of study are also required from the department head and the dean.

Within the limits of university regulations and program requirements, the student is the chief architect of his/her program of study. The student must be aware of all procedures, forms, and deadlines required by the department and The Graduate School. His/Her chair and committee are available for guidance and consultation. Please consult The Graduate School’s website for forms and specific information.

It is the student's responsibility to arrange periodic conferences with his/her chair to review progress and deal with questions that may arise. It is expected students will meet with their chair at least once each semester to review their progress and plan the next semester's course work and activities.

Registration Information

In order to register, you will first need an advisor code (AKA “PIN”). New incoming students: please see admission letter for the PIN number to use in both summer and fall semesters; in the future, your PIN will be available for you during preregistration for each successive semester in DegreeWorks. DegreeWorks is available by logging into MyInfo with your NetID at https://prodmyinfo.montana.edu/pls/bzagent/twbkwbis.P_GenMenu?name=homepage.

From time to time, faculty will distribute e-mail messages to your MSU e-mail account. One is automatically set up for you when you register for classes. You are expected to check this account for important messages but can forward it to your preferred e-mail address if you wish.

Incoming students are often interested to know if there are any activities that they can undertake before the first day of classes. Faculty will expect students to read this graduate handbook. It is recommended that the guidelines be reviewed before the start of classes. Fall semester in your first year can be very busy and you may find it to be a struggle to read the handbook later.

Role of the Committee Chair

The chair helps you plan your program and serves as a liaison between you, the team coordinator, and The Graduate School. The chair advises you in selecting committee members with reference to faculty expertise that will be most helpful to your objectives.

The chair has a responsibility to be available for periodic consultations with you. During these consultations, the chair will review your concerns and assist you in planning future activities.

Role of the Graduate Committee

The purpose of the graduate committee is to provide guidance and protect your interests throughout the completion of the graduate program. The committee has the responsibility of approving your program of study. The committee also has a duty to observe the standards and protect the interests of the university regarding the academic quality of work being done under its supervision.

The committee consists of the chairperson plus a minimum of two additional committee members selected by you and your chair. One committee member may be from off-campus but must have a terminal degree in the appropriate field, have a letter of support from the department head and a curriculum vita on file with the Graduate School.

If a committee member must be replaced, the new member is bound by the agreements of the previous committee. Any professor who disagrees with prior agreements should not accept an assignment to that committee.

Program of Study

The Program of Study and Committee form is due by end of second semester in the program. MS/DI students will follow a set curriculum and coursework must be completed sequentially unless special arrangements are made with the program director.

Program credit requirements are determined by the Graduate School, your chosen track, AND your committee. The base credit requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 30 credits are required for a master’s degree,
  2. A minimum of 21 credits must be 500 level or higher,
  3. A maximum of 9 400-level credits may be used.

A program of study can be changed following initial submission. If the program changes after you have submitted your Program of Study form, then you must submit a Program of Study Revision form.

The program of study is based on the student’s needs, professional requirements, and departmental requirements.

Graduate School Policies

University Bulletin Policies

All graduate students in our programs are expected to review the policies and procedures for successful completion of master's degrees in the current MSU Bulletin. This information can also be found on The Graduate School’s webpage at http://www.montana.edu/gradschool/.

Grading Policy

The department maintains high academic standards for admission and retention in the program. Careful evaluation of students' performance and feedback to students are seen as essential components of a quality graduate education. Assigned grades for course work is one important form of feedback students receive. Grading criteria vary across several considerations (type of course content, length of course, number of credits, etc.). In general, grades reflect the following range of assessments of students' performance in a course:

Excellent to outstanding performance. “A” is the highest grade possible and is an indication of an outstanding level of performance. “A-” is considered to be an excellent level of performance. It is not expected that all students will achieve this level of performance, nor is it expected that students will achieve this in every course.

Good to very good performance. “B+” is considered very good performance, “B” is considered to be good performance. Grades of a “B” in graduate courses are not indicative of reservations about student's preparation for continuing in the program or entering the profession. “B-” is considered adequate performance; however, a B- may be indicative of some concerns. At times B- may result in remediation work.

Not the level of mastery expected in graduate education. Students earning “C” grades or lower will be required to repeat the course and/or do extra work to increase their mastery of the course material. Repeating the course and/or extra work may be required in courses that are considered essential to the students' continuation in the program and entry into the profession.

Inadequate mastery of course content. “D” grades may bring into question the appropriateness of the student continuing in the program and entering the profession. Repeating the course and/or extra work will be required.

Failure. “F” grades are cause to question the appropriateness of the student continuing in the program and entering the profession. If the student’s graduate committee decides that the student will be allowed to continue in the program, repeating the course and extra work will be required.

While grades are an important form of feedback and evaluation, they do not provide a complete picture of student performance. Grades serve as a single indicator for what is usually a complex array of performances. Also, one grade is usually required to cover a continuum of quality of performance. For example, “B” grades may be assigned for performance ranging from “adequate for graduate-level work” to “very good performance.” For this reason, it is important that students receive other forms of quantitative and qualitative feedback from faculty and peers (e.g., written comments, conferences, letters of recommendation, etc.).

Students are encouraged to seek additional feedback from faculty and peers in areas where they feel they would benefit from more information. Students are also encouraged to seek further information from faculty if they are uncertain about grading criteria or the meaning of a grade.

Leave of Absence, Withdrawal, and Problem Remediation of Graduate Students

Students wishing to withdraw from graduate school may to do so at any time. Please let your advisor know if you are withdrawing so that your position in the graduate program can be made available to another student. Students should contact The Graduate School to pursue the withdrawal procedure.

Students wishing to take a leave of absence need to reach an agreement with their chair concerning the leave. The student should write a letter to the chair describing the leave, and a copy should be filed with The Graduate School. The letter should include the reasons for the leave of absence and its duration.

Students who do not have an agreement for a leave of absence with their chair (and a letter documenting that agreement) and do not take classes for one semester will be withdrawn from the graduate program to allow opportunities for other students. Students who are withdrawn for nonattendance will need to reapply for admission to graduate school if they desire to resume their program.

Problems may arise regarding student progress through the graduate program. Potential problems include inadequate academic performance (grades lower than a “B”); inadequate skill development (lower than a “B” grade in competency development, practicum, and/or internship courses); inadequate progress on the graduate program (average of less than one sixth of the total credits needed to graduate completed per year); impairment of functioning (causes could include health problems, stress, mental illness, substance abuse and/or dependence); or violations of standards of ethical conduct. These and other problems will be addressed in the following manner:

First, the chair will discuss the problem with the student and develop plans for remediation. If the student is in agreement with the plans for remediation, then there will be a follow-up meeting at a designated time at which point progress regarding problem remediation will be assessed. The chair will keep documentation of the discussion addressing the problem and the discussion concerning progress and its remediation. If the student and the chair cannot reach an agreement about the problem in need of remediation, the manner in which the problem will be addressed, or an agreement about the assessment of progress in the remediation of the problem, the student will meet with the entire graduate committee. The student may also ask to meet with any other program faculty or the entire program faculty. If the student's committee is in agreement that the student is failing to remediate identified problems within an appropriate time span, the student may be counseled out of the graduate program and into alternative career or academic programs which are better suited to his/her needs and abilities. Students wishing to contest problem remediation plans, or being counseled to withdraw from the program may do so by following the university's student grievance procedures which are referenced in the MSU Bulletin.

Faculty Expectations of Students

Students pursuing a degree in a departmental master’s program are expected to develop their knowledge of facts, theories, and procedures in their field and related disciplines. In addition, students are expected to be able to think independently and utilize academic and professional resources. Students must learn to see themselves as part of a collaborative learning community that includes both higher education and community resources. Students must become proficient at understanding, analyzing, and critiquing their respective research knowledge base.

Students are expected to understand and participate in the process of ethical decision-making and to recognize professional and ethical challenges. Students should recognize and be able to make appropriate referrals, seek supervision when necessary, and accurately identify personal and professional limits.

Application for Advanced Degree

The Application for Advanced Degree must be filed early in the expected term of graduation. It is due to the Graduate School no later than the following dates: 

  • Fall: September 20
  • Spring: February 5
  • Summer: June 10

 

MDI Policies & Procedures 2020-2022

General Policies to Guarantee the Rights of the Student/Intern

Mutual Responsibility

Acceptance of a student/intern for participation in the MDI constitutes an agreement of mutual responsibility. The intern's part of this agreement is to accept and respect established MDI policies and rules, supervised practice facilities policies, The Academy’s Code of Ethics, the regulations of Montana State University-Bozeman, and to act responsibly and in a manner appropriate to these regulations and policies. Interns are requested to complete and sign student agreements prior to their program start date (Appendix B1; Intern Agreement for Participation in MDI) and before leaving for supervised practice rotations (Appendix B2; MDI Intern Responsibilities). As part of this mutual responsibility agreement, MDI directors and preceptors also agree to carry out their commitment to higher education and to provide interns high quality instruction and experiences (see Appendix B3; MDI Director Responsibilities).

University Policies and Procedures

Academic policies and procedures for MSU are available online at https://www.montana.edu/provost/students/ or the Montana State University Catalog and in the Schedule of Classes published each semester.

Intern recruitment
Policy: 

MDI will recruit all prospective students/interns without preference to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability or status as a Vietnam-era veteran.

Procedures:   
  1. The statement of equal rights will appear in all MDI information.
Intern admission
Policy:

Applications will be reviewed by the MDI Director and Assistant Directors. Applicants will be evaluated based on variety of factors including scholastic achievement, work/volunteer experience, professional references, leadership abilities and program fit.

Procedures:       

MDI Applicants

To be considered for admission, MDI applicants should meet the following criteria:

  1. Proof of a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics from an ACEND accredited program, or proof of a master’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics and/or related major from an accredited college or university is needed. Proof of earned degree will be provided by a final transcript. (Alternatively, prospective students may have earned a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field but completed post-baccalaureate didactic coursework in dietetics from an accredited college or university).
  2. Verification statement (or declaration of intent) from an accredited didactic program
  3. Preferred 100 hours of volunteer or work experience in food, nutrition and/or dietetics
  4. Three references from dietetic professionals, faculty and/or employers
  5. GRE is not required for MDI internship only program 

 

MS/DI Applicants

To be considered for admission, MS/DI applicants should meet the following criteria:

  1. Proof of a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics from an ACEND accredited program, or proof of a master’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics and/or related major from an accredited college or university is needed. Proof of earned degree will be provided by a final transcript. (Alternatively, prospective students may have earned a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field but completed post-baccalaureate didactic coursework in dietetics from an accredited college or university) 
  2. Preferred 100 hours of volunteer or work experience in food, nutrition and/or dietetics
  3. 3 references from dietetic professionals, faculty and/or employers
  4. An undergraduate GPA of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale). Applicants with post-baccalaureate experience must have a graduate GPA of at least 3.00
  5. PreferredGRE score above the 40th percentile in at least one of analytical, quantitative and/or verbal reasoning categories in one or more categories
    1. GRE scores should be sent to Montana State University, Campus Code 4488 
Policy:

Requirements for admission to MDI included proof of an accredited nutrition or dietetics-related education, food safety and CPR certifications, various forms of insurance, membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, immunizations, a clean drug screening and a criminal free background.

Procedures:

To be considered for admission to the MDI, the following degrees, statements and certifications are necessary. 

  1. Transcript(s) and verification statements are necessary for the application process.
  2. Once admitted to the program, proof of insurance,ServSafe and CPR certifications and a successful background check are needed to remain in the program. A detailed list of requirements follows:
    1. Proof of a bachelor’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics from a ACEND accredited program, or proof of a master’s degree in nutrition and/or dietetics and/or related major from an accredited college or university is needed. Proof of earned degree will be provided by a final official transcript.
    2. Verification statement from ACEND accredited Didactic Program (DP) in Nutrition and Dietetics or a completed Declaration of Intent to Complete Degree statement. 
    3. Proof of current health insurance, automobile insurance, a medical exam and immunizations.
    4. Current ServSafe certification or its equivalent and CPR certification.
    5. A successfully completed background check and drug screening.
    6. After receiving an invitation to enroll in the MDI, interns are responsible for enrolling by paying program fees and registration costs.
Policy:

Individuals accepting a match appointment with MDI will be required to complete background check. Background checks are done at the student/intern’s expense and findings submitted to the program director. 

Procedures:
  1. Applicants shall include in the ‘Background Section’ of their DICAS application any information that could appear in a background check. Background checks are comprehensive and can include findings such as all arrests and criminal charges even if dismissed, deferred, as well as expunged records.
  2. Discrepancies or self-reported disclosures reported on background checks will be evaluated individually by the MDI Director, MSU Health & Human Development Department Head, and Education, Health & Human Development Associate Dean, in consultation with the Dean, to determine whether the intern will be admitted to the program.
  3. The intern supervised practice sites will also be consulted.
  4. Failure to disclose a discrepancy could have worse consequences than not disclosing on DICAS if discovered later upon review of a background check report and may be cause for termination from the program.
Student Rights
Statement of Equal Rights

Your rights as a student at Montana State University - Bozeman are delineated in the MSU student conduct code, found on-line at: http://www.montana.edu/policy/student_conduct

Policy:

Montana State University - Bozeman protects student civil rights with the following statement of equal opportunity:

"It is Montana State University-Bozeman’s policy to prohibit and eliminate discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, or status as a Vietnam-era veteran. This policy applies to all program services and facilities, and includes, but is not limited to, applications, admission, access to programs and services, and employment. Such discrimination is prohibited by titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam ERA Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act Amendments of 1978, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Civil Rights Act of 1991, and other federal and state statutes and regulations”. Any questions and concerns about the application of these laws and regulations may be directed to the affirmative action officer; director of the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, or to the director, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, U.S. Department of Labor.”

MSU’s non-discrimination policy and procedures found on-line at:  http://www2.montana.edu/policy/affirmative_action/.  

Minimum wage ruling
Policy:

Students are supervised during a variety of experiences in several facilities; however, students are not employees within the meaning of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Procedures:

The U.S. Department of Labor publication entitled "Employment Relationship under the Fair Labor Standards Act," dated February 1973 indicates that interns are not employees if all of the following circumstances surrounding their activities apply:

  1. the training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the preceptor, is similar to that which would be given in a vocational school;
  2. the training is for the benefit of the interns;
  3. the interns do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation (i.e., the intern will consult with a preceptor before making a decision);
  4. the preceptor providing the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the interns, and on occasion his or her operations may actually be impeded;
  5. the interns are not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the training period; and
  6. the preceptors and the interns understand that the interns are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training.
Access to personal files
Policy:

Students/interns shall have access to their own personal files otherwise stored in a secure location.

Procedures:

Upon request, a student may view his/her personal file in the presence of the Program Director. Intern files will be kept in a secured location in the Program Director’s office.

Acknowledgement of University regional accreditation and related policies
Policy:

MSU is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) and is in good standing. MSU has been re-accredited in 2018 for another 7 years, following a self-study and NWCCU accreditation team visit (February 2018).

Procedures:

Interns may access the full accreditation report from NWCCU online at: http://www.montana.edu/accreditation/AccDocs.html  

Withdrawal and refund of tuition and fees
Policy:

Should a student withdraw from the program after enrolling, paying program fees, and beginning orientation, program fees are not refundable. 

Procedures:       
  1. Upon withdrawal from the program, the student will retrieve all personal items that might be stored in shared MDI space.
  2. The student will meet with the Program Director for an exit interview but cannot expect to receive a refund of fees paid to the University.
    1. The $1000 deposit paid to secure a spot in the program is non-refundable.
    2. The supervised application program fee is not refundable.
    3. Students will pay for graduate level credits on a semester basis. Refunds will be determined based on MSU tuition policies and deadlines for withdrawing from coursework.
Scheduling and Program Calendar
Policy:

Interns must follow the MDI rotation and coursework schedule provided by the Program Director.

Non-Degree Graduate DI Program Track

Orientation begins in late July/early August and rotations begin late-August. The DI only program concludes at the end of May (total program 40 weeks). There is a one-week vacation around Thanksgiving and a 2-week winter holiday. Other holidays per preceptor schedule, but not guaranteed.   

MS/DI Program Track

Students will enroll in graduate level courses starting the summer semester after acceptance into the program. Students will be enrolled in graduate level coursework for the first 4 semesters of the program and the schedule will follow the MSU academic calendar. Supervised practice will be completed during year 2 (Fall and Spring semesters) and will not follow the academic calendar.

Procedures:

The MDI Program Director will develop a supervised practice schedule for each intern enrolled in the program that includes sustainable food systems concentration, foodservice management, community nutrition, clinical nutrition, and self-selected rotations. 

MS/DI students will complete 39 graduate level credits. Courses should be completed in sequential order as defined by the program curriculum provided at the start of the program.

Access to MDI Program Handbook
Policy:

The MDI Program Handbook is available to prospective students and applicants on the MDI website. 

Procedures:

The MDI Program Directors will maintain the MDI Program Handbook. The most current version will be made available on the MDI web site. Once a student has been accepted into the program and completed an agreement to participate in MDI, he/she will be sent an electronic copy of the program handbook. 

Protection of private information
Policy:

Students shall be protected from improper disclosure of data from their disciplinary records.

Procedures:

Such data shall only be made available:

  1. in cases of legal compulsion,
  2. when the intern's written permission is secured, or
  3. to persons who are directly involved in the disciplinary proceedings established in the statement, and then only to the extent that consultation of the record is essential to determine the charge against the intern or to determine penalties, and
  4. provided that transcripts of academic record shall not contain information about disciplinary action except when such action affects the eligibility of the intern to continue as a member of MDI.
Policy:

Information about a student contained in academic and counseling records shall be considered confidential.

Procedures:

Information about the views, beliefs, and associations of students acquired by instructors and advisors may be released only with the written consent of the student. However, judgments of ability and character may be provided. Information accumulated in counseling interns on personal problems of a private or confidential nature shall be available only to those persons authorized by the student's written permission.

Information in academic and counseling records may be released only when:

  1. such release is legally compelled,
  2. the intern gives written authorization for such a release,
  3. faculty & preceptors have adequate reasons to consult records, or
  4. individual interns are neither identified nor identifiable in statistical summaries of academic records.
Access to support services, health, counseling, testing, and financial aid 
Support Services
Policy:

When on the main campus in Bozeman, students have access to academic support services necessary for completion of orientation and assignment activities.

Procedures:       
  1. The MDI Program Director will arrange access to necessary academic support services associated with the MDI program.
Financial Aid
Policy:

MDI students that are eligible for federal financial aid may apply for loans. Additionally, other assistance may be available to interns in the form of scholarships and short-term loans depending on individual eligibility.

Procedures: 
  1. Loan information and applications are available from the Office of Student Financial Aid Services located in the Student Union Building at MSU-Bozeman or on the MSU website at http://www.montana.edu/wwwfa/ . The MSU Financial Aid Office telephone number is (406) 994-2845. 
  2. Interns are also encouraged to apply directly to AND to be considered for their national scholarship programs.
Grievance about program
Policy:

If a student has a complaint about program policies, activities or actions, he or she may appeal through the Program Director. If the intern chooses not to confer with Program Director, he or she may proceed to consult with the Head of the Department of Health and Human Development.

Procedures: 
  1. Filing of the complaint: If a student experiences or observes a violation of program policies or has a complaint about an activity, he or she should document the incident (Incident Report, Appendix G) and compare to program policies. The Incident Report will be placed in the Program Assessment files. 
  2. Processing of complaint: If the student concludes that a program policy has been violated or actions are inappropriate for a professional, he or she will schedule an appointment (in person or phone) with the Program Director to discuss the incident or situation.        
  3. If the student has a complaint regarding actions of the Program Director, he or she may schedule an appointment (in person or phone) with the Head of the Department of Health and Human Development to discuss the incident or situation. 
  4. If the student does not resolve the issues, he or she may proceed to discuss the incident or situation with the Dean of the College of Education, Health and Human Development.
  5. If the issue cannot be resolved at the academic level, students have the right to file and discuss the report with the MDI Advisory Board. In this case, the Advisory Board will proceed to discuss and resolve the issue with the Program Director.
Policy:

If an intern deems reduction of a performance rating unfair by a preceptor, he or she may appeal through the Program Director or MDI Advisory Board. 

Procedures:
  1. If an intern receives a low performance rating that he or she can document is unfair, he or she can report the discrepancy with the Program Director. 
  2. The Program Director will meet (in person or phone call) with the intern to investigate the performance in relationship to the rating. Documentation will include dates of supervised practice, meeting with preceptor, required assignments, professional behaviors, and the performance rating (rubrics).
  3. The Program Director will follow-up with a phone conference with the preceptor to clarify requirements of assignments, professional behavior and performance rating.
  4. After conferring with other MSU faculty, the Program Director will either support or not support the performance rating. Reasons for the decision will be presented to the intern.
  5. If the intern does not agree with the assessment and the preceptor is not receiving a stipend from MSU, he or she may consult with the MDI Advisory Board. 
  6. If the intern does not agree with the assessment and the preceptor is receiving a stipend from MSU, he or she may proceed to confer with the Head of the Department of Health and Human Department.
  7. If the intern does not resolve the issue, he or she may proceed to discuss the incident or situation with the Dean of the College of Education, Health and Human Development.
Policy:

A complaint about the standards, policies, and procedures of the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) may be submitted by any individual, for example, student, faculty, dietetics practitioner, and/or member of the general public.

Procedures:
  1. ACEND should only be contacted for complaints related to program non- compliance with accreditation standards after all other options with the program have been exhausted.
  2. A copy of the accreditation standards and/or the Commission’s policy and procedure for submission of complaints may be obtained from the Program Director or by contacting ACEND.
  3. Complaints can be submitted to:

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190

Chicago, IL 60606-6995

Phone: 800.877.1600, ext. 5400

e-mail: [email protected] 

Academic Policies
Intern Accountability
Policy:

The intern is expected to follow all procedures related to academic issues in preparation as a future food and nutrition professional.  Behaviors exhibited in the academic settings are also those expected in the professional setting.

Procedures:
  1. Read all policies and procedures contained in the Program Handbook.
  2. Program policies and procedures will be reviewed during Program Orientation.  Ask questions if any policy or procedure is unclear.

 

Specifics related to intern accountability:

Attendance

  1. Attendance is mandatory and required for all supervised practice experiences.
  2. Arrive at the clinical facility prior to the start time for supervised practice.
  3. Check in with your assigned preceptor to review daily goals and assignments.

 

Professional Courtesy and Behavior

  1. Professional behavior and respect for others and diverse viewpoints are expected at all times.

 

Assignments

  1. Written work should be typed and professional in appearance. This includes using adequate margins in spacing, as well as correct grammar, spelling, and referencing.
  2. If not specified, formatting will include: Times Roman font, font size – 12, single spaced paragraphs, double spaces between paragraphs, 1-inch margins and paginated. 
  3. The correct referencing format is found in each January issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Look for Authors’ Guidelines to locate the referencing requirements. 

 

Late Assignments

  1. Interns are expected to complete all assignments in accordance with the oral and written directions from directors, faculty and preceptors by verbally stated or written due dates.
  2. The score for any unexcused late assignment may be subject to a late penalty.
  3. Consequence for non-submittal of an assignment may include probation or termination in the program.

 

Missed Exams and Assignments

  1. If an intern must miss an examination or assignments due to illness or an unexpected event, the intern is required to contact the Program Director or preceptor before the exam or assignment is due.
  2. If an intern misses an examination or assignment, a late penalty may occur if the reason is not deemed reasonable by the Program Director or prior notice was not given for the absence.

 

Travel

  1. An intern's travel time to clinical, foodservice, and community facilities or practicum sites does not count as either preparation time or supervised practice.
  2. Time during daily inter-site travel is considered to be acceptable supervised practice time.
  3. It is highly recommended that each intern possesses a reliable car for travel during the internship. Due to rural nature of Montana and distance between supervised practice facilities, public transportation is not a reasonable option.
  4. Each intern is responsible for maintaining his/her own current car insurance policy. Proof of insurance is required at the beginning of the internship.
  5. Students are liable for maintaining his/her own car as well as making sure that insurance is kept up to date.

 

Injuries or Illness

  1. If an intern is injured or becomes ill during supervised practice, he or she should immediately seek medical assistance or leave the facility to recover.
  2. Contact your preceptor to inform him or her of your condition and status.
  3. If ill, do not expose clients, patients, or employees by continuing to work in the facility.
  4. Any time that is missed during the supervised practice rotation due to injury or illness needs to be re-scheduled.  This will ensure successful completion of required number of supervised practice hours.
  5. Confer with your preceptor to reschedule supervised practice time and inform the Program Director of the situation and plans to complete the supervised practice hours.
  6. Program Director must be informed all illness the day of incident or as soon as reasonably possible

 

Holidays and Vacation

  1. MS/DI students will follow the academic calendar for the first 4 semesters of online coursework. During the second year, MS/DI will follow the holiday schedule for MDI interns as noted below.
  2. Interns will follow the clinical schedule in their respective facility in regard to state and national holidays. Since dietitians are often scheduled during holidays, interns should expect that they may also need to work during a holiday.
  3. No individual vacation is provided during the MDI’s 40-week rotation schedule. However, interns typically have one week in November and two weeks in December off.

 

Outside Employment

  1. MDI involves very comprehensive and intensive supervised practice experiences in different locations.
  2. Demands on interns' time and frequent moving to different locations are such that it would be very difficult to be successfully engaged in supervised practice and hold an outside job simultaneously.
  3. Because the primary goal of the program is to have interns succeed, directors and preceptors strongly discourage interns from working an outside job.
Intern Schedule
Policy:

The Program Director will provide interns with personal schedules that will appropriately place them in the facilities located in the various cluster areas in the state.  A general outline of the internship schedule is found on page 14 of the MDI Handbook.

Procedures:

The Program Director, in consultation with preceptors with major rotations, will review applications, intern personal goals to appropriately schedule interns in the affiliated facilities.

  1. The Program Director will discuss the planned schedules with individual interns.
  2. The Program Director reserves the right to change the schedule as needed and will notify the intern of any changes.
Supervised Practice Hours
Policy:

Interns will complete 1315 supervised practice hours throughout the duration of the program. Additional program hours will be completed during the initial orientation and professional development weeks.

Procedure: 
  1. Interns are required to notify the MDI Program Director if any days of supervised practice are missed due to illness or injury. 
  2. Any time that is missed during the supervised practice rotation due to injury or illness needs to be re-scheduled.  This will ensure successful completion of required number of supervised practice hours
Professional Policies and Procedures                                                                                            
AND and MTAND memberships
Policy:

To fully develop as a food and nutrition professional, membership and participation in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is highly desirable; therefore, membership as a student or active member in the dietetic professional organization is required.   

Procedure:
  1. To obtain professional membership, the easiest method is to go to the Student section of the Academy website (http://www.eatright.org/students/join/) and follow the guidelines.
  2. Membership in AND automatically makes the intern a member of his or her affiliate/state association. Interns need to ensure that their affiliate is Montana.
Professional meeting attendance
Policy:

Interns may attend an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Food and Nutrition Conference and Exhibition or other state dietetic meetings during supervised practice.  Attendance needs approval by the preceptor and Program Director. 

Procedures:
  1. If the intern wishes to attend a dietetic meeting in his or her home state, access to their respective state’s website would also be appropriate.  FNCE information can be accessed at http://www.eatright.org
  2. Meeting registration, lodging and travel costs are the responsibility of the intern.
  3. Meeting attendance and participation may be counted as supervised practice hours.
Policy:

Interns may attend other dietetic-related meetings during supervised practice.  Attendance needs approval by preceptor and Program Director.

Procedures:
  1. If a dietetic-related meeting occurs during supervised practice, an intern may request time to attend the meeting.
  2. To gain approval for attendance, requirements include:
  3. intern’s preceptor approves the attendance;
  4. the meeting is related to the intern’s current rotation;
  5. time spent at the dietetic-related meeting will count as FNCE or an affiliate state meeting and as supervised practice; and
  6. meeting registration, lodging and travel are incurred by the intern; and
  7. all supervised practice assignments are to be completed prior to attendance to the meeting; and
  8. an oral report is presented to the preceptor upon return, and summary sent to the Program Director.
Insurance – Professional Liability
Policy: 

Since clinical facilities require that all students have malpractice liability insurance, each intern is covered under the MSU Student Professional Liability Insurance.

Procedures:

MSU provides proof of liability insurance when requested by supervised practice facilities.

Internship Program Policies

Liability for safety in travel
Policy:

Safety during travel is of prime importance to MDI interns.  Due to the distances to be traveled during this internship, attention to safe driving will be stressed.

Procedures:
  1. During Program Orientation, interns will receive information about travel in Montana and safe driving tips.
Policy:

MDI interns are required to obtain car and accident insurance prior to participating in supervised practice in affiliated facilities.

Procedures:
  1. Submit proof of insurance to the Program Director within 2 weeks during Program Orientation.
Injury or illness during Supervised Practice rotations
Policy:

Safe behavior and good health are important to optimal performance during supervised practice; however, it is recognized that one can be injured or become ill on or off-site.  If injured or ill during a supervised practice rotation, the intern will schedule additional time to complete the required number of supervised practice hours.

Procedures:
  1. If an intern is injured or becomes ill during supervised practice, he or she should immediately seek medical assistance or leave the facility to recover.
  2. The preceptor should be contacted to inform him or her of the condition and status.
  3. If ill, the intern should not expose clients, patients, or employees by continuing to work in the facility.
  4. Any time that is missed during the supervised practice rotation due to injury or illness needs to be re-scheduled.  This will ensure successful completion of required number of supervised practice hours.
  5. The preceptor should be contacted to reschedule supervised practice time, and Program Director should be appraised of the situation and plans to complete the supervised practice hours.
Substance Screening
Policy:

MDI requires a urine substance screen for all interns per facility onboarding procedures.

Procedures:
  1. Before being placed in supervised practice facilities, interns are required to have urine substance screening facilitated by CastleBranch. 
  2. Information will be given to interns to obtain the required tests.
  3. All costs associated with the urine substance testing are the responsibility of the student.
  4. Positive Substance Screen: A Positive substance screen will be confirmed by the Medical Review Officer (MRO) from theCASTLEBRANCH® approved drug testing laboratory.
    1. Interns with a positive substance screen can anticipate, per rotation facility policy, not being able to complete supervised practice at that site.
    2. Interns with a positive substance screen will meet with MDI Directors and EHHD Assistant Dean/Director of Student Success to determine course of action including potential dismissal from the MDI program.
Criminal background checks

Note:  This information is also found in general program information.

Policy:

Affiliation agreements with facilities contain requirements that interns coming into facilities do not have a criminal record; therefore, a background check is required to participate in supervised practice. 

Procedures:
  1. Before being placed in supervised practice facilities, interns are required to have background checks conducted by CastleBranch. The background checks include criminal and public record searches Montana statewide, counties resided in outside of the state, and Fraud & Abuse Control Information Systems (FACIS) checks.  https://www.castlebranch.com/.
Educational purpose of Supervised Practice to prevent use of students to replace employees

Note:  This policy is also listed under Intern Rights, specifically Minimum Wage Ruling.           

Policy:

Interns are supervised during a variety of experiences in several facilities; however, students are not employees within the meaning of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Procedures:

The U.S. Department of Labor publication entitled "Employment Relationship under the Fair Labor Standards Act," dated February 1973 indicates that interns are not employees if all of the following circumstances surrounding their activities apply:

  1. the training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the preceptor, is similar to that which would be given in a vocational school;
  2. the training is for the benefit of the interns;
  3. the interns do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation (i.e., the intern will consult with a preceptor before making a decision);
  4. the preceptor providing the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the interns, and on occasion his or her operations may actually be impeded;
  5. the interns are not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the training period; and
  6. the preceptors and the interns understand that the interns are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training.
Filing and Handling Complaints from interns and preceptors
Policy:

The MDI Program Director will be responsible for filing and handling complaints from interns and preceptors.             

Procedures:

The MDI Program Director will hear complaints from interns and preceptors and keep a record of all complaints in secure program files. 

Assessment of prior learning and credit toward program requirements 
Policy:

MDI recognizes that interns may have prior experiences that equate planned activities during supervised practice; therefore, will grant credit for those experiences and provide alternative, higher level experiences to support continued growth as a professional.

Procedures:

To award credit for supervised practice completed at other schools, interns need to provide the following information: name and level of course, pre-requisite courses, course syllabus, and name of course text, if applicable.

Evaluation of equivalency of prior education or experiences
Policy:

The Program Director, in consultation with MDI faculty and preceptors, will evaluate and award credit for prior education and/or work experiences.

Procedures:
  1. To evaluate and give credit for prior work experience, students need to provide the length of time (dates, number of hours), names and qualifications of supervisors, and detailed description of the experience.  A set of experiences may only be used for one exempted rotation.  
  1. Faculty and preceptors will compare the experience to MDI supervised experiences and decide whether or not to accept the request to credit the experience toward the number of required supervised practice hours.
Recency of Education
Policy:

Completion of all requirements for the Didactic Program (DP) in Nutrition and Dietetics from an ACEND accredited program must be completed within the past five years.   

Procedures:
  1. An original, signed copy of the DP Verification Statement must be given to the Program Director before the start of MDI in August.
  1. If the date on the DP Verification Statement is more than 5 years prior to the starting year of the internship, the applicant must take or have taken 9 credits in advanced level dietetics related coursework within the last 5 years at a university with an approved DP or coordinated program. At least three of the nine credits must be in medical nutrition therapy.  Documentation of the plan for the nine credits or completion of those credits must be included in the application packet. Documentation of successful completion of the coursework must be provided before the start of the program.

Supervised Practice Placement

Policy:

It is the goal of program faculty to appropriately place interns in the most suitable supervised practice experience.

Procedures:
  1. Program directors, in conjunction with facility preceptors, decide the placement of interns in supervised practice sites during the summer, after students have committed to the internship.  Except for the Self-Selected rotation, interns do not arrange their own clinical/community/foodservice management rotations for supervised practice.
  2. Student interns will provide a letter (email) of introduction to each preceptor contact prior to the first day of a rotation.  The letter will provide contact information, perceived strengths and weakness, and expectations for the upcoming rotation (see Appendix C – Letter of Introduction).
  3. Students will complete a self-evaluation form for both clinical, community and foodservice experiences within their Competency Log which is in line with the foundation knowledge and competencies for dietitian education (see Appendix D and E; Updated Version 1.04 of the 2008 Foundation Knowledge and Competencies for Dietitian Education and MDI Intern Competency Log).  Students should compile this information as they progress throughout the internship.
  4. A number of policies apply to supervised practice:
    1. After program orientation, each intern will complete a minimum rotation of 37 weeks, approximately 40 hours per week, in each major emphasis area, with a 6-week self-selected rotation.
    2. The assigned schedule may vary each week, but interns will be prepared to work the assigned shift, early or late, and the assigned days, including weekends.
    3. As a professional, no time clock is punched. Interns remain on the job for the amount of time required to complete the assigned responsibilities for the day.
    4. The final evaluation for each rotation is mutually determined by facility preceptor(s) in consultation with university faculty
      (see Appendix F).
Formal assessment of intern learning
Policy:

MDI will assess interns’ learning and skill attainment on a regular basis throughout the internship.

Procedures:
  1. At the MTAND annual meeting and with the help of AND’s preceptor training program, preceptors will be oriented to appropriately evaluate an intern’s knowledge and skill during supervised practice.
  2. Prior to interns arriving at their facilities, preceptors will receive evaluation rubrics to be used for intern evaluation.
  3. The MDI Competency and Intern Evaluation for Supervised Practice form (see Appendix F) will initially be used as an introductory negotiation piece for intern and preceptor to express expectations and standards of performance.  The form will then be used at post-rotation to provide feedback and evaluation to the intern and at mid-rotation for longer experiences.
  4. During the assessment, preceptors will share their assessment with the Program Director, discuss their assessments with the intern, and the Program Director will follow-up with the intern to discuss evaluation and plans to improve or maintain performance.
Performance and progress reports
Policy:

All performance and progress reports will be discussed, reviewed, and then filed as part of a permanent record for the intern.

Procedures:
  1. After meeting with the intern, the preceptor will electronically send the evaluation to the Program Director.
  2. The Program Director will electronically save the report; all performance and progress reports will be saved in individual electronic intern files.
Self-Selected Rotations

For all self-selected rotations, including international rotations, interns will complete a Self-Selected rotation form detailing the proposed learning objectives and outcome measures, what core competencies to be addressed during the experience and the types of activities proposed. 

Policy: 

Interns will plan 6 weeks of their internship experience, called “self –selected rotations.”

Procedures:
  1. Interns will be provided with a list of possible self-selected rotation topics and preceptors during the orientation period. Interns may choose experiences that are not listed. 
  1. By mid-January of the internship year, the intern will submit a self-selected rotation form for each rotation experience they have planned to the MDI director. This plan is considered a proposal and can be revised over the course of the rotations until March 1st.  Information on the self-selected rotation form includes the following:
    1. Preceptor Information
      1. Qualifications
      2. Signed agreement statement to serve as a preceptor
      3. Contact Information
    2. Evaluation
      1. Learning Outcomes of Intern
      2. ACEND competencies addressed by rotation
      3. Activities or Projects
Policy:

Interns are responsible for expenses associated with the self-selected experiences including transportation, housing, and meals.

Policy:

Self-selected rotations will be evaluated.

Procedures:
  1. Interns will submit an evaluation of each self-selected rotation that includes a self-evaluation and an evaluation from the preceptor.  In the evaluation, intern and preceptor should address each learning outcome or competency as well as assess the quality of activities or projects completed by the intern.
MDI Optional International Rotation
Policy:

Interns wishing to complete an international experience may do so as part or all of their self-selected four weeks. The maximum time that can be spent abroad is 10 percent (4 weeks of 40). 

Procedures:
  1. By the end of the twenty-fourth week of the internship, the intern will submit an International Experience proposal to the MDI Director.
  2. Required components of the International Experience proposal
    1. Justification for international experience
    2. Interest
    3. Qualifications of intern
      1. Demonstration of maturity and sound judgment
      2. Financial support for expenses
      3. Housing information
      4. Language proficiency, if needed
      5. Current passport and/or visa
      6. Health, travel and liability insurance in host country
    4. Qualifications of preceptor and location
      1. Qualified dietetic professional to serve as supervising preceptor
      2. Safe and secure location for housing and work
    5. Goals for rotation
      1. Alignment with MDI and ACEND competencies
      2. Tentative schedule of activities
      3. Projects and related assignments
      4. Evaluation procedures
    6. Preceptor qualifications and communication
      1. Preceptor qualifications
      2. Agreement to supervise intern
      3. Contact information
      4. Schedule of communication points
Policy:

Interns are responsible for expenses associated with the international experiences including transportation, housing, meals, passports, visas or other paperwork required by the host country; immunizations required by the host country; medical and liability insurance coverage if additional coverage is required.

Procedure:
  1. Within any International Experience proposal, the intern will list financial support for expenses.
Policy:

Interns are responsible for the safety of his/her own person and possessions during travel and stay in the host country.

Procedure:
  1. Within any International Experience proposals, the intern will list current U.S. diplomatic assessment of the country’s safety level.
Distance Education       
Policy: 

Students enrolled in online coursework will access course materials and course exams through a secure online course management system.

Procedure: 
  1. Students at Montana State University are provided with a unique NetID that is used to access our online course management system (Brightspace). The NetID number is considered a unique student identifier and is used to confirm identity in the CMS platform.

Program Retention and Remediation Procedures

Intern Advancement
Policy:

Once admitted to MDI, the intern must meet certain criteria to advance through the program. 

Procedure:

Advancement criteria for the non-degree graduate DI track include:

  1. Earn performance ratings that meet or exceed standard (>80% rating) for the respective supervised practice.
  2. If an intern receives a less than standard evaluation during any major rotation, the student is removed from regular appointment and is placed on probationary status.
  3. Exhibit professional behavior in supervised practice and MDI or dietetic professional meetings at all times.
  4. If an intern exhibits unprofessional behavior or unsafe clinical behavior, this will constitute as an inappropriate incident (Appendix G – Incident Report). 

 

Advancement criteria for the MS/DI track include:

  1. Complete required online coursework in sequential order with a minimum GPA of 3.0 each term and a cumulative GPA of 3.0.
  2. Earn performance ratings that meet or exceed standard (>80% rating) for the respective   supervised practice.
  3. If an intern receives a less than standard evaluation during any major rotation, the student is removed from regular appointment and is placed on probationary status.
  4. Exhibit professional behavior in supervised practice and MDI or dietetic professional meetings at all times.
  5. If an intern exhibits unprofessional behavior or unsafe clinical behavior, this will constitute as an inappropriate incident (Appendix G – Incident Report). 
Disciplinary and Termination Procedures
Policy:

Professional and safe clinical behavior are critical to success as a future food and nutrition professional; therefore, unprofessional or unsafe clinical behavior constitute an inappropriate incident, and if accumulated will result in disciplinary or termination procedures.          

Procedures:
  1. Unprofessional or unsafe clinical behavior is defined as:
    1. two or more unexcused absences or tardiness to supervised practice or professional meeting,
    2. chronic lack of participation in supervised practice,
    3. disrespect exhibited toward peers, faculty, or preceptors,
    4. refusal to work with another person based on the individual’s personal beliefs, race, culture, or religious preference;
    5. failure to display stable mental, physical or emotional behavior(s) which may affect another’s wellbeing;
    6. use of any substance that may impair clinical judgment or be harmful to self or others;
    7. dishonesty,
    8. cheating or plagiarism,
    9. failure to maintain confidentiality in interactions or records,
    10. attempting activities without adequate orientation, skill preparation, or appropriate assistance.
  2. Clinical behavior that is observed by preceptors or program faculty will be documented in an incident report.

 

Probation and Warning Status

  1. Unprofessional or unsafe clinical behavior
    1. An intern whose pattern of unprofessional or unsafe clinical behavior is found to be excessive (i.e. 3 incidents) will be removed from a regular appointment in MDI (Appendix G – Incident Report).
    2. Probation:  At that time, the intern will be placed on probation and counseled to change behavior.
    3. Interns will be notified by the Program Director when an incident has occurred and been recorded.  When the student is placed on probation or warning status, documentation is completed and placed in his or her personal file (Appendix H – Notification of Probationary or Warning Status).
    4. Warning:  Interns have two weeks to change the inappropriate behavior.  If the behavior remains unchanged, the probationary status will be advanced to a warning status. Prior to this warning period, the intern, preceptor, and Program Director meet and agree to a plan for behavior change (Appendix H – Notification of Probationary or Warning Status).
    5. The warning status is a time period of two weeks in which the intern has the opportunity to change the inappropriate behavior.
    6. If the unprofessional or unsafe clinical behavior continues through the warning period, the intern’s participation in MDI will be terminated.
  2. Academic actions that result in probation include:
    1. Unsatisfactory rating from any supervised practice preceptor;
    2. In some cases, such as cheating, plagiarism, or dishonesty in any venue, the intern may receive a grade of F for an assignment;
    3. Interns receiving an unsatisfactory rating from facility preceptors, which is mutually substantiated by the Program Director, will be required to complete additional work with the details listed in a contract, and placed on probation.
    4. Failure to complete required assignments throughout the internship.
    5. For MS/DI students, a 3.0 must always be maintained. See Graduate School Policy below for more information.

Monitoring is in place to identify students that are failing to meet academic requirements. Assignments are graded throughout the program and students that have received a “C” or lower or that have failed to turn in assignments are monitored closely. If more than one assignment results in poor performance, students are asked to meet with MDI Program Director to discuss options for academic support.

Policy:

Students/interns that are not meeting the advancement criteria for the non-degree graduate DI or the MS/DI programs may be asked to terminate the program. Students/interns will be counseled on other career opportunities.

Procedures:
  1. If a student is unable to improve their academic performance with academic support or is not able to meet the program requirement of an >80% rating on their rotation performance evaluation, they may be asked to terminate the program.
  2. Students will meet with the MDI Program Director to discuss other career path options such as public health nutrition, community wellness, exercise science or other health related career options.
  3. Students also have the option to meet with the Careers, Internships and Student Employment Services Department at Montana State University for additional career guidance. 
Termination or Resignation
Policy:

If unprofessional or unsafe clinical behavior continues through the probationary and warning periods, an intern’s participation in the MDI will be terminated. If an intern fails to meet the standards set for supervised practice, the intern’s participation in the MDI will be terminated.

Procedures:
  1. Accumulation of three incident reports will dictate a joint conference of the intern, Program Director and preceptors.
  2. Review of all reports will be thorough and verified.
  3. If reports are verified, the final decision will be made by the Program Director and preceptor with consultation with the Chair of the Department of Health and Human Performance and MDI Advisory Board.
  4. Interns terminated from MDI for any reason may follow the appeal procedures as outlined in the MSU Conduct Guidelines and Grievance Procedures for Students.
Policy:

If an intern decides that dietetics or the MDI is not his or her appropriate career choice, interns have the right to resign from the program.

Procedures:
  1. After discussion of the decision to withdraw with the Program Directors and preceptor, he or she must submit a letter of resignation to the Program Director.
  2. If the intern should choose to later reapply to MDI, he or she will be considered on an equal basis with all other applicants.
Program completion and maximum time to complete program
Policy:

Interns who successfully complete the program will be awarded an AND Verification Statement, which allows the graduate to take the Registration Exam for Dietitians.

Procedures:
  1. Successful completion of the MDI program is defined as:
    1. Attainment of ratings of 4 out 5 on evaluations during supervised practice rotations; 
    2. Attainment of at least 80% or higher on knowledge assessments;
    3. Completion of all assignments during program orientation, internship, online course, and final assessment.
  1. Successful completion of the MS/ MDI program is defined as:
    1. Completion of all required coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale
    2. Attainment of an overall rating of ≧ 3 out 5 on evaluations during supervised practice rotations;
    3. Attainment of at least 80% or higher on knowledge assessments;
    4. Completion of all assignments during program orientation, internship, online course, and final assessment.
Policy:

Interns must complete the internship in 150% of the planned time for completion. 

Procedures:
  1. DI Program Only- Interns must demonstrate completion of the internship within 60 weeks or additional program fees will be assessed. 
  2. MS/DI Graduate Students- Students must complete the program within 36 months or additional fees will be assessed. Due to the nature of the program (MS classes first year, supervised practice second year), additional DI program fees may be assessed if intern is unable to complete supervised practice during his or her assigned time. Students must be enrolled in supervised practice graduate level credits while completing internship hours.

 

Procedure for obtaining the verification statement
Policy:

The Program Director will present all successful interns AND Verification Statements during a graduation ceremony at the end of the internship.

Procedures:
  1. Interns will be together for a final week of assessments, program evaluation, RD Exam Workshop, MTAND FANS attendance, and an MDI graduation ceremony.
  2. The Program Directors will collect and review all preceptor evaluations, assignments and final assessments to determine acceptability of the intern for graduation.
Graduation
Policy:

Interns demonstrating completion of the program will be considered MDI graduates.

Procedures:
  1. A graduation ceremony will be held during the last week of the internship program.
Examination for Registered Dietitians
Policy:

MDI will provide the procedures for taking the RD examinations.

Procedures:

At the final week of the internship, the Program Director will provide interns with the following:

  1. Verification statements (4 copies)
  2. CDR information and forms
  3. Directions for taking the RD examination.
  4. Suggestions for preparing for the exam.
  5. Information regarding certification and licensure for dietitians in Montana and surrounding states
  6. Locations of testing sites
Job and career placement
Policy:              

MDI will promote employment for graduates within the state of Montana and Northwest region.

Procedures:
  1. Career opportunities will be emailed to the alumni listserv.
  2. At the MTAND annual meeting, the Program Director will facilitate introduction of MDI graduates to potential employers.
Facility selection for supervised practice
Policy:

Facilities that serve as supervised practice sites have state licensure and/or are accredited by the Joint Commission. 

Procedures:
  1. Registered Dietitians who are qualified to serve as preceptors are identified.
  2. Supervisor permission is obtained.
  3. Affiliation agreement is developed between MSU-Bozeman/ MDI and the facility’s human resources department.
  4. Affiliation agreements are updated by the MDI Program director according to the term of the agreement, based on site visits and intern evaluations.
Preceptor Compensation
Policy: 

The MDI includes in its budget preceptor compensation in the amount of $100/intern per week.  Preceptor compensation will be provided in a consistent manner.

Procedure:
  1. The appropriate compensation amount will be paid by MSU Dept of Health & Human Development to the department or program of each preceptor; preceptors cannot receive compensations individually. For example, a preceptor mentoring 4 interns per year for 2 weeks each would earn $800 for the nutrition department of their hospital or other institution or organization.  The use of these funds would be at the discretion of the department, but MDI encourages facilities to use this compensation for nutrition related activities, i.e., professional development, conference attendance fees, nutrition education materials and resources, etc.
MDI Speaker Compensation
Policy:

Speaker honorarium for preceptor and intern training:

  • Non-departmental presenters will receive $225 for 1-3 hours presentations/workshops
  • $440 for 4-6 hours, unless otherwise negotiated
  • Travel compensation and lodging can also be provided at Montana State Reimbursement rates.
  • All compensated speakers/presenters will meet MSU policies/requirements for reimbursement.

MS/DI Graduate School Additional Policies

MS/DI students will be held to all of the above policies in addition to the following policies specific to MSU Graduate School Requirements.  

Graduate School Committees 
Policy:

Students will be required to select a graduate committee composed of a minimum of three (3) members.

Procedures:
  1. The MS program coordinator will be assigned as the graduate committee co-chair in the first semester of the program
  2. The MS program coordinator will work with the student to create a graduate committee by the end of the second semester of the program
Program of Study
Policy: 

The program of study acts as a contract between the student, the department, the college, The Graduate School, and the University.

Procedures:
  1. The program of study must be submitted on an official Graduate Program of Study & Committeeform to The Graduate School by the end of the student’s second (2nd) term of graduate attendance. A one-time fee is associated with the filing and approval of this form.
  2. The program of study must be recommended by the student’s graduate committee chair and department head. Final approval rests with The Graduate School. 
  3. The program of study may be amended through the course of the student’s graduate study. Changes to a student’s program of study must be made through the Graduate Program Change Form and recommended by the graduate committee chair and the department head. Final approval rests with The Graduate School. No fee is associated with this form.

Leave of Absence and Remediation Procedures:

Leave of Absences
Policy:

Students wishing to take a leave of absence need to reach an agreement with the MDI program director as well as their committee chair concerning the leave.

Procedures:
  1. The student should write a letter to the MDI program director and chair describing the leave, and a copy should be filed with The Graduate School.
    1. The letter should include the reasons for the leave of absence and its duration.
  2. Students who do not have an agreement for a leave of absence with their chair (and a letter documenting that agreement) and do not take classes for one semester will be withdrawn from the graduate program to allow opportunities for other students.
  3. Students who are withdrawn for nonattendance will need to reapply for admission to graduate school if they desire to resume their program.
Remediation

Policy:  Interns have access to remedial instruction through meeting with course instructors during office hours, meeting with preceptors, meeting with the MDI Program Director, and utilizing campus support services.

Procedures:
  1. Problems may arise regarding student progress through the graduate program. Potential problems include:
    1. inadequate academic performance (grades lower than a “B”)
    2. inadequate skill development (lower than a “B” grade in competency development, practicum, and/or internship courses)
    3. inadequate progress on the graduate program (average of less than one sixth of the total credits needed to graduate completed per year)
    4. impairment of functioning (causes could include health problems, stress, mental illness, substance abuse and/or dependence)
    5. violations of standards of ethical conduct.
  2. These and other problems will be addressed in the following manner: First, the MDI program director and/or chair will discuss the problem with the student and develop plans for remediation.
    1. If the student is in agreement with the plans for remediation, then there will be a follow-up meeting at a designated time at which point progress regarding problem remediation will be assessed.
    2. The chair will keep documentation of the discussion addressing the problem and the discussion concerning progress and its remediation.
    3. If the student and the chair cannot reach an agreement about the problem in need of remediation, the manner in which the problem will be addressed, or an agreement about the assessment of progress in the remediation of the problem, the student will meet with the entire graduate committee. The student may also ask to meet with any other program faculty or the entire program faculty.
    4. If the student's committee is in agreement that the student is failing to remediate identified problems within an appropriate time span, the student may be counseled out of the graduate program and into alternative career or academic programs which are better suited to his/her needs and abilities.
    5. Students wishing to contest problem remediation plans, or being counseled to withdraw from the program may do so by following the university's student grievance procedures which are referenced in the MSU Bulletin.
Academic Standing
Policy:

All course requirements must be completed with at least a grade of C. An overall GPA in the graduate program must be a 3.0.

Procedures:
  1. A degree-seeking graduate student is expected to obtain a 3.00 Grade Point Average (GPA) to be in Good Academic Standing.
A student must maintain:
  1. A minimum 3.00 GPA each term,
  2. A minimum 3.00 GPA in the entire Program of Study, and
  3. A cumulative 3.00 GPA overall.
  1. Any student whose cumulative or term GPA is less than 3.00 at the end of any term may be placed on probation or suspended from their degree program
A student may be placed on University Probation for either of the following reasons:
  1. The cumulative GPA or Program of Study GPA has fallen below 3.00.
  2. The Graduate School or academic department provisions of admission have not been met.
Suspension
Policy: 

A student may be suspended from a degree program for any of the following reasons:

    • Cumulative or program GPA falls below a 3.00 after being placed in University Probation status.
    • Provisions of admission not satisfied.
    • Unsatisfactory progress in a degree program.
    • Cumulative or program GPA falls below 3.00 for any two (2) terms.
Procedures:

If a degree-seeking student wishes to appeal their suspension they must follow the steps in the timeline outlined below:

  1. Notice of Appeal. The student must notify the Office of Student Services(OSS) in The Graduate School, their intent to appeal within five (5) business days of receiving the suspension letter.
  2. Submission of Appeal. The student has an additional ten (10) business days to provide a letter and any supporting documents to the OSS.
  3. Plan of Action proposal. The submitted appeal can be accepted or denied. If the appeal is accepted, the student will be sent a Plan of Action from the OSS to be completed with their committee chair/graduate coordinator. The committee chair/graduate coordinator and the department will make a determination if they are willing to support the student’s Plan of Action proposal. If the Plan of Action is supported, the plan must enumerate the items to be completed for the student to return to good standing.

Final approval of a suspension appeal resides with The Graduate School.

Appendices 

Appendix A: MDI Intern Evlauation of Preceptor

This form is to be completed and submitted to the Program Director at the end of each rotation for each preceptor.

 

Intern:                                                  Preceptor:                                           Rotation Dates:          

Hours Spent with Preceptor:               Facility:

How well did the preceptor: Outstanding Very Good Good Fair Poor
Give clear explanations and demonstrate activities          
Foster a learning environment          
Encourage me to seek additional knowledge          
Demonstrate commitment to the internship process          
Facilitate open communication throughout the rotation          
Provide timely constructive feedback on my performance; both what I did well and what I needed to work on          
Provide adequate experiences for the learning objectives          
Consider/treat me as a professional          
Listen to my comments and observations          
Offer additional enrichment learning experiences when time permitted          
Offer a broad learning environment          
Sought opportunities for me to develop/ display competency          

 

Please give specific feedback on any areas marked as fair or poor.

 

Please give specific feedback on the learning experience from this preceptor.  What activities/experiences did you find valuable, what activities/experiences would have improved this rotation?

 

Please provide specific comments related to this rotation experience – was the rotation appropriate for meeting competencies and developing and confidence in the area of dietetics it supports?

 

Appendix B1: Intern Agreement for Participation in MDI

I, __________________________, accept my appointment in the MDI and have read, understood, and agree to uphold the following: (Please initial each statement to illustrate your understanding and agreement.)

 

                  I have read and will follow the policies listed in the MDI Program Handbook.

                  If I must miss orientation or supervised practice due to illness, death, or emergency in the family, I will contact my Program Director and/or preceptor prior to the orientation or experience.  I understand that supervised practice must be rescheduled and completed.

                  I must meet all standards for supervised practice required for membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in order to remain in and graduate from MDI.

_______      I understand the conditions for probationary/warning status and termination from the program.

                  I am responsible for arranging my own housing and transportation.

                  I am encouraged to attend local dietetic meetings, and lectures presented by visiting dietetic professionals.

                  As part of the final MDI week I will attend the Montana Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics state conference and expo.  I will be responsible for my own expenses, transportation, and lodging.

                  I am aware that this is a very intense, demanding, professional program and outside employment is strongly discouraged.

                  I must submit evidence of a satisfactory health exam and immunizations before participating in supervised practice.

                  I must obtain the ServSafe® certification or its equivalent and CPR certification.

_______      I must obtain a background check and drug screening before participating in supervised practice.

                  If I withdraw from the program for any reason, I will not be guaranteed reentry to the program.  Readmission will depend upon space availability and faculty recommendation.  No preference will be given to reentry students.  Program fees will not be refunded.

 

_______      _____                 ____                      ________________________________                                              _

Signature                                                                                                           Date

Appendix B2: MDI Intern Responsibilities

It is the MDI intern’s responsibility to be on time, be prepared, and participate fully in all supervised practice experiences, webinars, and events.

  • The MDI Intern should have a positive attitude, that is, be prepared and eager to learn what supervised practice prescribes – even when the value of the experiences may not be immediately evident to the MDI Intern, and consider how they fit into the big picture. There is always something to learn.  
  • The MDI Intern should be internally motivated, that is, be interested in learning because they want to become excellent practitioners, team members, and professional leaders. Grades and other extrinsic rewards are less important than what the MDI Intern learns and how they conduct themselves in professional settings.
  • Always be on time during ALL rotations, webinars, field trips and with meeting deadlines set for assignments.  Discuss with preceptors ahead of time if you are not able to make the deadline.  Adhere to assigned work hours.
  • Look ahead and plan meetings with upcoming preceptors to arrange schedules and review assignments. 
  • Get started on assignments early.
  • Take advantage of opportunities offered inside and outside of the organization.

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to communicate regularly and appropriately with preceptors and others so that expectations, arrangements, responsibilities etc. are understood and agreed upon.

  •  The MDI Intern should be open to new information, ideas, experiences, approaches, ways of accomplishing things, and opportunities – even when these seem to be or are in conflict with the MDI Intern’s personal beliefs and prior experiences.
  • MDI Interns should be willing to approach each new situation with the same openness and eagerness that they had at the beginning of their supervised practice experience.
  • The MDI Intern should remember that preceptors, wonderful as they are, are not mind-readers.
  • You are not expected to know all the answers.  Remember, you are in an internship to learn so ask lots of questions to enhance your knowledge.
  • Practice good listening skills and avoid gossiping.  Display positive body language, such as good eye contact, firm hand shakes, and greeting people with a smile.

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to plan carefully and thoroughly as their preceptor asks them to do. It is also the MDI Intern’s responsibility to follow through with all supervised practice plans and to prepare for the unexpected.

  • The MDI Intern should be organized and willing to assume responsibility for their own learning.   Excuses for disorganization and forgetfulness are not acceptable.
  • MDI Interns should be flexible and willing and able to adapt appropriately as situations change and circumstances warrant.  Expect and accept that problems and frustrations will occur periodically, but learning to deal with problems will allow you to grow as a professional. 
  • Cope with problems with a positive attitude.
  • MDI Interns should remember that providing patient/client care and/or high-quality food and nutrition services should be their preceptor’s priority.

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to learn when to ask for guidance and when to be appropriately self-directed.

  • MDI Interns should learn when to ask others questions and when to search for the answers themselves. Clarify tasks given to you so you don’t waste time.  If expectations are not clear to you, ask the preceptor what the expectations are.
  • Be flexible; respond positively to changes in schedules or assignments.
  • MDI Interns should be able and willing to build upon their prior learning. 
  • MDI Interns should be able to integrate new information and concepts with those that they learned previously. (Preceptors do not have the time nor should they be expected to teach or re-teach theory that MDI Interns should have mastered previously.)

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to look for connections:
    -between theory and practice
    -to what is already known and understood
    -between and among the new things being learned
    -between the training environment and future roles

  • MDI Interns should expect to spend time in reflection and self-assessment.
  • MDI Interns should be patient – with patients, clients, employees, preceptors, and themselves. Learning and the development of professional skills takes time, effort, practice, and patience. 
  • MDI Interns should understand that not everyone is ‘great’ at everything. They should expect their assessments from you will generally reflect the fact that there is room for them to improve.
  • MDI Interns should understand that they are expected to develop and demonstrate entry-level competence for all of the ACEND competencies. If they are not able to so in the time allotted, they should be prepared to devote additional time and energy in these areas.

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to maintain an appropriate perspective and stay focused on learning and the tasks at hand.

  • MDI Interns should manage their personal lives so that they can take full advantage of the experiences the program and their preceptors are providing for them.
  • MDI Interns should expect that completing a supervised practice experience will be time-consuming and challenging. Without challenge and stretching, there will not be growth. 

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to take care of him or herself.

They should:

  • Eat well 
  • Exercise 
  • Get enough rest 
  • Manage their stress  

It is the MDI Intern’s responsibility to be organized, respectful, and appreciative.

  • MDI Intern behaviors should reflect their recognition that many are doing extra tasks and giving generously of the time, energy, and talents so that MDI Interns can be in this facility, having these learning experiences. 
  • MDI Interns should not take their supervised practice program or the guidance of their preceptors for granted or make unwarranted assumptions.
  • Be courteous to preceptors, director, and their fellow interns.
  • Always treat others with respect, even when you don’t share the same values or opinions.
  • Ask for things to do. Don’t always wait to be told what to do.  Volunteer to see patients or do other tasks especially then the preceptor is busy.  If you lack guidance, talk to the preceptor, or to the internship director.
  • Understand that constructive criticism is given to improve you skills and is not to be taken personally
  • Read e-mails daily and respond (if needed) promptly.
  • Check your mailbox daily and empty it regularly. 
  • Practice good organizational skills and pay attention to details.

Edited 2013: Adapted from an original work by Mickie S. Rops, CAE

Appendix C: Letter of Introduction

Dear MDI WIC Preceptor,

My name is Intern X and I am the MDI intern coming to your facility soon. I would like to take this opportunity to formally introduce myself as I look forward to my rotation with you at the STR County WIC, 2020 West Persimmon St., on Monday, September 24th.   Is this the correct address and should I arrive at 8:00AM?  I will come with business casual dress unless instructed otherwise.

I grew up in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin which led me to an excellent education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where I earned a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources.          Afterwards, I felt a need to explore and experience new things, so I decided to travel and spent the next ten or so years living in Spain, Washington, Colorado and Mexico. Throughout these years, I gained valuable experience including, marketing and event planning with non-profits, Spanish, sales and also continued to gain experience in restaurants as a server, bartender, host and dining room manager.

It was during this time that food and nutrition became very important to me. I began to    make healthy lifestyle changes and experienced the benefits first-hand.  The transformation in my life was significant and this truly inspired me to return to school to pursue a career in dietetics.

I am especially looking forward to my rotation with you at STR County WIC. I have a daughter who is almost 2 years old so I understand many of the intricacies involved with feeding young children and the importance of good nutrition and making mealtimes a positive experience. I am extremely passionate about health, wellness and prevention of chronic diseases. I am also very interested in any programs involving children, particularly aimed at prevention of childhood obesity.  

I truly look forward to working with you and staff at STR County WIC and am excited for anything that you have planned for me. If you need to contact me my phone number is, (206) 291-4757. Thank you so much.

Sincerely,

Intern X

Appendix D: MDI Intern Competency LOG

Name:  

 

         

CRDN #

COMPETENCY

DATE COMPLETED

ROTATION CATEGORY

ACTIVITY USED TO MEET COMPETENCY

SELF RATING & COMMENTS    (1-5; 5 =high score)

PRECEPTOR & FACILITY

             

Domain 1. Scientific and Evidence Base of Practice: Integration of scientific information and research into practice.  Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRDN 1.1

Select indicators of program quality and/or customer service and measure achievement of objectives.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 1.2

Apply evidence-based guidelines, systematic reviews and scientific literature.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 1.3

Justify programs, products, services and care using appropriate evidence or data.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 1.4

Evaluate emerging research for application in nutrition and dietetics practice.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 1.5

Conduct projects using appropriate research methods, ethical procedures and data

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 1.6

Incorporate critical-thinking skills in overall practice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domain 2. Professional Practice Expectations: Beliefs, values, attitudes and behaviors for the professional dietitian nutritionist level of practice.  Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRDN 2.1

Practice in compliance with current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice and Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.2

Demonstrate professional writing skills in preparing professional communications.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.3

Demonstrate active participation, teamwork and contributions in group settings.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.4

Function as a member of interprofessional teams.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.5

Assign patient care activities to NDTRs and/or support personnel as appropriate.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.6

Refer clients and patients to other professionals and services when needs are beyond individual scope of practice.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.7

Apply leadership skills to achieve desired outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.8

Demonstrate negotiation skills.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.9

Participate in professional and community organizations.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.10

Demonstrate professional attributes in all areas of practice.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.11

Show cultural competence/sensitivity in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.12

Perform self-assessment and develop goals for self-improvement throughout the program.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.13

Prepare a plan for professional development according to Commission on Dietetic Registration guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.14

Demonstrate advocacy on local, state or national legislative and regulatory issues or policies impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 2.15

Practice or role play mentoring and precepting others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domain 3. Clinical and Customer Services: Development and delivery of information, products and services to individuals, groups and populations.  Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRDN 3.1

Perform the Nutrition Care Process and use standardized nutrition language for individuals, groups and populations of differing ages and health status, in a variety of settings.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.2

Conduct a nutrition focused physical assessment.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.3

Demonstrate effective communications skills for clinical and customer services in a variety of formats and settings.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.4.

CRDN 3.4 Design, implement and evaluate presentations to a target audience.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.5

CRDN 3.5 Develop nutrition education materials that are culturally and age appropriate and designed for the educational level of the audience.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.6

Use effective education and counseling skills to facilitate behavior change.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.7

Develop and deliver products, programs or services that promote consumer health, wellness and lifestyle management.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.8

Deliver respectful, science-based answers to client questions concerning emerging trends.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.9

Coordinate procurement, production, distribution and service of goods and services, demonstrating and promoting responsible use of resources.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 3.10

Develop and evaluate recipes, formulas and menus for acceptability and affordability that accommodate the cultural diversity and health needs of various populations, groups and individuals.

 

 

 

 

 

Domain 4. Practice Management and Use of Resources: strategic application of principles of management and systems in the provision of services to individuals and organizations. Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRDN 4.1

Participate in management of human resources.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.2

Perform management functions related to safety, security and sanitation that affect employees, customers, patients, facilities and food.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.3

Conduct clinical and customer service quality management activities.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.4

Apply current nutrition informatics to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.5

Analyze quality, financial and productivity data for use in planning.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.6

Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to promote sustainability, reduce waste and protect the environment.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.7

Conduct feasibility studies for products, programs or services with consideration of costs and benefits.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.8

Develop a plan to provide or develop a product, program or service that includes a budget, staffing needs, equipment and supplies.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.9

Explain the process for coding and billing for nutrition and dietetics services to obtain reimbursement from public or private payers and fee-for-service and value-based payment systems.

 

 

 

 

 

CRDN 4.10

Analyze risk in nutrition and dietetics practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concentration 5.  The sustainable food system concentration builds on core competencies and develops additional depth necessary for future proficiency aimed at the intersection between dietetics and sustainable food systems. Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

SFS 5.1

Understand food science and food systems principles, techniques of food preparation and application to the development, modification and evaluation of recipes, menus and food products acceptable to diverse groups.

 

 

 

 

 

SFS 5.2

Demonstrate understanding of terminology related to sustainable food systems, components, inputs, influences, and outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

SFS 5.3

Demonstrate understanding and critical thinking regarding differing viewpoints on sustainable food systems issues.

 

 

 

 

 

SFS 5.4

Work effectively in groups to accomplish tasks related to the production, distribution, and marketing of fresh produce.

 

 

 

 

 

SFS 5.5

Communicate educational information regarding the use of fresh, local produce to clients or customers.

 

 

 

 

 

SFS 5.6

Follow accounting procedures established for produce market operations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical Knowledge Confirmation

Major Disease States covered during the Clinical Comprehensive Hospital Rotations:

 

 

 

     DATE

Cardiovascular Disease

 

 

Diabetes

 

 

Gastrointestinal Disease

 

 

Geriatrics

 

 

Nutrition Support – enteral and parenteral

 

 

Oncology

 

 

Pediatrics

 

 

Renal/Dialysis

 

 

Weight Management

 

 

 

Appendix E: Montana Dietetic Program Supervised Practice Plan and Evaluation

MDI Supervised Practice Plan and Evaluation - Clinical

Dietetic Intern:
Rotation:
Preceptor:
Dates of Rotation:
Part I: On the first day of the rotation, please review the competencies and activities for the rotation. Preceptor and intern will discuss expectations for the rotation.

CRDN#

Competency – Upon completion of rotation the intern will able to:

Activity selected to meet competency

Domain 1.

Scientific and Evidence Base of Practice

 

 
1.1

Select indicators of program quality and/or customer service and measure achievement of objectives

   
1.2

Apply evidence-based guidelines, systematic reviews and scientific literature.

   

1.3

Justify programs, products, services and care using appropriate evidence or data.

   

1.4

Evaluate emerging research for application in nutrition and dietetics practice.

   

1.5

Conduct projects using appropriate research methods, ethical procedures and data

   

1.6

Incorporate critical-thinking skills in overall practice.

   

Domain 2.

Professionl Practice Expectations

   

2.1

Practice in compliance with current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice and Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics.

   

2.2

Demonstrate professional writing skills in preparing professional communications.

   
2.3 

Demonstrate active participation, teamwork and contributions in group settings

   
2.4 Function as a member of interprofessional teams.    
2.5

Assign patient care activities to NDTRs and/or support personnel as appropriate.

   
2.6

Refer clients and patients to other professionals and services when needs are beyond individual scope of practice.

   
2.7 Apply leadership skills to achieve desired outcomes.    
2.8 Demonstrate negotiation skills.    
2.9 Participate in professional and community organizations.    
2.10 Demonstrate professional attributes in all areas of practice.    
2.11

Show cultural competence/sensitivity in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff.

   
2.12

Perform self-assessment and develop goals for selfimprovement throughout the program.

   
2.14

Demonstrate advocacy on local, state or national legislative and regulatory issues or policies impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession.

   
2.15 Practice or role play mentoring and precepting others    
Domain 3. Clinical and Customer Services    
3.1

Perform the Nutrition Care Process and use standardized nutrition language for individuals, groups and populations of differing ages and health status, in a variety of settings.

   
3.2

Conduct a nutrition focused physical assessment

   
3.3

Demonstrate effective communications skills for clinical and customer services in a variety of formats and settings.

   
3.4

Design, implement and evaluate presentations to a target audience.

   
3.5

Develop nutrition education materials that are culturally and age appropriate and designed for the educational level of the audience.

   
3.6

Use effective education and counseling skills to facilitate behavior change.

   
3.7

Develop and deliver products, programs or services that promote consumer health, wellness and lifestyle management.

   
3.8 

Deliver respectful, science-based answers to client questions concerning emerging trends.

   
Domain 4.

Practice Management and Use of Resources

   
4.1 

Participate in management of human resources.

   
4.2

Perform management functions related to safety, security and sanitation that affect employees, customers, patients, facilities and food.

   
4.3

Conduct clinical and customer service quality management activities.

   
4.4

Apply current nutrition informatics to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data.

   
4.5

Analyze quality, financial and productivity data for use in planning.

   
4.6

Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to promote sustainability, reduce waste and protect the environment.

   
4.7

Conduct feasibility studies for products, programs or services with consideration of costs and benefits.

   
4.8

Develop a plan to provide or develop a product, program or service that includes a budget, staffing needs, equipmen and supplies.

   
4.9

Explain the process for coding and billing for nutrition and dietetics services to obtain reimbursement from public or private payers and fee-for-service and value-based payment systems.

   
4.10

Analyze risk in nutrition and dietetics practice.

   

Concentration 5.

Sustainable Food System

   

SFS 5.3

Demonstrate understanding and critical thinking regarding differing viewpoints on sustainable food systems issues.

   
 SFS 5.4

Communicate educational information regarding the use of fresh, local produce to clients or customers.

   
ROTATION EXPECTATIONS
Preceptor expectations:

 

Intern expectations:

 

 

Intern’s objectives for rotation:
  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

 

Intern Evalautiaon for Supervised Practice - Clinical

Dietetic Intern:
Rotation:
Preceptor:
Dates of Rotation:

FINAL EVALUATION & FEEDBACK: Before the final day of the rotation please meet with the intern and provide evaluation and feedback on their progress in each category below. For a rating of 1 or 2 please provide specific comments to assist the intern in making goals for improvement in following rotations. Please provide a copy of the feedback to the intern and an electronic copy to the MDI director.

1 2 3 4 5

Early beginner, needs more practice, not at expected level for intern

Beginner, approaching expected level for intern

Doing well, performing as expected for inter level

Above average, doing better than expected

Outstanding, doing much better than expected

 

EVALUATION CRITERIA

1 2 3 4 5
Professionalism          
Displayed professional appearance. 1 2 3 4 5
Reported to work on time and did not leave until designated time. 1 2 3 4 5
Demonstrated an attitude of learning and willingness to work. 1 2 3 4 5
Took initiative to learn and practice skills to their highest potential.

1

2 3 4 5
Maintained confidentiality of information.

1

2 3 4 5
Set and enforced high standards of professional ethics.

1

2 3 4 5
Fostered teamwork and interacted well with staff and other interns

1

2 3 4 5
Received and utilized constructive feedback in a positive manner.

1

2 3 4 5
Accepted responsibility for his/her actions.

1

2 3 4 5
Communications Skills          

Wrote concisely and effectively (clear, organized, appropriate grammar and spelling).

1 2 3 4 5

Voiced understanding of preceptor expectations.

1 2 3 4 5

Spoke in a clear and professional manner to convey accurate information.

1 2 3 4 5

Responded appropriately to patient/client nonverbal cues.

1 2 3 4 5

Practiced good listening skills (allows other time to formulate and complete statements).

1 2 3 4 5
Personal & Time Management Skills          
Appropriately prioritized work assignments and tasks. 1 2 3 4 5

Came prepared daily for rotation.

1 2 3 4 5

Handled increasing work load from beginning to end of rotation.

1 2 3 4 5

Followed directions

1 2 3 4 5

Resource Management Skills

         

Used reference materials and current approaches/techniques effectively.

1 2 3 4 5

Consulted with preceptor/mentor and asked appropriate questions for clarification of issues.

1 2 3 4 5

Was able to justify/support decisions with correct information.

1 2 3 4 5

Knowledge Base

         

Has and used adequate knowledge base; demonstrated appropriate understanding and ability to perform assigned tasks.

1 2 3 4 5

Demonstrated increasing ability throughout the rotation to achieve competency.

1 2 3 4 5

Nutrition Care Process Skills

         

Assessed the nutritional status of patient appropriately and consistently.

2 3 4 5

Diagnosed nutrition problems and created appropriate PES statements.

1 2 3 4 5

Planned and implemented appropriate nutrition interventions; prioritize nutrition diagnosis, formulated a nutrition Rx, established patient goals to manage intervention.

1 2 3 4 5

Monitored and evaluated PES and intervention impacts on nutrition diagnosis.

2 3 4 5

Overall Rating

         

Intern overall rating for rotation.

1 2 3 4 5

 

Clinical Knowledge Confirmation

Major Disease States covered during the Clinical Comprehensive Hospital Rotations:

Date

Cardiovascular Disease

   

Diabetes

   

Gastrointestinal Disease

   

Geriatrics

   

Nutrition Support – enteral and parenteral

   

Oncology

   

Pediatrics

   

Renal/Dialysis

   

Weight Management

   
Comments
Discuss intern overall strengths:

 

Specific comments to assist the intern in making goals for improvement:

 

Thank you for comments or suggestions regarding any aspect of the MDI Program:

 

MDI Supervised Practice Plan and Evaluation - Food Service

Dietetic Intern:
Rotation:
Preceptor:
Dates of Rotation:
Part I: On the first day of the rotation, please review the competencies and activities for the rotation. Preceptor and intern will discuss expectations for the rotation.

CRDN#

Competency – Upon completion of rotation the intern will able to:

Activity selected to meet competency

Domain 1.

Scientific and Evidence Base of Practice

 

 
1.1

Select indicators of program quality and/or customer service and measure achievement of objectives

   
1.2

Apply evidence-based guidelines, systematic reviews and scientific literature.

   

1.3

Justify programs, products, services and care using appropriate evidence or data.

   

1.4

Evaluate emerging research for application in nutrition and dietetics practice.

   

1.5

Conduct projects using appropriate research methods, ethical procedures and data

   

1.6

Incorporate critical-thinking skills in overall practice.

   

Domain 2.

Professionl Practice Expectations

   

2.1

Practice in compliance with current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice and Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics.

   

2.2

Demonstrate professional writing skills in preparing professional communications.

   
2.3 

Demonstrate active participation, teamwork and contributions in group settings

   
2.4 Function as a member of interprofessional teams.    
2.5

Assign patient care activities to NDTRs and/or support personnel as appropriate.

   
2.6

Refer clients and patients to other professionals and services when needs are beyond individual scope of practice.

   
2.7 Apply leadership skills to achieve desired outcomes.    
2.8 Demonstrate negotiation skills.    
2.9 Participate in professional and community organizations.    
2.10 Demonstrate professional attributes in all areas of practice.    
2.11

Show cultural competence/sensitivity in interactions with clients, colleagues and staff.

   
2.14

Demonstrate advocacy on local, state or national legislative and regulatory issues or policies impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession.

   
2.15 Practice or role play mentoring and precepting others    
Domain 3. Clinical and Customer Services    
3.3

Demonstrate effective communications skills for clinical and customer services in a variety of formats and settings.

   
3.4

Design, implement and evaluate presentations to a target audience.

   
3.5

Develop nutrition education materials that are culturally and age appropriate and designed for the educational level of the audience.

   
3.6

Use effective education and counseling skills to facilitate behavior change.

   
3.7

Develop and deliver products, programs or services that promote consumer health, wellness and lifestyle management.

   
3.8 

Deliver respectful, science-based answers to client questions concerning emerging trends.

   
3.9

Coordinate procurement, production, distribution and service of goods and services, demonstrating and promoting responsible use of resources.

   
3.10

Develop and evaluate recipes, formulas and menus for acceptability and affordability that accommodate the cultural diversity and health needs of various populations, groups and individuals

   
Domain 4.

Practice Management and Use of Resources

   
4.1 

Participate in management of human resources.

   
4.2

Perform management functions related to safety, security and sanitation that affect employees, customers, patients, facilities and food.

   
4.3

Conduct clinical and customer service quality management activities.

   
4.4

Apply current nutrition informatics to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data.

   
4.5

Analyze quality, financial and productivity data for use in planning.

   
4.6

Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to promote sustainability, reduce waste and protect the environment.

   
4.7

Conduct feasibility studies for products, programs or services with consideration of costs and benefits.

   
4.8

Develop a plan to provide or develop a product, program or service that includes a budget, staffing needs, equipmen and supplies.

   
4.10

Analyze risk in nutrition and dietetics practice.

   

Concentration 5.

Sustainable Food System

   

SFS 5.1

Understand food science and food systems principles, techniques of food preparation and application to the development, modification and evaluation of recipes, menus and food products acceptable to diverse groups.

   

SFS 5.2

Demonstrate understanding of terminology related to sustainable food systems, components, inputs, influences, and outcomes.

   

SFS 5.3

Demonstrate understanding and critical thinking regarding differing viewpoints on sustainable food systems issues.

   
 SFS 5.4

Work effectively in groups to accomplish tasks related to the production, distribution, and marketing of fresh produce.

   
SFS 5.5

Communicate educational information regarding the use of fresh, local produce to clients or customers.

   
SFS 5.6

Follow accounting procedures established for produce market operations.

   
ROTATION EXPECTATIONS
Preceptor expectations:

 

Intern expectations:

 

 

Intern’s objectives for rotation:
  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

 

Intern Evalautiaon for Supervised Practice - Clinical

Dietetic Intern:
Rotation:
Preceptor:
Dates of Rotation:

FINAL EVALUATION & FEEDBACK: Before the final day of the rotation please meet with the intern and provide evaluation and feedback on their progress in each category below. For a rating of 1 or 2 please provide specific comments to assist the intern in making goals for improvement in following rotations. Please provide a copy of the feedback to the intern and an electronic copy to the MDI director.

1 2 3 4 5

Early beginner, needs more practice, not at expected level for intern

Beginner, approaching expected level for intern

Doing well, performing as expected for inter level

Above average, doing better than expected

Outstanding, doing much better than expected

 
 

 

EVALUATION CRITERIA

1 2 3 4 5
Professionalism          
Displayed professional appearance. 1 2 3 4 5
Reported to work on time and did not leave until designated time. 1 2 3 4 5
Demonstrated an attitude of learning and willingness to work. 1 2 3 4 5
Took initiative to learn and practice skills to their highest potential.

1

2 3 4 5
Maintained confidentiality of information.

1

2 3 4 5
Set and enforced high standards of professional ethics.

1

2 3 4 5
Fostered teamwork and interacted well with staff and other interns

1

2 3 4 5
Received and utilized constructive feedback in a positive manner.

1

2 3 4 5
Accepted responsibility for his/her actions.

1

2 3 4 5
Communications Skills          

Wrote concisely and effectively (clear, organized, appropriate grammar and spelling).

1 2 3 4 5

Voiced understanding of preceptor expectations.

1 2 3 4 5

Spoke in a clear and professional manner to convey accurate information.

1 2 3 4 5

Responded appropriately to patient/client nonverbal cues.

1 2 3 4 5

Practiced good listening skills (allows other time to formulate and complete statements).

1 2 3 4 5
Personal & Time Management Skills          
Appropriately prioritized work assignments and tasks. 1 2 3 4 5

Came prepared daily for rotation.

1 2 3 4 5

Handled increasing work load from beginning to end of rotation.

1 2 3 4 5

Followed directions

1 2 3 4 5

Resource Management Skills

         

Used reference materials and current approaches/techniques effectively.

1 2 3 4 5

Consulted with preceptor/mentor and asked appropriate questions for clarification of issues.

1 2 3 4 5

Was able to justify/support decisions with correct information.

1 2 3 4 5

Knowledge Base

         

Has and used adequate knowledge base; demonstrated appropriate understanding and ability to perform assigned tasks.

1 2 3 4 5

Demonstrated increasing ability throughout the rotation to achieve competency.

1 2 3 4 5

Nutrition Care Process Skills

         

Assessed the nutritional status of patient appropriately and consistently.

2 3 4 5

Diagnosed nutrition problems and created appropriate PES statements.

1 2 3 4 5

Planned and implemented appropriate nutrition interventions; prioritize nutrition diagnosis, formulated a nutrition Rx, established patient goals to manage intervention.

1 2 3 4 5

Monitored and evaluated PES and intervention impacts on nutrition diagnosis.

2 3 4 5

Overall Rating

         

Intern overall rating for rotation.

1 2 3 4 5
Comments
Discuss intern overall strengths:

 

Specific comments to assist the intern in making goals for improvement:

 

Thank you for comments or suggestions regarding any aspect of the MDI Program:

 

Appendix F: Incident Report

Name:

Date of Report:

 

Date and Descripton of Incident:

 

 

 

 

 

Signature of Preceptor: ____________________________________
Signature of Student: ______________________________________
Level of Incident:

___ Report

___ Policy Violation

___ Unprofessional Behavior

___ Other  

 

Appendix G: Notification of Probationary or Warning Status

This form is to be downloaded and printed. After discussion among the intern, preceptor, and Program Director, the form is signed and placed in the student’s file. During the probationary or warning period, encouragement and direction will be given by preceptors and Program Director to assist the student in correcting the inappropriate professional behavior or sub-standard academic/supervised practice performance.

 

Date: ____________________________

 

_________________________________ (intern’s name) has been placed on probationary/warning status due to the following performance during the designated time period. The reason for this action stems from failure to meet the following policy(ies) on page ______ as listed in the MDI Program Handbook. Incident reports attached.

 

Performance and time period: _________________________________

 

Policy: ____________________________________________________________

 

Actions to remove the probationary or warning status, which has been agreed upon by both intern and faculty member in the noted time period, include the following:

Actions:

 

Time Period: ________________________________________________

Student: ____________________________________________________  (signature)

Faculty: _____________________________________________________  (signature)

Director: ____________________________________________________  (signature)

To view the printable program handbook, please download the MDI Handbook 2020-2022